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Married: May 12, 2014

J.P. Bowie was born and raised in Aberdeen, Scotland. He left home at age eighteen for the bright lights of London. For the next twelve years, he sang, danced and acted his way around the theatres of London and the provinces, appearing in shows with many famous British singers, actors and comedians. While working aboard a cruise ship JP met Phil, a singer/guitarist who entertained in the ship’s nightclub. Phil is originally from Washington DC and worked the east coast cabaret circuit extensively. After their life on the ocean wave ended, they joined one another in California, moved to Las Vegas, then back to California where they now live in San Diego. They married on May 12, 2014: “We've been 'living in sin' for 21years so it's time don't you think?” JP is a prolific writer of gay romance novels and the two are enjoying their new life in sunny California, reuniting with old friends and making new ones. “If the future is as good as the past we’ll be just fine.”
Together since 1993: 22 years.
James “J.P.” (born October 5)
Phil (born January 24)
Married: May 12, 2014



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Paul Edward Paget was the son of Henry Luke Paget, Bishop of Chester and Elmer Katie Hoare. He became business partner of John Seely, whom he met at Cambridge and with whom he restored many damaged church buildings after World War II.
Born: January 24, 1901
Died: 1985, Frogshall, United Kingdom
Lived: Mottistone Manor, Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Templewood, Frogshall, Northrepps, Norfolk
Buried: St Michael, Starling Rise, Sidestrand, Norfolk, NR27 0NJ

Mottistone Manor is a National Trust property in the village of Mottistone on the Isle of Wight. It has popular gardens and is a listed building. It was first mentioned in documents related to the Domesday Book.
Address: Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1983 741020
Place
The oldest parts of the manor, the south-east wing, date from the XV or early XVI century. The north-west wing was added or remodelled by Thomas Cheke in 1567, and additions to the south-east wing were made in the early XVII century. The whole house was remodelled in the 1920s by the architects Seely and Paget, Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963) of the firm being a great-grandson of Charles Seely (1803–1887), who had bought the house and estate in 1861. Though not open to the public, the manor has hosted gatherings for the Seely family. The great-great granddaughter of General J. E. B. Seely, 1st Baron Mottistone, the theatre and opera director Sophie Hunter, held her wedding reception here with Benedict Cumberbatch on February 14, 2015.
Life
Who: Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963)
'The Shack' is a small caravan in the grounds of Mottistone Manor in which the Hon. John Seeley and Paul Paget spent weekends. Seeley later inherited the title Lord Mottistone. The pair were founders of an architectural practice that flourished from the 1920s to the 1960s as Seeley & Paget. The firm is best known for their church architecture and the business partners were also life partners. Entertaining lavishly at Mottistone Manor the pair retreated at night to The Shack where they slept in bunks at either end of their tiny space - while guests relaxed in the more comfortable rooms of the Manor. This sleeping arrangement enabled them to avoid accusations of a sexual relationship when necessary. The interior of the The Shack was designed by the architects in chrome and plywood in the Modern movement style - while the outside is more rustic. Though small inside, there were luxuries such as heated chromed steel pipes formed into a ladder up to the bunk beds so they went to bed with warm feet. The Manor is in private ownership but the National Trust now admits visitors to The Shack as part of visits to the Mottistone estate and gardens. John Seely and Paul Paget also designed Eltham Palace, which hosted “The Queens of Eltham Palace” event for LGBT History Month 2012.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Templewood house was built 1938 as shooting box and base for other country activities for Samuel Hoare, Lord Templewood by Paul Edward Paget of the architectural firm Seely and Paget. The house incorporates fragments from the old Bank of England by John Soane, and from Nuthall Temple which stood in Nottinghamshire and was one of only four houses built in the United Kingdom generally said to have been inspired by Palladio's Villa Capra in Vicenza. Nuthall Temple was demolished in 1929. The two sphinxes which flank the terrace in front of the portico were salvaged from Nuthall Temple. The four columns which support the portico were salvaged from Soane’s Old Bank of England. The listed building is in excellent condition and is set in parkland and approached down a long chestnut tree-lined avenue.
Address: Northrepps, Norfolk NR27 0LJ, UK (52.89486, 1.34922)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 224676 (Grade II, 1988)
Place
Built in 1938, Design by John Seely and Paul Paget for the latter's uncle Sir Samuel Hoare, Viscount Templewood.
Painted brick, now pink but originally a warm yellow; lead roofs. Rectangular in plan, with rectangular ranges across west and east faces. Single storey west façade of 7 bays. Rendered plinth. Sash windows with glazing bars. Central 3-bay portico with 4 Ionic columns from the Taylor/Soane Bank of England supported on a rendered plinth; pediment over with Templewood's coat of arms in high relief; central double-leaved door with semicircular head, lower panels blank and upper 2 panels of each glazed. Each window of the flanking wings has apron and a continuous band to sill and head. Plain parapet. Statues on extreme corners in glass-fibre by Edwin Russell c1965. The entrance is reached by a shallow flight of stone steps flanked by 2 XVIII century stone sphinxes all from Nuthall Temple, Nottinghamshire by Thomas Wright (demolished 1929). To the left of the facade a screen wall with 6 blind rusticated arches. 7-bay south front has a double perron with stone and timber balustrade from Nuthall leading to a 3-bay loggia with 4 Bank of England columns; one bay to each side with sash windows and all 5 bays with a plain cornice and wrought iron roof balustrade by Bakewell of Derby also from Nuthall. 2 flanking wings project each with a sash with louvred shutters in the gable-end; bands and plain parapet as west front. Clerestorey above centre 5 bays with 3 oculi with radiating glazing bars and a stone festoon over the central opening. Semicircular terrace to the west front with similar balustrade from Nuthall. Central door with fanlight having 2 vertical glazing bars; sash to either side. 2 flanking bays project slightly having sashes with shutters. Plain cornice and wrought iron balustrade above centre 3 bays. Clerestorey with central oculus. Service entrance to north. Interior. Large central saloon with coved ceiling painted in 1964 with the life of Paul Paget by Brian Thomas. Modest apartments round the perimeter of the saloon.
Life
Who: Paul Edward Paget (January 24, 1901 – August 13, 1985)
Paul Paget was the son of Henry Luke Paget, Bishop of Chester and Elmer Katie Hoare (daughter of Sir Samuel Hoare). He became business partner of John Seely (later Lord Mottistone), whom he met at Cambridge and with whom he restored many damaged church buildings after WWII. From 1926 he had been a successful designer of opulent houses, including the former Eltham Palace, and claimed that he looked after 14 city churches. In his partnership with Seely he concentrated more on their clients than on design work. He succeeded Seely as surveyor to St Paul’s Cathedral in 1963 and designed or restored many churches. He was master of the Art Workers Guild in 1971. In August 1971 Paget married Verily Anderson in London, England. He was invested as a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects (FRIBA) and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (FSA). He was also a Commander, Royal Victorian Order (CVO). Paul retired to Templewood in Frogshall, Northrepps, Norfolk, a building he had designed for his uncle Samuel Hoare, Viscount Templewood. He is buried at St Michael (Starling Rise, Sidestrand, Norfolk, NR27 0NJ)



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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James Bernard was a British film composer. While still a student at Wellington College, Bernard met Benjamin Britten when the composer visited the school. The two stayed in touch during Bernard's service in the RAF from 1943 to 1946. In 1950, Britten approached him to copy out the vocal score of his new opera Billy Budd for his publishers Boosey & Hawkes. While doing this he stayed with Benjamin Britten at Aldeburgh. He went to the opening night with Benjamin Britten's housekeeper and the librettist, E.M. Forster. Around the time Bernard graduated from the RCM, he met the writer and critic Paul Dehn with whom he started a relationship. Dehn died in 1976. Working on She (1965, in which McGregor played one of the members of the tribe), Bernard first met the man who later became his second life partner, actor Ken McGregor, with whom he lived in Jamaica until McGregor's death there in 1994. Bernard then moved back to London and lived there for the remainder of his life. McFarland published David Huckvale’s critical biography of the composer, James Bernard - Composer to Count Dracula in 2006.
Together from 1965 to 1994: 29 years.
James Bernard (September 20, 1925 – July 12, 2001)
Ken McGregor (died in 1994)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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George Dewey Cukor was an American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
Born: July 7, 1899, Lower East Side, New York City, New York, United States
Died: January 24, 1983, Los Angeles, California, United States
Lived: 9166 Cordell Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90069, USA (34.09418, -118.39137)
Buried: Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale), Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Garden of Honor (Private Garden), GPS (lat/lon): 34.12273, -118.23605
Awards: Academy Award for Best Director, more
Books: What Price Hollywood?

Florence Yoch and Lucile Council were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California. Their landscape design works include The George Cukor gardens in the Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles - over several decades
Address: 9166 Cordell Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90069, USA (34.09418, -118.39137)
Type: Private Property
Place
Design by Roland E. Coate (1890-1958)
The legendary director George Cukor’s residence in the Hollywood Hills provided a luxurious backdrop to the director’s vibrant social life. At the height of his career, Cukor’s home served as an vital social center in Hollywood’s gay community. He hired former film actor William "Billy" Haines as his interior designer, who filled the home with elegant decor and dozens of photographs of Cukor’s Hollywood friends.
Life
Who: Florence Yoch (1890–1972) and Lucile Council (1898–1964)
Florence Yoch was a landscape architect in California who was active from 1915 through the 1950s. Her career included commissions for private residential clients, parks, public spaces, and film sets for Hollywood movies. Florence Yoch’s college education began in 1910 at the University of California, Berkeley and then at Cornell’s College of Agriculture. She would go on to earn her degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1915. Upon graduation, Yoch immediately went to work designing gardens in Pasadena and Orange County. In 1921, she hired as apprentices Katherine Bashford (who would leave to found her own solo practice in 1923) and Lucile Council, who had studied at both the Cambridge School of Domestic and Landscape Architecture and at Oxford. In 1925, Florence and Lucile formed a partnership, Yoch & Council, setting up shop in the garden studio at Council’s home in South Pasadena. From there they would enjoy a thriving business creating landscaping for a large roster of clients that ranged from wealthy clientele in Pasadena and Santa Barbara to Hollywood players. Other than George Cukor gardens, their landscape design works include: The estate of Howard Huntington, a Henry E. Huntington heir, in Pasadena; The equestrian estate of Will Keith Kellogg in the Pomona Valley, the present day campus of Cal Poly Pomona; Il Brolino estate with topiary garden in Montecito; The Getty House gardens in Windsor Square, Los Angeles; Rancho Los Alamitos in Long Beach, California; The Jack L. Warner estate in Beverly Hills - present day David Geffen estate; Film sets for the exterior of “Tara” in Gone with the Wind; The David O. Selznick estate in Beverly Hills. The works of Florence Yoch & Lucile Council are documented in the book "Landscaping the American dream: the gardens and film sets of Florence Yoch, 1890-1972.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries is a corporation that owns and operates a chain of cemeteries and mortuaries in Los Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties in Southern California.
Addresses:
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cathedral City), 69855 Ramon Rd, Cathedral City, CA 92234, USA (33.81563, -116.4419)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Covina Hills), 21300 Via Verde Drive, Covina, CA 91724, USA (34.06783, -117.84183)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cypress), 4471 Lincoln Ave, Cypress, CA 90630, USA (33.8337, -118.0552)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Glendale), 1712 S Glendale Ave, Glendale, CA 91205, USA (34.12524, -118.24371)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Hollywood Hills), 6300 Forest Lawn Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.14688, -118.32208)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Long Beach), 1500 E San Antonio Dr, Long Beach, CA 90807, USA (33.84384, -118.17116)
Place
The company was founded by a group of San Francisco businessmen in 1906. Dr. Hubert Eaton assumed management control in 1917 and is credited with being Forest Lawn’s "founder" because of his origination of the "memorial-park" plan. The first location was in Tropico which later became part of Glendale, California. Its facilities are officially known as memorial parks. The parks are best known for the large number of celebrity burials, especially in the Glendale and Hollywood Hills locations. Eaton opened the first mortuary (funeral home) on dedicated cemetery grounds after a long battle with established funeral directors who saw the "combination" operation as a threat. He remained as general manager until his death in 1966 when he was succeeded by his nephew, Frederick Llewellyn.
Notable queer burials at Forest Lawn Memorial Parks:
• Lucile Council (1898-1964), Section G, Lot 5 Space 9, Glendale. Florence Yoch (1890–1972) and Lucile Council were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California.
• George Cukor (1899-1983), Garden of Honor (Private Garden), Glendale. American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
• Brad Davis (1949-1991), Court of Remembrance/Columbarium of Valor, G64054, Hollywood Hills. American actor, known for starring in the 1978 film Midnight Express and 1982 film Querelle. Davis married Susan Bluestein, an Emmy Award-winning casting director. They had one child, Alex, a transgender man born as Alexandra. Davis acknowledged having had sex with men and being bisexual in an interview with Boze Hadleigh.
• Helen Ferguson (1901-1977), Ascension, L-7296, space 1, Glendale. For nearly thirty years, former actress and publicist Helen Ferguson had an intimate relationship with Barbara Stanwyck. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, Loretta Young and Robert Taylor, among others.
• Edmund Goulding (1891–1959), Wee Kirk Churchyard, L-260, Space 4, Glendale. He was a British film writer and director. As an actor early in his career he was one of the Ghosts in the 1922 British made Paramount silent “Three Live Ghosts” alongside Norman Kerry and Cyril Chadwick. Also in the early 1920s he wrote several screenplays for star Mae Murray for films directed by her then husband Robert Z. Leonard. Goulding is best remembered for directing cultured dramas such as “Love” (1927), “Grand Hotel” (1932) with Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, “Dark Victory” (1939) with Bette Davis, and “The Razor's Edge” (1946) with Gene Tierney and Tyrone Power. He also directed the classic film noir “Nightmare Alley” (1947) with Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell, and the action drama “The Dawn Patrol.” He was also a successful songwriter, composer, and producer.
• Howard Greenfield (1936-1986) and Tory Damon (1939-1986), Hollywood Hills. Plot: Courts of Remembrance, wall crypt #3515. Damon’s epitaph reads: Love Will Keep Us Together..., Greenfield’s continues: ... Forever.
• Francis Grierson aka Jesse Shepard (1849-1927), Glendale, Great Mausoleum, Coleus Mezzanine Columbarium. Composer and pianist.
• Edward Everett Horton (1886-1970), Whispering Pines section, Map #03, Lot 994, Ground Interment Space 3, at the top of the hill. American character actor, he had a long career in film, theater, radio, television, and voice work for animated cartoons.
• Charles Laughton (1899–1962), Court of Remembrance, C-310 (wall crypt), Hollywood Hills. English stage and film character actor, director, producer and screenwriter.
• W. Dorr Legg (1904-1994), Eternal Love, Map E09, Lot 1561, Space 3, Hollywood Hills. W. Dorr Legg was a landscape architect and one of the founders of the U.S. gay rights movement, then called the homophile movement.
• David Lewis (1903-1987) and James Whale (1889-1957), Columbarium, Glendale. When David Lewis died in 1987, his executor and Whale biographer, James Curtis, had his ashes interred in a niche across from Whale’s.
• Liberace (1919-1987), Courts of Remembrance section, Map #A39, Distinguished Memorial – Sarcophagus 4, Hollywood Hills. American pianist, singer, and actor. A child prodigy and the son of working-class immigrants, Liberace enjoyed a career spanning four decades of concerts, recordings, television, motion pictures, and endorsements.
• Paul Monette (1945-1995) and Roger Horwitz (1941-1986), Hollywood Hills. Horwitz’s headstone reads: “My little friend, we sail together, if we sail at all.”
• Marion Morgan (1881-1971), The Great Mausoleum, Dahlia Terrace, Florentine Columbarium, Niche 8446, Glendale. Choreographer, longtime companion of motion picture director Dorothy Arzner.
• George Nader (1921-2002), Mark Miller, with friend Rock Hudson (1925-1985), Cenotaph, Cathedral City. Nader inherited the interest from Rock Hudson’s estate after Hudson’s death from AIDS complications in 1985. Nader lived in Hudson’s LA home until his own death. This is a memorial, George Nader’s ashes were actually scattered at sea.
• Alla Nazimova (1879-1945), actress,Whispering Pines, lot 1689, Glendale.
• Orry-Kelly (1897-1964), prominent Australian-American Hollywood costume designer. 3 times Oscar Winner. His partner was Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was acknowledged also by Kelly's mother. When Orry-Kelly died, his pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and Jack Warner read his eulogy.
• Charles Pierce (1926–1999), Columbarium of Providence, niche 64953, Hollywood Hills. He was one of the XX century's foremost female impersonators, particularly noted for his impersonation of Bette Davis. He performed at many clubs in New York, including The Village Gate, Ted Hook's OnStage, The Ballroom, and Freddy's Supper Club. His numerous San Francisco venues included the Gilded Cage, Cabaret/After Dark, Gold Street, Bimbo's 365 Club, Olympus, The Plush Room, the Venetian Room at the Fairmont Hotel, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, and the War Memorial Opera House. He died in North Hollywood, California, aged 72, and was cremated. His memorial service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park was carefully planned and scripted by Pierce before his death.
• George Quaintance (1902-1957), Eventide Section - Lot 2116 - Space 1, Glendale. American artist famous for his "idealized, strongly homoerotic" depictions of men in physique magazines. In 1938, he returned home with his companion Victor Garcia, described as Quaintance's "model, life partner, and business associate". In the early 1950s, Quaintance and Garcia moved to Rancho Siesta, which became the home of Studio Quaintance, a business venture based around Quaintance's artworks.
• Robert J. Sandoval (1950–2006), Glendale. Sandoval was a judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Sandoval and his long-time partner, Bill Martin, adopted a son in 1992, making them one of the first gay male couples in Los Angeles County to adopt a child. The couple named their son Harrison Martin-Sandoval, combining their last names to symbolize their familial unity. Sandoval died in 2006. He is survived by his partner of 24 years, Bill Martin, and his son, Harrison Martin-Sandoval. After his death, his alma mater McGeorge School of Law honored his contributions by placing him on the Wall of Honor.
• Emery Shaver (1903-1964) and Tom Lyle (1896-1976), Sanctuary, Glendale. Tom Lyle was the founder of Maybelline.
• Ethel Waters (1896-1977), Ascension Garden, Glendale. African-American blues, jazz and gospel vocalist and actress. In 1962. Ethel Waters had a lesbian relationship with dancer Ethel Williams that led to them being nicknamed “The Two Ethels.”
• Paul Winfield (1941–2004) was an American television, film and stage actor. He was known for his portrayal of a Louisiana sharecropper who struggles to support his family during the Great Depression in the landmark film “Sounder,” which earned him an Academy Award nomination. He portrayed Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 1978 television miniseries “King,” for which he was nominated for an Emmy Award. Winfield was also known to science fiction fans for his roles in “The Terminator,” “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” and “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” Winfield was gay, but remained discreet about it in the public eye. His partner of 30 years, architect Charles Gillan, Jr., died on March 5, 2002, of bone cancer. Winfield died of a heart attack in 2004 at age 62, at Queen of Angels – Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles. Winfield and Gillan are interred together.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Frederick II was King of Prussia from 1740 until 1786, the longest reign of any Hohenzollern king. His most significant accomplishments during his reign included his military victories, his reorganization ...
Born: January 24, 1712, Kingdom of Prussia
Died: August 17, 1786, Potsdam, Germany
Lived: Sanssouci Palace, Maulbeerallee, 14469 Potsdam, Germany (52.4042, 13.03849)
Buried: Sanssouci Palace, Potsdam, Potsdamer Stadtkreis, Brandenburg, Germany, Plot: buried in the lawn of the south patio of Sans Souci
Spouse: Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel-Bevern (m. 1733–1786)
Parents: Sophia Dorothea of Hanover, Frederick William I of Prussia

Count Francesco Algarotti was a man of vast knowledge and an expert in art and music who charmed his way into the lives of many of the leading figures of his time. His chief work on art is the Saggi sopra le belle arti (Essays on the Fine Arts). Among his other books are Poems, Travels in Russia, Essay on Painting, and Correspondence. At the age of twenty, Algarotti left his native Italy for the bright lights of Paris. He soon became friendly with Voltaire, who referred to him as his “cher cygne de Padoue” (dear swan of Padua). Voltaire wrote in a letter on December 15, 1740, that seeing “tender Algarotti strongly hugging handsome Lugeac, his young friend, I seem to see Socrates reinvigorated on Alcibiades’ back” (referring to Charles-Antoine de Guerin, Marquis de Lugeac (1720-1785)). At twenty-two, in London, the bisexual Algarotti became entangled in a love triangle with the bisexual Lord John Hervey, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762). Hervey and Montagu competed for Algarotti’s love and attention for many years. Frederick the Great fell in love with the charming young Algarotti and named him a count of Prussia and Court Chamberlin. Augustus III of Poland honored Algarotti with the title of councilor. In 1754, after seven years in Berlin and Dresden, Algarotti returned to Italy, where he died in 1764. Frederick erected a monument to his memory on the Campo Santo at Pisa.
Count Francesco Algarotti (December 11, 1712 – May 3, 1764)
Frederick II the Great, King in Prussia (January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Sanssouci is the former summer palace of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, in Potsdam, near Berlin. It is often counted among the German rivals of Versailles.
Address: Maulbeerallee, 14469 Potsdam, Germany (52.4042, 13.03849)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Tuesday through Sunday 10.00-18.00
Phone: +49 331 9694200
Place
Built between 1745 and 1747, Design by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff (1699-1753)
While Sanssouci is in the more intimate Rococo style and is far smaller than its French Baroque counterpart, Versailles, it too is notable for the numerous temples and follies in the park. The palace was built to fulfill King Frederick’s need for a private residence where he could relax away from the pomp and ceremony of the Berlin court. The palace’s name emphasises this; it is a French phrase (sans souci), which translates as "without concerns,” meaning "without worries" or "carefree,” symbolising that the palace was a place for relaxation rather than a seat of power. Sanssouci is little more than a large, single-story villa—more like the Château de Marly than Versailles. Containing just ten principal rooms, it was built on the brow of a terraced hill at the centre of the park. The influence of King Frederick’s personal taste in the design and decoration of the palace was so great that its style is characterised as "Frederician Rococo,” and his feelings for the palace were so strong that he conceived it as "a place that would die with him.” Because of a disagreement about the site of the palace in the park, Knobelsdorff was fired in 1746. Jan Bouman, a Dutch architect, finished the project. During the XIX century, the palace became a residence of Frederick William IV. He employed the architect Ludwig Persius to restore and enlarge the palace, while Ferdinand von Arnim was charged with improving the grounds and thus the view from the palace. The town of Potsdam, with its palaces, was a favourite place of residence for the German imperial family until the fall of the Hohenzollern dynasty in 1918. After WWII, the palace became a tourist attraction in East Germany. Following German reunification in 1990, Frederick’s body was returned to the palace and buried in a new tomb overlooking the gardens he had created. Sanssouci and its extensive gardens became a World Heritage Site in 1990 under the protection of UNESCO; in 1995, the Foundation for Prussian Palaces and Gardens in Berlin-Brandenburg was established to care for Sanssouci and the other former imperial palaces in and around Berlin. These palaces are now visited by more than two million people a year from all over the world.
Life
Who: Frederick II (24 January 1712 – 17 August 1786), King of Prussia, aka Frederick the Great
Voltaire, long guest in the royal palace of Sans-Souci in Potsdam, left unequivocal evidence on Frederick the Great’s homosexuality, arriving, in a letter of 1 December 1740, to define him “the respectable, unique and lovable bitch.” On 15 June 1743 he wrote, addressing Frederick II as "Caesar":
I love Caesar in the embrace
Of his mistress that gives up to him;
I laugh and I’m not offended
to see him, young and handsome,
above and below Nicomede.
I admire him more than Cato,
Since he is tender and magnanimous.
And in the same letter Voltaire wrote: "Your Majesty is with me a civettina (a coquette), very seductive.” Always him, talking about the Court of Potsdam with a female correspondent on 17 November 1750 specifies: "I know, my dear child, all that is said about Potsdam around Europe. Especially women are wild (...) but this does not concern me (...) I well see, my dear child, that this country is not for you. I see that people spend ten months a year in Potsdam. This is not a Court, is a retreat from which the ladies are banned. And yet we are not in a monastery. Considering everything, wait for me in Paris." The meaning of the allusions by Voltaire is made clear by another witness, Giacomo Casanova (1725-1798), who wrote in his memoirs that he saw in Potsdam Frederick II drive the first battalion of his soldiers, all with a gold watch donated from him for having the courage to subdue him... like Caesar had made with Nicomedes. The thing, he assured, was no one mystery. Frederick the Great died on August 17, 1786 in the armchair of his study in Sanssouci. He wished to be buried in a tomb next to his "Weinberghäuschen" and next to his favourite dogs. His nephew and successor Frederick William II did not obey these instructions and ordered him to be buried in the Potsdam garrison church (destroyed in 1945) next to his father, the soldier-king Frederick William I. Almost 160 years later, in the turmoil of WWII, German soldiers took the coffins to safety in an attempt to save them from possible destruction. In March 1943 they were taken into an underground bunker in Potsdam-Eiche and then in March 1945 to the salt mine at Bernterode in Eichsfeld (Thüringen). From there they were carried off after the war by soldiers of the U.S. Army to Marburg (Hesse). The coffins stayed in the Marburg Elisabeth Church until their transfer to Burg Hohenzollern at Hechingen (Baden-Württemberg) in August 1952. After the reunification of Germany the final wish of Frederick the Great was fulfilled. On August 17, 1991, the 205th anniversary of his death, the sarcophagus with the mortal remains of the King was laid out in the forecourt of Sanssouci palace, escorted by an honour guard of the Bundeswehr. The burial took place that night in the tomb Frederick had planned for the purpose since 1744 on the highest terrace of vineyards. His soldier-king father found his final resting place in the Kaiser-Friedrich-Mausoleum at the Church of Peace in Sanssouci Park.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Félicie de Fauveau was a nineteenth-century French sculptor who was a precursor of the pre-Raphaelite style. Her multiple sculptural works showcase a variety of techniques and mediums including marble, stone, glass and bronze. Wikipedia
Born: January 24, 1801, Livorno
Died: December 12, 1886, Florence
Lived: 18 Rue de la Rochefoucauld, 75009 Paris, France

Born in Tuscany in 1801, Félicie de Fauveau (1801-1886) moved to France at the peak of the Restoration, after having spent her childhood in Florence. In Paris, she studied painting and sculpture and cultivated an interest in archeology and ancient symbolism, establishing a studio in Paris from 1826 to 1830, at 18 Rue de la Rochefoucauld, 75009 Paris, which was frequented by artists such as Paul Delaroche and Ary Scheffer. After her participation at the Paris Salon in 1827, De Fauveau received ample acclaim. Stendhal called her the “new Canova.” One of the statues she presented at the event, “Queen Christine of Sweden Refusing to Spare the Life of Her Equerry Monaldeschi,” was awarded the gold medal, which the artist received from King Charles X, who looked to De Fauveau to promote the ideals of the Restoration. Her award-winning statue would also inspire Alexandre Dumas’s play “Christine.” In Paris, she subsequently received multiple commissions including bronze doors destined for the Louvre, a project that failed to reach fulfilment. A dedicated Legitimist, who supported the return of the Bourbon king to France after the fall of Napoleon, de Fauveau was supported by Marie Caroline, Duchess of Berry. Both women organized failed resistance efforts in the Vandee region. De Fauveau hoped the crown would be captured by Marie Caroline’s under-aged son, the Count of Chambord. After two squelched uprisings in the early 1830s and six months in prison, De Fauveau joined her mother in Florence in 1834, where she vowed to remain in voluntary exile until the Count of Chambord was crowned king of France, a hope that never materialized.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Edith Wharton was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930.
Born: January 24, 1862, New York City, New York, United States
Died: August 11, 1937, Saint-Brice-sous-Forêt, France
Lived: Land’s End, Ledge Road, Newport RI, USA (41.45463, -71.30905)
Château Sainte-Claire, Hyères, Var Département, France (43.12054, 6.12863)
Le Pavillon Colombe, 33 Rue Edith Wharton, Saint-Brice-sous-Forêt, Val-d’Oise department, Île-de-France, France (48.99942, 2.356)
53 Rue de Varenne, 75007 Paris, France (48.85445, 2.32166)
The Mount, 2 Plunkett St, Lenox, MA 01240, USA (42.33102, -73.28201)
882-884 Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
Buried: Cimetière des Gonards, Versailles, Departement des Yvelines, Île-de-France, France
Spouse: Edward Robbins Wharton (m. 1885–1913)
Movies: The Age of Innocence, The Glimpses of the Moon, more

William Morton Fullerton was an American print journalist, author and foreign correspondent for The Times. A bisexual man-about-town, he juggled romances with Edith Wharton, Lord Ronald Gower and the Ranee of Sarawak. Wharton also had lesbian affairs, including one with writer Janet Flanner, and was friends with Teddy Roosevelt’s bisexual sister, poet Corinne Roosevelt Robinson. Fullerton and Wharton’s affair lasted from 1906 to 1909. They were introduced by mutual friend Henry James (brother of Alice James.) She undoubtedly considered him the love of her life, describing him as her "ideal intellectual partner". However they were never 'officially' together, as Wharton was already married and Fullerton's highly promiscuous personality prevented him from ever committing to a serious relationship. After the affair ended, Wharton, who was fiercely guarded when it came to her private life, requested that Fullerton destroy every letter she had ever sent him in order to avoid any scandal. The affair itself, although suspected, was not confirmed until the 1980s. Fullerton had ignored Wharton's request and had kept all of her letters, which were eventually published as a book, The letters of Edith Wharton, in 1988. Wharton wrote also several design books, including her first published work, The Decoration of Houses of 1897, co-authored by Ogden Codman, Jr.
Together from 1906 to 1909: 3 years.
Edith Wharton (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937)
William Morton Fullerton (September 18, 1865 – August 26, 1952)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The Mount is a country house in Lenox, Massachusetts, the home of noted author Edith Wharton, who designed the house and its grounds and considered it her "first real home."
Address: 2 Plunkett St, Lenox, MA 01240, USA (42.33102, -73.28201)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 413-551-5111
National Register of Historic Places: 71000900, 1971. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built in 1902, Design by Edith Wharton (1862-1937)
The Mount survives today as an example of Wharton’s design principles. Edith Wharton wrote several of her novels there, including “The House of Mirth” (1905), the first of many chronicles of life in old New York. At The Mount, she entertained the cream of American literary society, including her close friend, novelist Henry James, who described the estate as "a delicate French chateau mirrored in a Massachusetts pond.” Although she spent many months traveling in Europe nearly every year with her friend, Egerton Winthrop (John Winthrop’s descendant), The Mount was her primary residence until 1911. When living there and while traveling abroad, Wharton was usually driven to appointments by her longtime chauffeur and friend Charles Cook, a native of nearby South Lee, Massachusetts. Edith Wharton and her husband, Edward, lived in The Mount from 1902 to 1911. After the Whartons left, the house was a private residence, a girls’ dormitory for the Foxhollow School, and site of the theatre company Shakespeare & Company. It was then bought by Edith Wharton Restoration, which has restored much of the property to its original condition. Today, The Mount is a cultural center and historic house museum, welcoming close to 40,000 visitors each year. The house is open daily from May through October for house and garden tours. Speciality Ghost and Backstairs tours are also offered. In the summer, The Mount hosts performances, music, lectures, and outdoor sculpture exhibits. Additional special events are hosted throughout the year.
Life
Who: Edith Wharton, nèe Edith Newbold Jones (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937)
Edith Wharton was engaged to Henry Stevens in 1882 after a two-year courtship. The month the two were to marry, the engagement abruptly ended. In 1885, at age 23, she married Edward (Teddy) Robbins Wharton, who was 12 years her senior. From a well-established Boston family, he was a sportsman and a gentleman of the same social class and shared her love of travel. From the late 1880s until 1902, he suffered acute depression, and the couple ceased their extensive travel. At that time his depression manifested as a more serious disorder, after which they lived almost exclusively at their estate The Mount. In 1908 her husband’s mental state was determined to be incurable. In the same year, she began an affair with Morton Fullerton, a journalist for The Times, in whom she found an intellectual partner. She divorced Edward Wharton in 1913 after 28 years of marriage. Fullerton was bisexual and had affairs with Wharton, Lord Ronald Gower and the Ranee of Sarawak. Wharton had also lesbian affairs, including one with writer Janet Flanner, and was friend with bisexual poet Corinne Roosevelt Robinson, sister of Teddy Roosevelt.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Rumor has it that Edith Wharton purchased the remote property at the southern end of Ledge Road because she wanted to live as far as possible from her mother without leaving Newport.
Address: Ledge Road, Newport RI, USA (41.45463, -71.30905)
Type: Private Property
Place
In 1897 Edith Wharton purchased Land’s End from Robert Livingston Beeckman, a former U.S. Open Tennis Championship runner-up who would go on to become Governor of Rhode Island. At that time Wharton described the main house as "incurably ugly." Wharton agreed to pay $80,000 for the property, and spend thousands more to alter the home’s facade, decorate the interior, and landscape the grounds. Ultimately, Wharton would allow that she and Ogden Codman, Jr., a revivalist architect who supervised the renovations, had finally helped the home achieve "acertain dignity." The newly constructed gardens were especially impressive having been laid-out in classical design by Beatrix Ferrand, the landscape architect responsible for the gardens at Dumbarton Oaks. Wharton’s original French doors and carefully crafted moldings still grace the dining and living room areas. It is a "comfortable, functional" family home.
Life
Who: Edith Wharton, nèe Edith Newbold Jones (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937)
Edith Wharton was a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930. Wharton combined her insider’s view of America’s privileged classes with a brilliant, natural wit to write humorous, incisive novels and short stories of social and psychological insight. She was well acquainted with many of her era’s other literary and public figures, including Theodore Roosevelt. In addition to novels, Wharton wrote at least 85 short stories. She was also a garden designer, interior designer, and a taste-maker of her time. She wrote several design books, including her first published work, “The Decoration of Houses” (1897), co-authored by Ogden Codman, Jr. (1863-1951.) Another is the generously illustrated “Italian Villas and Their Gardens” of 1904. Ogden Codman, Jr. was a noted architect and interior decorator in the Beaux-Arts styles. Wharton became one of his first Newport clients for her home there, Land’s End. In her autobiography, “A Backward Glance,” Wharton wrote: “We asked him to alter and decorate the house—a somewhat new departure, since the architects of that day looked down on house-decoration as a branch of dress-making, and left the field up to the upholsterers, who crammed every room with curtains, lambrequins, jardinières of artificial plants, wobbly velvet-covered tables littered with silver gew-gaws, and festoons of lace on mantelpieces and dressing tables.” On June 1, 1937 Wharton was at the French country home of Ogden Codman, where they were at work on a revised edition of “The Decoration of Houses,” when she suffered a heart attack and collapsed. She later died of a stroke on August 11, 1937.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Immediately after the death of her father, Alice Delamar rented a house on Park Avenue 270.
Address: Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
Type: Private Property
Place
Park Avenue is a wide New York City boulevard which carries north and southbound traffic in the borough of Manhattan, and is also a wide one-way pair in the Bronx. For most of the road’s length in Manhattan, it runs parallel to Madison Avenue to the west and Lexington Avenue to the east. Park Avenue’s entire length was formerly called Fourth Avenue; the title still applies below 14th Street. Meanwhile, the section between 14th and 17th Street is called Union Square East, and between 17th and 32nd Streets, the name Park Avenue South is used. In the Bronx, Park Avenue runs in several segments between the Major Deegan Expressway and Fordham Road.
Notable queer residents at Park Avenue:
- No. 270: real estate titan Dr. Charles V. Paterno formed the Vanderbilt Av. Realty Corp. and commissioned the architectural firm of Warren & Wetmore to design a massive U-shaped neo-Renaissance building. Paterno envisioned two distinct sections—the mansion-like apartments that took the address 270 Park Avenue, and the apartment hotel that used the name Hotel Marguery. The residents would share a 70 by 275 foot garden with a private drive. As the restrained brick and stone structure rose, Manhattan millionaires rushed to take apartments. Construction was completed, as predicted, in the fall of 1917, at a cost of around $8 million, exclusive of the land. Twelve stories tall, there were 20 acres of floor space divided into 108 apartments. Deemed the “largest apartment building in the world,” a Dec. 1917 advertisement counted “1,536 living rooms; 1,476 closets; 100 kitchens; 100 sculleries.” Potential residents could choose apartments of 6 to 10 rooms with three or four baths, at an annual rent of $4000 to $6500. Larger apartments, from 12 to 19 rooms with four to six baths, would cost $7000 to $15000. The highest rent would be equivalent to about $23,000 per month in 2015. The moneyed residents could enjoy the convenience of the downstairs restaurant, run by the Ritz-Carlton restaurant. Rudolph Guglielmi had a spacious apartment in the building in Nov. 1925 when he applied for United States citizenship. Better known to American audiences by his screen name, Rudolph Valentino, the movie star had to dodge a battery of questions. His failure to do military service during the war was brought up—he explained it was due to “a slight defect in the vision of his left eye.” The Italian Government had listed him “as a slacker.” The New York Times reported that “it was discovered to be an error which was later corrected.” Then there was the question about why Valentine’s wife, Winifred, was living on 96th Street and not in the Park Avenue apartment. “Mrs. Valentino said that the only issue between her husband and herself was that he wished her to give up all business and settle down into home life, and this she would not do.” The 1920s saw the comings and goings of other internationally-known names. In 1926 Queen Marie of Romania stayed briefly in the apartment of Ira Norris; and a year later Charles Lindbergh’s family, including his mother, stayed at No. 270 Park Avenue following his triumphant June 1927 return from Europe. Acclaimed stage actress Gertrude Lawrence (rumoured to be the lover of Daphne du Marier) took an apartment in 1929. No. 270 Park Avenue occupied the entire block between Madison Avenue and 47th and 48th Street. The 12-storey complex containing 108 suites in two separate sections, which were connected by the architects by two triumphal arches over the Vander Bild Avenue. Alice DeLamar rented the largest apartment. The apartment building stood near the Delamar Mansion, which had to be sold. An American magazine, the St. Louis Star “told” the adventures of Prince Carol of Romania (future Carol II of Romania, son of Marie of Romania) overcome by love for the fair miss De la Mar, offering his heart and his titles, but without achieving the desired result. Miss De la Mar told in a few words: “I did not want to marry the prince because I didn’t love him. I own $10 million and if I want to marry then I do not wish to give up my freedom to marry without love." The prince wrote: "The American press blew the rumor that I came to America to find a rich woman. The Daily News even picked a few candidates ahead of me: Miss Millicent Rogers, Miss Abby Rockefeller and Miss Alice Lamar." King Carol II ruled from 1930 to 1940. Carol is more known for his amorous adventures than for his way of ruling: in it, he does not seem to have excelled. In 1920 Alice Delamar moved into a beautiful house on Sunset Boulevard in Palm Beach. The inherited house of Pembroke was sold a few years later. The auction took place on August 16, 1924 in the Great Reception Hall of Pembroke. On June 24, 1947 plans were filed by architects Harrison & Abramovitz for the more than $21 million Time Life Building. The Hotel Marguery, once the largest apartment building in the world, and its astonishingly colorful history, was soon bulldozed. In 1971, Alice wrote that the complex has long been demolished. Today the site is occupied by the JP Morgan Chase Tower, constructed in 1960 and designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
- No. 410: Monroe Wheeler and Glenway Wescott’s latest apartment was in a very grand building at 410 Park Avenue, and they gave a large party for their friend. Maugham enjoyed the gathering, but when their upstairs neighbour Marlene Dietrich appeared, he felt upstaged and left. By the late 40s, Monroe Wheeler was a high profile New Yorker. His full-page portrait appeared in the Nov. 1948 issue of Vogue. At his parties at 410 Park Avenue were such celebrities as Cecil Beaton, Francis Bacon, Ben Shahn, Gore Vidal, and Christopher Isherwood. Among the regulars were Paul Cadmus, Marianne Moore, Katherine Anne Porter, Pavel Tchelitchew and Charles Henri Ford, Diana and Reed Vreeland, Joseph Campbell, the Kirsteins, E.E. Cummings, Brooke Astor, Philip Johnson, and others. Wheeler’s most amusing annual guests were Osbert and Edith Sitwell, the brother and sister poet famous for their double wit and set-up dry humor. In 1958 Monroe Wheeler learned that the grand old building at 410 Park Avenue would be demolished and replaced by a office tower. He found a small apartment at 215 E. 79 St. in a tall pale-blond brick building called the Thornely. They lived there for two years.
- No. 465, The Ritz Tower: Built in 1925 as the city’s most elegant apartment hotel, The Ritz Tower today remains one of Manhattan’s most luxurious and sought-after residential cooperatives noted for its spacious and elegant apartments, each one unique. Greta Garbo lived here for a time in the 40s. Most happy about this move was probably Mercedes de Acosta, who had an apartment at 471 Park Avenue, from where she could see Garbo's north facing rooms. Mercedes told the story that during the wartime, when people were not allowed to show light at night “we gave each other signs with candles. Why we were not arrested for this offence is still today a riddle to me.” In 1951 Garbo moved from the Ritz into a suite with four rooms located on the seventeenth floor of The Hampshire House at 150 Central Park South.
- No. 530: In 1950, Alice DeLamar’s address is still a house in New York at 530 Park Avenue. This 19-story, white-brick apartment building at 530 Park Avenue on the southwest corner at 61st Street next to the Regency Hotel was erected in 1940 and designed by George F. Pelham Jr., who also designed 41, 50, 785, 1130 and 1150 Park Avenue and 1056 Fifth Avenue. It was bought in 2007 for about $211 million by Blackrock Realty Advisors which then sold it to Aby Rosen, the owner of the Seagrams Building and Lever House on Park Avenue who converted the rental building to a condominium with 116 apartments in 2013. Handel Architects LLP was architect and William T. Georgis was interior designer for the conversion.
- No. 564: The second clubhouse of the Colony Club, was commissioned in 1913 and constructed from 1914 to 1916. It was designed by Delano & Aldrich in the Neo-Georgian style, with interiors designed by Elsie de Wolfe. See Colony Club.
- No. 570: On April 24, 1947, Willa Cather died of a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 73 in her home at 570 Park Avenue in Manhattan.
- No. 695, 10065: Hunter College is an American public university and one of the constituent organizations of the City University of New York, located in the Lenox Hill neighborhood of Manhattan's Upper East Side. The college grants undergraduate and graduate degrees in over one-hundred fields of study across five schools. Hunter College also administers Hunter College High School and Hunter College Elementary School. Founded in 1870, originally as a women's college, Hunter is one of the oldest public colleges in the United States. The college assumed the location of its main campus on Park Avenue in 1873. Hunter began admitting men into its freshman class in 1964. In 1943 Eleanor Roosevelt dedicated the former home of herself and Franklin Delano Roosevelt to the college, which reopened in 2010 as the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Audre Lorde (1934-1992); Pauli Murray (1910–1985).
- No. 882-884: Ogden Codman, Jr. collaborated with Edith Wharton on the redesign of her townhouse at 882-884 Park Avenue, now demolished.
- No. 993: From the 1940s to the mid 1970s Marlene Dietrich kept, and often resided in apartment 12E, a four room apartment in this building. She relocated to New York to be close to her daughter Maria Riva and her grandchildren. 993 Park Avenue went co-op in the late fifties and Dietrich bought an apartment in the building. The full service, thirteen storey Italianite block had been built in the teens by Bing & Bing. Dietrich decorated her modest apartment (a two bed / two bath unit of 1600 square feet), in a mixture of styles: Louis XIV furniture was offset against glizy mirrored walls befitting a movie star. When she wasn’t travelling the world with her spectacular one-woman show, Dietrich divided her time between her New York home and a Paris rental on the Avenue Montaigne. Visting Dietrich in Paris in the late 70s, her friend Leo Lerman noted "the podge of the [Parisian] flat, which I find touching and that Gray [Foy] says is so unlike her New York controlled elegance. I like both and find both very much the way she is." After a stage fall in Australia in 1975 Dietrich went into semi-retirement in Paris, becoming increasingly reclusive. Her grandson, J. Michael Riva lived at the Park Avenue apartment during the early 80s with his then-fiance, Jamie Lee Curtis, when the latter was filming "Trading Places" (1983.) Dietrich died in 1992. Her heirs sold the apartment in 1998 for $615.000. 993 Park Ave #12E reappeared on the market in 2010. The refurbished unit was listed by Sotheby’s Real Estate for $ 2.250.000.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Château Sainte-Claire is a villa in the hills above Hyères, in the Var Département of France, which was the residence of Olivier Voutier and later of the American novelist Edith Wharton. Its garden is classified as one of the Notable Gardens of France.
Address: Hyères, Var Département, France (43.12054, 6.12863)
Type: Public Park (open to public)
Place
Built in 1820
In 1927, the property was purchased by the American novelist Edith Wharton, who used it as her summer residence. She called it "Sainte-Claire du Château" and created the garden in its present form, filling it with cacti and sub-tropical plants. The Château Sainte-Claire is located in the hills just above the old town of Hyères. Its park contains the ruins of part of the old walls of the city, dating to the end of the XII century. The walls were destroyed by the order of Cardinal Richelieu during the reign of Louis XIII of France. In the XVII century, the site was occupied by a convent belonging to the order of the Institute of Poor Women, created in Assisi in 1212, of which Sainte-Claire was the first Mother Superior. Following the French Revolution, the convent was closed and then demolished, and the land was sold. In 1820, the land was sold to the French naval officer and archeologist Olivier Voutier, best known as the man who brought the “Venus de Milo” from Greece to France. Voutier constructed the present villa, which he called La Villa Sainte Claire, and restored the ramparts of the old city between the villa and the ruins of an old tower. The villa was purchased by the city of Hyères in 1955, and the park became a public garden. Since 1990 it has been the office of the National Park of Port-Cros and the Botanical Preserve of Porquerolles (the island park off the coast of Hyères.)
Life
Who: Edith Wharton, nèe Edith Newbold Jones (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937)
The maritime officer and archaeologist Olivier Voutier built the peculiar neo-Romanesque villa. His gravesite can be seen at the top of the gardens close to the medieval tower. A few years later, Edith Wharton moved into the house and turned it into her own literary and botanical shelter. In a letter to Bernard Berenson in 1919 she extolled the region’s endless charms: “I read your letter stretched out on a bank of amaranth and moly, with the blue sea sending little silver splashes up to my toes, and roses and narcissus and mimosa outdoing Coty’s best from the centre all around to the sea. In front of us lay two or three Odyssean isles, and the boat with a Lotean sail which is always in the right place was on duty as usual — and this is the way all my days are spent! Seven hours of blue-and-gold and thyme and rosemary and hyacinth and roses every day that the Lord makes; and in the evenings, dozing over a good book! ….”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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A long, low, XVIII century house called "Pavillon Colombe,” named after the two Venetian actresses for whom it had been built. This is where Edith Wharton spent her summers.
Address: 33 Rue Edith Wharton, Saint-Brice-sous-Forêt, Val-d’Oise department, Île-de-France, France (48.99942, 2.356)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1769, Design by François Joseph Bélanger (1744–1818)
Le Pavillon Colombe was the house on rue de Montmorency (now rue Edith Wharton) in St. Brice-sous-Forêt, Seine-et-Oise (now Val d’Oise), France, that Edith Wharton acquired in 1918. The house was probably built for Jean André de Vassal de Saint-Hubert, who offered it to his mistress, Marie Catherine Ruggieri (1751–1830), an actress known as Mademoiselle Colombe. For this reason, Edith Wharton named the house Le Pavillon Colombe. In 1918–1919, the house was renovated by Charles Moreux and Henri Gonse and landscaped by Lawrence Johnston. Edith Wharton lived in Saint-Brice-sous-Forêt from 1919 until her death in 1937. The road she lived on has since been named after her.
Life
Who: Edith Wharton, nèe Edith Newbold Jones (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937)
After her Paris years before and during the war, Edith Wharton’s French residences were seasonal. Just after the war, she took over, and did up, two French houses and gardens. One is in Hyères, east of Toulon, a house called Château Sainte-Claire, on a hillside above the little town, in the grounds of a ruined XVII century convent, with a staggering view down to the Mediterranean, where she spent the winters. The other is on the outskirts of Paris, in a small town called Saint-Brice-sous-Fôret, on the edge of the Montmorency Forest. On June 1, 1937 Wharton was at the French country home of Ogden Codman Jr., where they were at work on a revised edition of “The Decoration of Houses,” when she suffered a heart attack and collapsed. Edith Wharton later died of a stroke on August 11, 1937 at Le Pavillon Colombe, her XVIII century house on Rue de Montmorency in Saint-Brice-sous-Forêt. She died at 5:30 p.m., but her death was not known in Paris. At her bedside was her friend, Mrs. Royall Tyler. Wharton was buried in the American Protestant section of the Cimetière des Gonards in Versailles, "with all the honors owed a war hero and a chevalier of the Legion of Honor... a group of some one hundred friends sang a verse of the hymn "O Paradise"”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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“My years of Paris life were spent entirely in the rue de Varenne – rich years, crowded and happy years.” Edith Wharton
Address: 53 Rue de Varenne, 75007 Paris, France (48.85445, 2.32166)
Type: Private Property
Place
When her marriage deteriorated, Edith Wharton decided to move permanently to France, living at 53 Rue de Varenne, Paris, in an apartment that belonged to George Washington Vanderbilt II. Wharton was preparing to vacation for the summer when WWI broke out. Though many fled Paris, she moved back to her Paris apartment on the Rue de Varenne and for four years was a tireless and ardent supporter of the French war effort. One of the first causes she undertook in August 1914 was the opening of a workroom for unemployed women; here they were fed and paid one franc a day. What began with thirty women soon doubled to sixty, and their sewing business began to thrive. When the Germans invaded Belgium in the fall of 1914 and Paris was flooded with Belgian refugees, she helped to set up the American Hostels for Refugees, which managed to get them shelter, meals, clothes and eventually an employment agency to help them find work. She collected more than $100,000 on their behalf. In early 1915 she organized the Children of Flanders Rescue Committee, which gave shelter to nearly 900 Belgian refugees who had fled when their homes were bombed by the Germans. Aided by her influential connections in the French government, she and her long-time friend Walter Berry (then president of the American Chamber of Commerce in Paris), were among the few foreigners in France allowed to travel to the front lines during WWI. She and Berry made five journeys between February and August 1915, which Wharton described in a series of articles that were first published in Scribner’s Magazine and later as “Fighting France: From Dunkerque to Belfort,” which became an American bestseller. Travelling by car, Wharton and Berry drove through the war zone, viewing one decimated French village after another. She visited the trenches, and was within earshot of artillery fire. She wrote, "We woke to a noise of guns closer and more incessant... and when we went out into the streets it seemed as if, overnight, a new army had sprung out of the ground.”
Life
Who: Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (July 29, 1859 – 1927)
Walter Berry was an American lawyer, diplomat, Francophile, and friend of several great writers. Berry was born in Paris, a descendant of the Van Rensselaer family of New York. After attending St. Mark’s School and Harvard, he took a law degree at Columbia University, practicing law in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Paris, where he pursued a career in international law and diplomacy. After serving as a judge at the International Tribunal of Egypt from 1908 to 1911, he settled in Paris for the remainder of his life and became a strong advocate of France, tirelessly promoting its cause in the United States when WWI broke out in 1914; he served as President of the American Chamber of Commerce in Paris from 1916 to 1923. After the war he vigorously opposed both Germany and the Soviet Union. A close friend of Henry James and Edith Wharton, who called him "the love of my life," he met Marcel Proust in the summer of 1916, beginning "a friendship that was to be one of the most rewarding of Proust’s final years." He was a cousin of Harry Crosby, leaving him in his will "my entire library except such items as my good friend Edith Wharton may care to choose." Edith Wharton is buried next to her long-time friend, Walter Berry, at Cimetière des Gonards, Versailles, Departement des Yvelines, Île-de-France, France.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Donald Vining, was a gay diarist.
Born: June 20, 1917, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: January 24, 1998, New York City, New York, United States
Education: West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Yale School of Drama
Buried: Forest Grove Cemetery, Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine, USA
Books: A Gay Diary, more

Donald Vining was a gay diarist. Vining published essays on gay relationships - his own with his partner Richmond Morell Purinton lasted more than 43 years - which appeared in varied American periodicals. Many of Vining's original diaries (1932-1958) are now at Yale University. Donald Vining was a pacifist who admitted his homosexuality to his draft board because his mother needed his support, and he could not afford to be placed in a camp for conscientious objectors. In his review, John D'Emilio said, "A Gay Diary is, unquestionably, the richest historical document of gay male life in the United States that I have ever encountered.... It chronicles a whole life in which homosexuality is but one part and an ever changing part at that.... It illuminates a critical period in gay male American history.” D'Emilio discusses the earlier years of the diary at some length in his Sexual Politics, Sexual Communities: The Making of a Homosexual Minority. The strength of Vining's diary lies precisely in his detailed chronicle of the daily life of non-professional gay men in Manhattan over a period of more than 40 years.
Together from 1946 to 1989: 43 years.
Donald Vining (June 20, 1917 – January 24, 1998)
Richmond M. Purinton (November 9, 1905 - November 16, 1989)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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At Augusta, the capital of the U.S. state of Maine, Donald Vining (1917-1998) is buried together with his long-time companion, Richmond Purinton (1905-1989), at Forest Grove Cemetery (Winthrop St, Augusta, ME 04330). Donald Vining was a gay diarist, he published essays on gay relationships, his own with Purinton lasted more than 43 years.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Constance Fenimore Woolson was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe.
Born: March 5, 1840, Claremont, New Hampshire, United States
Died: January 24, 1894, Venice
Lived: 15 Beaumont Street, Oxford
Buried: Campo Cestio, Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy, Plot: 153 Zona Vecchia
Anne's Tablet, Mackinac Island, MI 49757 (memorial)

Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840-1894) was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe. The relationship between Woolson and Henry James has prompted much speculation by biographers, especially Lyndall Gordon in her 1998 book, “A Private Life of Henry James.” In 1893 Woolson rented an elegant apartment on the Grand Canal of Venice. Suffering from influenza and depression, she either jumped or fell to her death from a fourth story window in the apartment in January 1894, surviving for about an hour after the fall. The event stunned Henry James. After travelling to Italy for Woolson’s funeral, James found himself returning to and eventually moving into the house that she had once occupied at 15 Beaumont Street, Oxford.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Anne's Tablet is an Art Nouveau sculptural installation located within Mackinac Island State Park adjacent to Fort Mackinac on Mackinac Island. Consisting of stone benches and a bronze plaque, the overlook was built in 1916 as a memorial to local author Constance Fenimore Woolson.
Address: Anne's Tablet Trail, Mackinac Island, MI 49757, USA (45.85216, -84.61486)
Type: Public Park
Life
Who: Constance Fenimore Woolson (March 5, 1840 – January 24, 1894)
Constance Fenimore Woolson, a member of a prominent Cleveland family of means, as a girl summered on Mackinac Island in a now-vanished building located directly below the overlook. The experience inspired her to become a professional writer, and in 1875 she published her first volume of short stories, “Castle Nowhere: Lake-Country Sketches,” based on her experiences on Mackinac Island and in surrounding shorelines of the Great Lakes. The work was followed by Woolson's first novel, “Anne.” Also set on Mackinac Island, the work was published in 1880. Woolson's success at conveying the dilemmas faced by young Victorian-era women in a regionalist setting inspired further works from the increasingly successful author set in new homes in St. Augustine, Florida and in Venice. Unfortunately, the popular writer's personal attachment to Henry James was not fully reciprocated, and the depressed author fell from a Venetian window in 1894. As Woolson was buried in Italy, there was no location in the United States where her American-born readers could pay their respects. The Anne's Tablet installation was constructed as a gift from Samuel Mather, a successful iron ore mineowner and nephew of the writer. The sculptor was New York City's William Ordway Partridge. The Grand Hotel is a historic hotel and coastal resort on Mackinac Island. Constructed in the late XIX century, the facility advertises itself as having the world's largest porch. The Grand Hotel is well known for a number of notable visitors, including five U.S. presidents, Russian presidents Vladimir Putin and Dmitri Medvedev, inventor Thomas Edison, and author Mark Twain. Grand Hotel is a member of Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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The Cimitero Acattolico ("Non-Catholic Cemetery") of Rome, often referred to as the Cimitero dei protestanti ("Protestant Cemetery") or Cimitero degli Inglesi ("Englishmen's Cemetery"), is a public cemetery in the rione of Testaccio in Rome.
Address: Via Caio Cestio, 6, 00153 Roma, Italy (41.8763, 12.4795)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 06 574 1900
Place
The Protestant Cemetery is near Porta San Paolo and adjacent to the Pyramid of Cestius, a small-scale Egyptian-style pyramid built in 30 BC as a tomb and later incorporated into the section of the Aurelian Walls that borders the cemetery. It was formerly called Cimitero Anticattolico, the anti-Catholic cemetery. It has Mediterranean cypress, pomegranate and other trees, and a grassy meadow. It is the final resting place of non-Catholics including but not exclusive to Protestants or British people. The earliest known burial is that of a University of Oxford student named Langton in 1738. The English poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley are buried there.
Notable queer burials at Campo Cestio:
• Hendrik Christian Andersen (April 15, 1872 – December 19, 1940), sculptor, friend of Henry James. A bust of the young Count Alberto Bevilacqua, a muse of sculptor Hendrik Christian Andersen, remains in the home of Henry James, Lamb House, in Rye, England. Henry James to Henrik Andersen, three years later, upon the death of Andersen’s brother: “The sense that I can’t help you, see you, talk to you, touch you, hold you close & long, or do anything to make you rest on my, & feel my deep participation – this torments me, dearest boy, makes my ache for you, & for myself; makes me gnash my teeth & groan at the bitterness of things. . . . This is the one thought that relieves me about you a little – & I wish you might fix your eyes on it for the idea, just, of the possibility. I am in town for a few weeks, but return to Rye Apr. 1, & sooner or later to have you there & do for you, to put my arm round you & make you lean on me as on a brother & a lover, & keep you on & on, slowly comforted or at least relieved of the bitterness of pain – this I try to imagine as thinkable, attainable, not wholly out of the question.”
• Dario Bellezza (1944–1996), Italian poet, author and playwright
• Enrico Coleman (1846–1911), artist and orchid-lover, friend of Giovanni “Nino” Costa (who was special friend with Elihu Vedder)
• Gregory Corso (1930–2001), American beat generation poet
• The tomb of Maria Bollvillez (Zona V.7.18) was the first of de Fauveau’s commissions from the Russian aristocracy. Félicie de Fauveau (1801–1886) was a XIX-century French sculptor who was a precursor of the pre-Raphaelite style. Her multiple sculptural works showcase a variety of techniques and mediums including marble, stone, glass and bronze. Her family connections to the restored Bourbon court of Charles X led to commissions that helped launch her early career in Paris. But in 1830 when Charles X was forced to abdicate, de Fauveau paid for her opposition to the new order by being imprisoned for three months and then, in 1833, went into exile in Florence. She made a striking figure on arrival there: as Ary Scheffer’s portrait shows, she had adopted an androgynous appearance, with cropped hair and male clothing. One visitor reported that she had vowed to keep her hair short until the Bourbon monarchy was restored in France (it never was). Her admirers included Italian opera singer Angelica Catalani and Elizabeth and Robert Browning, who had also made their home in Florence. De Fauveau’s works were coveted by the city’s Russian ex-pats including Anatole Demidoff; the artist received multiple commissions from the industrialist and enjoyed the friendship of his wife Caroline Bonaparte. The Tsar Nicolas I purchased various works from the artist and his daughter Maria Nikolaieva was given a dagger, now at the Louvre, whose handle is engraved with scenes from Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” Guy Cogeval (Musée d’Orsay) uses the word lesbienne (lesbian) in his introduction to the catalogue for the exhibition “The Amazon of sculpture”, whereas Christophe Vital mentions on the adjacent page that Félicie de Fauveau was sans doute (without doubt) in love with the young (male) page who died in the Vendée (Charles de Bonnechose, for whom Félicie designed a monument on her prison wall). Michelle Facos also explicitly suggests that Félicie de Fauveau might have been a lesbian in her “Introduction to Nineteenth-Century Art” ( 2011). Usually her relationship to the Countess de la Rochejaquelein is then referred to.
• Denham Fouts (1914-1948), referenced in literary works by Christopher Isherwood, Truman Capote, and Gore Vidal. He was also a friend of George Platt Lynes, who photographed him. Isherwood described him as a mythic figure, "the most expensive male prostitute in the world." Fouts died in 1948, at the Pensione Foggetti, in Rome, at the age of 35.
• Wilhelm von Humboldt (1794–1803), son of the German diplomat and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt and nephew of Alexander von Humboldt
• Hans von Marées (1837–1887), German painter
• Dora Ohlfsen (1878-1948) was born as Dorothea Ohlfsen-Bagge in Ballarat, Victoria. Her father was Norwegian, Christian Herm Ohlfsen-Bagge, probably born in Schleswig (northern Germany now), and her mother, Kate Harison, Australian. She claimed that her great-grandfather was the Sydney convict printer, Robert Howe. Dora was educated at Sydney Girls High School and studied piano privately with Max Volgrich and Henri Kowalski. She traveled to Germany in 1883 to continue her piano studies under Moritz Moszkowski in Berlin; however, when she contracted neuritis, she began teaching music in Germany and later in Russia, after completing piano studies at Theodor Kullak’s Neue Akademie der Tonkunst. She lived in St Petersburg with a Madame Kerbitz and took up painting; she sold one of her work to the Czarina. Her extentive knowledge of languages gained her employement with the American ambassador and allowed her to write on music, theatre, drama and art for Russian and American newspaper. After traveling through various Baltic countries, she settled in Rome to study sculpture at the French Academy and with French engraver, Pierre Dautel. She produced many medallions using academic portraits, included Lord Chelmsford, Sir James Fairfax and General Peppino Garibaldi, and Symbolyst compositions. Church commissions came from Cardinal O’Connell of Boston and Josef Alteneisel, Prince-Bishop of Brixen in the Tyrol. The medallion in bas-relief of the Prince Bishop of Brizen, Tyrol, is among her finest productions. It has been praised in the French and Italian papers as "the wonderful achievement of a beautiful young Australian, who has only studied art for a comparatively short time" (June 10 1908). During WWI she became a Red Cross nurse in Italy. The Fascist government were patrons of her work and she produced a large relief portrait medallion of Mussolini and a war memorial, “Sacrificio,” at Formia, in 1924-26. Ohlfsen was commissioned by Mussolini to design this memorial because her art studies had been solely in Italy and she had nursed Italian soldiers during the war. This is the only work of its kind in Italy to be made by a woman or a foreigner. William Moore in the Brisbane Courier of 8 March 1930 referred to her as the artist who modelled a bust of Nellie Stewart; she also sculpted the head of W.A. Holman in plaster. In 1948, she and her companion, the Russian Baroness Hélène de Kuegelgen (1879-1948), were found gassed in her studio in Rome at Via di S. Nicola da Tolentino, 00187 Roma, close to the Spanish Steps. They had been living at that address, in an area traditionally associated with artists’ studios, for nearly half a century. Police said the deaths were accidental. Hélène de Kuegelgen was the daughter of Pavel Kuegelgen and Alexandra, nee Zhudlovsky. They had moved to Italy in 1902 from St. Petersburg, a city they both loved but which they accurately saw as being on the brink of revolution. Hélène (Elena) was from a well-connected family of Balten Germans, with one uncle a physician to the Tsar and another editor of the Petersburger German newspaper. Her family also boasted several prominent artists, two of them court painters. Dora and Hélène are buried together. A relief bust of the god Dionysius, one hand raised in a gesture of blessing, watches over one of the most distinctive graves in the Cemetery (Zone 1.15.28). Ohlfsen's work is represented in the collections of the British Museum and the Petit Palais in Paris, and in Australian collections including Museum Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales.
• John Addington Symonds (1840–1893), English poet and critic
• Pavel Fedorovich Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian surrealist painter, long-time partner of Charles Henri Ford. Campo Cestio is the original burial place, he was then moved to Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris.
• Una Vincenzo, Lady Troubridge (1887-1983), died in Rome in 1963; she had left written instructions that her coffin be placed in the vault in Highgate Cemetery where Hall and Batten had been buried, but the instructions were discovered too late. She is buried in the English Cemetery in Rome, and on her coffin is inscribed "Una Vincenzo Troubridge, the friend of Radclyffe Hall".
• Elihu Vedder (1836–1923), American painter, sculptor, graphic artist
• Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840–1894) was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe. In 1893 Woolson rented an elegant apartment on the Grand Canal of Venice. Suffering from influenza and depression, she either jumped or fell to her death from a fourth story window in the apartment in January 1894, surviving for about an hour after the fall She is also memorialized by Anne's Tablet on Mackinac Island, Michigan.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Samuel Osborne Barber II was an American composer of orchestral, opera, choral, and piano music. He is one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th century: music critic Donal Henahan stated that ...
Born: March 9, 1910, West Chester, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: January 23, 1981, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Curtis Institute of Music
Lived: Capricorn, Capricorn, Haines Road, west of Croton Lake Road, Mt Kisco, NY 10549, USA (41.23958, -73.73527)
107 S Church St, West Chester, PA 19382, USA (39.95792, -75.60441)
Buried: Oaklands Cemetery, West Chester, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA
Nationality: American
Awards: Pulitzer Prize for Music, more
Parents: Samuel Le Roy Barber, Marguerite McLeod Beatty

Samuel Barber was a composer of orchestral, opera, choral, and piano music. He is one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th century: music critic Donal Henahan stated, "Probably no other American composer has ever enjoyed such early, such persistent and such long-lasting acclaim." He was twice awarded the Pulitzer Prize for music, for his opera Vanessa and his Concerto for Piano and Orchestra. At 14, he entered the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, where he studied piano with Isabelle Vengerova, composition with Rosario Scalero, and voice with Emilio de Gorgoza. He began composing seriously in his late teenage years. Around the same time, he met fellow Curtis schoolmate Gian Carlo Menotti, who became his partner in life as well as in their shared profession. Menotti supplied the libretto (text) for Barber's opera, Vanessa. Menotti also contributed the libretto for Barber's chamber opera A Hand of Bridge. Barber's Antony and Cleopatra was commissioned to open the new Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center in 1966. In recent years, a revised version for which Menotti provided collaborative assistance has enjoyed some success.
Together from 1929 to 1981: 52 years.
Gian Carlo Menotti (July 7, 1911 – February 1, 2007)
Samuel Osmond Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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In 1943, Samuel Barber and Gian Carlo Menotti purchased a house in Mount Kisco, New York.
Address: Capricorn, Haines Road, west of Croton Lake Road, Mt Kisco, NY 10549, USA (41.23958, -73.73527)
Type: Private Property
Place
Mount Kisco is a village and a town in Westchester County, New York. The Town of Mount Kisco is coterminous with the village. The population was 10,877 at the 2010 census. The Village of Mount Kisco was incorporated in 1875 and was partly in the towns of Bedford and New Castle. In 1978, the village chose to become a town in its own right and joined several villages in the state that have made same choice. According to the town’s official web site, Kisco is derived from an Indian word –either kiskamenahook meaning “settlement near a brook” or cisqua meaning “a muddy place.” Mount comes from the 623-foot hill northwest of town. The Mount Kisco Municipal Complex was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997. Merestead, St. Mark’s Cemetery, and the United Methodist Church and Parsonage are also listed.
Life
Who: Samuel Osborne Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981)
For three years, 1939–42, Samuel Barber taught at the Curtis Institute, but in 1942 he joined the U.S. Army Air Forces, becoming its resident composer. In 1943, a gift from Bok enabled Barber and Menotti to buy a house in Mt. Kisco, New York, which they named Capricorn. They were regularly visited by a wide variety of artists and intellectuals, and their domestic happiness brought greater productivity for both composers. At the peak of his powers, Barber unveiled “Medea,” his ballet score for the Martha Graham Dance Company, in 1946; “Knoxville, Summer of 1915,” a song with orchestra, in 1947; and his lone piano sonata in 1949. (All are still in the world repertory; in 1953 Barber reworked his ballet score for orchestra and soprano, as “Medea’s Meditation and Dance of Vengeance,” Op. 23a.) His opera “Vanessa” (1958) received its premiere at the Metropolitan Opera, won a Pulitzer Prize, and became the first American opera performed at Austria’s Salzburg Festival. He wrote three works for the opening of Lincoln Center, including the opera “Antony and Cleopatra,” his second commission for the Met. When the premiere of “Antony and Cleopatra” was hammered by the critics, Barber withdrew to a villa in Italy, where he battled depression. He and his lifelong partner, Menotti, separated and Capricorn, their home, was sold. Barber continued to compose in New York City but drank too much. Cared for by Menotti, he died of cancer and was buried in Oaklands Cemetery in the town of his birth, West Chester, Pennsylvania.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Samuel Barber was born in West Chester, Pennsylvania, the son of Marguerite McLeod (née Beatty) and Samuel Le Roy Barber.
Address: 107 S Church St, West Chester, PA 19382, USA (39.95792, -75.60441)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: West Chester State College Quadrangle Historic District (Bounded by S. High and S. Church Sts., College and Rosedale Aves.), 81000539, 1981
Place
West Chester is a borough and the county seat of Chester County, Pennsylvania. The population was 18,461 at the 2010 census. West Chester University of Pennsylvania is located in the borough. Valley Forge, the Brandywine Battlefield, Marsh Creek State Park, and other historical attractions are nearby, as are Longwood Gardens, the Brandywine River Museum, and Christian C. Sanderson Museum. The area was originally known as Turk’s Head — after the inn of the same name located in what is now the center of the borough. West Chester has been the seat of government in Chester County since 1786, and the borough incorporated in 1799. In the heart of town is its courthouse, a classical revival building designed in the 1840s by Thomas U. Walter, one of the architects for the Capitol in Washington, D.C. In the XVIII century West Chester was a center of clockmaking. In the late XIX century the Hoopes, Bro. and Darlington company became a major wheelworks, first for wagons and later automobiles. In the early XX century, an important industry was the Sharples cream separator company. In the late XX century, Commodore International, one of the pioneers of home computers, giving its headquarters as West Chester, was located approximately a mile northeast of the borough.
Life
Who: Samuel Osborne Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981)
Samuel Barber was a composer of orchestral, opera, choral, and piano music. He is one of the most celebrated composers of the XX century: music critic Donal Henahan stated that "Probably no other American composer has ever enjoyed such early, such persistent and such long-lasting acclaim." Growing up with music in the house (his aunt was Metropolitan Opera star Louise Homer and his uncle, Sidney Homer, was a composer who had a lifelong impact on Barber’s style), Barber decided early on to become a composer, and wrote an operetta at age 10. Four years later he was admitted into the newly established Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. In 1928, while at conservatory, Barber met fellow composer and future life partner Gian Carlo Menotti. Well-trained and a favorite of the school’s founder, Mary Louise Curtis Bok, Barber began his professional career auspiciously with the publication of the delightful “School for Scandal Overture,” in 1931. He completed his well-regarded setting of Matthew Arnold’s “Dover Beach,” for soprano and string quartet, in the same year. He travelled in Europe, particularly Italy, and won a Rome Prize, which sent him to the American Academy for 1935–37. While there, he wrote his string quartet, arranging the second movement for string orchestra (the famous “Adagio for Strings.”) He also completed his “First Symphony.” Samuel Barber died of cancer in 1981 in New York City at the age of 70. He was buried in Oaklands Cemetery (120 W Market St # 1, West Chester, PA 19382). Samuel Barber’s will provided for a burial plot next to his own, reserved for Gian Carlo Menotti, Barber’s partner for most of his adult life. Further, the will said that if Menotti chose not to be buried in Oaklands Cemetery (he is buried near his last home in Scotland), a stone should be placed on the empty plot and inscribed with the words "To The Memory Of Two Friends."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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George Randolph Scott was an American film actor whose career spanned from 1928 to 1962. As a leading man for all but the first three years of his cinematic career, Scott appeared in a variety of genres, ...
Born: January 23, 1898, Orange County, Virginia, United States
Died: March 2, 1987, Beverly Hills, California, United States
Education: Georgia Institute of Technology
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Buried: Elmwood Cemetery, Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, USA, Plot: R-38
Height: 1.9 m
Children: Sandra Scott, Christopher Scott
Spouse: Patricia Stillman (m. 1944–1987), Marion duPont Scott (m. 1936–1939)

Cary Grant (born Archibald Alexander Leach) was an English stage and Hollywood film actor who became an American citizen in 1942. Randolph Scott was an American film actor whose career spanned from 1928 to 1962. They met in 1932 when they were cast together in Hot Saturday. They lived together for many years in Los Angeles. Their home was featured in an issue of Architectural Digest that showed legendary Hollywood stars at home. After that, the house was dabbed “Bachelor Hall” (recently sold in 2006 for more or less 4 million dollars.) They both married but remained close ever afterward. Toward the end of their lives, Scott and Grant were often seen together, on one occasion holding hands late at night in the Polo Lounge, alone except for the waiters. Scott died little more than 3 months after Grant.
They met in 1932 and remained friends until Grant’s death in 1986: 54 years.
Cary Grant (January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986)
Randolph Scott (January 23, 1898 – March 2, 1987)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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At Elmwood Cemetery (700 W 6th St; Charlotte, North Carolina 28202) is buried Randolph Scott (January 23, 1898 – March 2, 1987), American film actor. He was good friends with Fred Astaire and Cary Grant. He met Grant on the set of “Hot Saturday” (1932), where they shared only one scene together, and shortly afterwards they began rooming together in a beach house in Malibu that became known as "Bachelor Hall". According to author Robert Nott, "They lived together on and off for about ten years, because they were friends and wanted to save on living expenses (they were both considered to be notorious tightwads)." In 1944, Scott and Grant stopped living together but remained close friends throughout their lives. 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Paul Leroy Robeson was an American bass singer and actor who became involved with the Civil Rights Movement.
Born: April 9, 1898, Princeton, New Jersey, United States
Died: January 23, 1976, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Somerville High School
Columbia University
Rutgers University
Columbia Law School
Lived: The Chestnuts, Branch Hill, NW3
Buried: Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum, Hartsdale, Westchester County, New York, USA, Plot: Hillcrest A, Grave 1511
Albums: Paul Robeson. Ol' Man River - His 56 Finest 1925-1945, more

English Heritage Blue Plaque: 17 East Heath Road, “Katherine Mansfield (1888–1923) writer, and her husband John Middleton Murry (1889–1957) critic lived here”.
Addresses:
1 Ellerdale Cl, London NW3 6BE, UK (51.55445, -0.17962)
17 E Heath Rd, London NW3 1AL, UK (51.56079, -0.17506)
Branch Hill, London NW3, UK (51.56067, -0.18363)
Place
Hampstead Heath (locally known as "the Heath") is a large, ancient London park, covering 320 hectares (790 acres.) Hampstead Heath, a grassy public space sitting astride a sandy ridge, is one of the highest points in London, running from Hampstead to Highgate, which rests on a band of London Clay. The Heath is rambling and hilly, embracing ponds, recent and ancient woodlands, a lido, playgrounds, and a training track, and it adjoins the stately home of Kenwood House and its grounds. The south-east part of the Heath is Parliament Hill, from which the view over London is protected by law. Running along its eastern perimeter are a chain of ponds – including three open-air public swimming pools – which were originally reservoirs for drinking water from the River Fleet. The Heath is a Site of Metropolitan Importance for Nature Conservation, and part of Kenwood is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. Lakeside concerts are held there in summer. The Heath is managed by the City of London Corporation, and lies mostly within the London Borough of Camden with the adjoining Hampstead Heath Extension and Golders Hill Park in the London Borough of Barnet. The Heath first entered the history books in 986 when Ethelred the Unready granted one of his servants five hides of land at "Hemstede.” This same land is later recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as held by the monastery of St. Peter’s at Westminster Abbey, and by then is known as the "Manor of Hampstead.” Westminster held the land until 1133 when control of part of the manor was released to one Richard de Balta; then during Henry II’s reign the whole of the manor became privately owned by Alexander de Barentyn, the King’s butler. Manorial rights to the land remained in private hands until the 1940s when they lapsed under Sir Spencer Pocklington Maryon Wilson, though the estate itself was passed on to Shane Gough, 5th Viscount Gough. Over time, plots of land in the manor were sold off for building, particularly in the early XIX century, though the Heath remained mainly common land. The main part of the Heath was acquired for the people by the Metropolitan Board of Works. Parliament Hill was purchased for the public for £300,000 and added to the park in 1888. Golders Hill was added in 1898 and Kenwood House and grounds were added in 1928. From 1808 to 1814 Hampstead Heath hosted a station in the shutter telegraph chain which connected the Admiralty in London to its naval ships in the port of Great Yarmouth. The City of London Corporation has managed the Heath since 1989. Before that it was managed by the GLC and before that by the London County Council (LCC.) In 2009, the City of London proposed to upgrade a footpath across the Heath into a service-road. The proposal met with protests from local residents and celebrities, and did not proceed.
Notable queer residents at Hampstead Heath:
• In 1936 Beverly Nichols (September 9, 1898-September 15, 1983) purchased a house at One Ellerdale Close, NW3. Ellerdale Road is one of Hampstead’s premier turnings, ideally located off the top of Fitzjohns Avenue. A book about Beverly Nichols’ city garden near Hampstead Heath in London, “Green Grows the City,” published in 1939, was very successful. That book introduced Arthur R. Gaskin, who was Nichols’s manservant from 1924 until Gaskin’s death in 1966. Gaskin was a popular character, who also appeared in the succeeding gardening books.
• Lord Alfred Douglas, or “Bosie,” Oscar Wilde’s one time lover and ruin, moved at 26 Church Row, NW3 with his wife (he was by now officially heterosexual) in 1907 until 1910, shortly after winning a libel suit against “The Daily News,” which had run an obituary calling him a degenerate, only to find he was still alive. Though not a great writer, the peer was highly rated by the young John Betjeman, who told C.S. Lewis, his tutor at Oxford, that Douglas was a better poet than Shakespeare.
• Katherine Mansfield (1888–1923) and John Middleton Murry (1889–1957) lived at 17 E Heath Road, NW3. A prominent critic, Murry is best remembered for his association with Katherine Mansfield, whom he married in 1918 as her second husband, for his friendship with D. H. Lawrence, T. S. Eliot, and for his friendship (and brief affair) with Frieda Lawrence. Following Mansfield’s death, Murry edited her work. Mansfield had several romantic relationships with both men and women. She became pregnant in 1909 but her lover’s parents did not approve of the relationship and they broke up. She hastily married a George Bowden, a singing teacher, but left him the same evening, before the marriage could be consummated. Mansfield later miscarried. Mansfield began a relationship with Ida Baker which continued for many years, even after Mansfield met her second husband, John Middleton Murray, in 1911. “Baker, whom Mansfield often called, with a mixture of affection and disdain, her “wife”, moved in with her shortly afterwards.” Mansfield was diagnosed with tuberculosis in 1917, leading to her death in 1923.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: The Chestnuts, Branch Hill, NW3 Paul Robeson (1898–1976), “Singer and Actor lived here 1929–1930"
• John Schlesinger (1926-2003) was an English film and stage director, and actor. He won an Academy Award for Best Director for “Midnight Cowboy,” and was nominated for two other films (“Darling” and “Sunday Bloody Sunday”). Schlesinger was born at 53 Hollycroft Avenue, NW3 into a middle class Jewish family, the son of Winifred Henrietta (née Regensburg) and Bernard Edward Schlesinger, a physician. He recalled a normal, middle-class childhood in Hampstead (he grew up at 15 Templewood Avenue, NW3), though he was not happy at the boarding-schools to which he was sent.
• Josephine Hutchinson (1903-1998), American actress who appeared in “North By North West” (1959) lived at Swiss Cottage, 4 Finchley Road, NW3.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum is located in the hamlet of Hartsdale, town of Greenburgh, Westchester County, New York, about 25 miles (40 km) north of Midtown Manhattan. It was founded in 1902, and is non-sectarian. Ferncliff has three community mausoleums, a crematory, a small chapel, and a main office located in the rear of the main building.
Address: 280 Secor Rd, Hartsdale, NY 10530, USA (41.02737, -73.83234)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 914-693-4700
Place
Ferncliff Cemetery has three community mausoleums that offer what The New York Times has described as "lavish burial spaces". As of 2001, a standard crypt space in the mausoleums was priced at $15,000. The highest-priced spaces were private burial rooms with bronze gates, crystal chandeliers, and stained-glass windows, priced at $280,000. The Ferncliff Mausoleum, aka "The Cathedral of Memories", is the cemetery's oldest mausoleum, constructed in 1928. It has classic architecture, but the corridors are dark without glass panes to admit natural light. Judy Garland, Ed Sullivan, and Joan Crawford are three of the most famous interments in the main mausoleum. The Shrine of Memories is Ferncliff's second mausoleum and was constructed in 1956. "Shrine of Memories" is a more contemporary structure than "Ferncliff Mausoleum." It has many panes of glass to admit natural light, and there is a large frieze of Christopher Columbus in the main hall of the building. Basil Rathbone is one of the most famous interments in "Shrine of Memories." Rosewood is Ferncliff's most recently completed community mausoleum, having been constructed in 1999. Aaliyah and her father Michael Haughton have a private room in Rosewood. Cab Calloway is interred with his wife Zulme "Nuffie". The cemetery is also known for its in-ground burials in sections located in front of the mausoleums. Ferncliff is one of the very few cemeteries that does not permit upright headstones in its outdoor plots. All outdoor grave markers are flush with the ground. This feature facilitates maintenance of the cemetery grounds. However, there are several upright headstones that were placed before this policy was instituted. Malcolm X is one of the most famous ground burials, in plot Pinewood B.
Notable queer burials at Ferncliff Cemetery:
• James Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – December 1, 1987), novelist, essayist
• Joan Crawford (c. 1905–1977), actress
• Alice Delamar (1895-1983), heiress and socialite, cremated here but buried in Palm Beach
• Judy Garland (1922–1969), singer, actress
• Moss Hart (1904–1961), playwright and director
• Alberta Hunter (1895-1984), blues singer
• Elsa Maxwell (1883–1963), columnist, society figure
• Ona Munson (1910–1955), actress
• Basil Rathbone (1892–1967), actor. In 1924 he was involved in a brief relationship with Eva Le Gallienne.
• Paul Robeson (1898–1976), actor, singer, and civil rights activist.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Nell Carter was an American singer and actress. She won a Tony Award for her performance in the Broadway musical Ain't Misbehavin', as well as an Emmy Award for her reprisal of the role on television.
Born: September 13, 1948, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
Died: January 23, 2003, Beverly Hills, California, United States
Buried: Hillside Memorial Park, Culver City, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Acacia Gardens, Wall KK, Crypt 7040
Children: Tracy Carter, Daniel Carter, Joshua Carter
Spouse: Roger Larocque (m. 1992–1993), George Krynicki (m. 1982–1992)

Nell Carter (1948–2003) was an American singer and actress. She won a Tony Award for her performance in the Broadway musical “Ain't Misbehavin',” as well as an Emmy Award for her reprisal of the role on television. From 1981 to 1987, Carter starred in the NBC sitcom “Gimme a Break!.” She received two Emmy and two Golden Globe nominations for her work on the series. Carter died at the age of 54 on January 23, 2003, from heart disease complicated by diabetes in her Beverly Hills home. She was survived by her domestic partner, Ann Kaser. She is buried at Hillside Memorial Park & Mortuary (6001 W Centinela Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90045).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Lived: Tan Llan, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2ST, UK (52.75838, -3.90129) [Cadw Building ID: 16146 (Grade II, 1995)]
Tyn-y-Celyn, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2TA, UK (52.75788, -3.90737) [Cadw Building ID: 5239 (Grade II, 1991)]
Hengwrt, Llanelltyd
26 Hereford Square, SW7
Rhagatt Hall, Rhagatt, Corwen, Denbighshire, LL21 9HY, UK (52.98415, -3.34396)
Buried: Saint Illtud Church Cemetery, Llanelltyd, Gwynedd, Wales
Buried alongside: Frances Power Cobbe

Frances Power Cobbe was an Irish writer, social reformer, anti-vivisection activist, and leading women's suffrage campaigner. She formed a marriage with sculptor Mary Lloyd, whom she met in Rome in 1861 and lived with from 1864 until Lloyd's death. Cobbe referred to Lloyd alternately as "husband," "wife," and "dear friend." Cobbe founded the Society for the Protection of Animals Liable to Vivisection in 1875, the world's first organization campaigning against animal experiments, and in 1898 the BUAV. Cobbe was a member of the executive council of the London National Society for Women's Suffrage and writer of editorial columns for London newspapers on suffrage, property rights for women, and opposition to vivisection. Lloyd studied and worked with French artist Rosa Bonheur. In 1853, she worked in the studio of Welsh sculptor John Gibson in Rome, along with sculptor Harriet Hosmer. In 1858, Lloyd inherited a share in the Welsh landed estate of Hengwrt. This allowed Lloyd to refer to herself as a landed proprietor when signing petitions supporting women's suffrage, and gave her some local political rights, such as the ability to appoint a vicar. They are buried together in the churchyard at Llanelltyd, Wales.
Together from 1861 to 1896: 35 years.
Frances Power Cobbe (December 4, 1822 – April 5, 1904)
Mary Charlotte Lloyd (January 23, 1819 – 1896)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Rhagatt Hall is located in a landscaped park on the north side of the B5437, 1km. approx. west of Carrog.
Address: Rhagatt, Corwen, Denbighshire, LL21 9HY, UK (52.98415, -3.34396)
Type: Private Property
Cadw Building ID: 15562 (Grade II, 1995)
Place
The existence of an estate at Rhagatt can be documented from the late XIV century. The house was described as “old” in 1803, and the rear wing of the present house may incorporate parts of a down-hill sited building of possible XVII century date. However the main block is largely of 1819-20, when an earlier building was extended and remodelled for Edward Lloyd, whose family had acquired the estate in 1804. The external detail of the rear wing is also largely early XIX century or later. The interior of the house was again restored and substantially remodelled ca. 1970. Rhagatt Hall has roughly coursed and squared stone to entrance and garden fronts, rougher rubble to rear west elevation; slate roofs. 2 storeyed. Entrance front faces east and is a 3 window range with advanced pedimented central bay. Entrance with recessed doorway renewed ca. 1970 (formerly with columns in antis.) Flanking 12-pane sash windows, with 9-pane sashes to first floor and above the entrance. Right hand windows appear to be inserted, and the scars of earlier openings are visible alongside them. Similar scars to left of entrance may indicate the blockings of windows which were themselves later insertions. A length of wall perpendicular to the building line divides the main part of the house from the service wing, which has 2 x12-pane sash windows to first floor, inserted openings below. Garden front has twin full height bows, the boldly overhanging eaves of the hipped roof carried straight across them. Each has a floor length 12-pane sash window to ground floor, and a 6-pane sash above. Long rear west elevation has 2 long casement windows to lower right, with 6-pane sash windows above; a stair window (reduced in length) and a blocked doorway (apparently cut by the present stairs) in the angle with a projecting full-height bow. Paired long casement windows (inserted) in the bow, and further inserted openings in the 2-window range beyond. Cross wing to left may be of early origin, but was remodelled ca. 1970. Rhagatt is of historical interest as a small country house, the seat of an old-established estate. The early XIX century re-working of older buildings on the site is a distinctive exercise in simple Neo-Classical villa-architecture.
Life
Who: Mary Charlotte Lloyd (January 23, 1819 – 1896)
Rhagatt Hall is the family home of Mary Lloyd, daughter of Edward Lloyd, who later became the life companion of Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904.)



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904), feminist writer, lived with Mary Lloyd at 26 Hereford Square, SW7 from 1862 to 1884.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1858 Mary Lloyd inherited a share in the Welsh landed estate of Hengwrt. This allowed Lloyd to refer to herself as a landed proprietor when signing petitions supporting women’s suffrage, and also gave her some local political rights, such as the ability to appoint a vicar.
Addresses:
Tan Llan, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2ST, UK (52.75838, -3.90129) [Cadw Building ID: 16146 (Grade II, 1995)]
Tyn-y-Celyn, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2TA, UK (52.75788, -3.90737) [Cadw Building ID: 5239 (Grade II, 1991)]
Place
Llanelltyd is a small village and community in Gwynedd, to the north of Dolgellau. The Community population taken at the 2011 Census was 514. It is home to the XII century Cymer Abbey, a grade I listed building. St Illtyd’s church, one of the oldest parish churches in Wales, is a grade II listed building. A late Medieval church retaining much of its historic character and with the special interest of its XVIII century vernacular porch and fenestration. Hengwrt, Llanelltyd (near Dolgellau) was the home of Robert Vaughan (1592-1667.) He was the eminent Welsh antiquary and collector of manuscripts (later known as the Hengwrt-Peniarth Library.) A later Georgian Mansion was built on the site 1750-54. Mary Lloyd had a one-third share in the Welsh estate of Hengwrt by way of her sister Frances and her husband, Robert Williams Vaughan. They died childless; Vaughan willed a life interest in Hengwrt to his wife’s three unmarried sisters, Mary, Jane, and Harriet. This was rebuilt and remodelled in the XIX century. The house was destroyed by fire in 1962, but the three outbuildings, much remodeled, remain, and the site still has a clear view of the church of St Illtyd’s, where Cobbe and Lloyd are buried. Mary Lloyd and Frances Power Cobbe lived at Tan Llan, a house on the edge of Llanelltyd. Tan Llan is a mid-XVIII century house, said formerly to have been dated 1728. Long a dower house of the Nannau estate, it was altered and extended in the late XIX century. Located across the river from the idyllic little market town of Dolgellau, Llanelltyd was then “a scattering of some twenty cottages.” Lloyd was, in effect, its resident squire; the church living was in the gift of Hengwrt, which also owned much of the farmland. Tan Llan is situated at the eastern extremity of Llanelltyd village some 50m south east of the main road; sited against the gentle slope of the hill and accessed via a metalled drive leading east from the church lane. A L-shaped two-and-a-half-storey primary house with one-and-a-half-storey service range adjoining to the north east. Rubble construction with overlapping stone coping to gable parapets with moulded kneelers; tall end chimneys with moulded capping andweather-coursing. 3-window symmetrical main south east front with Victorian fenestration. Central entrance with part-glazed door behind large XX century conservatory; flanking storied, canted baywindows with plain sashes. Similar, smaller sash windows to thefirst-floor centre and the second floor, the latter contained within gabled rubble dormers; deep verges and plain bargeboards. XIX century single-storey extensions to the rear with modern windows and amodern upper door with bridge access to the banked garden behind. The connecting service range is set back and has 3 gabled dormersas before with large 6-pane Victorian sashes. Below, further 6-pane windows of differing size and an off-centre entrance to left with French doors; plain off-centre stack to right. Modern extension to the north east. Inside, a fine full-height original oak dog-leg stair with moulded rail and turned balusters, with similar gallery at the top; decorative tread-ends. The lower flight has lost its balusters. Four XVIII century 6-panel doors (raised and fielded) with simply moulded architraves to first floor; 4 similar doors of painted pine to the attic floor. Ground-floor living room left has fireplace made up of sections of small-field XVIII century oak panelling (raised and fielded as before.) A large earlier XVIII century vernacular house with Victorian alterations, retaining some good XVIII century internal detail. Group value with the coach house and stable block at Tan Llan. The census of 1891 found Cobbe and Lloyd living at Tyn-y-Celyn, Llanelltyd, with three servants. Dated 1773 Tyn-y-Celyn is formerly the home of Henry Griffiths, timber merchant. Early XIX century alterations and later XIX century cross-range. Tyn-y-Celyn is below the A 496 to west of the junction with the A 470; set back from the by-road that runs through the village; rubble boundary wall with ball finials to gated entry at left. Rubble revetment wall to hillside at rear. Symmetrical 3-window, 2 storey and attic front; rubble construction with slate roof, gable parapets and tall end chimneys with plain capping and weather-coursing. Distinctive central gable in the form of a pediment with 6-pane oculus, characteristic of the area; stone spout to right. Massive stone lintels to 16-pane sash windows ; continuous cills to first floor forming band beneath windows; the front formerly had a verandah. Inscribed slate date plaque to centre over modern 12-pane glazed door. The right gable has one attic casement and a small-pane window over a modern rubble porch. 1 window cross-range beyond with 4-pane casement windows and 12-pane and 9-pane sashes. Set in the slope at the left end is a lower XIX century cross-wing set at an angle to the original house; similar construction including boulder plinth to the rear. The range diminishes in height towards the rear, the left-hand windows therefore being stepped-up. Mostly 4-pane sashes to the first floor. The main entrance has been moved from the front to the right-hand side. The main ground-floor rooms retain Georgian detail including 6-panel doors and panelled shutters; the drawing room has architraves with bosses and the dining room has plainarched recesses. Original dog-leg stairs with swept-up hand rail, shaped tread-ends and turned balusters. Twin purlin pegged trusses. Listed as a late XVIII century regional house retaining much of its internal and external character.
Life
Who: Mary Charlotte Lloyd (January 23, 1819 – 1896)
Mary Lloyd was a Welsh sculptor who lived for decades with feminist Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904.) She was the 8th of 17 children born to Edward Lloyd of Rhagatt and his wife, Frances Maddocks. She may have lived for a time with a maiden aunt, Margaret Lloyd of Berth. Born about 1780, Margaret Lloyd was a friend of the Ladies of Llangollen (Llangollen is ten miles to the east of Rhagatt Hall, on the great road from London to Holyhead and Dublin.) Mary inherited several books inscribed “M. Lloyd. The gift of Lady Eleanor Butler and Miss Ponsonby” and also some letters written to her aunt Margaret by the poet Felicia Hemans, who until 1831 lived less than ten miles from Berth. Mary Lloyd studied and worked with French artist Rosa Bonheur. In 1853 she was working in the studio of Welsh sculptor John Gibson in Rome, along with American sculptor Harriet Hosmer. When Cobbe and Lloyd met in the winter of 1861-62, both were mature single women (Cobbe was 39, Lloyd was 43) who had some private income, lived alone, and were fond of animals. Mary Lloyd died in 1896. Responding to letters of condolence, Cobbe wrote that she had died “bravely resting on my arm & telling me we should not long be separated.” She was buried as they had planned in the Saint Illtud's churchyard, in a double plot that left room for Cobbe to rest beside her under the single headstone.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino, also known as Luisa Casati, was an Italian heiress, muse, and patroness of the arts in early 20th-century Europe known for her eccentricities.
Born: January 23, 1881, Milan
Died: June 1, 1957, Knightsbridge, London, United Kingdom
Lived: 32 Beaufort Gardens, SW3
Villa San Michele, Viale Axel Munthe, 34, 80071 Anacapri NA, Italy (40.5574, 14.225)
Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, Dorsoduro, 701-704, 30123 Venice, Italy (45.43082, 12.33153)
Buried: Brompton Cemetery, West Brompton, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, Greater London, England
Other name: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino

Luisa, Marquise Casati Stampa di Soncino was an eccentric Italian heiress, muse, and patroness of the arts in early 20th century Europe. As the concept of dandy was expanded to include women, the Marchesa Casati fitted the utmost female example by saying: "I want to be a living work of art". From 1919-1920 she lived at Villa San Michele in Capri, the tenant of the unwilling Axel Munthe. British author Compton Mackenzie in his diaries described her time on the Italian island, tolerant home to a wide collection of artists, gay men, and lesbians in exile. Her numerous portraits were painted and sculpted by artists as various as Giovanni Boldini, Paolo Troubetzkoy, Romaine Brooks (with whom she had an affair), Kees van Dongen, and Man Ray. By 1930, Casati had amassed a personal debt of $25 million. Unable to satisfy her creditors, her personal possessions were auctioned off. Rumor has it that among the bidders was Coco Chanel. She died in poverty on June 1, 1957, aged 76, and is buried under a small urn at Brompton Cemetery, London, England.
Luisa Adele Rosa Maria Von Amman (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
Beatrice Romaine Goddard aka Romaine Brooks (May 1, 1874 – Dec. 7, 1970)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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From 1919 to 1920 Luisa Casati lived at Villa San Michele in Capri, the tenant of the unwilling Axel Munthe.
Address: Viale Axel Munthe, 34, 80071 Anacapri NA, Italy (40.5574, 14.225)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +39 081 837 1401
Place
Built around the turn of the XX century
The Villa San Michele was built on the Isle of Capri, Italy, by the Swedish physician and author Axel Munthe. The villa’s gardens have panoramic views of the town of Capri and its harbour, the Sorrentine Peninsula, and Mount Vesuvius. The villa sits on a ledge at the top of the Phoenician Steps, between Anacapri and Capri, at a height of 327 meters above sea level. San Michele’s gardens are adorned with many relics and works of art dating from ancient Egypt and other periods of classical antiquity. They now form part of the Grandi Giardini Italiani. The story of the villa is recorded by Axel Munthe in his book “The Story of San Michele,” first published in 1929 and reprinted many times since then. Between 1919 and 1920, Munthe was an unwilling landlord to the outrageous socialite and muse Luisa Casati, who took possession of Villa San Michele.
Life
Who: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
Luisa Casati’s time on the Italian island, tolerant home to a wide collection of artists, gay men, and lesbians in exile, was described by British author Compton Mackenzie in his diaries. Her numerous portraits were painted and sculpted by artists as various as Giovanni Boldini, Paolo Troubetzkoy, Romaine Brooks (with whom she had an affair), Kees van Dongen, and Man Ray; many of them she paid for, as a wish to "commission her own immortality.” She was muse to Italian Futurists such as F. T. Marinetti, Fortunato Depero, and Umberto Boccioni. Augustus John’s portrait of her is one of the most popular paintings at the Art Gallery of Ontario; Jack Kerouac wrote poems about it and Robert Fulford was impressed by it as a schoolboy.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In 1910, Luisa Casati took up residence at the Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, on Grand Canal in Venice (now the home of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection.)
Address: Dorsoduro, 701-704, 30123 Venice, Italy (45.43082, 12.33153)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Wednesday through Monday 10.00-18.00
Phone: +39 041 240 5411
Place
Built in the XVIII century, Design by Lorenzo Boschetti (active 1709-1772)
The building was unfinished, and has an unusually low elevation on the Grand Canal. The museum’s website describes it thus: “Palazzo Venier dei Leoni’s long low façade, made of Istrian stone and set off against the trees in the garden behind that soften its lines, forms a welcome "caesura" in the stately march of Grand Canal palaces from the Accademia to the Salute.” The palace was also Peggy Guggenheim’s home for thirty years. In 1951, the palace, its garden, now called the Nasher Sculpture Garden, and her art collection were opened to the public from April to October for viewing. Her collection at the palace remained open during the summers until her death in Camposampiero, northern Italy, in 1979; she had donated the palace and the 300-piece collection to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in 1976. The foundation, then under the direction of Peter Lawson-Johnston, took control of the palace and the collection in 1979 and re-opened the collection there in April 1980 as the Peggy Guggenheim Collection. After the Foundation took control of the building, it took steps to expand gallery space; by 1985, "all of the rooms on the main floor had been converted into galleries ... the white Istrian stone facade and the unique canal terrace had been restored" and a protruding arcade wing, called the barchessa, had been rebuilt by architect Giorgio Bellavitis. Since 1985, the museum has been open year-round. In 1993, apartments adjacent to the museum were converted to a garden annex, a shop and more galleries. In 1995, the Nasher Sculpture Garden was completed, additional exhibition rooms were added, and a café was opened. A few years later, in 1999 and in 2000, the two neighboring properties were acquired. In 2003, a new entrance and booking office opened to cope with the increasing number of visitors, which reached 350,000 in 2007. Since 1993, the museum has doubled in size, from 2,000 to 4,000 square meters. Since 1985, the United States has selected the foundation to operate the U.S. Pavilion of the Venice Biennale, an exhibition held every other summer. In 1986, the foundation purchased the Palladian-style pavilion, built in 1930.
Life
Who: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
Luisa Casati was an Italian heiress, muse, and patroness of the arts in early XX century Europe known for her eccentricities. As the concept of dandy was expanded to include women, the Marchesa Casati fitted the utmost female example by saying: "I want to be a living work of art.” In 1900, she married Camillo, Marchese Casati Stampa di Soncino (1877-1946.) The couple’s only child, Cristina Casati Stampa di Soncino, was born the following year. The Casatis maintained separate residences for the duration of their marriage. They were legally separated in 1914. They remained married until Marchese Casati’s death in 1946. She captivated artists and literary figures such as Robert de Montesquiou, Romain de Tirtoff (Erté), Jean Cocteau, and Cecil Beaton. She had a long term affair with the author Gabriele d’Annunzio, who is said to have based on her the character of Isabella Inghirami in “Forse che si forse che no” (Maybe yes, maybe no) (1910.) Her soirées at Palazzo Venier dei Leoni would become legendary. Casati collected a menagerie of exotic animals, and patronized fashion designers such as Fortuny and Poiret.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Consecrated by the Bishop of London in June 1840, Brompton Cemetery is one of Britain’s oldest and most distinguished garden cemeteries.
Address: Fulham Rd, London SW10 9UG, UK (51.48529, -0.19114)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-16.00, Sunday 9.00-20.00
Phone: +44 20 7352 1201
English Heritage Building ID: 203792 (Grade II, 1969)
Place
Brompton Cemetery is located near Earl’s Court in west London (postal districts SW5 and SW10), in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. It is managed by The Royal Parks, and is one of the Magnificent Seven cemeteries. Established by Act of Parliament, it opened in 1840 and was originally known as the West of London and Westminster Cemetery. Some 35,000 monuments, from simple headstones to substantial mausolea, mark the resting place of more than 205,000 burials. The site includes large plots for family mausolea, and common graves where coffins are piled deep into the earth, as well as a small columbarium. Brompton was closed to burials between 1952 and 1996, but is once again a working cemetery, with plots for interments and a “Garden of Remembrance” for the deposit of cremated remains. The cemetery has a reputation for being a popular cruising ground for gay men.
Notable queer burials at Brompton Cemetery:
• Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino, infamous Italian quaintrelle, muse, eccentric and patron of the arts. The quote "Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale her infinite variety," from Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, was inscribed on her tombstone.
• Geraldine Jewsbury (1812-1880), writer.
• Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928), leading suffragette.
• Ernest Thesiger (1879-1961), character actor, “The Old Dark House” and “Bride of Frankenstein.”
Life
Who: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
By 1930, Luisa Casati had amassed a personal debt of $25 million. Unable to pay her creditors, her personal possessions were auctioned off. Designer Coco Chanel was reportedly one of the bidders. Luisa Casati fled to London where she lived in comparative poverty in a one-room flat. She was rumoured to be seen rummaging in bins searching for feathers to decorate her hair. On June 1, 1957, Marchesa Casati died of a stroke at her last residence at 32 Beaufort Gardens, SW3 aged 76. Following a requiem mass at Brompton Oratory, the Marchesa was interred in Brompton Cemetery. She was buried wearing her black and leopard skin finery and a pair of false eyelashes. She was also interred with one of her beloved stuffed pekinese dogs. Her tombstone is a small grave marker in the shape of an urn draped in cloth with a swag of flowers to the front. The inscription on the tombstone misspells her "Louisa" rather than "Luisa.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
B. Michael Hunter was an educator, cultural activist and journal editor of Sojourner: Black Gay Voices in the age of AIDS. "It's through the community that we met. I first met him at a meeting of the Lesbian & Gay People of Color Steering Committee. I noticed Bert, one of the handsomest men I had ever seen, who was really quite and cautious - the opposite of me. He was a writer and refreshingly not a graduate of an Ivy League school, like my ex-lover. I was happy to learn that he did not grow up with money and, like me, received financial aid to get through mostly all-white schools. I felt safe with him from the beginning, and not ashamed of unpacking whatever personal baggage I may have brought with me. I wondered about Bert being Black, having experienced too many Black people telling me that I wasn't oppressed enough." --Johnny “My previous experience with men who attended Ivy League school also left me a little cold - they seem to never be satisfied with things. John was very different - he is one of the few men I trust." Bert. Hunter died of AIDS in 2001. John Albert Santos Manzon married his new partner, Michael Leo Branca, in 2012. They are looking to adopt.
Together from 1990 to 2001: 11 years.
Bertram Michael Hunter (April 15, 1958 - January 23, 2001)



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Anne Whitney was an American sculptor and poet.
Born: September 2, 1821, Watertown, Massachusetts, United States
Died: January 23, 1915, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Lived: John Hunt House, Water Street, Watertown
Whitney Farm, 476 North Rd, Shelburne, NH 03581
92 Mount Vernon Street, Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (42.35779, -71.06874)
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA, Plot: Lot 709, Thistle Path
Buried alongside: Abby Adeline Manning
Books: Poems, by Anne Whitney.
Known for: Sculpture, Poetry

Anne Whitney was an American sculptor and poet. A well-known supporter of both the abolitionist and suffragist movements, Whitney herself was to publicly feel the brunt of the sexism of the day when, in 1875, the commission for a statue of Charles Sumner that won a competition was denied her when it was discovered that a woman created the winning model. She also sculpted members of her family and the painter Abby Adeline Manning, with whom Whitney is said to have had a "Boston marriage." Manning's work has since fallen into obscurity. She and Anne Whitney perhaps met around 1862 when Anne was studying with the renowned William Rimmer. Between 1867 and 1876, she and Anne visited Munich, Paris and Rome. In 1878, Adeline and Anne were living and working in their new studio at 92 Mt. Vernon in Boston. In 1888, Anne purchased 225 acres in Shelburne, New Hampshire, and her and Adeline spent their summers on the farm. Some have written of Adeline that she was gentle as a moonbeam, yet firm as a rock and was Anne's other self and second conscience. They buried her and Anne's ashes next to each other under the same headstone in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Together from 1862 to 1906: 44 years.
Abby Adeline Manning (June 1836 - May 21, 1906)
Anne Whitney (September 2, 1821 – January 23, 1915)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The Town of Watertown is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. It is part of the Greater Boston area. The population was 31,915 at the 2010 census.
Address: Watertown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA (42.37092, -71.18283)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Watertown Arsenal Historic District (Arsenal St.), 99000498, 1999
Place
Watertown is one of fourteen Massachusetts municipalities that have applied for, and been granted, city forms of government but wish to retain "The town of” in their official names. Watertown is made up of six neighborhoods: Bemis, Brigham (Brigham Historic District), Coolidge Square, East Watertown, Watertown Square and the West End. Archeological evidence suggests that Watertown was inhabited for thousands of years before the arrival of settlers from England. Two tribes of Massachusett people, the Pequossette and the Nonantum, had settlements on the banks of the river later called the Charles. The Pequossette built a fishing weir to trap herring at the site of the current Watertown Dam. The annual fish migration, as both alewife and blueback herring swim upstream from their adult home in the sea to spawn in the fresh water where they were hatched, still occurs every spring. Watertown, first known as Saltonstall Plantation, was one of the earliest of the Massachusetts Bay settlements. It was begun early in 1630 by a group of settlers led by Sir Richard Saltonstall and the Rev. George Phillips and officially incorporated that same year. The alternate spelling "Waterton" is seen in some early documents. The first buildings were upon land now included within the limits of Cambridge known as Gerry’s Landing. For its first quarter century Watertown ranked next to Boston in population and area. Since then its limits have been greatly reduced. Thrice portions have been added to Cambridge, and it has contributed territory to form the new towns of Weston (1712), Waltham (1738), Lincoln (1754) and Belmont (1859.) In 1632 the residents of Watertown protested against being compelled to pay a tax for the erection of a stockade fort at Cambridge; this was the first protest in America against taxation without representation and led to the establishment of representative government in the colony. As early as the close of the XVII century Watertown was the chief horse and cattle market in New England and was known for its fertile gardens and fine estates. Here about 1632 was erected the first grist mill in the colony, and in 1662 one of the first woolen mills in America was built here. Boston town meetings were held here during the siege of Boston, when many Boston families made their homes in the neighborhood. For several months early in the American Revolution the Committees of Safety and Correspondence made Watertown their headquarters and it was from here that General Joseph Warren set out for Bunker Hill. From 1832 to 1834 Theodore Parker conducted a private school here and his name is still preserved in the Parker School, though the building no longer operates as a public school. The Edmund Fowle House is a historic house and local history museum at 28 Marshall Street in Watertown, Massachusetts. Built in 1722, it is the second oldest surviving house in Watertown (after the Browne House, built c. 1698.) Watertown was the seat of Massachusetts government during the British occupation of Boston in the American Revolution. The committees of the 2nd and 3rd Provincial Congress met in this house from Apr. 22 to 19 July, 1775, and the Executive Committee met here from 19 July, 1775, to September 18, 1776. The house was built by Edmund Fowle (1747-1821) and originally located on Mount Auburn St., then called Mill St. In 1776 the Treaty of Watertown, the first treaty signed between the newly formed United States of America and a foreign power, the St. John’s and Mi’kmaq First Nations of Nova Scotia, was signed in this house. Sturgis and Brigham Architects (Charles Brigham and John Hubbard Sturgis) purchased the house in 1871, moved it to its present Marshall St. address and converted it into a two family residence. The Historical Society of Watertown purchased the house in 1922. The Historical Society was awarded $500,000 in 2004 and another $200,000 in 2006 by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the restoration of the Edmund Fowle House. The grand re-opening of the house took place in May, 2008. The Abraham Browne House (built circa 1694-1701) is a colonial house located at 562 Main Street. It is now a nonprofit museum operated by Historic New England and open to the public two afternoons per year. The house was originally a modest one-over-one dwelling, probably with a minor dependency to one side. It has grown by a series of enlargements but they occurred behind the original block, thus preserving the profile of the one-over-one elevation. (The exception, a XIX century addition, was removed before 1919.) The Browne House is one of fewer than a half-dozen houses in New England to retain this profile. By 1919 the house was nearly ruined when it was acquired by William Sumner Appleton, who in 1923 donated it to the nonprofit organization now known as Historic New England. It was then painstakingly restored in the first fully documented restoration in America. The Abraham Browne house was featured on PBS’s “This Old House” television program while they were in Watertown for a restoration project during their 20th anniversary season. The Watertown Arsenal operated continuously as a military munitions and research facility from 1816 until 1995, when the Army sold the property, by then known as the Army Materials Technology Laboratory, to the town of Watertown. The Arsenal is notable for being the site of a 1911 strike prompted by the management methods of operations research pioneer Frederick Winslow Taylor. Taylor’s method, which he dubbed "Scientific Management," broke tasks down into smaller components. Workers no longer completed whole items; instead, they were timed using stopwatches as they did small tasks repetitively, as Taylor attempted to find the balance of tasks that resulted in the maximum output from workers. The strike and its causes were controversial enough that they resulted in Congressional hearings in 1911; Congress passed a law in 1915 banning the method in government owned arsenals. Taylor’s methods spread widely, influencing such industrialists as Henry Ford, and the idea is one of the underlying inspirations of the factory (assembly) line industrial method. The Watertown Arsenal was the site of a major superfund clean-up in the 1990s, and has now become a center for shopping, dining and the arts, with the opening of several restaurants and a new theatre. The site includes the Arsenal Center for the Arts, a regional arts center that opened in 2005. The Arsenal is now owned by athenahealth. Arsenal Street features two shopping malls across the street from one another, with the Watertown Mall on one side, and The Arsenal Project of Watertown (formerly the Arsenal Mall) on the other. The Perkins School for the Blind, founded in 1829, has been located in Watertown since 1912. The Stanley Brothers built the first of their steam-powered cars, which came to be known as Stanley Steamers, in Watertown in 1897. In 1988, Watertown Square became the new location for the Armenian Library and Museum of America, said to host the largest collection of Armenian artifacts in North America. The Birthplace of Harriet Hosmer, Riverside Street, is currently the location of the Riverside Condominiums. Dr. Hiram Hosmer was born in 1798 in Walpole, NH. Helped his father on the farm and learned the trade of cabinet maker. He received his degree from Harvard in 1824. He married Sarah Watson Grant of Walpole, NH in 1827. Of his four children only the youngest, Harriet Hosmer survived. The John Hunt House is Anne Whitney’s birthplace. The house was built by James Barton in 1715. It was sold to John Hunt in 1745. Joseph Warren boarded (in the southwestern corner on the first floor) here during the session of the Provincial Congress in 1775. He left afterward to ride to Bunker Hill, 17 June, 1775. It was later owned by Nathaniel Whitney, Jr. and in it was born Anne Whitney, September 2, 1821. It was bought from Nathaniel Whitney, Jr. by Luke Robinson, who lived here the rest of his life. The house was demolished 8 May, 1935. It was later sold to Mr. F.E. Howard who moved it to Water Street and had tenants "of a lower class.”
Life
Who: Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895), Harriet Hosmer (1830-1908) and Anne Whitney (1821-1915)
Leverett Saltonstall travelled with Charles William Dabney, Jr., his Harvard classmate, after graduation and generally had a difficult time settling down; it was said that his mother forced him, against his will, to marry. He is buried at Harmony Grove Cemetery (30 Grove St, Salem, MA 01970). Both Harriet Hosmer, a neoclassical sculptor, considered the most distinguished female sculptor in America during the XIX century, and Anne Whitney, a sculptor and poet, where from Watertown. Nathaniel Hawthorne described in his novel “The Marble Faun,” the group of American women artists living in Rome, causing Henry James to dismiss them as "The White Marmorean Flock.” They were: Harriet Hosmer, Anne Whitney, Emma Stebbins, Edmonia Lewis, Louisa Lander, Margaret Foley, Florence Freeman, and Vinnie Ream. While living in Rome, Hosmer associated with a colony of artists and writers that included Nathaniel Hawthorne, Bertel Thorvaldsen, William Makepeace Thackeray, and the two female Georges, Eliot and Sand. When in Florence, she was frequently the guest of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning at Casa Guidi.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Beacon Hill is a historic neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the population of Boston’s Beacon Hill neighborhood is 9,023.
Address: Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (42.35779, -71.06874)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Beacon Hill Historic District (Bounded by Beacon St., the Charles River Embankment, and Pinckney, Revere, and Hancock Sts.), 66000130, 1966
Place
The window on the top 92 Mount Vernon Street marked the studio for two decades of sculptor Anne Whitney, who was part of a group of American women sculptors gathering around actress Charlotte Cushman in Rome in the mid-XIX century. In 1878, Addy Manning and Anne were living and working in their new studio in Boston. In 1888, Anne purchased 225 acres in Shelbourne (476 North Rd, Shelburne, NH 03581), and Adeline and her spent theirs summer on the farm. Although the home of Annie Adams Fields and her husband, publisher James T. Fields, at 148 Charles Street, does not survive, it was the site of their important literary salon. Prescott Townsend was a significant figure in local GLBT civil rights history. Toward the end of his life, his two remaining properties on the Hill were on its North Slope, traditionally the side where servants of patrician South Slope residents lived. He accommodated a motley collection of tenants, mostly young gay men, in an eight-unit building at 75 Phillips Street; Prescott himself inhabited an old brick townhouse at the end of Lindall Place, a cul-de-sac that terminated just behind the Philips Street apartments. A subterranean corridor lined with cubicles connected the basements of the two buildings. The tunnel was said to have housed runaway slaves in transit on the Underground Railway prior to the Civil War. The Drawing-Room at 148 Charles Street with Miss Jewett and Mrs. Fields, from a photograph lent by Mr. M. A. DeW. Howe, in Sarah Orne Jewett, by Francis Otto Matthiessen, 1929
Life
Who: Anne Whitney (September 2, 1821 – January 23, 1915), Annie Adams Fields (June 6, 1834 – January 5, 1915) and Prescott Townsend (June 24, 1894 – May 23, 1973)
Anne Whitney had a “Boston marriage” with her longtime partner Adeline “Addy” Manning (1836-1906.) During the late Victorian era, such marriages between women, generally professional and upper class, were both common and accepted by society at large. After the death of James T. Fields in 1881, his wife Annie Fields continued to support the work of many women writers, including Sarah Orne Jewett (1849-1909), who spent winters with her, poet Louise Imogen Guiney (1861-1920), and Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-96.) Fields was also active in charitable works. She spent many hours at the Charity House on Chardon Street and cofounded the Cooperative Society of Visitors, a case review agency that made recommendations to the central administration of Boston’s relief organizations for aid disbursement. The Society was absorbed into the Associated Charities of Boston. Fields’s book “How to Help the Poor” (1884) served as an unofficial guide to the programs and policies of Associated Charities. Prescott Townsend was an American cultural leader and gay rights activist, from the 1930s through the early 1970s. He was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, the fourth child (third son) of Kate Wendell and Edward Britton Townsend; his mother was both a descendant of Myles Standish and other Mayflower passengers, and the great-granddaughter of the American founding father Roger Sherman. He attended the Volkman School, graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year. He spent the summer of 1914 in logging camps in Montana and Idaho, and traveled to North Africa and the Soviet Union. He returned to Boston's Beacon Hill neighborhood, where he began a relationship with theater producer Elliot Paul, with whom he founded the experimental Barn Theatre in 1922. Paul introduced Townsend to numerous avant-garde creatives, including openly-gay writer André Gide. Townsend operated speakeasies, restaurants, and theaters, cultivating a bohemian neighborhood on Beacon Hill's Joy Street. He pioneered the popularity of A-frame houses, building several in Provincetown. He was later a founder of the Provincetown Playhouse, where the works of Eugene O'Neill were first performed. In the 1930s, Townsend repeatedly addressed the Massachusetts legislature as an acknowledged homosexual man advocating for the repeal of sodomy legislation, urging the lawmakers "to legalize love." He was indulged due to his Boston Brahmin status, but ignored. While working at the Fall River shipyard during WWII, Townsend was arrested on Jan. 29, 1943 for participating in an "unnatural and lascivious act". The Mid-Town Journal headline reported, "Beacon Hill 'Twilight' Man Member of Queer Love Cult Seduced Young Man". He didn't deny it, and was sentenced to eighteen months in the Massachusetts House of Corrections on Deer Island. No one in his influential family applied any pressure to shorten his jail time. A month later he was officially stricken from both the New York and Boston Social Registers. Townsend had, for years, been suffering from failing health brought on by Parkinson's Disease, and on May 23, 1973 his body was found in the Beacon Hill apartment of John Murray who had been caring for him during the final years of his life. The police reported that "when we came in to take charge of the body, Mr. Townsend was found in a kneeling prayer position at his bedside." Of his entire family, only one sister, a nephew and a great-nephew attended his memorial service at the Arlington Street Church.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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A small, dynamic figure, with flashing brown eyes and, in later life, white hair worn short, Anne Whitney (September 2, 1821 – January 23, 1915) was a thorough Bostonian by breeding and inclination. Wholly free of sentimentality in the age of its abundance, she was known for her satiric wit. She supported movements for abolition and woman's rights, the education of the Afro-American people and the blind, and forest conservation. From an early age she had vacationed in the White Mountains in New Hampshire, and in 1882 she purchased a rams at Shelburne (476 North Rd, Shelburne, NH 03581), where for thirty years she spent her summers, taking long walks, managing the farm, and reading poetry aloud on the veranda of the house overlooking Mounts Washington, Madison, and Adams. Here, as in Boston and abroad, her constant companion was Abby Adeline Manning of Brooklyn, an amateur painter who from 1880 had devoted her life to her older, more talented friend. Mrs Hugh S. Hince is the great-grandniece of Anne Whitney’s mother and the present owner of Whitney Farm.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston.
Address: 580 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37479, -71.14449)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +1 617-547-7105
National Register of Historic Places: 75000254, 1975. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, Mount Auburn Cemetery marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery,” derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. It is Watertown’s largest contiguous open space and extends into Cambridge to the east, adjacent to the Cambridge City Cemetery and Sand Banks Cemetery.
Notable queer burials are at Mount Auburn Cemetery:
• Roger Brown (1925–1997), professor at Harvard University from 1952 until 1957 and from 1962 until 1994, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1957 until 1962. During his time at the University of Michigan, he met Albert Gilman (died 1989), later a Shakespeare scholar and a professor of English at Boston University. Gilman and Brown were partners for over 40 years until Gilman's death from lung cancer in 1989. Brown's sexual orientation and his relationship with Gilman were known to a few of his closest friends, and he served on the editorial board of The Journal of Homosexuality from 1985, but he did not come out publicly until 1989. Brown chronicled his personal life with Gilman and after Gilman's death in his memoir. Brown died in 1997, and is buried next to Gilman.
• Katharine Ellis Coman (1857-1915), author on economic subjects who lived with Katharine Lee Bates (Author of "America the Beautiful"), and died at her home, was cremated at Mount Auburn Cemetery but was buried with her parents at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
• Abby Adeline Manning (1836-1906), painter, and her partner, Anne Whitney (1821-1915), poet and sculptor, together.
• Amy Lowell (1874–1925), poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
• Annie Adams Fields (1834–1915), author and hostess; wife of James Thomas Fields, later companion to Sarah Orne Jewett.
• Charlotte Cushman (July 23, 1816 – February 18, 1876), actress, her last partner was lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins, who sculpted Angels of the Water on Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, New York City.
• Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924) was a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. She founded the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.
• Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908), sculptor. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton (died 1864). Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie. Hosmer was good friend with Charlotte Cushman and Matilda Hays, Cushman’s partner, left Charlotte for her.
• Alice James (1848-1892) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American diarist. The only daughter of Henry James, Sr. and sister of psychologist and philosopher William James and novelist Henry James, she is known mainly for the posthumously published diary that she kept in her final years. Her companion was Katherine Peabody Loring and from their relationship it was conied the term “Boston Marriage”.
• Henry James (1843-1916) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of XIX century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
• Stewart Mitchell (November 25, 1892–November 3, 1957) was an American poet, editor, and professor of English literature. Along with Gilbert Seldes, Mitchell’s editorship of The Dial magazine signaled a pivotal shift in content from political articles to aesthetics in art and literature. In 1929 he became the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Richard Cowan (1909-October 24, 1939)’s diary, which he started while he was a student at Cornell, chronicles the life of a young gay man in Boston in the 1930s. Cowan committed suicide at the age of thirty. His forty-seven-year old mentor and long-term lover, Stewart Mitchell, was devastated. Mitchell resigned as president of the Massachusetts Historical Society on account of a “personal misfortune,” and wrote a friend, “There is no running away from a broken heart.” According to the Boston Herald Nov. 9, 1957: “Mitchell directed that the urn containing his mortal remains be buried, “but not in winter,” in the lot “where my dear friends Georgine Holmes Thomas and Richard David Cowan now repose”.”
• Francis Williams Sargent (1848 - 1920) and Jane Welles Hunnewell Sargent (1851 - 1936), Margarett Williams Sargent’s parents. Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) was born into the privileged world of old Boston money; she was a distant relative of John Singer Sargent.
• Henry Davis Sleeper (1878-1934), a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator, who had a long lasting friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, an economist, an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, the founder and director of the American Ambulance Field Service during WWI, and a United States Representative from Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein was a Soviet film director and film theorist, a pioneer in the theory and practice of montage.
Born: January 22, 1898, Riga, Latvia
Died: February 11, 1948, Moscow, Russia
Buried: Novodevichy Cemetery, Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia, Plot: Section 4, Row 37, Grave 8
Spouse: Pera Atasheva (m. 1934–1948)
Books: Film form, The Film Sense, The Eisenstein Reader, more
Parents: Julia Eisenstein, Mikhail Eisenstein

Sergei Alexandrovich Yesenin (1895–1925) was a Russian lyric poet. He was one of the most popular and well-known Russian poets of the XX century. He was buried December 31, 1925, in Moscow's Vagankovskoye Cemetery (ul. Sergeya Makeeva, 15, Moskva, Russia, 123100). His grave is marked by a white marble sculpture. The Moscow Art Theatre (or MAT) is a theatre company in Moscow (Kamergerskiy pereulok, 3, Moskva, Russia, 124365). It was founded in 1898 by the seminal Russian theatre practitioner Konstantin Stanislavski, together with the playwright and director Vladimir Nemirovich-Danchenko. It was conceived as a venue for naturalistic theatre, in contrast to the melodramas that were Russia's dominant form of theatre at the time. As a teenager Alla Nazimova (1879-1945) began to pursue an interest in the theatre and took acting lessons at the Academy of Acting in Moscow. She joined Konstantin Stanislavski's Moscow Art Theatre using the name of Alla Nazimova for the first time. Sergei Eisenstein (1898–1948) was a Soviet film director and film theorist, a pioneer in the theory and practice of montage. Eisenstein is a 2000 movie by Renny Bartlett, "a series of loosely connected (and unevenly acted) theatrical sketches whose central theme is the director's shifting relationship with the Soviet government" focusing on "Eisenstein the political animal, gay man, Jewish target and artistic rebel". Eisenstein is buried at Novodevichy Cemetery (Luzhnetsky proezd, 2, Moskva, Russia, 119048), Plot: Section 4, Row 37, Grave 8.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Nadejda Mikhailovna Mountbatten, Marchioness of Milford Haven was the second daughter of Grand Duke Michael Mikhailovich of Russia and his morganatic wife Countess Sophie von Merenberg. She was a younger sister of Countess Anastasia de Torby.
Born: March 28, 1896, London, United Kingdom
Died: January 22, 1963, Cannes, France
Buried: St Michael with Braywood, High Street, Bray, Windsor and Maidenhead, SL6 2AB
Spouse: George Mountbatten, 2nd Marquess of Milford Haven (m. 1916)
House: House of Romanov
Children: David Mountbatten, 3rd Marquess of Milford Haven, Lady Tatiana Elizabeth Mountbatten
Parents: Grand Duke Michael Mikhailovich of Russia, Sophie of Merenberg

Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt was a Swiss-born American socialite. Her identical twin sister, Thelma Morgan (1904–1970), became a mistress of Edward, Prince of Wales and married James Vail Converse and Marmaduke Furness, 1st Viscount Furness. Known as "The Magnificent Morgans", Gloria and Thelma were popular society fixtures, even as teenagers. On March 6, 1923, in New York City, at the townhouse of friends, Gloria Morgan became the second wife of Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt, age 42, an heir to the Vanderbilt railroad fortune. At the death of his husband in 1934, a custody battle for their only child, Gloria, erupted and made national headlines. As a result of a great deal of hearsay evidence admitted at trial, the scandalous allegations of Vanderbilt's lifestyle—including a purported lesbian relationship with Nadezhda de Torby, the Marchioness of Milford Haven—led to a new standard in tabloid newspaper sensationalism. A former maid of Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt offered testimony regarding a possible lesbian relationship between Lady Milford Haven and her former employer. Lady Milford Haven also appeared as a witness at the trial. Before leaving for the United States to testify, Lady Milford Haven publicly denounced the maid's testimony as "a set of malicious, terrible lies".
Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt (August 23, 1904 – February 13, 1965)
Nadejda Mikhailovna Mountbatten, Marchioness of Milford Haven (March 28, 1896 – January 22, 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Nadejda Mountbatten, Marchioness of Milford Haven (March 28, 1896 –January 22, 1963) is buried at St Michael with Braywood (High Street, Bray, Windsor and Maidenhead, SL6 2AB). During the 1934 Gloria Vanderbilt custody trial, a former maid of Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt's offered testimony regarding a possible lesbian relationship between Lady Milford Haven and her former employer. Lady Milford Haven also appeared as a witness at the trial. Before leaving for the United States to testify, Lady Milford Haven publicly denounced the maid's testimony as "a set of malicious, terrible lies". Nada and her sister-in-law, Edwina Mountbatten (wife of Lord Mountbatten), were extremely close friends and the two frequently went together on rather daring adventures, traveling rough in difficult and often dangerous parts of the world.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Marcus Samuel "Marc" Blitzstein, was an American composer, lyricist, and librettist. He won national attention in 1937 when his pro-union musical The Cradle Will Rock, directed by Orson Welles, was shut down by the Works Progress Administration.
Died: January 22, 1964, Fort-de-France, Martinique
Buried: Chelten Hills Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts, US & Canada
Movies: Too Much Johnson

Marc Blitzstein (1905–1964), was an American composer, lyricist, and librettist. He won national attention in 1937 when his pro-union musical “The Cradle Will Rock,” directed by Orson Welles, was shut down by the Works Progress Administration. Blitzstein was openly gay. His first lover was the conductor Alexander Smallens (1889-1972), with whom he traveled to Europe in 1924. Blitzstein nevertheless married novelist Eva Goldbeck on March 2, 1933. They had no children. He dedicated a number of works to his wife-to-be. She died of anorexia in 1936, and his grief prompted him to throw himself into the work of creating “The Cradle Will Rock.” He is buried at Chelten Hills Cemetery (1701 E Washington Ln, Philadelphia, PA 19138).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Buried: Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, Charleston County, South Carolina, USA

Magnolia Cemetery is a historic cemetery in Charleston, South Carolina. It was dedicated in 1850; Charles Fraser delivered the dedication address. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a Historic District in 1978. Notable queer burials at Magnolia Cemetery:
• Ned Jennings (1898-1929) was born in Washington, D.C., but moved to Charleston with his parents within a few weeks. His father would become postmaster of the city and an early developer of Folly Beach. Jennings attended Porter Military Academy and soon became one of the “boys” that Laura Bragg, director of the Charleston Museum, would mentor over the years. He went to Paris in 1927 and studied privately with the artists Mela Meuter and Walter Renee Fuerst, eventually returning to the city.
• Helen Gardner McCormack (1903-1974) was head of the Gibbes Art Gallery for years and years, and she was beloved aroung town. She was the second big lover of the other museum director, Laura Bragg, who was running the Gibbes’s rival, the Charleston Museum.
• Isabelle Bowen-Heyward (1870-1926) entered a romantic friendship with Laura Bragg that would last until her death. By February 1915 Bragg moved into Belle’s home at 7 Gibbes Street, where the rooms were filled with the Bowen and Heyward family silver and “people are always laughing,” or so she wrote her father. These letters home were filled with news off her new romantic partner: “Belle has made me one of the family and I am more comfortably situated than I have ever before been.” This emotional partnership with Belle provided Bragg with an entrée into a social circle well-connected to the powerful political and economic leaders of the community.
• Josephine Pinckney (1895-1957) was a novelist and poet in the literary revival of the American South after WWI. Her first best-selling novel was the social comedy, “Three O'clock Dinner” (1945). Josephine Pinckney was born in Charleston to Thomas Pinkney and Camilla Scott. She received the Southern Authors Award in 1946. As a poet, novelist, and essayist, Pinckney was an active participant in the Charleston Renaissance. In 1920, she co-founded the Poetry Society of South Carolina. She was involved in institutions such as the Charleston Museum and Dock Street Theatre and was an early proponent of the historic preservation of Charleston. She was an active member of the Society for the Preservation of Spirituals, which transcribed and annotated African American songs. Both organizations met for the first time at Pinckney's home at 21 King St. in Charleston.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, FRS, commonly known simply as Lord Byron, was an Anglo-Scottish poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement.
Born: January 22, 1788, Dover, United Kingdom
Died: April 19, 1824, Missolonghi, Greece
Education: Harrow School
Aberdeen Grammar School
University of Cambridge
Lived: Newstead Abbey, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG15 8GE, UK
Buried: Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA (memorial)
St Mary Magdalene, Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, NG15 7AS - By the Market Place in the centre of the town
Poems: Don Juan, She Walks in Beauty, more
Movies: Gothic, Don Juan DeMarco, Don Juan

Newstead Abbey (Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG15 8GE, UK) was formerly an Augustinian priory. Converted to a domestic home following the Dissolution of the Monasteries, it is now best known as the ancestral home of George Gordon, Lord Byron. The priory of St. Mary of Newstead, a house of Augustinian Canons, was founded by King Henry II of England about the year 1170, as one of many penances he paid following the murder of Thomas Becket. Contrary to its current name, Newstead was never an abbey: it was a priory. Sir John Byron of Colwick in Nottinghamshire was granted Newstead Abbey by Henry VIII of England on 26 May 1540 and started its conversion into a country house. By the time Lord Byron inherited the property, it was practically a ruin. He and his mother soon moved to Nottingham and neither lived permanently at Newstead for any extended period. Byron had a beloved Newfoundland dog named Boatswain, who died of rabies in 1808. Boatswain was buried at Newstead Abbey and has a monument larger than his master's at St Mary Magdalene (Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, NG15 7AS), by the Market Place in the centre of the town. Byron finally sold the property in 1818. The Abbey is now publicly owned, by Nottingham City Council, and houses a museum containing Byron memorabilia.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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George Balanchine was a choreographer. Styled as the father of American ballet, he co-founded the New York City Ballet and remained its Artistic Director for more than 35 years.
Born: January 22, 1904, Saint Petersburg, Russia
Died: April 30, 1983, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Saint Petersburg Conservatory
Lived: Weston, CT 06883, USA (41.22837, -73.38265)
Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor, Suffolk County, New York, USA, GPS (lat/lon): 40.99193, -72.29418
Spouse: Tanaquil Le Clercq (m. 1952–1969), more
Books: Complete stories of the great ballets, more
Movies: A Midsummer Night's Dream
Association: School of American Ballet

In the XVII century, Weston’s first English settlers were mostly farmers living in the town of Fairfield, Connecticut, the boundaries of which extended to Weston until the late XVIII century. The Norfield Parish was created in the area now occupied by the towns of Weston and Easton. In 1787, the area was formally incorporated as the Town of Weston. In 1845, the Town of Easton was split off from Weston.
Address: Weston, CT 06883, USA (41.22837, -73.38265)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: Kettle Creek Historic District (Roughly, Weston and Old Weston Rds. N of Broad St.), 95001348, 1995
Place
A meteor exploded above the town Dec. 14, 1807. Six pieces, totaling 28 pounds (13 kg), were recovered and examined by scientists, who issued a report. This was the first time that people realized the nature of meteors. Despite rocky soil, farmers in town grew apples, onions, and potatoes. Grist, cider, lumber, and fulling mills were built. The town had nine manufacturers by 1850, but two decades later only the Bradley Edge Tool Company still thrived. That factory burned down in 1911. Unlike other nearby towns, Weston never had a railroad built through it, which stifled the development of non-agricultural businesses. Between the Civil War and the Great Depression, the town’s population dropped from approximately 1,000 to a low of 670, by 1930. Artists, writers, and actors from New York became attracted to the community in the 1930s and began settling in it. Construction of the Merritt Parkway, which arrived to the south of Weston in 1938, resulted in further population growth.
Notable queer residents at Weston:
• George Balanchine (January 22 [O.S. January 9] 1904 – April 30, 1983), choreographer and influential figure in ballet, lived at 10 Ridge Road.
• Paul Cadmus (1904–1999), painter. Starting in 1975, Paul Cadmus produced one or two paintings a year, working out of a studio at his home in Weston, given to him by Lincoln Kirstein, who was married to Cadmus’s sister, Fidelma. Kirstein was general director of the New York City Ballet. Through Kirstein, Cadmus became friends with George Balanchine, who lived nearby in Weston, as well as with Alice De Lamar. Cadmus died just shy of 95 on Dec. 12, 1999, in Weston.
• In 1938 Alice De Lamar gave Pavel Tchelitchev (1898-1957) a studio on her property at Stonebrook. Here the artist became captivated by the rural landscape of New England.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale are buried together at Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor.
Address: 62-298 Suffolk St, Sag Harbor, NY 11963, USA (40.99239, -72.29374)
Type: Cemetery (open to publich)
National Register of Historic Places: Sag Harbor Village District (Roughly bounded by Sag Harbor, Rysam, Hamilton, Marsden, Main and Long Island Ave.), 73001274, 1973 & (Roughly bounded by Sag Harbor, Bay, Eastville, Grand, Joel'sLn., Middle Line Hwy., Main, Glover and Long Island), 94000400, 1994
Place
Oakland Cemetery is a public, not-for-profit cemetery located in the village Sag Harbor, New York. It was founded in 1840 and currently sits on 26 acres bounded by Jermain Ave to the north, Suffolk St to the east, and Joels Ln to the west. It is the permanent resting place of over 4,000 people, including more XVIII and XIX century sea captains than in any other Long Island cemetery. It was incorporated in 1884. Prior to the opening of Oakland Cemetery in 1840, Sag Harbor’s most notable cemetery was the Old Burial Ground, opened in 1767 on the corner of Union and Madison Streets next to the First Presbyterian Church. At total of 17 veterans of the American Revolution and one representative to the New York Provincial Congress of 1775 are buried there. Unfortunately, years of neglect left the Old Burial Ground in a state of disrepair. In 1840 Oakland Cemetery was founded, covering just 4 acres, enclosed with stone posts and chestnut pickets. One hundred thirty nine graves from the Old Burial Ground were moved to Oakland Cemetery, including Ebenezer Sage and Captain David Hand and his five wives. During the mid-1800’s, in the center of the property which is now Oakland Cemetery, sat of a group of buildings known as Oakland Works. John Sherry had them built in 1850 to house his brass foundry. He soon took on a partner, Ephraim N. Byram, a clock maker and astronomer who was later buried in the cemetery. They enlarged the building to make room for Byram’s clock manufactory and named the place the Oakland Brass Foundry and Clock Works. The business was in operation for 12 years. In 1863 the building was leased to Abraham DeBevoise and B. & F. Lyon for use as a stocking factory. In 1865 a second building and another bleach house were added to the property. This business closed after three years. Over the next ten years two other industries occupied the Oakland Works. First, a barrel-head and stave factory owned by George Bush; then, a Morrocco leather business owned by Morgan Topping. Both proved unsuccessful. A final attempt to operate a business on the site was made in 1880 when Edward Chapman Rogers opened the Oakland Hat Manufactory. This venture also failed. In 1882, unoccupied for almost two years, the old wooden structures caught fire and burned to the ground. The site was purchased by Joseph Fahys and Stephen French and donated to the cemetery. In September, 1884 the Oakland Cemetery Association purchased the remaining Oakland Works property for $400, adding a third section and extending the cemetery east to its present boundary at Suffolk St for a total of ten acres. In October, 1903 the Ladies Village Improvement Society unveiled a new memorial gate. The Broken Mast Monument in Oakland Cemetery, sculpted by Robert Eberhard Launitz, commemorates those "Who periled their lives in a daring profession and perished in actual encounter with the monsters of the deep."
Notable queer burials at Oakland Cemetery:
• George Balanchine (1904-1983), ballet choreographer and co-founder of the New York City Ballet.
• Arthur Gold (February 6, 1917 – January 3, 1990) and Robert Fizdale (April 12, 1920 –December 6, 1995) were a two-piano ensemble; they were also authors and television cooking show hosts. Gold and Fizdale met during their student years at the Juilliard School. They formed a lifelong gay partnership and shared interests in music (forming one of the most important piano duos of the XX century), travel, and cooking. Works written for Gold and Fizdale: Paul Bowles, "Concerto for Two Pianos” (1946–47), "Sonata for Two Pianos” (1947), "Night Waltz for Two Pianos” (1949), "A Picnic Cantata for Two Pianos” (1953); John Cage, "A Book of Music for Two Pianos”; Francis Poulenc, “L’embarquement pour Cythère” (1951), “Sonate for Two Pianos” (1952-53), “Elegy for Two Pianos” (1959); Germaine Tailleferre, “Il était un Petit Navire Suite for Two Pianos,” “Paris-Magie version for Two Pianos,” “Toccata for Two Pianos,” “Sonata for Two Pianos”; Samuel Barber, “Souvenirs,” Op. 28.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban, PC KC was an English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist, orator, and author. He served both as Attorney General and as Lord Chancellor of England.
Born: January 22, 1561, Strand, London
Died: April 9, 1626, Highgate, United Kingdom
Education: University of Cambridge
University of Poitiers
Lived: Old Gorhambury House, Gorhambury, St Albans AL3 6AH, UK (51.75618, -0.39292)
York House, Watergate Walk, London WC2N 6DU, UK (51.50809, -0.12292)
Canonbury Tower, N1
Buried: St Michael, St.Michael's Street, St Albans, Hertfordshire, AL3 4SL
Trinity College (memorial)
Spouse: Alice Barnham (m. 1606–1626)

Anthony Bacon and his brother, Francis Bacon, spent their early years at York House in the Strand, London. Their mother (who was one of the most educated women of her day, speaking French, Latin, Greek, Spanish, Hebrew and Italian) oversaw their early education. In April 1573, the Bacon brothers enrolled in Trinity College, Cambridge, where they lived in the household of the Master of Trinity College, John Whitgift. The boys’ father died in Feb. 1579 after having been one of the most powerful men in England for the past twenty years.
Address: Watergate Walk, London WC2N 6DU, UK (51.50809, -0.12292)
Type: Public Park (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 208922 (Grade II, 1958)
Place
York House in the Strand in London was one of a string of mansions which once stood along the route from the City of London to the royal court at Westminster. It was built as the London home of the Bishops of Norwich not later than 1237, and around 300 years later it was acquired by King Henry VIII. It came to be known as York House when it was granted to the Archbishop of York in 1556 and retained that name for the rest of its existence. Its neighbours were Suffolk House (later Northumberland House) on the west and Durham House, London residence of the Bishop of Durham, to the east. For about seventy years from 1558 it was leased to various Lord Keepers of the Great Seal of England, including Nicholas Bacon, Thomas Egerton and Francis Bacon. In the 1620s it was acquired by the royal favourite George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, and after an interlude during the English Civil War it was returned to George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, who sold it to developers for £30,000 in 1672. He made it a condition of the sale that his name and full title should be commemorated by George Street, Villiers Street, Duke Street, Of Alley, and Buckingham Street. Some of these streets are extant, though Of Alley has been renamed York Place, Duke Street is now John Adam Street and George Street is now York Buildings. Villiers Street runs along the eastern side of Charing Cross railway station. The mansions facing in the Strand were built where they were partly because they had direct access from their garden fronts to the Thames, which was then a preferred transport artery. The York Watergate (also known as Buckingham Watergate), built ca. 1626, survives, now marooned 150 yards (137 m) from the river, within the Embankment Gardens, due to the construction of the Thames Embankment. With the Banqueting House it is one of the few surviving reminders in London of the Italianate court style of Charles I. Its boldly rusticated design in a confident Serlian manner has been attributed to Sir Balthazar Gerbier, to Inigo Jones himself and to the sculptor and master-mason Nicholas Stone. The design is modelled closely on that of the Medici Fountain in the Jardin du Luxembourg in Paris. It was restored in the 1950s.
Life
Who: Anthony Bacon (1558–1601)
Anthony Bacon was a member of the powerful Bacon family who was also a spy during the Elizabethan era. He was Francis Bacon’s brother. Bacon traveled to France in 1580. While there, he served as an intelligencer reporting to spymaster Sir Francis Walsingham. He initially settled in Montauban-de-Picardie. In 1586, he was charged with sodomy for having sex with his page Isaac Burgades, who had sodomized other pages in the household, and they in turn having let the practice become known in the town. Although the theoretical punishment was still burning at the stake, as the result of intervention in 1587 of Henry, then King of Navarre, Bacon never suffered any consequence, but left Montauban because of the scandal. The 1975 biography by Daphne du Maurier, “Golden Lads,” located the archival records in Montauban; no English records had existed. Bacon returned to England in Feb. 1592. He initially stayed with his brother Francis in Francis’ chambers at Gray’s Inn. Together, they established a scrivenery employing scriveners who acted as secretaries, writers, translators, copyists and cryptographers, dealing with correspondence, translations, copying, ciphers, essays, books, plays, entertainments and masques. In 1593, Bacon paid for his friend Antonio Pérez to come to England. Pérez may have been the model for the character of Don Adriana de Armado in Shakespeare’s “Love’s Labour’s Lost.” In 1593 Bacon was also elected member of Parliament for Wallingford, Berkshire. In April 1594, Bacon established his own residence in Bishopsgate. The next year, he became Secretary of State of Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex and moved into Essex House. During this time, Essex House was the center of the so-called "Shakespeare circle,” a literary circle that involved the Earl of Essex, Sir Thomas Walsingham, and Henry Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke. Sir Henry Cuffe and Sir Henry Wotton were also among the Earl of Essex’s supporters at this time. In 1597 Bacon was MP for Oxford. In 1601, Essex was accused, and then convicted, of high treason, with Bacon’s brother Francis playing a role in Essex’s prosecution. Anthony Bacon died shortly thereafter, at the home of Essex’s widow Frances Walsingham. He is buried at St Olave Church (8 Hart St, London EC3R). After Anthony’s death, Francis Bacon collected his correspondence, bequeathing it to his literary executor William Rawley, who in turn bequeathed it to Thomas Tenison, who in turn bequeathed it to the Lambeth Palace library, where it currently remains.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 145 North End Road, Golders Green, Evelyn Waugh (1903-1966) "Writer lived here"
Address: Canonbury Square, London N1 2AL, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Canonbury is a residential district in the London Borough of Islington in the north of London. It is roughly in the area between Essex Road, Upper Street and Cross Street and either side of St Paul’s Road. In 1253 land in the area was granted to the Canons of St Bartholomew’s Priory, Smithfield and became known as Canonbury. The area continued predominantly as open land until it was developed as a suburb in the early XIX century. In common with similar inner London areas, it suffered decline when the construction of railways in the 1860s enabled commuting into the city from further afield. The gentrification of the area from the 1950s included new developments to replace war-damaged properties in Canonbury Park North and South as well as restoration of older buildings. East Canonbury is the south-eastern corner of the district, bordering on the Regents Canal. Parts of this area were transferred to the district from the London Borough of Hackney in a boundary adjustment (along the line of the northern tow-path of the canal), in 1993. In the east is the New River Estate (formerly the Marquess Estate), a 1,200 dwelling council estate, completed in 1976 on 26 acres (110,000 m2), and designed by Darbourne & Darke. A dark red brick, traffic free estate, it was praised as an example of municipal architecture, but acquired a bad reputation and has since been extensively redeveloped to improve security for residents. Canonbury Square is an attractive square, developed between 1805 and 1830, it includes a variety of distinct styles. In 1812, when few properties had been built, the New North Road turnpike, now known as Canonbury Road, was constructed and bisects the square. Many significant figures from the arts and literary worlds have lived on the square, including George Orwell, Evelyn Waugh and Samuel Phelps.
Notable queer residents at Canonbury Square:
• Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626), King James I’s Lord Chancellor, lived in Canonbury Tower, N1 1616-1626
• Evelyn Waugh (October 28, 1903- April 10, 1966), writer, lived at 17a Canonbury Square, N1; he left after a couple of years in 1930, claiming he was tired of having to explain to friends why he was livng in so appalling a district. Waugh lived also at 145 North End Road (London, W14)
• Duncan Grant (1885-1978) and Vanessa Bell (1879-1961), painters and designers, lived at 26a Canonbury Square, N1 from 1949 to 1955.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Old Gorhambury House located near St Albans, Hertfordshire, is a ruined Elizabethan mansion, a leading and early example of the Elizabethan prodigy house. It was built by Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper, and was visited a number of times by Queen Elizabeth.
Address: Gorhambury, St Albans AL3 6AH, UK (51.75618, -0.39292)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Open all year round during any reasonable daylight hours (Managed by English Heritage)
Phone: +44 370 333 1181
English Heritage Building ID: 163801 (Grade I, 1953)
Place
Built in 1563-8
The house was built partly from bricks taken from the old Abbey buildings at St Albans, then in process of demolition following the Benedictine priory’s dissolution some 25 years earlier. It was used as a residence by Sir Nicholas Bacon’s youngest son, the polymath (scientist, philosopher, statesman and essayist) Sir Francis Bacon, before being bequeathed by him to his former secretary, Sir Thomas Meautys, who married Anne Bacon, the great-granddaughter of Sir Nicholas. The estate passed in 1652 to Anne’s second husband Sir Harbottle Grimston, Master of the Rolls and Speaker in the Convention Parliament of 1660. The estate is owned by the Grimston family to the present day, having been passed via Harbottle Grimston’s son Samuel, who died childless in 1700, to his great-nephew William Luckyn, who in turn became the first Viscount Grimston in 1719. The surviving remains include a two-storey porch, chapel and clock tower. The site is maintained by English Heritage and is free to visit. In the years 1777-84, the current Palladian-style Gorhambury House was built nearby. Designed by Sir Robert Taylor and commissioned by James Bucknall Grimston, 3rd Viscount Grimston, it replaced Old Gorhambury House, which was left to fall into ruin. It remains the home of the Earl of Verulam. The current house is a member of Historic Houses Association and is open for tours at certain times.
Life
Who: Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban PC KC (January 22, 1561 – April 9, 1626)
Francis Bacon was a philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist, orator, and author. He served both as Attorney General and Lord Chancellor of England. After his death, he remained extremely influential through his works, especially as philosophical advocate and practitioner of the scientific method during the scientific revolution. When he was 36, Bacon engaged in the courtship of Elizabeth Hatton, a young widow of 20. Reportedly, she broke off their relationship upon accepting marriage to a wealthier man, Bacon’s rival, Edward Coke. Years later, Bacon still wrote of his regret that the marriage to Hatton had not taken place. At the age of 45, Bacon married Alice Barnham, the 14-year-old daughter of a well-connected London alderman and MP. Bacon wrote two sonnets proclaiming his love for Alice. The first was written during his courtship and the second on his wedding day, May 10, 1606. When Bacon was appointed lord chancellor, "by special Warrant of the King," Lady Bacon was given precedence over all other Court ladies. Reports of increasing friction in his marriage to Alice appeared, with speculation that some of this may have been due to financial resources not being as readily available to her as she was accustomed to having in the past. Alice was reportedly interested in fame and fortune, and when reserves of money were no longer available, there were complaints about where all the money was going. Alice Chambers Bunten wrote in her “Life of Alice Barnham” that, upon their descent into debt, she actually went on trips to ask for financial favours and assistance from their circle of friends. Bacon disinherited her upon discovering her secret romantic relationship with Sir John Underhill. He rewrote his will, which had previously been very generous — leaving her lands, goods, and income — revoking it all. Bacon’s personal secretary and chaplain, William Rawley, however, wrote in his biography of Bacon that his marriage was one of "much conjugal love and respect,” mentioning a robe of honour that he gave to her, and which "she wore unto her dying day, being twenty years and more after his death.” Biographers continue to debate Bacon’s sexual inclinations and the precise nature of his personal relationships. Some authors believe that despite his marriage, Bacon was primarily attracted to men. Forker, for example, has explored the "historically documentable sexual preferences" of both King James and Bacon, and concluded they were all oriented to "masculine love,” a contemporary term that "seems to have been used exclusively to refer to the sexual preference of men for members of their own gender." The Jacobean antiquarian Sir Simonds D’Ewes implied there had been a question of bringing him to trial for buggery, which his brother Anthony Bacon had also been charged with. This conclusion has been disputed by others, who point to lack of consistent evidence, and consider the sources to be more open to interpretation. In his "New Atlantis," Bacon describes his utopian island as being "the chastest nation under heaven,” in which there was no prostitution or adultery, and further saying that "as for masculine love, they have no touch of it.” A monument to Bacon at his burial place is at St Michael (St.Michael's Street, St Albans, Hertfordshire, AL3 4SL).
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Edith “Edy” Craig, like her younger brother Edward, was illegitimate, as her mother, Ellen Terry, was still married to her first husband George Frederic Watts when she eloped with architect-designer Edward William Godwin in 1868. Edith Craig was born the following year at Gusterwoods Common in Hertfordshire, and was given the surname “Craig” to avoid the stigma of illegitimacy. The family lived in Fallows Green, Harpenden in Hertfordshire, designed by Godwin, until 1874. The couple separated in 1875.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Elisabeth "Bessie" Marbury was a pioneering American theatrical and literary agent and producer who represented prominent theatrical performers and writers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and ...
Born: June 19, 1856, New York City, New York, United States
Died: January 22, 1933, New York City, New York, United States
Lived: 13 Sutton Pl, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75738, -73.96029)
Irving House, 122 E 17th St, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.73582, -73.98764)
Maine Chance Spa, Maine Chance Ln, Mt Vernon, ME 04352, USA (44.51379, -69.92439)
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, Bronx County, New York, USA
Books: Manners: A Handbook of Social Customs

Elsie de Wolfe was an actress, interior decorator, author of the influential 1913 book The House in Good Taste, and a prominent figure in New York, Paris, and London society. Bessie Marbury was a highly successful theatrical agent (her clients included Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw), as well as the woman who made a series of suggestions to de Wolfe that led to the interior designer becoming a pioneer in her field. Since 1892, she lived openly with De Wolfe in what many observers accepted as a lesbian relationship. De Wolfe's 1926 marriage to diplomat Sir Charles Mendl was page-one news in the New York Times. The Times said, "The intended marriage comes as a great surprise to her friends." As the Times put it: “When in New York she makes her home with Miss Elisabeth Marbury at 13 Sutton Place.” Dave Von Drehle speaks of “the willowy De Wolfe and the masculine Marbury... cutting a wide path through Manhattan society. Gossips called them "the Bachelors.” De Wolfe was noticeably absent from Marbury's funeral, despite the fact that she was the prime beneficiary of Marbury's will.
Together from 1892 to 1933: 41 years.
Elizabeth “Bessie” Marbury (June 19, 1856 - January 22, 1933)
Elsie de Wolfe (December 20, 1865 – July 12, 1950)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Bessy Marbury was born and raised in the affluent and cultured home of one of 19th century New York's oldest and most prominent "society" families. Elizabeth Arden’s name is a household word; her line of cosmetics are popular in the world. She invented the beauty industry at a time when most women were preparing their own lotions and creams at home. Using artful packaging to convey an image of quality, Arden collaborated with a chemist to create the first “scientific” makeup formulations. She introduced modern eye makeup to America, and created the concept of the makeover. In the 1930s, it was said that there were only three American names known in every corner of the globe: Singer Sewing Machines, Coca-Cola, and Elizabeth Arden. Less well known was Arden’s intimate relationship with literary agent Bessie Marbury. It was perhaps a case of opposites attract: Arden was beautiful, fit, and politically conservative, while Marbury was an older, obese political firebrand. While they were together, Arden supported her girlfriend’s Democratic fundraising and feminist activities. They spent many weekends at Marbury’s Maine home, Lakeside Farm. After Marbury’s death in 1933, Arden bought the property with the intention of fulfilling Marbury’s wish that it be turned into a home for working women—though it eventually became part of a luxury resort instead.
They met in 1925 and remained friends until Marbury’s death: 8 years.
Elizabeth “Bessie” Marbury (June 19, 1856 - January 22, 1933)
Florence Nightingale Graham aka Elizabeth Arden (Dec. 31, 1884 – Oct. 18, 1966)


Portrait, Elizabeth Marbury at the Hyde Ball at Sherry's.

Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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In 1892 Elsie de Wolfe and Elizabeth Marbury moved at Irving House, a residence that had been built for writer Washington Irving – hence called “Irving House.” (Today, a plaque on the building mentions Irving but not de Wolfe or Marbury.) Though East 17th Street was not fashionable at that time, their block was situated firmly in the elegant Gramercy Park district, which held a certain cachet for the two women.
Address: 122 E 17th St, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.73582, -73.98764)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1830
Elisabeth Marbury suggested that Elsie De Wolfe focus her attention on the remodeling of Irving House, her first interior decoration project. De Wolfe removed the dark woodwork and wallpaper, velvet curtains, and heavy furniture that had marked the tastes of the mid-Victorian era. She had the walls painted ivory and light gray and the house completely refurnished in XVIII century French style. When the remodeling was finished, they established a Parisian-type salon at their residence. Each Sunday afternoon from 1897 to 1907, an eclectic assortment of guest met at Irving House for literary talk, gossip, tea and snacks, and an exchange of wit. Guests included such personalities as Sarah Bernhardt, Ellen Terry, Oscar Wilde, Nellie Melba, Henry Adams, and Isabella Stewart Gardner. “You never know who you are going to meet at Bessie’s and Elsie’s,” one salon-goer remarked, “but you can always be sure that whoever they are they will be interesting and you will have a good time.”
Life
Who: Elisabeth "Bessy" Marbury (June 19, 1856 – January 22, 1933) and Elsie de Wolfe, Lady Mendl, (December 20, 1859 – July 12, 1950)
Elsie De Wolfe’s 1926 marriage to diplomat Sir Charles Mendl was page one news in the New York Times. The marriage was platonic and one of convenience. The pair appeared to have married primarily for social amenities, entertaining together, but keeping separate residences. In 1935, when de Wolfe published her autobiography, she didn’t even mention her husband in it. The Times reported "the intended marriage comes as a great surprise to her friends," a veiled reference to the fact that since 1892 de Wolfe had been living openly in what many observers accepted as a lesbian relationship. As the paper put it: "When in New York she makes her home with Miss Elizabeth Marbury at 13 Sutton Place." The daughter of a prosperous New York lawyer, Elisabeth (Bessy) Marbury, like de Wolfe, was also a career pioneer. She was one of the first female theater agents and one of the first woman Broadway producers. Her clients included Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw. During their nearly 40 years together, Marbury was initially the main support of the couple. Dave Von Drehle speaks of "the willowy De Wolfe and the masculine Marbury... cutting a wide path through Manhattan society. Gossips called them "the Bachelors."” Expecting nothing to change in their relationship due to her marriage to Mendl, de Wolfe remained Marbury’s lover until the latter’s death in 1933.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Sutton Place first became fashionable around 1920, when several wealthy socialites, including Anne Harriman Vanderbilt and Anne Morgan, built townhouses on the eastern side of the street, overlooking the East River. Both townhouses were designed by Mott B. Schmidt, launching a career that included many houses for the wealthy.
Address: Sutton Pl, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75738, -73.96029)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Sutton Place Historic District (1--21 Sutton Pl. & 4--16 Sutton Sq.), 85002294, 1985
Place
Elisabeth Marbury, the wealthy literary agent and producer who had been born into an aristocratic family, commissioned society architect Mott Schmidt to transform a Victorian rowhouse at No. 13 Sutton Place into a Georgian residence. She moved in with her long-time companion, decorator Elsie de Wolfe, and began a campaign of convincing her other female friends to follow suit. One of those friends was Anne Vanderbilt whose husband, William K. Vanderbilt died on July 22, 1920, making Anne a widow for the third time. New York society was shocked when, on January 9, 1921, a New York Times headline reported that “Mrs. W.K. Vanderbilt to Live In Avenue A.” She had sold her gargantuan Fifth Avenue mansion for $3 million to move to what the newspaper called “a little-known two-block thoroughfare.” She used $50,000 of the $3 million to purchase Effingham Sutton’s house, No. 1, and, like Elisabeth Marbury, who was already living there, hired Mott B. Schmidt to renovate it into a 13-room Georgian mansion. Anne Vanderbilt’s close friend, 38-year old Anne Tracy Morgan, daughter of J. Pierpont Morgan, announced her plans to have Mott Schmidt create a house abutting the new Vanderbilt house. “Miss Morgan’s new home is being altered, to conform somewhat to the Colonial style of Mrs. Vanderbilt’s house, after which type most of the houses in the exclusive-little nook have been patterned,” said The Times. “Many of the rooms will contain rare old paneling and furniture. Some of these furnishings will be brought from abroad, but much of it will be Colonial. It is expected that the cost of the site and the remodeling will be about $125,000.” By now the neighborhood was filling with single and very wealthy women who were keeping Mott and Elsie de Wolfe busy changing XIX century middle class homes into fashionable neo-Georgian residences. Anne Vanderbilt’s sister, Mrs. Stephen Olin, was already here as were Mrs. Lorillard Cammann and Francis B. Griswold. Sutton Place was dubbed “The Amazon Enclave.” Two months later Mott Schmidt filed revised plans for Anne Morgan’s house at No. 3 Sutton Place. She had purchased the house next door, No. 5, and the original plans were scrapped so that the two houses could be merged. “The new plans call for the rebuilding of the two structures into a four-story dwelling in American Colonial style with a roof garden,” reported The Times. Reflecting their close relationship, Morgan and Vanderbilt would share a common garden to the rear. To create the illusion of a vintage home, Mott reused the bricks from the old buildings on the site. An elevator, in-house incinerator, gas furnace and refrigerators brought the home squarely into the modern age. Mott based the design on two Philadelphia houses; the 1765 Samuel Powel House and its neighbor, the Benjamin Wister Morris House. He treated the Morgan house and the Vanderbilt house as two independent but critically-related designs. A critic assessed them saying “No more valuable or successful examples of the consistent and intelligent use of English architectural precedent in the designing of American houses are to be found than these two houses on Sutton Place.” The house was completed in 1922 and House & Garden praised Morgan for her choice of XVIII Century interiors. “There are hundreds of beautiful drawing rooms in New York, but I know of no one but Miss Morgan who has determined to make the largest and most important room in her house an early American one. She is using an old pine paneled room, such as were often seen in old Southern houses. The New England pine rooms were usually much smaller and the paneling was generally more severe.” The house of Anne Morgan on Sutton Place was purchased after her death by Arthur Amory Houghton, Jr., the great-grandson of the founder of Corning Glass. Twenty years later, Houghton donated the house to the United Nations Association of the United States. The association leased it to the United Nations for a year as the home of the Secretary General, then sold it to the organization in 1973. Today the stately home of Anne Morgan remains the home of the U.N.’s Secretary General. Its colonial façade, along with those of its neighbors built by independent-thinking women who broke free of tradition, looks as though it has stood there for centuries. 360 E. 55th Street, 404 E. 55th Street and 405 E. 54th Street are known as The Sutton Collection. Located in the heart of Sutton Place, the Sutton Collection is made up of three unique buildings, each building is filled with exceptional architectural details and true New York style that can only be found in the rarest of pre-war properties. At 404 E 55th St resided Noel Coward, this was the playwright’s last Manhattan residence.
Life
Who: Anne Tracy Morgan (July 25, 1873 – January 29, 1952)
Anne Morgan was a philanthropist who provided relief efforts in aid to France during and after WWI and WWII. Morgan was educated privately, traveled frequently and grew up amongst the wealth her father had amassed. She was awarded a medal from the National Institute of Social Science in 1915, the same year she published the story “The American Girl.” In 1932 she became the first American woman appointed a commander of the French Legion of Honor. In 1903 she became part owner of the Villa Trianon near Versailles, France, along with decorator and socialite Elsie De Wolfe (1859-1950) and theatrical/literary agent Elisabeth “Bessie” Marbury (1856-1933.) Morgan was instrumental in assisting De Wolfe, her close friend, in pioneering a career in interior decoration. The three women, known as "The Versailles Triumvirate," hosted a salon in France and, in 1903, along with Anne Vanderbilt (1861-1940), helped organize the Colony Club, the first women’s social club in New York City and, later, helped found the exclusive neighborhood of Sutton Place along Manhattan’s East River.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Elisabeth Marbury, a professional manager and drama agent, encouraged Elizabeth Arden to purchase a lakefront property in Maine. Arden bought The Gables, the property adjacent to her friend’s on Long Pond in Mount Vernon. Following Marbury’s death, Arden purchased the former’s Lakeside Farm.
Address: Maine Chance Ln, Mt Vernon, ME 04352, USA (44.51379, -69.92439)
Type: Private Property
Place
Around 1925, Elisabeth Marbury acquired a summer home in Mount Vernon called Lakeside Farm, where she entertained many illustrious guests. After Marbury’s death in 1934, Arden converted Lakeside Farm and her own property, The Gables, into the fashionable Maine Chance Farm, a health and beauty spa for the rich and famous. It’s been said that the name was “a double-entendre for her clients who saw it as their main chance to recapture their youth.” Over the years, Arden’s clientele included first lady Mamie Eisenhower, writer Edna Ferber and actresses Judy Garland, Lillian Gish and Ava Gardner. Stefan Tufano’s parents bought the property a few years after the spa closed in 1970. They used it as a summer home and then moved in full time in the 1990s. Tufano moved in to care for them near the end of their lives, and in 2014 the former Maine Chance Spa went up for sale for $765.000.
Life
Who: Elisabeth "Bessy" Marbury (June 19, 1856 – January 22, 1933) and Florence Nightingale Graham (December 31, 1878 – October 18, 1966), aka Elizabeth Arden
Born in New York City, Elisabeth “Bessie” Marbury grew up in a well-to-do and cultured home. Educated to a large extent by her father at home, she spent her early years occupied with social activities, and Sunday school teaching. In 1885 she volunteered to organize a benefit theatrical performance, which became the springboard for her career as a professional manager. A few years later, she managed to get a job handling the dramatic version of “Little Lord Fauntleroy,” which had become a current best-seller. Later in her career she would represent other major writing talents such as George Bernard Shaw, Oscar Wilde, James M. Barrie and Somerset Maugham. In the early 1890s, she joined several other agents in forming the American Play Company, and she helped stage several productions with music by Jerome Kern and Cole Porter, becoming instrumental in the development of the typical American style of musical comedy. One of her friends was Elizabeth Arden (1878-1966), whom she encouraged to purchase property in Maine. Arden liked the area so much that she bought an adjacent property, The Gables. In 1933, following several years of declining health, Marbury died in New York City. In her will she requested that Lakeside Farm be turned into a home for working women, but her friends failed to see the plan through. In frustration, Arden purchased the property with the intention of overseeing the project herself, but in the end she combined Lakeside Farm with Maine Chance and made it into the first of many luxury resorts where patrons paid top dollar to enjoy a full range of dietary, exercise, and beauty regimens. Marbury is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, NY, while Arden is buried at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, NY.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Although located in Woodlawn, Bronx and one of the largest cemeteries in New York City, it has the character of a rural cemetery.
Address: 517 E 233rd St, Bronx, NY 10470, USA (40.89006, -73.87425)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.30-16.30
Phone: +1 718-920-0500
National Register of Historic Places: 11000563, 2011 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Woodlawn Cemetery opened in 1863, in what was then southern Westchester County, in an area that was later annexed to New York City in 1874. It is notable in part as the final resting place of some great figures in the American arts, such as authors Countee Cullen and Herman Melville, and musicians Irving Berlin, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, and Max Roach. “Memorial To A Marriage” has been erected by Patricia Cronin and her partner Deborah Kass. Sculptor Cronin did the original sculpture of Carrara marble in 2002, to address what she considered a Federal failure: not allowing gay Americans the right to marry. It has been replaced with a bronze casting, installed on the couple’s burial plot in 2011. Since 2002 when the marble was first installed, the memorial has become one of the most visited of Woodlawn. After 18 years together, Patricia Cronin and Deborah Kass went to City Hall on the morning of July 24, 2011, with nearly 900 other New York City couples, waiting for three hours in the heat to get legally married on the first day.
Notable queer burials at Woodlawn Cemetery:
• Diana Blanche Barrymore Blythe (1921-1960), known professionally as Diana Barrymore, was a film and stage actress. She was the daughter of renowned actor John Barrymore and his second wife, poet Blanche Oelrichs.
• Frances (Fannie) Evelyn Bostwick (died in 1921) was the mother of Marion “Joe” Carstairs. Bostwick was an American heiress who was the second child of Jabez Bostwick and his wife Helen. Joe Carstairs' legal father was Scottish army officer Captain Albert Carstairs. At least one biographer has suggested that the Captain may not have been Joe's biological father. Carstairs' mother, an alcoholic and drug addict, later married Captain Francis Francis. She divorced Captain Francis to marry French count Roger de Périgny in 1915, but eventually left him because of his infidelity. Her fourth and last husband, whom she married in 1920, was Serge Voronoff, a Russian–French surgeon who become famous in the 1920s and 1930s for his practice of transplanting monkey testicle tissue into male humans for the claimed purpose of rejuvenation. For some years Evelyn had believed in Voronoff's theories, and she funded his research and acted as his laboratory assistant at the Collège de France in Paris. Voronoff arrived in New York with his wife's body on the ship "S.S. France" in May, 1921.
• Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was a women’s suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920. She was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, New York alongside her longtime companion, Mary Garrett Hay, a fellow New York state suffragist, with whom she lived for over 20 years. Under a single monument inscribed in block letters: "Here lie two, united in friendship for 38 years through constant service to a great cause."
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) born as Countee Porter, was a poet, author and scholar who was a leading figure in the Harlem Renaissance. It is rumored that Cullen was a homosexual, and his relationship with Harold Jackman ("the handsomest man in Harlem"), was a significant factor in his divorce. The young, dashing Jackman was a school teacher and, thanks to his noted beauty, a prominent figure among Harlem’s gay elite. Van Vechten had used him as a character model in his novel “Nigger Heaven” (1926.)
• Joseph Raphael De Lamar (1843-1918), a prominent mine owner and operator in the western United States and Canada, as well as a financier and speculator, from the late 1870s until his death in 1918. De Lamar married Nellie Virginia Sands, a direct descendant of John Quincy Adams, on 8 May, 1893, and they had one daughter together, Alice DeLamar.
• Marjory Lacey-Baker (died in 1971), actress, she was the long-time companion of Dr. Lena Madesin Phillips, founder of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs. They met in 1919 and together until Ms Philipps’ death in 1955. Ms Phillips is buried at Maple Grove Cemetery (500 N Main St, Nicholasville, KY 40356).
• Joseph Christian “J.C.” Leyendecker (1874-1951) was one of the preeminent illustrators of the early XX century.
• George Platt Lynes (1907-1955) was a fashion and commercial photographer.
• Elisabeth "Bessie" Marbury (1856–1933) was a pioneering American theatrical and literary agent and producer who represented prominent theatrical performers and writers in the late XIX and early XX centuries and helped shape business methods of the modern commercial theater. She was the longtime companion of Elsie de Wolfe (later known as Lady Mendl), a prominent socialite and famous interior decorator.
• Herman Melville (1819-1891) was a novelist, short story writer, and poet from the American Renaissance period.
• Blanche Marie Louise Oelrichs (October 1, 1890 – November 5, 1950) was a poet, playwright and theatre actress known by the pseudonym "Michael Strange.” Starting in the summer of 1940 until her death, Oelrichs was in a long-term relationship with Margaret Wise Brown, the author of many children’s books. The relationship began as something of a mentoring one, but became a romantic relationship including co-habitating at 10 Gracie Square beginning in 1943.
• Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was a suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women’s rights movement.
• John William Sterling (May 12, 1844 – July 5, 1918) was a founding partner of Shearman & Sterling LLP and major benefactor to Yale University. In Sterling's will, he directs: "no interment other than my own and that of my sister, Cordelia, shall ever take place" in his Mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery. An exception is made, however, "in case my said friend, James O. Bloss (September 30, 1847 – December 18, 1918), who has lived with me for more than forty years, should desire to be interred in the said Mausoleum and should die without ever having been married." Cordelia Sterling is burried with her brother. Bloss died less than six months after Sterling, according to his sister, of a broken heart, and is not buried with his friend, though the reason is unknown. He is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester. Sterling's obituary in the New York Times referred to "his lifelong friend, James O. Bloss, a retired cotton broker, who made his home with the testator for more than forty years." James Orville Bloss died suddenly in New York City, on December 15, 1918.
• Bert Williams (1874-1922), was one of the pre-eminent entertainers of the Vaudeville era. He married Charlotte ("Lottie") Thompson, a singer with whom he had worked professionally, in a very private ceremony. Lottie was a widow eight years Bert's senior. The Williamses never had children biologically, but they adopted three of Lottie's nieces. In 1919 their niece Lottie Tyler met blues singer Alberta Hunter. In August 1927, Hunter sailed for France, accompanied by Lottie. Their relationship lasted until Ms. Tyler's death, many years later.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Claire Waldoff, born Clara Wortmann, was a German singer. She was a famous kabarett singer and entertainer in Berlin during the 1910s and 1920s, chiefly known for performing ironic songs in the Berlinish dialect.
Born: October 21, 1884, Gelsenkirchen, Germany
Died: January 22, 1957, Bad Reichenhall, Germany
Buried: Pragfriedhof, Stuttgart, Stuttgarter Stadtkreis, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Buried alongside: Olga von Roeder
Albums: Immer ran an Speck, Claire Waldoff, Folge 8, more
Genres: Cabaret, Music hall, Operetta, Revue, Schlager music
Record labels: ZYX Music, duo-phon records, more

Claire Waldoff was a famous German cabaret singer and entertainer in Berlin during the 1910s and 1920s. Waldoff was known for singing her songs in distinctive Berliner slang. Her success reached its peak in the 1920s. She performed at the two great Berlin varietés, Scala and Wintergarten, sang together with Marlene Dietrich, and had her songs played on the radio. Her repertoire included around 300 original songs. Waldoff lived happily together with Olga Freiin von Roeder in Berlin during the 1920s. Together they often met other lesbian friends in the club, Damenklub Pyramide, in Berlin. After the German Nazis won the elections in 1933, and Hitler came to power, Waldoff's success ended. In 1939, she and Olga von Roder left Berlin together, and moved to Bayerisch Gmain. Waldoff lost all her money in German Monetary reform in 1948. In 1953, she wrote her autobiography. In 1954, she got a little monetary support by the senate of the city of Berlin. Claire and Olga are buried together at the Pragfriedhof cemetery in Stuttgart.
Together from (around) 1920 to 1957: 37 years.
Claire Waldoff aka Clara Wortmann (October 21, 1884 - January 22, 1957)
Olga Freiin von Roeder (June 12, 1886 - July 11, 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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At Pragfriedhof (Friedhofstraße 44, 70191 Stuttgart), Olga Von Roeder (1886-1963) and Claire Waldoff (1884-1957) are buried together. Claire Waldoff was a German singer. Waldoff lived together with her significant other Olga "Olly" von Roeder until her death. The couple lived happily in Berlin during the 1920s. Part of the queer scene, they associated with celebrities like Anita Berber in the milieu around Damenklub Pyramide near Nollendorfplatz. After the war, she lost her savings in the West German monetary reform of 1948 and from 1951 relied on little monetary support by the Senate of Berlin.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lady Evelyn Barbara "Eve" Balfour was an English farmer, educator, organic farming pioneer, and a founding figure in the organic movement. She was one of the first women to study agriculture at an English university, graduating from the University of Reading. The daughter of the second Earl of Balfour, she began farming in 1920, in Haughley Green, Suffolk, England. In 1939, with her friend and neighbor Ryan Nelson, she launched the Haughley Experiment, the first long-term, side-by-side scientific comparison of organic and chemical-based farming. Balfour, who lived on a farm with her companion Beryl ‘Beb’ Hearnden from 1919 to about 1951, and then lived with agriculturalist Kathleen Carnley until this latter's death, ‘discovered the freedom of breeches’ in the First World War; Elizabeth Lutyens remembered ‘She had an Egyptian face of great strength and charm, with cropped hair and masculine manners, in spite of a feminine heart.’ Hearnden's pursuit of paid journalism work in London coincided with her departure from the struggling farming cooperative.
Together from 1919 to 1951: 32 years.
Lady Evelyn "Eve” Barbara Balfour (July 16, 1898 - January 14, 1990)
Beryl “Beb” Hearnden (1897 – January 22, 1978)
Kathleen Carnley (1889-1976)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Giles Lytton Strachey was a British writer and critic. A founding member of the Bloomsbury Group and author of Eminent Victorians, he is best known for establishing a new form of biography in which ...
Born: March 1, 1880, London, United Kingdom
Died: January 21, 1932, Hungerford, United Kingdom
Education: University of Cambridge
Lived: The Mill, Tidmarsh, Reading, West Berkshire RG8, UK (51.46833, -1.08754)
Ham Spray House, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 3QZ, UK (51.3681, -1.50219)
51 Gordon Square, Bloomsbury, WC1H
Sutton Court, A368, Stowey-Sutton, Bath and North East Somerset BS39 5TX, UK (51.34174, -2.58037)
Stowey House, Clapham Common, Windmill Dr, London SW4 9DE, UK (51.45783, -0.14816)
67 Belsize Park Gardens, London NW3, UK (51.54694, -0.16578)
6 Belsize Park Gardens, London NW3, UK (51.54831, -0.16922)
69 Lancaster Gate, London W2 3NA, UK (51.51124, -0.1823)
Buried: Church of St Andrew, South Parade, at the bottom of the High Street, Chew Magna, Avon, BS408SH
Parents: Richard Strachey
Siblings: James Strachey, Julia Strachey, Dorothy Bussy, Oliver Strachey

Giles Lytton Strachey was a British writer and critic. Dora Carrington was a British painter and decorative artist, remembered in part for her association with members of the Bloomsbury Group, especially Lytton Strachey. Though Strachey spoke openly about his homosexuality with his Bloomsbury friends (he had a relationship with John Maynard Keynes, who also was part of the Bloomsbury group), it was not widely publicized until the late 1960s, in a biography by Michael Holroyd. In 1921, Carrington agreed to marry Ralph Partridge, not for love but to secure the 3-way relationship. Strachey himself had been much more sexually interested in Partridge, as well as in various other young men, including a secret sadomasochistic relationship with Roger Senhouse (later the head of publisher Secker & Warburg). Dora Carrington committed suicide out of grief in 1932, shortly after Lytton Strachey’s death. Ralph married Frances Marshall on March 2, 1933. They lived happily at Ham Spray until Ralph’s death in 1960.
Together from 1917 to 1932: 15 years.
Dora de Houghton Carrington (March 29, 1893 – March 11, 1932)
Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 –January 21, 1932)
Ralph Partridge (1894 – November 30, 1960)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Stowey House was a Victorian mansion off the south side of Clapham Common.
Address: Clapham Common, Windmill Dr, London SW4 9DE, UK (51.45783, -0.14816)
Type: Public Park (open to public)
Phone: +44 20 7926 9000
Place
Lytton Strachey was born on March 1, 1880 at Stowey House, Clapham Common, London, the fifth son and the eleventh child of Lieutenant General Sir Richard Strachey, an officer in the British colonial armed forces, and his second wife, the former Jane Grant, who became a leading supporter of the women’s suffrage movement. In 1920, as part of a second wave of establishing open air schools in the capital, the LCC set up an open air school in the grounds of Stowey House. The Stowey House Open Air School accommodated some 300 “delicate” and pre-tuberculous children, selected from five times that number nominated by school medical officers. Entered by a small door through a wall off the busy street, the School had 8 classroom pavilions (5 for boys and 3 for girls), plus a larger structure used for the pupils’ daily rest, and for folk dancing and corrective exercise. Parts of the school facilities and furniture had been built by the children themselves. They also worked in the gardens. Pupils remained at the School for about 12 to 18 months. The School survived the disruptions of WW2, and carried on at least through the 1950s and closed in the mid 1960s. Stowey House was demolished in 1967. In the late 1960s its site, and the adjacent South Lodge, were redeveloped as new premises for the Henry Thornton School. These, in their turn, have been superseded by the buildings of Lambeth College. The site of the Open Air School is now occupied by the southern part of the College and its grounds.
Life
Who: Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 – January 21, 1932)
Lytton Strachey was a British writer and critic. A founding member of the Bloomsbury Group and author of “Eminent Victorians,” he is best known for establishing a new form of biography in which psychological insight and sympathy are combined with irreverence and wit. His biography “Queen Victoria” (1921) was awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. At Trinity College, Cambridge, Strachey soon became closely associated: Clive Bell, Leonard Woolf and Saxon Sydney-Turner. With another undergraduate student, A. J. Robertson, these students formed a group called the Midnight Society, which, in the opinion of Clive Bell, was the source of the Bloomsbury Group. Other close friends at Cambridge were Thoby Stephen and his sisters Vanessa and Virginia Stephen (later Bell and Woolf respectively.) Strachey also became acquainted with other men who greatly influenced him, including G. Lowes Dickinson, John Maynard Keynes, Walter Lamb (brother of the painter Henry Lamb), George Mallory, Bertrand Russell and G. E. Moore. Strachey had an unusual relationship with the painter Dora Carrington. She loved him and they lived together from 1917 until his death. In 1921 Carrington agreed to marry Ralph Partridge, not for love but to secure a three-way relationship. She committed suicide two months after Strachey’s death.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Lancaster Gate is a mid-XIX century development in the Bayswater district of central London, immediately to the north of Kensington Gardens. Lytton Strachey lived here with his family in childhood and beyond.
Address: 69 Lancaster Gate, London W2 3NA, UK (51.51124, -0.1823)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
When Lytton Strachey was four years old the family moved from Stowey House to 69 Lancaster Gate, North of Kensington Gardens. Lancaster Gate consists of two long terraces of houses overlooking the park, with a wide gap between them opening onto a square containing a church. Further terraces back onto the pair overlooking the park and loop around the square. Until 1865 the terraces were known as Upper Hyde Park Gardens, with the name Lancaster Gate limited to the square surrounding the church. The development takes its name from Lancaster Gate, a nearby entrance to Kensington Gardens, itself named in honour of Queen Victoria as Duke of Lancaster. The terraces are stuccoed and are in an eclectic classical style featuring English Baroque details and French touches. The church, known as Christ Church, Lancaster Gate, was an asymmetrical gothic composition with a needle spire. The architects were F. & H. Francis. The Church was one of the most well known in London, but when dry rot was discovered in the roof the decision was taken to demolish most of the site and redevelop it. The last service in the church was on March 6, 1977, and demolition began on August 15, 1977; only the tower and spire survive. The rest of the building was replaced by a housing scheme called Spire House in 1983. Lancaster Gate stands alongside Hyde Park Gardens as one of the two grandest of the XIX century housing schemes lining the northern side of Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens. The development was planned in 1856-57 on the site of a nursery and tea gardens, and construction took at least 10 years. The terraces overlooking the park were designed by Sancton Wood and those around the square by John Johnson. The exteriors are largely complete, with just a couple of XX century infills, but many of the interiors have been reconstructed behind the facades. Many of the properties are still in residential use and command very high prices. Others are used as embassies (such as the Embassy of Costa Rica), offices, or hotels. For many years, the headquarters of The Football Association were located in Lancaster Gate and the term was often used as a metonym for the organisation, but it later relocated to Soho Square and is now based at Wembley Stadium.
Life
Who: Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 – January 21, 1932)
69 Lancaster Gate was Lytton Strachey home until Sir Richard Strachey retired. After Strachey left Cambridge in 1905 his mother assigned him a bed-sitting room here. During his boyhood, while his parents were in India, Duncan Grant spent much time here with the family of Sir Richard and Lady Strachey. Currently 66-71 Lancaster Gate is the Lancaster Gate Hotel.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lytton Strachey, biographer and prominent member of the Bloomsbury Group, lived here from 1907 to 1914, where he wrote “Eminent Victorians.
Addresses:
67 Belsize Park Gardens, London NW3, UK (51.54694, -0.16578)
6 Belsize Park Gardens, London NW3, UK (51.54831, -0.16922)
Place
In 1907, lady Strachey, Lytton’s mother, decided that they should move later that year to a dilapidated house in Belsize Park Gardens, Hampstead. “There is a basement billiard-room,” Lytton wrote to Duncan Grant after inspecting the new house, “the darkest chamber I’ve ever seen in my life, and without billiard table. Your mother, mine and I found ourselves locked into it, and thought we’d be discovered three crumbling skeletons – forty years hence. Fortunately I was able to leap a wall and attract a caretaker.” No. 67 Belsize Park Gardens, NW3 was a smaller house than Lancaster Gate, but still spacious enough to cater for the rather depleted numbers of the family. As before in the previous house, Lytton was assigned a bed-sitting-room where he was to compose his reviews and articles. In January 1914 he stayed with his family, who where then making preliminary arrangements to move from no. 67 to no. 6 Belsize Park Gardens, NW3. “I flew from Square to Square, from Chelsea to Hampstead Heath with infinite alacrity,” he told Duncan Grant. The name Belsize is derived from French “bel assis” meaning “well situated.” The Manor of Belsize dates back to 1317. Although not named on the Geographers’ London Atlas, the area has many thoroughfares bearing its name: Belsize Avenue, Belsize Court, Belsize Crescent, Belsize Gardens, Belsize Grove, Belsize Lane, Belsize Mews, Belsize Park (the road), Belsize Park Gardens, Belsize Place, Belsize Square, and Belsize Terrace. The name comes from the XVII century manor house and parkland (built by Daniel O’Neill for his wife, the Countess of Chesterfield) which once stood on the site. The estate built up between 1852 and 1878, by which time it extended to Haverstock Hill. After WWI, the construction of blocks of flats began, and now a great many of the larger houses are also converted into flats. In WWII, a large underground air-raid shelter was built here and its entrance can still be seen near the tube station at Downside Crescent. The area on Haverstock Hill north of Belsize Park underground station up to Hampstead Town Hall and including part of a primary school near the Royal Free Hospital was heavily bombed. When the area was rebuilt, the opportunity was taken to widen the pavement and build further back from the road.
Life
Who: Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 – January 21, 1932)
After the Strachey family moved to 67 Belsize Park Gardens in Hampstead, and later to another house in the same street (6 Belsize Park Gardens), Lytton Strachey was assigned other bed-sitters. But, as he was about to turn 30, family life started irritating him, and he took to travelling into the country more often, supporting himself by writing reviews and critical articles for The Spectator and other periodicals. In 1916 Lytton Strachey was back in London living with his mother at 6 Belsize Park Gardens, Hampstead, where she had now moved. In the late autumn of 1917, however, his brother Oliver and his friends Harry Norton, John Maynard Keynes and Saxon Sydney-Turner agreed to pay the rent on the Mill House at Tidmarsh, near Pangbourne, Berkshire, where they all moved.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 46 Gordon Square, John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946), "Economist lived here 1916–1946"
Addresses:
46 Gordon Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H 0PD, UK (51.52445, -0.13018)
51 Gordon Square, London WC1H, UK (51.52419, -0.12987)
52 Tavistock Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H, UK (51.5247, -0.12791)
Place
Gordon Square is in Bloomsbury, in the London Borough of Camden, London (postal district WC1) part of the Bedford Estate. Gordon Square was developed by master builder Thomas Cubitt in the 1820s, as one of a pair with Tavistock Square, which is a block away and has the same dimensions. As with most London squares the central garden was originally for the private use of the residents of the surrounding houses, but it now belongs to the University of London and is open to the public. The square is named after the second wife of the 6th Duke of Bedford, Lady Georgiana Gordon, daughter of Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon. The university owns many of the buildings in the square and in early 2005 it submitted an application for a refurbishment of the square, including the reinstatement of railings similar to the originals. The work was completed in 2007. The west side of the square is dominated by the listed church of Christ the King and next to it the home of Dr Williams’s Library.
Notable queer resident at Gordon & Tavistock Square:
• James Strachey (September 26, 1887 - April 25, 1967), Lytton’s brother, lived at n. 41 Gordon Square, WC1H from 1919-56, with his wife, Alix, sometimes joined by Ralph Partridge.
• The economist John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946) lived at no. 46 Gordon Square, WC1H marked by a blue plaque. Before Keynes moved in, the same house was occupied by a young Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) and her siblings (including the noted painter and interior designer Vanessa Bell (1879-1961)) from 1905 to 1907 and frequented by other members of the Bloomsbury Group.
• Vanessa Bell moved into no. 50 Gordon Square, WC1H in 1920, moving to no. 37 Gordon Square, WC1H from 1922-29, with Clive Bell moving into no. 50.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 51 Gordon Square, Bloomsbury, WC1H Lytton Strachey (1880-1932), “Critic and biographer lived here.” Strachey moved here shortly after writing “Eminent Victorians” (1918), his controversial critique of Victorian values which set new parameters in the art of biography. In Gordon Square Strachey produced its follow-up, “Queen Victoria” (1921), another debunker of Victorian myths.
• From 1924 to 1939 Virginia Woolf lived at no. 52 Tavistock Square, WC1H south side of square: bombed in October, 1940 and replaced by the Tavistock Hotel in 1951.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Once home to the Bloomsbury group, The Mill at Tidmarsh in Berkshire is still an inspiring abode. The Mill was last on the market in 2010 for £1.995.000.
Address: Tidmarsh, Reading, West Berkshire RG8, UK (51.46833, -1.08754)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 400899 (Grade II, 1984)
Place
"Sounds too good to be alright!" wrote Dora Carrington to Lytton Strachey on the morning of October 19, 1917. She was poring over the particulars of The Mill at Tidmarsh in Berkshire. There was electric light and "bath H & C.” It was romantic and lovely, and the rent was £52 a year for a three-year lease. Carrington first set up house with Lytton Strachey in Nov. 1917, when they moved together to Tidmarsh Mill House, near Pangbourne, Berkshire. Carrington met Ralph Partridge, an Oxford friend of her younger brother Noel, in 1918. Strachey fell in love with Partridge and eventually, in 1921, Carrington agreed to marry him, not for love but to hold the menage a trois together with Lytton Strachey. Strachey paid for the wedding, and also accompanied the couple on their honeymoon in Venice.
Life
Who: Dora de Houghton Carrington (March 29, 1893 – March 11, 1932)
Dora Carrington moved into the mill with Lytton Strachey (1880-1932) just as he was publishing “Eminent Victorians,” the book that made him famous. The pair were already prominent in the Bloomsbury circle, which included Clive and Vanessa Bell (1879-1961), whose highly decorated house, Charleston in Sussex, is open to the public. Lytton and Carrington were frequently seen at Lady Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938)’s parties at Garsington Manor. He was a spidery, bearded intellectual, widely known to be homosexual, she a Slade-trained artist with a pageboy haircut and no first name. Their decision to live together raised eyebrows inside and outside their group.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Love and literary retreat, a Wiltshire farmhouse was a bliss for a Bloomsbury threesome. Ham Spray House was last on the market in 2008 for £2.750.000.
Address: Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 3QZ, UK (51.3681, -1.50219)
Type: Private Property
Place
In 1924, Lytton Strachey and Ralph Partridge, members of the Bloomsbury group, bought Ham Spray House, and several of that group and other writers and artists spent time there from then until Ralph died in 1960, including Dora Carrington and Frances Partridge. Ham Spray, which cost Partridge and Strachey £2,300, suited their communal living and working arrangements. Surrounded by fields, and with a local shop selling Wellington boots, it was "a perfect English country house.” "We believed there was no view more beautiful, more inexhaustible in England, and no house more lovable than Ham Spray," wrote Frances in her diary. The rooms are of Georgian proportions, with high ceilings and cornices and pretty fireplaces. Carrington’s paintings hung on every wall, alongside works by Duncan Grant, Vanessa Bell and Augustus John. While Lytton Strachey wrote in his upstairs study, looking out across Ham Hill and Inkpen Beacon, Carrington painted in a studio above the former granary. In the evenings, they gathered in the music room, where there was a piano, gramophone and ping-pong table. In Strachey’s former study – now a bedroom - there are surviving works by Carrington, including a mural of an owl and a self-portrait of her riding across the Downs, painted on a tile. On a door in the corner of the room is a trompe d’oeil of a bookshelf, featuring titles such as “Deception” by Jane Austen and “The Empty Room” by Virginia Woolf.
Life
Who: Ralph Partridge (1894 – November 30, 1960)
Dora Carrington was in love with Lytton Strachey, who loved Ralph Partridge, an ex-army officer; Carrington loved Strachey, but married Partridge to stabilise their triangular relationship. In 1924, they set up home together at the XIX-century farmhouse outside the village of Ham, in Wiltshire, along with Ralph’s lover (and later wife) Frances Marshall (1900-2004.) Strachey died of stomach cancer at Ham Spray in January 1932. Carrington, who saw no purpose in a life without Strachey, committed suicide two months after his death by shooting herself with a gun borrowed from her friend, Hon. Bryan Guinness (later 2nd Baron Moyne.) Her body was cremated and the ashes buried under the laurels in the garden of Ham Spray House. Strachey's modest little brass plaque is in the family church at Chew Magna, Somerset. The Partridges had a son, Burgo, and continued to live at the house for almost 30 years, entertaining a roll-call of artists and writers, among them E.M. Forster and Patrick Leigh Fermor. Frances sold the house a year after Ralph’s death in 1961, insisting that it did not become a shrine to the Bloomsbury Group.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Lytton Strachey's modest little brass plaque is in the family chapel at the Church of St Andrew (South Parade, at the bottom of the High Street, Chew Magna, Avon, BS408SH).
Address: A368, Stowey-Sutton, Bath and North East Somerset BS39 5TX, UK (51.34174, -2.58037)
Type: Museum (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 32831 (Grade II, 1960)
Place
Sutton Court is an English house remodelled by Thomas Henry Wyatt in the 1850s from a manor house built in the XV and XVI centuries around a XIV-century fortified pele tower and surrounding buildings. The house is at Stowey in the Chew Valley in an area of Somerset now part of Bath and North East Somerset, near to the village of Bishop Sutton. The house is surrounded by an extensive estate, laid out as a Ferme ornée, part of which is now the Folly Farm nature reserve. Since the early modern period the house has been the country seat of several prominent families including the St Loes one of whom married Bess of Hardwick. They lived at Sutton Court and expanded the property in the second half of the XVI century. Throughout the XVIII and XIX centuries it was owned by the Strachey baronets and their descendants until it was sold in 1987 and converted into apartments. In the early 1980's the house was used as a film location for the BBC Look and Read series “Dark Towers,” a series very popular to this day in Primary schools.
Life
Who: Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 – January 21, 1932)
The house became the seat of the Strachey family including John Strachey, the geologist, who inherited estates including Sutton Court from his father in 1674 at three years of age. He introduced a theory of rock formations known as Stratum, based on a pictorial cross-section of the geology under the estate and coal seams in nearby coal works of the Somerset Coalfield. He projected them according to their measured thicknesses and attitudes into unknown areas between the coal workings. The purpose was to enhance the value of his grant of a coal-lease on parts of his estate. This work was later developed by William Smith. Henry Strachey, the grandson of the geologist and a senior civil servant, was created a baronet in 1801. When he inherited the house in the XVIII century the house had been mortgaged, however the mortgage was paid by Strachey's employer Clive of India. Henry Strachey, the 2nd Baronet, was appointed High Sheriff of Somerset in 1832 and Edward Strachey the 3rd Baronet High Sheriff in 1864. In 1858 much of the house was remodelled for the 3rd Baronet by Thomas Henry Wyatt. The 4th Baronet who was also Edward Strachey, a Liberal politician, was returned to Parliament for Somerset South at the 1892 general election. He served under Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman and later H. H. Asquith as Treasurer of the Household from 1905 to 1909 and under Asquith as Parliamentary Secretary to the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries from 1909 to 1911. He was raised to the Peerage as Baron Strachie in 1911. During the 1970s major restoration work was undertaken to deal with dry rot and replace wiring which resulted in the removal of several ceilings and decorations from many of the rooms. Maurice Towneley-O'Hagan the 3rd Baron O'Hagan married Edward Strachey's daughter, the Hon. Frances Constance Maddalena and thereby gained Sutton Court. When he died it passed to his grandson, Tory MEP Charles Strachey, 4th Baron O'Hagan. He sold it in 1987 for conversion into flats. The building is now private apartments set in fifteen acres (3 ha) of communal grounds, including a trout lake and tennis court. It is run by a management company made up of the residents. Lytton Strachey was the fifth son and the eleventh child of Lieutenant General Sir Richard Strachey, an officer in the British colonial armed forces, and his second wife, the former Jane Grant, who became a leading supporter of the women's suffrage movement. Sir Richard Strachey GCSI FRS (1817–1908), third son of Edward Strachey and grandson of Sir Henry Strachey, 1st Baronet was born on July 24, 1817, at Sutton Court, Stowey, Somerset.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Buried: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, Westchester County, New York, USA

Ogden Codman, Jr. was an American architect and interior decorator in the Beaux-Arts styles, and co-author with Edith Wharton of The Decoration of Houses (1897). Codman spent his youth from 1875 to 1884 at Dinard, an American resort colony in France, and on returning to America in 1884, studied at the MIT. Wharton became one of his first Newport clients for her home there, Land's End. Subsequently she introduced Codman to Cornelius Vanderbilt II, who hired him to design the second and third floor rooms of his Newport summer home, The Breakers. In 1907, Codman built the Codman-Davis House in Washington, D.C. for his cousin Martha Codman, one of the few intact homes that he designed. This included a carriage house, now the Apex Night Club, ironically a gay club. Although a noted homosexual, on 8 October, 1904, Codman married one of his commissioner, Leila Griswold Webb, widow of railroad magnate H. Walter Webb, who died unexpectedly in 1910. In 1920, Codman left New York to return to France, where he spent the rest of his life at the Château de Grégy, wintering at Villa Leopolda in Villefranche-sur-Mer: it is his masterpiece, the fullest surviving expression of his esthetic.
Together from 1904 to 1910: 6 years.
Leila Howard Griswold Webb Codman (November 12, 1856 - January 21, 1910)
Ogden Codman, Jr. (January 19, 1863 - January 8, 1951)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Sleepy Hollow, New York, is the resting place of numerous famous figures, including Washington Irving, whose story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is set in the adjacent Old Dutch Burying Ground. Incorporated in 1849 as Tarrytown Cemetery, it posthumously honored Irving's request that it change its name to Sleepy Hollow Cemetery.
Address: 540 N Broadway, Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591, USA (41.09702, -73.86162)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: 09000380, 2009
Place
The cemetery is a non-profit, non-sectarian burying ground of about 90 acres (360,000 m2). It is contiguous with, but separate from, the church yard of the colonial-era church that was a setting for "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow". The Rockefeller family estate (see Kykuit), whose grounds abut Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, contains the private Rockefeller cemetery. Several outdoor scenes from the 1970 feature film “House of Dark Shadows” were filmed at the cemetery's receiving vault.
Notable queer burials at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery:
• Elizabeth Arden (1878–1966), businesswoman who built a cosmetics empire.
• Brooke Astor (1902–2007), philanthropist and socialite.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959), philanthropist; member of the Astor family.
• Paul Leicester Ford (1865–1902), editor, bibliographer, novelist, and biographer; brother of Malcolm Webster Ford by whose hand he died.
• Leila Howard Griswold Webb Codman (1856-1910), widow of railroad magnate H. Walter Webb, in 1904 married Ogden Codman, Jr. but died unexpectedly in 1910.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Lived: Palazzo di Valfonda, Via Valfonda, 9, 50123 Firenze, Italy (43.77837, 11.24866)
3 E 17th St, New York, NY 10003
Buried: Cimitero Accatolico, Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy, Plot: E18L/ E12/ 1355/

James Lorimer “Lorrie” Graham, Jr. (1835-1876), American Consul in Florence, died in that city on June 30, 1876. Graham was the brother of R.M.C. Graham, President of the Metropolitan Insurance Company. He was born in New-York on January 21, 1835, but educated partly at Amiens, in France. Graham afterward lived for a time in Rio Janeiro; then, returning to New York, sailed again in the ill-fated steamer San Francisco, which foundered in a gale off Cape Hatteras. The hardship and exposure he underwent at the time left lasting physical disturbances. In 1856 he married Josephine Garner, the sister of Commodore William T. Garner. His collections of coins, autographs, drawings, and books were very interesting and valuable, and his house at 3 E. 17th St, 10003, became quite a treasury of rare articles. Some time after his return to Europe, Graham was appointed Consul-General of the United States for Italy, and took up his residence in Florence, then the capital. His spacious apartments in the Orsini Palace were always opened, with the most free and bountiful hospitality, to his countrymen, and very few who visited Florence escaped a welcome there.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Palazzo di Valfonda, formerly also called Gualfonda, is located in Florence at number 9 of the street with the same name. It stretches along the tracks of the Santa Maria Novella station, next to the royal palace, built on the site of what was one of the most extensive private and beautiful gardens in the city, which stretched for about 12 hectares of an area from via Valfonda to the Fortezza da Basso from one side, and up to via della Scala on the other side to lap the Orti Oricellari and the vegetable gardens of the basilica of Santa Maria Novella .
Address: Via Valfonda, 9, 50123 Firenze, Italy (43.77837, 11.24866)
Type: Administrative Building (open to public)
Phone: +39 055 298951
Place
The palace was built by the Bartolini-Salimbeni family towards 1520, probably by the architect already used for another family palace in Via Tornabuoni, Baccio d'Agnolo. However, also other prominent artists, such as Benedetto da Rovezzano, Andrea Sansovino and Giovanni della Robbia, who endowed the house of a remarkable sculptural kit, contributed to the embellishment of the palace. In 1558 the building was bought by Chiappino Vitelli Il Giovane, mercenary, appointed head of the Tuscan militia by Cosimo I de' Medici. Later, the palace passed to the wealthy banking family of Germanic origin of Riccardi, who had the palace renovated and expanded by Gherardo Silvani. The Riccardi were great patrons and collectors of antiques and rare books and when in 1659 they bought the Palazzo Medici in Via Larga, they brought with them all their prestigious collections. In the early XIX century the building was purchased by a Strozzi-Ridolfi and then by Giuntini. By mid-century the beautiful garden was expropriated and destroyed to make room for the new station Maria Antonia and its annexes. In the late thirties of the XX century, the villa was purchased by the Unione degli Industriali, who renovated and expanded some parts of the building by the architect Gherardo Bosio. Since WWII the palace is the headquarters of Confindustria Firenze.
Life
Who: J. Lorimer Graham, Jr. (1869-April 29, 1876)
James Lorimer Graham, Jr., aka “Lorrie” Graham was born in New York City in 1831. He was educated in New York until the age of sixteen at which point he was sent to Amiens, France to complete his education. He lived there for a time with a cousin while pursuing his studies but would ultimately travel to Paris to complete his education. During his sojourn abroad he became a proficient French scholar and retained his fluency and perfect accent all his life. As such, he was often mistaken for a Frenchman. In terms of family, all that is known is that he married Josephine, a prominent New York merchant’s daughter, at an early age. Graham is said to have loved the literature and art of France and England as much as those of his own country. His love of literature and the arts led to jobs as a librarian and as the editor of Putnam's Magazine, a monthly periodical featuring American literature and articles on science, art, and politics. Graham served in Florence first as U.S. Consul General, then as U.S. Consul until his death in 1876.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The English Cemetery in Florence, Italy is at Piazzale Donatello. Its names, 'Cimitero Inglese' and 'Cimitero Protestante' are somewhat misleading, as the cemetery holds bodies of Orthodox Christians as well as those of many Reformed Churches; but the majority of those buried here were of the Anglophone British and American communities of Florence.
Address: Piazzale Donatello, 38, 50132 Firenze, Italy (43.77716, 11.26858)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 055 582608
Place
Before 1827 non-Catholics and non-Jews who died in Florence could be buried in Livorno only. In 1827 the Swiss Evangelical Reformed Church bought land outside the medieval wall and gate of Porta a' Pinti at Florence from Leopold II, Grand Duke of Tuscany for an international and ecumenical cemetery, Russian and Greek Orthodox burials joining the Protestant ones. Carlo Reishammer, a young architectural student, landscaped the cemetery, then Giuseppe Poggi shaped it as its present oval when Florence became capital of Italy. He surrounded it with studios for artists, including that of Michele Gordigiani (who painted the portraits of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, now in the National Portrait Gallery, London). Many famous people are buried in the graveyard like Elizabeth Barrett Browning (in a tomb designed by Frederic, Lord Leighton); her son Pen Browning is buried at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori. Florence has always been a place were queer people from all over the world came due to its acceptance, wherelse in other countries was impossible to live. We cannot say if the following were really all queer couples, or maybe just special friends, the fact is that some of them chose to be buried near to each other.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Acattolico:
• Emilia Sophia Macpherson Abadam Adams (1776-1831) was the grandmother of both Alice Abadam, the suffragette, and Vernon Lee (aka Violet Page), the writer.
• Charles Bankhead, M.D. (1768-1859), George IV's Physician Extraordinary, he was the physician in attendance at Castlereagh's suicide.
• Isa or Isabella Jane Blagden (1816 or 1817–1873) was an English-language novelist and poet born in the East Indies or India, who spent much of her life among the English community in Florence. Some of the surviving letters to Blagden from Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning are demonstrably affectionate. (Unfortunately Blagden's letters to them have not survived.) "Isa, perfect in companionship, as in other things," Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote of her. In one letter to Isa in the summer of 1859, she wrote: "My ever dearest, kindest Isa, I can't let another day go without writing just a word to say that I am alive enough to love you." In another from Paris a year earlier, Elizabeth Barrett Browning states that they had arrived "having lost nothing – neither a carpet-bag nor a bit of our true love for you."
• Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), died in her husband's arms. Robert Browning said that she died "smilingly, happily, and with a face like a girl's.... Her last word was... ''Beautiful". "On Monday July 1 the shops in the area around Casa Guidi were closed, while Elizabeth was mourned with unusual demonstrations." The nature of her illness is still unclear. Some modern scientists speculate her illness may have been hypokalemic periodic paralysis, a genetic disorder that causes weakness and many of the other symptoms she described.
• George Frederic Waihinger (1800-1867), German, was the beloved head waiter/butler to the Prince Demidoff of San Donato. Count Anatoly or Anatoli (called Anatole) Nikolaievich Demidov, 1st Prince of San Donato (1813–1870), was a Russian industrialist, diplomat and arts patron of the Demidov family.
• William Edgeworth (1832-1833), a one-year-old child unlisted in the Peerage though his two siblings Antonio Eroles and Francis Ysidro are. His mother is the Spanish Mariquita Eroles' sister, Rosa Florentina Eroles Edgeworth. His aunt is Maria Edgeworth, the great Irish novelist. He is buried in same plot with David (1807-1833) and Mary Reid (1833-1833), first husband and daughter of Mariquita Eroles, and Rev. Robert John Tennant (1809-1842), second husband of Mariquita. Mariquita Dorotea Francesca Tennant, née Eroles (1811–1860), is known as a social reformer. She is commemorated for helping the impoverished women of Windsor.
• Mary Farhill (1784-1854), small, clever, generous and eccentric, she was ennobled in Fiesole's Order of St Stephen. Farhill was found drowned in her bath at 70 years old. Though in Florence they thought she had no family when she died at the Villa il Palmerino, her brother Edward Farhill carefully arranged her burial in both English and Italian in a grand tomb. The Morning Post noted she willed her villa to the Grand Duchess of Tuscany, Maria Antonia. In the 1870s it came into the possession of the Earl of Belcarres and Crawford, Lord Lindsay. Dumas and Queen Victoria were guests under its roof. It later became Vernon Lee's residence.
• Harriet Theodosia Fisher, nee Garrow (1811-1848), half-sister of Theodosia Trollope, is buried with their maid, Elizabeth Shinner (1811-1852).
• James Lorimer "Lorrie" Graham, Jr (1831-1876), American Maecenas, married, gay, founded Graham's Magazine, had wealth, was shipwrecked and injured, appointed American Consul in Florence by President Grant, occupied the Palazzo di Valfonda, Claire Claremont (Mary Shelley's stepsister, who bore Lord Byron the child Allegra), lodging with him, and he collected autographs, books, paintings which he willed to the Century Association, New York, which sold them at auction.
• Hadrian Marryat (1845-1873). His maternal grandfather was General Lord Robert Edward Henry Somerset of Badminton House and his grandmother, Lady Louisa Augusta Courtenay, daughter of William Courtenay, 8th Earl of Devon, of Powderham Castle. The three Marryat children were painted in 1851-2 in Rome by the young Frederick Leighton.
• Clara Anastasia Novello (1818-1908), was an acclaimed soprano, the fourth daughter of Vincent Novello, a musician and music publisher, and his wife, Mary Sabilla Hehl. In 1843 she married Count Gigliucci, and retired in 1861. Clara Novello Davies (1861-1943), a well-known Welsh singer, teacher and conductor was named after Clara Novello. She married David Davies, a solicitor's clerk with the same surname as her own- Their son, David Ivor Davies, became better known as Ivor Novello, the actor, composer, dramatist and director.
• Eugene Polyakov (1943-1996), a Russian-trained balletmaster who was Rudolf Nureyev's chief assistant when Nureyev was director of the Paris Opera Ballet in the 1980's. Polyakov was born in Moscow and trained at the Bolshoi Ballet before leaving Russia for Venice in 1976. He formed his own troupe, Viva la Danza, there in 1977 and was the dance director of the Teatro Comunale in Florence from 1978 to 1983, when Nureyev appointed him balletmaster. Polyakov worked again in Florence from 1992 to 1995, when he returned to the Paris Opera Ballet. He died in Paris, but asked to be buried in Florence.
• Elena Raffalovich Comparetti (1842-1918) was an educator , intellectual and froebeliana Russian. She was the third daughter of Leo Raffalovich (1813-1879), wealthy jew landowner, and Rosette (Rosa) Mondel Loevensohn (1807-1895). The family moved to Paris. The older sister Maria Raffalovich, married to their uncle Hermann, is the mother of Marc André Raffalovich and great friend of Claude Bernard.
• William Reader of Banghurst House, Hampshire (1787-1846). His original tombstone identifies Henry Austin as his faithful servant; Austin died in Florence on July 5, 1859, age 40,
• The tomb of Mary Anne Salisbury (1798-1848) was placed by the Catholic wife of the last descendant of Michelangelo Buonarotti, Rosina, beneath a great yew tree at the entrance of the English Cemetery. It was tradition to have two yew trees, poisonous to cattle but essential for the English long bow of Agincourt in English graveyards, which also symbolize the Jachin and Boaz columns of the Jerusalem Temple. Only one yew tree remains and a falling branch from it destroyed this tomb, now replaced by the Rotary Club, 23/4/2012. The busts of Count Cosimo Buonarroti and Rosina which grace the Michelangelo museum at the Casa Buonarroti were sculpted by Aristodemo Costoli.
• James Bansfield’s tomb and that of King William IV's son's wife, Lady Georgina Hacking Hamilton Sewell, lie on either side of the king's natural son, Sir William Henry Sewell, each being apparently equal to Sir William. “Known as a servant above a servant a brother beloved. James died January 11, 1862. He was for 20 years the faithful and devoted servant of General Sir W.H. Sewell, K.C.B. by whose widow this tomb was raised.”
• Eleanore Emilie Contessa Stenbock-Fermor (1815-1859) was the daughter of Count Magnus Stenbock-Fermor, Russian Colonel. Her Oxford-educated PreRaphaelite poet nephew was Eric Stenbock.
• Theodosia Trollope, born Theodosia Garrow (1816–1865) was an English poet, translator, and writer known also for her marriage into the Trollope family. She married and bought a villa in Florence, Italy with her husband, Thomas Adolphus Trollope. Her hospitality made her home the centre of British society in the city. Her writings in support of the Italian nationalists are credited with changing public opinions.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
James Andrew Beard was an American cookbook author, teacher, syndicated columnist and television personality. Beard was a champion of American cuisine who taught and mentored generations of professional chefs and food enthusiasts.
Born: May 5, 1903, Portland, Oregon, United States
Died: January 21, 1985, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Reed College
Lived: James Beard Foundation, 167 W 12th St, New York, NY 10011, USA (40.73709, -73.99985)
498 E St, Gearhart, OR 97138
Buried: over the beach in Gearhart, Oregon where he spent his summers as a child (ashes)
TV shows: I Love to Eat

The James Beard Foundation is a New York City-based national non-profit culinary arts organization named in honor of James Beard, a prolific food writer, teacher, and cookbook author, who was also known as the "Dean of American Cookery."
Address: 167 W 12th St, New York, NY 10011, USA (40.73709, -73.99985)
Type: Adminstrative Building (open to public)
Phone: +1 212-675-4984
Place
The Foundation’s mission is to celebrate, nurture, and honor America’s diverse culinary heritage through programs that educate and inspire. The programs run the gamut from elegant guest-chef dinners to scholarships for aspiring culinary students, educational conferences, and industry awards. In the spirit of James Beard’s legacy, the Foundation not only creates programs that help educate people about American cuisine, but also support and promote the chefs and other industry professionals who are behind it. The Foundation was started in 1986 by Peter Kump, a former student of James Beard and founder of the Institute of Culinary Education. At Julia Child’s suggestion, Kump purchased Beard’s New York brownstone at 167 West 12th Street in Greenwich Village and preserved it as a gathering place where the general public and press alike are able to appreciate the talents of established and emerging chefs. The first such dinner was at the suggestion of Wolfgang Puck in 1987. Puck cooked a dinner to raise money and Kump later established it into a monthly event.
Life
Who: James Andrew Beard (May 5, 1903 – January 21, 1985)
James Beard was a cookbook author, teacher, syndicated columnist and television personality. Beard was a champion of American cuisine who taught and mentored generations of professional chefs and food enthusiasts. His legacy lives on in twenty books, other writings and his foundation’s annual James Beard awards in a number of culinary genres. Julia Child summed up Beard’s personal life: “Beard was the quintessential American cook. Well-educated and well-traveled during his eighty-two years, he was familiar with many cuisines but he remained fundamentally American. He was a big man, over six feet tall, with a big belly, and huge hands. An endearing and always lively teacher, he loved people, loved his work, loved gossip, loved to eat, loved a good time.” As a life-long bachelor, James Beard was homosexual. According to Beard’s memoir, "By the time I was seven, I knew that I was gay. I think it’s time to talk about that now." Beard also admitted of having "until I was about forty-five, I guess a really violent temper." Mark Bittman described him in a manner similar to Child’s description: "In a time when serious cooking meant French Cooking, Beard was quintessentially American, a Westerner whose mother ran a boardinghouse, a man who grew up with hotcakes and salmon and meatloaf in his blood. A man who was born a hundred years ago on the other side of the country, in a city, Portland, that at the time was every bit as cosmopolitan as, say, Allegheny, Pennsylvania." James Beard died of heart failure on January 21, 1985 at his home in New York City at age 81. He was cremated and his ashes scattered over the beach in Gearhart, Oregon, where he spent summers as a child.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

James Beard was born in Portland, Oregon in 1903 to Elizabeth and John Beard. His mother operated the Gladstone Hotel, and his father worked at the city's customs house. The family vacationed on the Pacific coast in Gearhart, Oregon, where Beard was exposed to Pacific Northwest cuisine. After spending many summers in Gearhart, Beard and his mother bought the smallest house in the seaside village, a cottage built in 1922 (498 E St, Gearhart, OR 97138). Restored to its original character, this charming cottage is located close to the beach on a large lot in West Gearhart. Beautifully landscaped, there is a garden/tool shed and playhouse included. Last sold in April 2012 for 327,500$. James Beard died of heart failure on January 21, 1985 at his home in New York City at age 81. He was cremated and his ashes scattered over the beach in Gearhart, Oregon. 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Duncan James Corrowr Grant was a British painter and designer of textiles, pottery, theatre sets and costumes. He was a member of the Bloomsbury Group.
Born: January 21, 1885, Aviemore, United Kingdom
Died: May 8, 1978, Aldermaston, United Kingdom
Education: Westminster School of Art
Lived: Wissett Lodge, Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Charleston Farmhouse, West Firle, Lewes, East Sussex BN8 6LL, UK (50.84268, 0.11559)
Hilton Hall, High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
24 Victoria Square, SW1W
26a Canonbury Square, N1
19 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
22 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
26 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
8 Fitzroy Street, W1T
28 Percy Street, W1T
1 Taviton Street, WC1H
143 Fellows Road, NW3
Doune of Rothiemurchus, The Polchar, Aviemore PH22, UK (57.1649, -3.83368)
45 Quai de Bourbon, Ile-St.-Louis, Paris
3 Park Square West, NW1
Buried: St Peter, The Street, West Firle, East Sussex, BN8 6LP
Books: Private

John Maynard Keynes, Baron Keynes of Tilton, was the preeminent economist of the 20th century. The artist Duncan Grant, whom he met in 1908, was one of Keynes's great loves. He was with Grant for nearly eight years and supported him financially even after they broke up. Keynes was also involved with Lytton Strachey. Keynes had won the affections of Arthur Hobhouse, as well as Grant, both times falling out with a jealous Strachey for it. Strachey had previously found himself put off by Keynes, not least because of his manner of "treat[ing] his love affairs statistically". Keynes' friends in the Bloomsbury Group were initially surprised when, in his later years, he began dating and pursuing affairs with women, demonstrating himself to be bisexual. Ray Costelloe (who would later marry Oliver Strachey) was an early heterosexual interest of Keynes. In 1906, Keynes had written of this infatuation that, "I seem to have fallen in love with Ray a little bit, but as she isn't male I haven't [been] able to think of any suitable steps to take.” In 1921, Keynes wrote that he had fallen "very much in love" with Lydia Lopokova, a well-known Russian ballerina, and one of the stars of Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. In the early years of his courtship, he maintained an affair with a younger man, Sebastian Sprott, in tandem with Lopokova, but eventually chose Lopokova exclusively. They married in 1925.
Together from 1908 to 1916: 8 years.
Duncan Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)
John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes (June 5, 1883 – April 21, 1946)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. As a child, he had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny", by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. A writer, he first met members of the Bloomsbury group in 1910 but was not fully accepted by them until 1914, when he became Duncan Grant's lover. Like Grant, Garnett was a conscientious objector and having worked in France in 1915 with the Friends War Victims Relief Mission, he worked as a farm laborer to avoid conscription on his return to England. Garnett moved with Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell to Charleston farmhouse in 1916. He married Grant’s daughter (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), Angelica, in 1942. He was present at her birth on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry, to the horror of her parents.
Together from 1914 to 1921: 7 years.
David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
Duncan Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Duncan Grant was a British painter and designer. He was a cousin, and for some time a lover, of Lytton Strachey. Through the Stracheys, Duncan was introduced to the Bloomsbury Group, where John Maynard Keynes became another of his lovers. Grant is best known for his painting style, which developed in the wake of French post-impressionist exhibitions mounted in London in 1910. He often worked with, and was influenced by, another member of the group, art critic and artist Roger Fry. Grant was in a relationship with Vanessa Bell and is the father of her daughter, Angelica. Duncan had many serious relationships with men, most notably David Garnett, who will marry his daughter. In Grant's later years, the poet Paul Roche, whom he had known since 1946, took care of him and enabled Grant to maintain his way of life. Roche was a British poet, novelist, and professor of English. Roche returned to England from New York to be with Grant after Bell's death, eventually joined by his entire family. Clarissa Tanner, Roche’s wife, came to accept Grant's role in Roche's life, although sexual relations between Roche and Grant cooled off out of respect for Tanner. Roche was devastated by Grant’s death at the age of 93.
Together from 1946 to 1978: 32 years.
Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)
Donald Robert Paul Roche (September 26, 1916 - October 30, 2007)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Doune of Rothiemurchus, two miles south of Aviemore in Strathspey is an XVII-century mansion which replaced an earlier castle. The lands were held by the Shaws, Mackintoshes and by the Dallases of Cantray. James Shaw of Rothiemurchus was killed at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411.
Address: The Polchar, Aviemore PH22, UK (57.1649, -3.83368)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Historic Scotland Building ID: 253 (Grade B, 1978)
Place
An elegant country house, the home of the Grants of Rothiemurchus for centuries. The Doune stands beside an ancient motte, or hill fort (Doune comes from 'dun' for a fortified place). The house dates to the XVI century, and was probably built by the Shaw family. The house was extended in the 1780s and again in 1803 when the Georgian frontage was added. For a time in the 1930s the house was operated as a hotel, and it was used by the army as a base during WWII. After the war the house was abandonned, and by 1975 it was derelict and in danger of being lost forever. An ambitious programme of ongoing restoration work has restored it to something approaching its former glory. Doune of Rothiemurchus was the home of Elizabeth Grant, who wrote her “Memoires of a Highland Lady” here. Visitors can explore the Doune as part of a themed “Highland Lady Safari,” or a Rothiemurchus Experience Safari Land Rover tour. The Doune is set in the midst of a glorious outdoor estate, with a location on the edge of Britain's winter playground; the Cairngorms National Park. The estate offers superb scenery and a huge variety of outdoor recreational activities.
Life
Who: Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)
Duncan Grant was a British painter and designer of textiles, pottery, theatre sets and costumes. He was a member of the Bloomsbury Group.He was a grandson of Sir John Peter Grant, 12th Laird of Rothiemurchus, KCB, GCMG, sometime Lieutenant-Governor of Bengal. Grant was also the first cousin twice removed of John Grant, 13th Earl of Dysart (b. 1946). Grant was born on January 21, 1885 to Major Bartle Grant, a "poverty-stricken" major in the army, and Ethel McNeil in Rothiemurchus, Aviemore, Scotland. Between 1887-94 the family lived in India and Burma, returning to England every two years. During this period Grant was educated by his governess, Alice Bates. Along with Rupert Brooke, Grant attended Hillbrow School, Rugby (between 1894–99). During this period, Grant would spend his school holidays at Hogarth House, Chiswick with his grandmother, Lady Grant. He attended St Paul's School, London (as a boarder for two terms) between 1899-91 where he was awarded several art prizes. Between 1899/1900-1906, Grant lived with his aunt and uncle, Sir Richard and Lady Strachey and their children. Lady Strachey was able to persuade Grant's parents that he should be allowed to pursue an education in art. In 1902 Grant was enrolled by his aunt at Westminster School of Art; he attended for the next three years. While at Westminster, Grant was encouraged in his studies by Simon Bussy, a French painter and lifelong friend of Matisse, who went on to marry Dorothy Strachey.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Back in London in 1905, Duncan Grant lived again with his parents at 143 Fellows Road, NW3 on the lower slopes of Hampstead. The Stracheys were nearby, having moved in June to 67 Belsize Park Gardens.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 33 Fitzroy Square, Roger Fry (1866–1934), “In this house Roger Fry 1866–1934 Artist and Art Critic ran the Omega Workshops 1913–1919"
Address: Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Fitzroy Square is one of the Georgian squares in London and is the only one found in the central London area known as Fitzrovia. The square, nearby Fitzroy Street, and the Fitzroy Tavern in Charlotte Street have the family name of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton, into whose ownership the land passed through his marriage. His descendant Charles FitzRoy, 1st Baron Southampton developed the area during the late XVIII and early XIX century. Fitzroy Square was a speculative development intended to provide London residences for aristocratic families, and was built in four stages. Leases for the eastern and southern sides, designed by Robert Adam, were granted in 1792; building began in 1794 and was completed in 1798 by Adam’s brothers James and William. These buildings are fronted in Portland stone brought by sea from Dorset. The Napoleonic Wars and a slump in the London property market brought a temporary stop to construction of the square after the south and east sides were completed. According to the records of the Squares Frontagers’ Committee, 1815 residents looked out on “vacant ground, the resort of the idle and profligate.” Another contemporary account describes the incomplete square: “The houses are faced with stone, and have a greater proportion of architectural excellence and embellishment than most others in the metropolis. They were designed by the Adams, but the progress of the late war prevented the completion of the design. It is much to be regretted, that it remains in its present unfinished state.” The northern and western sides were subsequently constructed in 1827-1829 and 1832-1835 respectively, and are stucco-fronted. The south side suffered bomb damage during WWII and was rebuilt with traditional facades to remain in keeping with the rest of the square.
Notable queer residents at Fitzroy Square:
• No. 8, W1T was the home of the painter James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903.)
• No. 19, W1T was the base for the “International School” run by Louise Michel in the 1890s. Later, from 1909 to 1911, was the home of Bloomsbury Group artist Duncan Grant (1885-1978.)
• No. 21, W1T was Roger Fry (December 14, 1866 –September 9, 1934)’s studio
• No. 22, W1T was Duncan Grant’s studio.
• No. 26, W1T Duncan Grant and John Maynard Keynes shared a flat.
• Engligh Heritage Blue Plaque: 29 Fitzroy Square, W1T Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (1882–1941), "Novelist and Critic lived here 1907–1911" Also George Bernard Shaw lived here from 1887 until his marriage in 1898.
• No. 33, W1T housed Roger Fry (1866-1934)’s Omega Workshop, creating avant-garde furniture from 1913 to 1919.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Charleston, in East Sussex is a property associated with the Bloomsbury group, that is open to the public.
Address: West Firle, Lewes, East Sussex BN8 6LL, UK (50.84268, 0.11559)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1323 811265
English Heritage Building ID: 292908 (Grade II, 1965)
Place
The interior of the XVIII century farmhouse contains an important series of mural and furniture decorations painted between 1916-1939 by Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell. Charleston was the country home of Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant and is an example of their decorative style within a domestic context, representing the fruition of over sixty years of artistic creativity. Vanessa Bell wrote of this time; "It will be an odd life, but ... it ought to be a good one for painting." In addition to the house and artists’ garden, there is an exhibition gallery showing a mix of contemporary and historical shows of fine and decorative art, a Crafts Council selected shop selling applied art and books relating to Bloomsbury, a small tea room and a video presentation. Charleston hosts a number of special events throughout the year, most notably the Charleston Festival which is centred on talks and drama relating to literary, artistic and Bloomsbury themes. The house is located in the village of Firle, in the Lewes District of East Sussex. As you enter the street in Firle village, continue up the street after the Ram Inn and you will see Little Talland House on the left, opposite the village hall. Little Talland House was rented by Virginia Woolf from January 1911 to January 1912. “I'm very much excited - furnishing my cottage, and staining the floors the colours of the Atlantic in a storm.” (Virginia Woolf, Letters, no. 552) “I've got to go down [to Firle] and make curtains and move beds at the cottage, having been so rash as to ask 5 people to stay the week after. Nessa is bringing a sewing machine; and in the intervals, I shall spur her to bouts of talk.” (Letters, no. 553) “I spent yesterday finishing off the cottage. Its right underneath the downs, and though itself an eyesore, still that dont matter when one's inside. I have one gooseberry bush; 3 mongrels, thought by some to grow currants. Shall you ever come and stay there? There is a Bath, and a W. C.” (Letters, no. 554, to Violet Dickinson) “The villa is inconceivably ugly, done up in patches of post-impressionist colour.” (Letters, no. 561). The graves of Vanessa and Quentin Bell and Duncan Grant are quite close to the wall on the North side of the churchyard at St Peter (The Street, West Firle, East Sussex, BN8 6LP).
Life
Who: Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978) and Vanessa Bell, née Stephen (May 30, 1879 –April 7, 1961)
In 1916 the artists Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant moved to Sussex with their unconventional household when Grant, under the terms of his exemption from military service, was employed at a nearby farm together with David Garnett (1892-1981.) Over the following half century Charleston became the country meeting place for the group of artists, writers and intellectuals known as Bloomsbury. Garnett, Clive Bell and John Maynard Keynes lived at Charleston for considerable periods; Virginia and Leonard Woolf, E. M. Forster, Lytton Strachey and Roger Fry were frequent visitors. Inspired by Italian fresco painting and the Post-Impressionists, the artists decorated the walls, doors and furniture at Charleston. The walled garden was redesigned in a style reminiscent of southern Europe, with mosaics, box hedges, gravel pathways and ponds, but with a touch of Bloomsbury humour in the placing of the statuary. "It’s most lovely, very solid and simple, with ... perfectly flat windows and wonderful tiled roofs. The pond is most beautiful, with a willow at one side and a stone or flint wall edging it all round the garden part, and a little lawn sloping down to it, with formal bushes on it." — Vanessa Bell. The rooms on show form a complete example of the decorative art of the Bloomsbury artists: murals, painted furniture, ceramics, objects from the Omega Workshops, paintings and textiles. The collection includes work by Auguste Renoir, Picasso, Derain, Matthew Smith, Sickert, Stephen Tomlin (1901-1937) and Eugène Delacroix.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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"Vanessa Bell, who had fallen in love with Duncan Grant before the start of the war, was painting in a farm-cottage on the Sussex coast, living in an uneasy triangle with Duncan and his new lover, David (known as Bunny) Garnett. In 1918 Bell gave birth to Grant’s child, Angelica Bell.” Hermione Lee, “Virginia Woolf” (1996)
Address: Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 01986 873173
Place
Wissett is a village and parish in the Waveney district of Suffolk located at 52.35N 01.46E TM3679 about 2 km (about 1.5 miles) northwest of Halesworth. Historically, it was in the hundred of Blything. It has a population of about 200, measured at 268 in the 2011 Census. Wisset manor was held by Ralph the staller, Baron of Gael in Brittany before the Norman Conquest. Ralph was created Earl of Suffolk and Norfolk in 1067, but his son lost the title and the manor passed to Count Alan of Brittany and Richmond in 1075. The Domesday Book shows that in 1086 Wissett had a church at Rumburgh with two carucates of free land, twelve monks, and a chapel in the village. The XI century flint parish church dedicated to Saint Andrew has a circular church tower with a floor dated to the XII Century. This is the oldest recorded church tower floor in the United Kingdom. Built as a chapel to Rumburgh Priory, the surviving elements of the Norman church are two doors to the nave and the tower arch. The parish is now part of the Blyth Valley Team Ministry in the diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich. Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, and David Garnett lived in Wissett for the summer of 1916. Virginia Woolf (Vanessa’s sister) said after visiting them: "Wissett seems to lull asleep all ambition. Don’t you think they have discovered the secret of life? I thought it wonderfully harmonious." Wissett Hall is a red brick manor house owned by Colin Holmes, co-founder of Dencora PLC. The village pub is the Plough Inn. Wissett Wines are produced at the Valley Farm Vineyards by Elaine Heeler and Vanessa Tucker, who brought the business in 2014, Wissett Wines was established in 1987.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981), Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978) and Vanessa Bell, née Stephen (May 30, 1879 – April 7, 1961)
David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. He was the son of Constance Clara Garnett (née Black), an English translator of XIX-century Russian literature, one of the first English translators of Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Anton Chekhov who introduced them on a wide basis to the English-speaking public, and Edward William Garnett, an English writer, critic and a significant and personally generous literary editor, who was instrumental in getting D. H. Lawrence's “Sons and Lovers” published. As a child, David had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny,” by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. His first wife was illustrator Rachel "Ray" Marshall (1891–1940), sister of translator and diarist Frances Partridge. He and Ray, whose woodcuts appear in some of his books, had two sons, one of whom (Richard) went to Beacon Hill School. Ray died relatively young of breast cancer. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. He was present at the birth of Grant’s daughter, Angelica (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?.” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry (on May 8, 1942), to the horror of her parents.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The house at 45 Quai de Bourbon, on the Ile-St.-Louis, was owned by Prince Antoine Bibesco (who died in 1951). Mina Curtiss, editor of the letters of Marcel Proust, describes it as “the most heavenly house on the prow of the Ile-St.-Louis, with a view of both sides of the Seine… with a room so beautiful it took my breath away – full length Vuillard panels obviously painted to fit on the walls… a princely residence… all elegant, ancient stone…” Duncan Grant stayed here in 1920.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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From 1920 to 1940 Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell had their studio at 8 Fitzroy Street, W1T. “The Armchair, 8 Fitzroy Street” by Duncan Grant, 1925, originally in the Collection of H. Trevor Williams, from whom the paiting was purchased by the Leicester Galleries, and subsequently purchased by the Ministry of Works in Dec. 1958, now hangs at Downing Street. The studio was destroyed by a bombing during WWII.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In 1922 David Garnett published the highly successful novel, “Lady Into Fox.” The money he made from this book enabled him to buy Hilton Hall, an early XVII century house near Huntingdon.
Address: High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 54022 (Grade II, 1951)
Place
Described as “The most beautiful of all the Bloomsbury houses” by biographer, critic and art historian Frances Spalding, Hilton Hall was bought by David Garnett Fox in 1924. There he entertained many literary friends: T.E. Lawrence would startle the village by roaring up unannounced on his motorbike; Virginia Woolf came and amused his boys by pretending to be a wolf. D.H. Lawrence teased him for living in a Hall, but added: “It’s not at all grand, except in the way a grandmother is grand, by being ancient.” Hilton Hall was built early in the XVII century perhaps by Robert Walpole, (a very distant relative of the prime minister) who died there in 1699 and is buried in Hilton Church. It was refronted and given new sash windows and panelling in the middle of the XVIII century but the fine Jacobean staircase, wide floorboards and moulded beams all remain. Otherwise it has been very little altered except by an extension containing panelling and a bay window salvaged from the ruins of Old Park Farm in Hilton. Behind the house there is a large dovehouse, also of the XVII century, which was used by Garnett’s second wife, Angelica, as a studio. She was the daughter of the Bloomsbury artists Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell, and was herself a noted artist. She has left her mark on the house with a decorated bedroom mantelpiece, a large mural in the dovehouse and a mosaic doorstep. Because of its place in the history of the Bloomsbury Group, and its collection of paintings and sculpture – especially by Angelica’s parents, it has been a popular destination for groups from the Cambridge branch of the Art Fund and the Friends of Kettle Yard. The grounds are all enclosed by hedging and fencing. Swimming pool, kitchen garden.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
The Garnetts lived at Hilton Hall, Hilton near St Ives in Cambridgeshire, where David Garnett kept a herd of Jersey cows. They had four daughters: in order, Amaryllis, Henrietta, and twins Nerissa and Frances; eventually the couple separated. Amaryllis Garnett (1943–1973) was an actress who had a small part in Harold Pinter’s film adaptation of “The Go-Between” (1970.) She drowned in the Thames, aged 29. Henrietta Garnett married Lytton Burgo Partridge, her father’s nephew by his first wife Ray, but was left a widow with a newborn infant when she was 18; she oversaw the legacies of both David Garnett and Duncan Grant. Nerissa Garnett (1946–2004) was an artist, ceramicist, and photographer. Fanny (Frances) Garnett moved to France where she became a farmer.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Soon after Duncan Grant and Paul Roche’s initial meeting in 1946, Roche moved into the flat owned by Marjorie Strachey (sister of Lytton Strachey) at 1 Taviton Street, WC1H where Grant had the use of a room for three days a week. Although still serving as a priest at St Mary’s, Cadogan Gardens, Roche often wore a sailor suit (a habit begun during the War) to meet Grant at Victoria Station.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 145 North End Road, Golders Green, Evelyn Waugh (1903-1966) "Writer lived here"
Address: Canonbury Square, London N1 2AL, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Canonbury is a residential district in the London Borough of Islington in the north of London. It is roughly in the area between Essex Road, Upper Street and Cross Street and either side of St Paul’s Road. In 1253 land in the area was granted to the Canons of St Bartholomew’s Priory, Smithfield and became known as Canonbury. The area continued predominantly as open land until it was developed as a suburb in the early XIX century. In common with similar inner London areas, it suffered decline when the construction of railways in the 1860s enabled commuting into the city from further afield. The gentrification of the area from the 1950s included new developments to replace war-damaged properties in Canonbury Park North and South as well as restoration of older buildings. East Canonbury is the south-eastern corner of the district, bordering on the Regents Canal. Parts of this area were transferred to the district from the London Borough of Hackney in a boundary adjustment (along the line of the northern tow-path of the canal), in 1993. In the east is the New River Estate (formerly the Marquess Estate), a 1,200 dwelling council estate, completed in 1976 on 26 acres (110,000 m2), and designed by Darbourne & Darke. A dark red brick, traffic free estate, it was praised as an example of municipal architecture, but acquired a bad reputation and has since been extensively redeveloped to improve security for residents. Canonbury Square is an attractive square, developed between 1805 and 1830, it includes a variety of distinct styles. In 1812, when few properties had been built, the New North Road turnpike, now known as Canonbury Road, was constructed and bisects the square. Many significant figures from the arts and literary worlds have lived on the square, including George Orwell, Evelyn Waugh and Samuel Phelps.
Notable queer residents at Canonbury Square:
• Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626), King James I’s Lord Chancellor, lived in Canonbury Tower, N1 1616-1626
• Evelyn Waugh (October 28, 1903- April 10, 1966), writer, lived at 17a Canonbury Square, N1; he left after a couple of years in 1930, claiming he was tired of having to explain to friends why he was livng in so appalling a district. Waugh lived also at 145 North End Road (London, W14)
• Duncan Grant (1885-1978) and Vanessa Bell (1879-1961), painters and designers, lived at 26a Canonbury Square, N1 from 1949 to 1955.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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28 Percy Street, W1T was the London base for Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant from 1955 to 1961.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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From 1961 to 1970 Duncan Grant stayed at 24 Victoria Square, SW1W. Grant moved here soon after Vanessa Bell’s death, and Paul Roche found him sitting among his unsorted belongings and furniture there in a state of emotional collapse, unable to focus on the mess. “I think it’s simpler just to die,” he told Paul. Clarissa Roche helped brighten his rooms by renewing curtains and covers.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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3 Park Square West, NW1, is part of John Nash's grand scheme for Regent's Park as a setting for the Regent's own palace (never built). It was home of Professor Patrick Trevor-Roper, eminent eye surgeon, from the 1960s to his death in 2004. Trevor-Roper was one of only three witnesses to the Wolfenden Committee on Homosexual Law Reform to identify themselves as gay men - a powerful demonstration of the legal and social pressure on gay men to remain discrete about their sexuality in the early 1960s. Trevor-Roper was committed to homosexual law reform throughout his life. Patrician in his manner, he had many liberal and bohemian friends as well as establishment connections. 3 Park Square West was the venue for the first meeting of the founders of the Terrence Higgins Trust. From 1970, gay artist Duncan Grant spent the last fifteen years of his life as a lodger, living and working in the basement areas of the house and often audible throughout the building due to his love of playing very loud rock music. Led Zeppelin was one of his favourites. Trevor-Roper furnished the house in Regency taste and was a long-standing campaigner - ultimately successful - against the opticians dispensing monopoly of spectacles. He also supported conservationists battles against the destruction by developers of historic areas of London; the house was the initial office of both the Spitalfields Trust and Twentieth Century Society.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cristóbal Balenciaga Eizaguirre was a Spanish Basque fashion designer and the founder of the Balenciaga fashion house.
Born: January 21, 1895, Getaria, Gipuzkoa, Spain
Died: March 23, 1972, Xàbia, Spain
Lived: Cristobal Balenciaga Museum, Aldamar Parkea, 6, 20808 Getaria, Gipuzkoa, Spain (43.30188, -2.20494)
Buried: Cementerio de Getaria (Getaria), San Sebastian, Provincia de Guipuzcoa, País Vasco, Spain
Label: Balenciaga
Other name: Cristobal Balentziaga Eizagirre (Basque)
Parents: Martina Eizaguirre Embil, José Balenciaga Basurto
Organization founded: Balenciaga

The Balenciaga Museum is located in Getaria, just 25Km from San Sebastian, and makes an ideal daytrip from Guipuzcoa’s capital. Whilst the museum is well worth a visit in itself, Getaria is also one of the prettiest coastal towns in the region.
Address: Aldamar Parkea, 6, 20808 Getaria, Gipuzkoa, Spain (43.30188, -2.20494)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +34 943 00 88 40
Place
The Balenciaga Museum (Cristobal Balenciaga museoa) opened on June 7th 2011. Getaria was chosen as it is the birthplace of the renowned designer, and the museum became the first in the world to be dedicated entirely to the work of a fashion designer. The museum is housed in a building connected to the Aldamar Palace, the former residence of the Marquis and Marquise of Casa Torre, grandparents of Queen Fabiola of Belgium and mentors to Balenciaga in his early days. The building consists of four floors divided into three large spaces and six halls. One section of the museum showcases a rotating selection of the designer’s pieces, some of which are part of the Balenciaga Foundation’s own Collection, as well as others belonging to private individuals. In addition to this, the museum plays host to various temporary exhibitions and leisure activities. The building itself is also well worth seeing for its interesting combination of tradition and modernity in a single structure.
Life
Who: Cristóbal Balenciaga Eizaguirre (January 21, 1895 – March 23, 1972)
Cristóbal Balenciaga was a Spanish Basque fashion designer and the founder of the Balenciaga fashion house. He had a reputation as a couturier of uncompromising standards and was referred to as "the master of us all" by Christian Dior and as "the only couturier in the truest sense of the word" by Coco Chanel, who continued "The others are simply fashion designers". He continues to be revered as the supreme deity of the European salons. On the day of his death, in 1972, Women's Wear Daily ran the headline "The king is dead" (no one in the fashion world had any doubt as to whom it referred). Balenciaga was born in Getaria, a fishing town in the Basque province of Gipuzkoa, on January 21, 1895. His mother was a seamstress, and as a child Balenciaga often spent time with her as she worked. At the age of twelve, he began work as the apprentice of a tailor. When Balenciaga was a teenager, the Marchioness de Casa Torres, the foremost noblewoman in his town, became his customer and patron. She sent him to Madrid, where he was formally trained in tailoring. Balenciaga was homosexual, although he kept his sexuality private throughout his life. The love of his life and long time partner was Franco-Russian milliner Vladzio Zawrorowski d'Attainville, who he met in the 1920s and had helped fund setting him up. When d'Attainville died in 1948, Balenciaga was so broken he almost considered closing the business. In 1960 he made the wedding dress for Fabiola de Mora y Aragón when she married king Baudouin I of Belgium. The Queen later donated her wedding dress to the Cristóbal Balenciaga Foundation. On 7 June 2011, the Balenciaga Museum was inaugurated in his hometown of Getaria by Queen Sofía of Spain and with the presence of Hubert de Givenchy, honorific president of the Balenciaga Foundation. The museum has a collection of more than 1,200 pieces designed by Balenciaga, part of them donations by disciples like Givenchy or clients, like Queen Fabiola of Belgium and the heirs of Grace Kelly. Balenciaga is buried at Cementerio de Getaria, San Sebastian.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Christian Dior was a French fashion designer, best known as the founder of one of the world's top fashion houses, also called Christian Dior, which is now owned by Groupe Arnault.
Born: January 21, 1905, Granville, France
Died: October 23, 1957, Montecatini Terme
Education: Sciences Po
Lived: 220, Route Départementale 562, 83440 Montauroux, France (43.59805, 6.78831)
Buried: Cimetière de Callian, Callian, Departement du Var, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Siblings: Catherine Dior, Raymond Dior, Jacqueline Dior, Bernard Dior
Parents: Maurice Dior, Isabelle Cardamone

Christian Dior’s love for this land was born in the 1930s, when his family, ruined by the stock market crash, had to leave Normandy to take refuge in the South. Dior’s father acquired a modest home, Les Nayssées, in Callian, and it is here that his son discovered himself "peasant in the heart".
Address: 220, Route Départementale 562, 83440 Montauroux, France (43.59805, 6.78831)
Type: Private Property
Phone: +33 4 94 39 01 40
Place
The château de La Colle Noire is a residence located at the entrance of the Pays de Fayence, on the border of the Alpes-Maritimes and the Var. It is built on a promontory overlooking the plain of Montauroux. The castle is surrounded by a park with a chapel dedicated to Sainte-Anne. The ensemble dates back to the mid-XIX century and was completely redesigned by Christian Dior from 1950. It is property of Parfums Christian Dior since 2013. From the XV century to the beginning of the XIX century, the site is described in various ways: La Colle Narbonne, La Colle, La Colle Noire, logis de La Colle. However, it was from 1826 that the domain really took shape, when Henri-Emmanuel Poulle (1792-1877), lawyer, first president of the Court of Aix-en-Provence and deputy of the Var, from an old family of Montauroux, becomes owner of the "domaine de La Colle", which by extension will take the name of the neighboring hamlet to become the "domaine de La Colle Noire". Beginning in 1839, Henri-Emmanuel Poulle created a relais des Postes on the estate, the building of which would probably serve as a base for the future castle. Over time, through various acquisitions, the estate reaches an area of more than 100 hectares, becoming a vast agricultural operation, composed mainly of plowing, pastures, vines and muriers. It was in 1858, at the age of 66, that Henri-Emmanuel Poulle decided to build a residence there for his retirement. The construction will last three years, from 1858 to 1861. The facade with its two emblematic towers, dominating the valley, dates from that time. It was also during this period that Poulle had a chapel dedicated to Sainte Anne, referring to her daughter Anne-Victoire. Henri-Emmanuel Poulle also built a chapel dedicated to Saint Barthélémy in the village of Montauroux, near the parish church. Due to the loss of his title, it could not be sold as a national asset during the French Revolution and was removed from vandalism during the revolution of 1870. It passed into the patrimony of Poulle and was transmitted to Christian Dior who offered it to the commune of Montauroux in 1953. Built in 1634 by the Pénitents Blancs (White Penitents,) it still presents today a decor painted on wood of which are adorned the walls as well as the vault. At the death of Henri-Emmanuel Poulle in 1877, the property passed to his daughter, Anne-Victoire (1827-1894), married to Félix Reibaud, maître des Postes du secteur. Anne-Victoire, very pious, obtained from the Bishop of Frejus that the priest of Montauroux could say mass at the Sainte-Anne chapel on the property every Sunday except at Christmas, Easter and other feasts. The inhabitants of the neighborhood then took the habit of coming to hear Mass at La Colle Noire. The Sainte-Anne chapel is still consecrated today. On the death of Anne-Victoire in 1894, his son Paul Félix Honoré Reibaud inherited the estate of La Colle Noire. Head of office at the Ministry of Justice in Paris, he had no interest in this property. Abandoned, the property was sold to a businessman named Fayolle, whose widow resold the estate in 1921 to Pierre Grosselin. On October 25, 1950, the property, with an area of 50 hectares, made up of a noble house, agricultural buildings and land cultivated mainly in vines and flowers, was bought by Christian Dior.
Life
Who: Christian Dior (January 21, 1905 – October 24, 1957)
Christian Dior acquires the property in a region that he knew well. His father, widow since 1931, lived in the plain of Callian with his young sister Catherine, inspiration of the perfume Miss Dior. "And then Miss Dior was born. It was born from those evenings of Provence crossed by fireflies where the green jasmine serves as a counter-song to the melody of the night and the earth". It is therefore in this Provence dear to his heart, in the inaccessible Var inland that Christian Dior will develop his house, far from Paris and 30 Avenue Montaigne, home of his couture house. "It is in Montauroux, near Callian, where a good star had allowed me, fifteen years ago, to find tranquility and prepare a new existence. Of the house, I cannot say much because I'm doing it. It is simple, solid and noble, and its serenity suits the period of life that I will have to tackle in a few years. That house, I wish it to be my real home. Where - if God lends me long life - I can retire. Where - if I have the means - I can close the loop of my existence and find, under another climate, the closed garden that protected my childhood. That is where I can finally live quiet, forgetting Christian Dior to just become Christian again. It is at Montauroux that I write these last lines." It was to the Russian architect André Svétchine that Christian Dior entrusted the restoration and renovation of La Colle Noire from 1955 onwards. His friends Raymonde Zehnacker in Mougins and then Marc Chagall in Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat and in Saint-Paul-de-Vence also used the same architect, then specialized in the transformation of "rural dwellings, neither simple farms nor real castles". The stone was laid bare, the perspectives restored and enlarged, the accesses rethought with the transformation of the service wing into a main entrance. Planted with cypresses, this walkway leads to the hexagonal entrance hall, a sort of atrium designed by Christian Dior himself, where the Provençal calade floor draws a pattern of wind-colored roses, dear to his childhood in Normandy. To this facade located in the North responds the South facade, asymmetric, in the style of Provençal villa of the years 1940-50. It is reflected in a 45 meter long water mirror, also designed by Christian Dior, showing a contrast between the sinuosity of the landscape and the rigor of its straight lines. Completely redesigned, the distribution includes a large staircase with zenital lighting leading to "rooms to give" to friends of passage, a succession of reception rooms, including the large living room measuring more than 18 meters opening onto a terrace overlooking the mirror of water. Combining vintage furniture, comfort from the 1950s, references to Provence or England, "it is an art of living that Christian Dior wanted to invent at the Colle Noire", André Svétchine declared. The reception rooms and apartment of Christian Dior are furnished with eclecticism, decorated with objects of the XVIII and XIX centuries bought from antique dealers, while some rooms have the Louis XV or Louis XVI styles "among a multitude of other styles”. If Provence has inspired Christian Dior to create Miss Dior in 1947, it is the lily of the valley of the Colle Noire that is at the origin of Diorissimo, created in 1956 by Edmond Roudnitska. It is this tradition that inspired to François Demachy, perfume-creator of Parfums Christian Dior, La Col Noire, whose flowers come from the rose field in May, planted as a tribute in the park of the estate. After the death of Christian Dior on October 23, 1957, her sister Catherine inherited the estate but she cannot keep it and in 2013 the company Parfums Christian Dior bought La Colle Noire. Before this acquisition, the property belonged to the Laroche, owners of La Reserve in Beaulieu, then to Mr. and Mrs. Tassou. After an intense restoration begun in 2015, La Colle Noire was inaugurated by the Parfums Christian Dior on May 9, 2016 in the presence of Charlize Theron, regaining its vocation to welcome "the friends of the house". Christian Dior lies in a very simple tomb near his father, his housekeeper and his sister Catherine, who died in 2008, in the cemetery of Callian, near the chapel of Saint-Barthélemy.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Antonio D'Amico is a model and fashion designer. He is best known as the partner of Gianni Versace.
Born: January 21, 1959 (age 57), Mesagne

Gianni Versace’s influence and artistic vision are evident throughout the gated property, which features an opulent 10-bedroom, 11-bathroom Mediterranean villa decorated with hand-painted walls and ceiling frescos.
Address: 1116 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach, FL 33139, USA (25.7819, -80.13044)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 786-485-2200
Place
Built in 1930
The house was built in Mediterranean Revival style, commissioned by architect Alden Freeman. There is a rumour that during construction a time capsule was hidden in one of the walls. When Freeman died in 1937 the house was bought by Jacques Amsterdam who changed it into an apartment building naming it The Amsterdam Palace. In 1992 it was purchased by Gianni Versace to become his residence in South Beach. He restored and expanded the building by adding a south wing and a pool. Versace completely redecorated it. Gianni Versace and his partner Antonio D’Amico were regulars on the international party scene. A lot of famous people stayed in the house. Versace was murdered outside his Miami Beach home, the former Casa Casuarina now known as The Villa, at the age of 50 by Andrew Cunanan, a male prostitute and crazed C.S. Lewis fan. The Mansion now operates as a hotel, restaurant and event location. The restaurant is Il Sole at The Villa Casa Casuarina.
Note: The Hilton Garden Inn Miami South Beach - Royal Polo, formerly Embassy Hotel (2940 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, FL 33140) was the early location of Miami's Jewel Box Revue, from 1936 to 1939, featuring several dozen female impersonators and one male impersonator.
Life
Who: Giovanni Maria Versace (December 2, 1946 – July 15, 1997)
Gianni Versace was an Italian fashion designer and founder of Versace, an international fashion house, which produces accessories, fragrances, make-up and home furnishings as well as clothes. He also designed costumes for the theatre and films. As a friend of Eric Clapton, Diana, Princess of Wales, Naomi Campbell, Madonna, Elton John, Cher, Sting and many other celebrities, he was the first designer to link fashion to the music world. Versace met his partner Antonio D’Amico, a model, in 1982. Their relationship lasted until Versace’s murder. During that time, D’Amico worked as a designer for the company, becoming head designer for Istante and Versus Sport. Versace’s will left D’Amico with a lifelong pension of 50 million lire (about US$26,000) per month, and the right to live in any of Versace’s homes in Italy and the United States. However, due to Versace family’s interference he only obtained a fraction of these allowances.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Villa Fontanelle is a villa (sometimes called a Palazzo) near Moltrasio on Lake Como, Lombardy, Italy, about 50 kilometres (31 mi) from Milan. The four-storey yellow-painted building was built in the first half of the XIX century by the eccentric Lord Charles Currie, a visiting Englishman who fell in love with Lake Como. Failing to find a villa for sale, he decided to create his own, right on the water’s edge.
Address: 22010 Moltrasio CO, Italy (45.85111, 9.08944)
Type: Private Property
Place
By 1977, when it was bought by the Italian designer Gianni Versace, it was in a state of abandonment, and the designer set about restoring it to its former neoclassical glory. The work, completed in December 1980, included landscaping the three acres (1.2 Ha) of ornamental gardens, which include three cottages, a tennis court, water frontage of some 800m and a private mooring. Versace personally chose hundreds of oil paintings and with other artworks displayed throughout the interior and exterior, he created a mini-palace that was a personal shrine. Before Versace’s death celebrities, such as Sir Elton John, Sting, Diana, Princess of Wales and Madonna, were regular guests at the property. Since the death of Versace in 1997, however, only American singer Jennifer Lopez and her husband Chris Judd were known to have visited, having spent their honeymoon there in 2001. Otherwise the property was a largely lifeless temple to Gianni Versace, and his taste for the adolescent male body. The estate is now owned by Russian millionaire restaurateur Arkady Novikov who bought it for 33 million Euros in early 2008 and retained Milanese architect Claudio Pozza to undertake restoration works at the property.
Life
Who: Gianni Versace (December 2, 1946 – July 15, 1997)
Gianni Versace was an Italian fashion designer and founder of Versace. As a friend of Eric Clapton, Diana, Princess of Wales, Naomi Campbell, Madonna, Elton John, Cher, Sting, and many other celebrities, he was the first designer to link fashion to the music world. Openly homosexual, Versace and his partner Antonio D'Amico were regulars on the international party scene. Versace was murdered outside his Miami Beach home, the former Casa Casuarina now known as "The Villa," at the age of 50 by Andrew Cunanan. Versace's body was cremated and his ashes returned to the family's estate near Cernobbio, Italy. He is buried at Moltrasio cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Raymond Roussel was a French poet, novelist, playwright, musician, and chess enthusiast. Through his novels, poems, and plays he exerted a profound influence on certain groups within 20th century French ...
Born: January 20, 1877, Paris, France
Died: July 14, 1933, Palermo
Education: Conservatoire de Paris
Lived: 25 Boulevard Malesherbes, Paris
47 Rue Pierre Charron, Paris
25 Boulevard Richard Wallace, Neuilly
Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes, Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 89

Raymond Roussel (January 20, 1877 – July 14, 1933) was a French poet, novelist, playwright, musician, and chess enthusiast. Through his novels, poems, and plays he exerted a profound influence on certain groups within XX century French literature, including the Surrealists, Oulipo, and the authors of the nouveau roman. He began to be rediscovered in the late 1950s, by the Oulipo and Alain Robbe-Grillet. His most direct influence in the English speaking world was on the New York School of poets; John Ashbery, Harry Mathews, James Schuyler, and Kenneth Koch briefly edited a magazine called Locus Solus after his novel. French theorist Michel Foucault's only book-length work of literary criticism is on Roussel. Roussel was born in Paris on January 20, 1877, to affluent parents: his father, Eugène, was a stockbrocker; his mother, Marguerite, was the daughter of a wealthy Paris businessman. They lived at 25 Boulevard Malesherbes, near the Madeleine Church, and were thus neighbors of the family of Marcel Proust, who lived at number 9 Boulevard Malesherbes. The Roussels also knew the painter Madeleine Lemaire, the principal model for Proust’s Mme. Verdurin, who painted a portrait of Raymond as a child. Later in life, Roussel became acquainted with Robert de Montesquiou, Proust’s Baron de Charlus, who wrote one of the first substantial critical essays on Roussel’s work. In the 1880s, the Roussels moved from the Boulevard Malesherbes to a splendid mansion just off the Champs-Elysées; they also spent time at a villa in the Bois de Boulogne at Neuilly and later summered in another villa overlooking the Atlantic at Biarritz.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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After the death of his mother in 1911, Raymond Roussel (1877–1933) inherited the house at 25 Boulevard Richard Wallace, Neuilly, and lived there in almost total isolation. His habits was to write during the mornings and to consume a single meal comprising breakfast, lunch, and dinner from early to late afternoon; these solitary repasts often included 27 courses. He was then free to spend the evening at the theatre, where, with the long-suffering Mme. Dufrène, his fake mistress, he often attended the same spectacle night after night, always sitting in the same seat if possible.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.
Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on May 21, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”
Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942), buried together.
• Jean Börlin (1893-1930) was a Swedish dancer and choreographer born in Härnösand. He worked with Michel Fokine, who was his teacher in Stockholm. Jean Borlin was a principal dancer of the Royal Swedish Ballet when Rolf de Mare brought him to Paris in in 1920 as first dancer and choreographer of the Ballets Suedois at the Theatre de Champs-Elysees. According to Paul Colin, de Mare “was very rich” and he had brought the Swedish Ballet to Paris “especially to show his young lover, Jean Borlin.” The Stockholm press derided de Mare's sexual orientation. In contrast, open-minded Paris welcomed the Ballets Suedois. One wonders what might have happened if de Mare had not disbanded the company in 1925, reportedly because its recent performances had disappointed him. But he had a new lover. Borlin's last years were melancholy. By 1925, he was exhausted: he had choreographed all 23 ballets in his company's repertory and danced in each of its 900 performances -- a grueling schedule that led him to alcohol and drugs. In 1930, he opened a school in New York but died of heart failure shortly thereafter. He was only 37. He was buried at his own wish in the cemetery of Pére Lachaise in Paris in January l931. A stricken de Mare founded Les Archives Internationales de Danse, in his memory.
• Jean Jacques Régis de Cambacérès (1753-1824) 1st Duke of Parma, later 1st Duke of Cambacérès, was a French lawyer and statesman during the French Revolution and the First Empire, best remembered as the author of the Napoleonic Code, which still forms the basis of French civil law and inspired civil law in many countries. The common belief that Cambacérès is responsible for decriminalizing homosexuality in France is in error. Cambacérès was not responsible for ending the legal prosecution of homosexuals. He did play a key role in drafting the Code Napoléon, but this was a civil law code. He had nothing to do with the Penal Code of 1810, which covered sexual crimes. Before the French Revolution, sodomy had been a capital crime under royal legislation. The penalty was burning at the stake. Very few men, however, were ever actually prosecuted and executed for consensual sodomy (no more than five in the entire XVIII century). Sodomites arrested by the police were more usually released with a warning or held in prison for (at most) a few weeks or months. The National Constituent Assembly abolished the law against sodomy when it revised French criminal law in 1791 and got rid of a variety of offenses inspired by religion, including blasphemy. Cambacérès was a homosexual, his sexual orientation was well-known, and he does not seem to have made any effort to conceal it. He remained unmarried, and kept to the company of other bachelors. Napoleon is recorded as making a number of jokes on the subject. Robert Badinter once mentioned in a speech to the French National Assembly, during debates on reforming the homosexual age of consent, that Cambacérès was known in the gardens of the Palais-Royal as "tante Turlurette".
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Loie Fuller (1862–1928) was an American dancer who was a pioneer of both modern dance and theatrical lighting techniques. Fuller supported other pioneering performers, such as fellow United States-born dancer Isadora Duncan. Fuller helped Duncan ignite her European career in 1902 by sponsoring independent concerts in Vienna and Budapest. She was cremated and her ashes are interred in the columbarium at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Her sister, Mollie Fuller, had a long career as an actress and vaudeville performer.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Eileen Gray (1878–1976) was an Irish furniture designer and architect and a pioneer of the Modern Movement in architecture. Gray was bisexual. She mixed in the lesbian circles of the time, being associated with Romaine Brooks, Gabrielle Bloch, Loie Fuller, the singer Damia and Natalie Barney. Gray's intermittent relationship with Damia (or Marie-Louise Damien) ended in 1938, after which they never saw each other again, although both lived into their nineties in the same city. Damia died at La Celle-Saint-Cloud, a western suburb of Paris, and was interred in the Cimetière de Pantin (163 Avenue Jean Jaurès, 93500 Aubervilliers, France). Today, she is considered to be the third greatest singer of chansons réalistes, after Edith Piaf and Barbara.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Marie Laurencin (1883-1956) was a French painter and printmaker. She became an important figure in the Parisian avant-garde as a member of the Cubists associated with the Section d'Or. She became romantically involved with the poet Guillaume Apollinaire, and has often been identified as his muse. In addition, Laurencin had important connections to the salon of the American expatriate and famed lesbian writer Natalie Clifford Barney. She had heterosexual and lesbian affairs. During WWI, Laurencin left France for exile in Spain with her German-born husband, Baron Otto von Waëtjen, since through her marriage she had automatically lost her French citizenship. The couple subsequently lived together briefly in Düsseldorf. After they divorced in 1920, she returned to Paris, where she achieved financial success as an artist until the economic depression of the 1930s. During the 1930s she worked as an art instructor at a private school. She lived in Paris until her death.
• Mary Elizabeth Clarke Mohl (1793–1883) was a British writer who was known as a salon hostess in Paris. She was known by her nickname of "Clarkey". She was admired for her independence and conversation. She eventually married the orientalist Julius von Mohl. She was an ardent Francophile, a feminist, and a close friend of Florence Nightingale. She wrote about her interest in the history of women's rights. She was buried with her husband, Julius von Mohl, at Père Lachaise Cemetery (56th division).
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Francis Poulenc (1899–1963) was a French composer and pianist. The biographer Richard D. E. Burton comments that, in the late 1920s, Poulenc might have seemed to be in an enviable position: professionally successful and independently well-off, having inherited a substantial fortune from his father. He bought a large country house, Le Grande Coteau (Chemin Francis Poulenc, 37210 Noizay, France), 140 miles (230 km) south-west of Paris, where he retreated to compose in peaceful surroundings. Yet he was troubled, struggling to come to terms with his sexuality, which was predominantly gay. His first serious affair was with the painter Richard Chanlaire, to whom he sent a copy of the Concert champêtre score inscribed, "You have changed my life, you are the sunshine of my thirty years, a reason for living and working". Nevertheless, while this affair was in progress Poulenc proposed marriage to his friend Raymonde Linossier. As she was not only well aware of his homosexuality but was also romantically attached elsewhere, she refused him, and their relationship became strained. He suffered the first of many periods of depression, which affected his ability to compose, and he was devastated in January 1930, when Linossier died suddenly at the age of 32. On her death he wrote, "All my youth departs with her, all that part of my life that belonged only to her. I sob ... I am now twenty years older". His affair with Chanlaire petered out in 1931, though they remained lifelong friends. On 30 January 1963, at his flat opposite the Jardin du Luxembourg, Poulenc suffered a fatal heart attack. His funeral was at the nearby church of Saint-Sulpice. In compliance with his wishes, none of his music was performed; Marcel Dupré played works by Bach on the grand organ of the church. Poulenc was buried at Père Lachaise Cemetery, alongside his family.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Raymond Radiguet (1903–1923) was a French novelist and poet whose two novels were noted for their explicit themes, and unique style and tone. In early 1923, Radiguet published his first and most famous novel, “Le Diable au corps” (The Devil in the Flesh). The story of a young married woman who has an affair with a sixteen-year-old boy while her husband is away fighting at the front provoked scandal in a country that had just been through WWI. Though Radiguet denied it, it was established later that the story was in large part autobiographical. He associated himself with the Modernist set, befriending Picasso, Max Jacob, Jean Hugo, Juan Gris and especially Jean Cocteau, who became his mentor. Radiguet also had several well-documented relationships with women. An anecdote told by Ernest Hemingway has an enraged Cocteau charging Radiguet (known in the Parisian literary circles as "Monsieur Bébé" – Mister Baby) with decadence for his tryst with a model: "Bébé est vicieuse. Il aime les femmes." ("Baby is depraved. He likes women.") Radiguet, Hemingway implies, employed his sexuality to advance his career, being a writer "who knew how to make his career not only with his pen but with his pencil." Aldous Huxley is quoted as declaring that Radiguet had attained the literary control that others required a long career to reach. On December 12, 1923, Radiguet died at age 20 in Paris of typhoid fever, which he contracted after a trip he took with Cocteau. Cocteau, in an interview with The Paris Review stated that Radiguet had told him three days prior to his death that, "In three days, I am going to be shot by the soldiers of God." In reaction to this death Francis Poulenc wrote, "For two days I was unable to do anything, I was so stunned". In her 1932 memoir, “Laughing Torso,” British artist Nina Hamnett describes Radiguet's funeral: "The church was crowded with people. In the pew in front of us was the negro band from the Boeuf sur le Toit. Picasso was there, Brâncuși and so many celebrated people that I cannot remember their names. Radiguet's death was a terrible shock to everyone. Coco Chanel, the celebrated dressmaker, arranged the funeral. It was most wonderfully done. Cocteau was too ill to come." ... "Cocteau was terribly upset and could not see anyone for weeks afterwards.”
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) was a French actress.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. They are buried together.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Jamie Pedersen is an American lawyer and politician from the state of Washington who has served as a member of the Washington State Legislature since January 2007. He currently represents the 43rd District in the Washington State Senate.
Born: September 9, 1968 (age 48), Puyallup, Washington, United States
Education: Yale Law School
Puyallup High School
Yale University
Spouse: Eric Pedersen (m. 2004)
Party: Democratic Party
Residence: Seattle, Washington, United States
Succeeded by: Brady Walkinshaw
Anniversary: September 27
Married: July 3, 2004

Jamie Pedersen is an American lawyer and politician from the state of Washington who has served as a member of the Washington State Legislature since Jan. 2007. He currently represents the 43rd District in the Washington State Senate. Pedersen is married to Eric Cochran Pedersen, a high-school assistant principal whom he met while attending Central Lutheran Church on Capitol Hill in Seattle. They married at the same church on July 3, 2004. They registered as domestic partners on July 23, 2007, the day that the law went into effect. Their oldest son, Trygve, was born a month later on August 27. He was joined by his brothers Leif, Erik, and Anders on July 12, 2009. Pedersen graduated summa cum laude in American Studies from Yale and received his law degree from Yale Law School. Pedersen joined Preston Gates & Ellis in 1995, working on corporate mergers. His pro bono work during this time focused on gay rights issues and he was Lambda Legal's lead attorney on the state's same-sex marriage case – Andersen v. King County. In 2012 Pedersen publicly endorsed Washington Referendum 74, which legalized the same-sex marriage.
Together since 2004: 11 years.
Eric Cochran Pedersen
Jamie Pedersen (born September 9, 1968)
Anniversary: September 27
Married: July 3, 2004



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Isa or Isabella Jane Blagden was an English-language novelist and poet born in the East Indies or India, who spent much of her life among the English community in Florence.
Born: 1817
Buried: Cimitero Accatolico, Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy, Plot: B11C/ B42/ 1194

The English Cemetery in Florence, Italy is at Piazzale Donatello. Its names, 'Cimitero Inglese' and 'Cimitero Protestante' are somewhat misleading, as the cemetery holds bodies of Orthodox Christians as well as those of many Reformed Churches; but the majority of those buried here were of the Anglophone British and American communities of Florence.
Address: Piazzale Donatello, 38, 50132 Firenze, Italy (43.77716, 11.26858)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 055 582608
Place
Before 1827 non-Catholics and non-Jews who died in Florence could be buried in Livorno only. In 1827 the Swiss Evangelical Reformed Church bought land outside the medieval wall and gate of Porta a' Pinti at Florence from Leopold II, Grand Duke of Tuscany for an international and ecumenical cemetery, Russian and Greek Orthodox burials joining the Protestant ones. Carlo Reishammer, a young architectural student, landscaped the cemetery, then Giuseppe Poggi shaped it as its present oval when Florence became capital of Italy. He surrounded it with studios for artists, including that of Michele Gordigiani (who painted the portraits of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, now in the National Portrait Gallery, London). Many famous people are buried in the graveyard like Elizabeth Barrett Browning (in a tomb designed by Frederic, Lord Leighton); her son Pen Browning is buried at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori. Florence has always been a place were queer people from all over the world came due to its acceptance, wherelse in other countries was impossible to live. We cannot say if the following were really all queer couples, or maybe just special friends, the fact is that some of them chose to be buried near to each other.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Acattolico:
• Emilia Sophia Macpherson Abadam Adams (1776-1831) was the grandmother of both Alice Abadam, the suffragette, and Vernon Lee (aka Violet Page), the writer.
• Charles Bankhead, M.D. (1768-1859), George IV's Physician Extraordinary, he was the physician in attendance at Castlereagh's suicide.
• Isa or Isabella Jane Blagden (1816 or 1817–1873) was an English-language novelist and poet born in the East Indies or India, who spent much of her life among the English community in Florence. Some of the surviving letters to Blagden from Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning are demonstrably affectionate. (Unfortunately Blagden's letters to them have not survived.) "Isa, perfect in companionship, as in other things," Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote of her. In one letter to Isa in the summer of 1859, she wrote: "My ever dearest, kindest Isa, I can't let another day go without writing just a word to say that I am alive enough to love you." In another from Paris a year earlier, Elizabeth Barrett Browning states that they had arrived "having lost nothing – neither a carpet-bag nor a bit of our true love for you."
• Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), died in her husband's arms. Robert Browning said that she died "smilingly, happily, and with a face like a girl's.... Her last word was... ''Beautiful". "On Monday July 1 the shops in the area around Casa Guidi were closed, while Elizabeth was mourned with unusual demonstrations." The nature of her illness is still unclear. Some modern scientists speculate her illness may have been hypokalemic periodic paralysis, a genetic disorder that causes weakness and many of the other symptoms she described.
• George Frederic Waihinger (1800-1867), German, was the beloved head waiter/butler to the Prince Demidoff of San Donato. Count Anatoly or Anatoli (called Anatole) Nikolaievich Demidov, 1st Prince of San Donato (1813–1870), was a Russian industrialist, diplomat and arts patron of the Demidov family.
• William Edgeworth (1832-1833), a one-year-old child unlisted in the Peerage though his two siblings Antonio Eroles and Francis Ysidro are. His mother is the Spanish Mariquita Eroles' sister, Rosa Florentina Eroles Edgeworth. His aunt is Maria Edgeworth, the great Irish novelist. He is buried in same plot with David (1807-1833) and Mary Reid (1833-1833), first husband and daughter of Mariquita Eroles, and Rev. Robert John Tennant (1809-1842), second husband of Mariquita. Mariquita Dorotea Francesca Tennant, née Eroles (1811–1860), is known as a social reformer. She is commemorated for helping the impoverished women of Windsor.
• Mary Farhill (1784-1854), small, clever, generous and eccentric, she was ennobled in Fiesole's Order of St Stephen. Farhill was found drowned in her bath at 70 years old. Though in Florence they thought she had no family when she died at the Villa il Palmerino, her brother Edward Farhill carefully arranged her burial in both English and Italian in a grand tomb. The Morning Post noted she willed her villa to the Grand Duchess of Tuscany, Maria Antonia. In the 1870s it came into the possession of the Earl of Belcarres and Crawford, Lord Lindsay. Dumas and Queen Victoria were guests under its roof. It later became Vernon Lee's residence.
• Harriet Theodosia Fisher, nee Garrow (1811-1848), half-sister of Theodosia Trollope, is buried with their maid, Elizabeth Shinner (1811-1852).
• James Lorimer "Lorrie" Graham, Jr (1831-1876), American Maecenas, married, gay, founded Graham's Magazine, had wealth, was shipwrecked and injured, appointed American Consul in Florence by President Grant, occupied the Palazzo di Valfonda, Claire Claremont (Mary Shelley's stepsister, who bore Lord Byron the child Allegra), lodging with him, and he collected autographs, books, paintings which he willed to the Century Association, New York, which sold them at auction.
• Hadrian Marryat (1845-1873). His maternal grandfather was General Lord Robert Edward Henry Somerset of Badminton House and his grandmother, Lady Louisa Augusta Courtenay, daughter of William Courtenay, 8th Earl of Devon, of Powderham Castle. The three Marryat children were painted in 1851-2 in Rome by the young Frederick Leighton.
• Clara Anastasia Novello (1818-1908), was an acclaimed soprano, the fourth daughter of Vincent Novello, a musician and music publisher, and his wife, Mary Sabilla Hehl. In 1843 she married Count Gigliucci, and retired in 1861. Clara Novello Davies (1861-1943), a well-known Welsh singer, teacher and conductor was named after Clara Novello. She married David Davies, a solicitor's clerk with the same surname as her own- Their son, David Ivor Davies, became better known as Ivor Novello, the actor, composer, dramatist and director.
• Eugene Polyakov (1943-1996), a Russian-trained balletmaster who was Rudolf Nureyev's chief assistant when Nureyev was director of the Paris Opera Ballet in the 1980's. Polyakov was born in Moscow and trained at the Bolshoi Ballet before leaving Russia for Venice in 1976. He formed his own troupe, Viva la Danza, there in 1977 and was the dance director of the Teatro Comunale in Florence from 1978 to 1983, when Nureyev appointed him balletmaster. Polyakov worked again in Florence from 1992 to 1995, when he returned to the Paris Opera Ballet. He died in Paris, but asked to be buried in Florence.
• Elena Raffalovich Comparetti (1842-1918) was an educator , intellectual and froebeliana Russian. She was the third daughter of Leo Raffalovich (1813-1879), wealthy jew landowner, and Rosette (Rosa) Mondel Loevensohn (1807-1895). The family moved to Paris. The older sister Maria Raffalovich, married to their uncle Hermann, is the mother of Marc André Raffalovich and great friend of Claude Bernard.
• William Reader of Banghurst House, Hampshire (1787-1846). His original tombstone identifies Henry Austin as his faithful servant; Austin died in Florence on July 5, 1859, age 40,
• The tomb of Mary Anne Salisbury (1798-1848) was placed by the Catholic wife of the last descendant of Michelangelo Buonarotti, Rosina, beneath a great yew tree at the entrance of the English Cemetery. It was tradition to have two yew trees, poisonous to cattle but essential for the English long bow of Agincourt in English graveyards, which also symbolize the Jachin and Boaz columns of the Jerusalem Temple. Only one yew tree remains and a falling branch from it destroyed this tomb, now replaced by the Rotary Club, 23/4/2012. The busts of Count Cosimo Buonarroti and Rosina which grace the Michelangelo museum at the Casa Buonarroti were sculpted by Aristodemo Costoli.
• James Bansfield’s tomb and that of King William IV's son's wife, Lady Georgina Hacking Hamilton Sewell, lie on either side of the king's natural son, Sir William Henry Sewell, each being apparently equal to Sir William. “Known as a servant above a servant a brother beloved. James died January 11, 1862. He was for 20 years the faithful and devoted servant of General Sir W.H. Sewell, K.C.B. by whose widow this tomb was raised.”
• Eleanore Emilie Contessa Stenbock-Fermor (1815-1859) was the daughter of Count Magnus Stenbock-Fermor, Russian Colonel. Her Oxford-educated PreRaphaelite poet nephew was Eric Stenbock.
• Theodosia Trollope, born Theodosia Garrow (1816–1865) was an English poet, translator, and writer known also for her marriage into the Trollope family. She married and bought a villa in Florence, Italy with her husband, Thomas Adolphus Trollope. Her hospitality made her home the centre of British society in the city. Her writings in support of the Italian nationalists are credited with changing public opinions.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Barbara Stanwyck was an American actress. She was a film and television star, known during her 60-year career as a consummate and versatile professional with a strong, realistic screen presence, and a ...
Born: July 16, 1907, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: January 20, 1990, Santa Monica, California, United States
Education: Erasmus Hall High School
Lived: 1055 Loma Vista Drive
Buried: Lone Pine, California (ashes)
Height: 1.65 m
Children: Anthony Dion Fay
Spouse: Robert Taylor (m. 1939–1952), Frank Fay (m. 1928–1935)

Barbara Stanwyck was an American actress. She was a film and television star, known during her 60-year career as a consummate and versatile professional with a strong, realistic screen presence, and a favorite of directors including Cecil B. DeMille, Fritz Lang and Frank Capra. She was often cast as a tough woman in a man’s world, always in command and control, whether playing a reporter (Meet John Doe), a criminal manipulator (Double Indemnity, The Lady Eve), or a husbandless rancher (The Big Valley). She played a lesbian in Walk on the Wild Side, and it was not much of a stretch. For nearly thirty years, Stanwyck had an intimate relationship with her publicist Helen Ferguson, former actress. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, and Robert Taylor, among others. Ferguson represented actress Loretta Young for more than nineteen years.
They met in 1947 and remained friends until Ferguson’s death in 1977: 30 years.
Barbara Stanwyck (July 16, 1907 – January 20, 1990)
Helen Ferguson (July 23, 1901 - March 14, 1977)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Barbara Stanwyck's career spanned fifty years, from the Golden Age of Movies through her time in television. She was nominated for four Academy Awards, was given an hon-orary Oscar in 1982, and notably portrayed the matriarch in TV's “The Big Valley.” For many years, she and film star Robert Taylor were lovers. After his death in 1969, the actress began to see his spirit in her Beverly Hills home, at 1055 Loma Vista Drive, off Sunset Boulevard, and visitations continued right up until her own death in 1990. Upon her death at age 82, her will demanded her ashes be spread in Lone Pine, California.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Patricia Highsmith was an American novelist and short story writer, known for her psychological thrillers, which led to more than two dozen film adaptations.
Born: January 19, 1921, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
Died: February 4, 1995, Locarno, Switzerland
Education: Barnard College
Columbia University
Lived: 48 Grove Street
345 E. 57th Street
Casa Highsmith, Tegna
Buried: Cimitero di Tegna, Tegna, Distretto di Locarno, Ticino, Switzerland
Movies: Carol, The Talented Mr. Ripley, Purple Noon, more
Parents: Jay Bernard Plangman, Stanley Highsmith, Mary Coates Plangman

Patricia Highsmith wrote 22 novels, many of them set in Greenwich Village, where she lived at 48 Grove Street from 1940 to 1942, before moving at 345 E. 57th Street.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Tegna, in Switzerland’s Italian-speaking canton Ticino, is the village where Patricia Highsmith lived out the last years of her life, in the Vallemaggia, a narrow, rocky valley behind Locarno. Her ashes are immured in the cemetery and her famously bunker-like house is down the road.
Address: Tegna, Switzerland (46.1867, 8.74433)
Type: Private Property
Place
In 1988, Patricia Highsmith built the house she died in, with the help of Zurich-based architect Tobias Ammann. “Casa Highsmith,” a modernist flat-roofed single storey “M” shaped construction in the small village of Tegna in the Ticino, Switzerland, “bore a curious resemblance,” according to the Swiss National Library in Bern, “to the “long, low and flat-roofed” and “shining white” and Y-shaped house she imagined thirty years earlier for the architect Guy Haines [the hapless and fateful victim] in “Strangers on the Train” (before a second floor was added by new owners after her death).” She ended up curating herself in the shape of her own architecture; the fiction that, in hindsight, predicted her own house. Her final “dream home” had all along been “half felt and feebly” lodged within her own strange enactments designed to be so implausible as to contain the implicit sense of fate and inevitability within any choice.
Life
Who: Patricia Highsmith (January 19, 1921 – February 4, 1995)
Patricia Highsmith was an American novelist and short story writer, known for her psychological thrillers, which led to more than two dozen film adaptations. Her first novel, “Strangers on a Train,” has been adapted for stage and screen numerous times, notably by Alfred Hitchcock in 1951. Highsmith wrote 22 novels, including her series of five novels with Tom Ripley as protagonist, and many short stories. Michael Dirda observed, "Europeans honored her as a psychological novelist, part of an existentialist tradition represented by her own favorite writers, in particular Dostoyevsky, Conrad, Kafka, Gide, and Camus." Highsmith loved cats, and she bred about three hundred snails in her garden at home in Suffolk, England. Between 1959 and 1961, she fell in love with Marijane Meaker, who wrote under the pseudonyms "Vin Packer" and "Ann Aldrich" and later wrote young adult fiction as "M.E. Kerr". In the late 1980s, after 27 years of separation, Highsmith began corresponding with Meaker again, and one day showed up on Meaker's doorstep, slightly drunk and ranting bitterly. Meaker later said she was horrified at how Highsmith's personality had changed. Highsmith, aged 74, died from a combination of aplastic anemia and lung cancer at Carita hospital in Locarno, Switzerland, near the village where she had lived since 1982. She was cremated at the cemetery in Bellinzona, a memorial service was conducted in the Catholic Church in Tegna and her ashes interred in its columbarium. She left her estate, worth an estimated $3 million, and the promise of any future royalties to the Yaddo colony, where she spent two months in 1948 writing the draft of “Strangers on a Train.” Patricia Highsmith bequeathed her literary estate to the Swiss Literary Archives at the Swiss National Library in Bern, Switzerland.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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