reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
[personal profile] reviews_and_ramblings
Leo Lerman (May 23, 1914 – August 22, 1994) was an American writer and editor who worked for Condé Nast Publications for more than 50 years. Lerman also wrote for the New York Herald Tribune, Harper's Bazaar, Dance Magazine, and Playbill. (Picture: Leo Lerman by Oliviero Toscani)

Lerman’s lifelong love and partner was artist Gray Foy, together from 1948 until Lerman's death in 1994. When Lerman died without completing his life story, Gray discovered that Leo had actually kept diary-like notebooks. Foy showed them to Stephen Pascal, who used these notebooks and other outside materials about Lerman's life to put together the book. (Picture: Gray Foy)

Foy was an artist. He stopped doing his obsessively detailed drawings years ago, but one hangs at the museum of Modern Art, a gift of Steve Martin. He had just had his first show at the Durlacher Brothers gallery in 1948, and got by with a night job in the art department of Columbia University, when he went to a party Leo Lerman gave for the couturier Peirre Balmain in his basement apartment in 1948, and never left.

Lerman was born in New York City, the son of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, Ida (née Goldwasser) and Samuel Lerman. He grew up in East Harlem and Queens, New York. As a child, he accompanied his house-painter grandfather and father on various jobs in upper-class homes. He was openly gay.

Selections from his journals, roughly 10 percent of the writings, were published in 2007 as The Grand Surprise: The Journals of Leo Lerman. Meant to be the source material for a novel he never wrote, the journals detail his social and business interactions with a remarkable number of famous and important people who passed through the New York arts scene from the 1940s to the '90s.

Lerman died in New York City on August 22, 1994. He was 80. Frederick Gray "Gray" Foy, Jr, son of Frederick Gray Foy (1892 - 1969), was born on Aug. 10, 1922 Dallas, Texas, and died Nov. 23, 2012.


Leo Lerman was an American writer and editor who worked for Condé Nast Publications. Lerman also wrote for the New York Herald Tribune, Harper's Bazaar, Dance Magazine, and Playbill. Lerman’s lifelong love was artist Gray Foy, together from 1948 until Lerman's death in 1994. When Lerman died without completing his life story, Gray discovered that Leo had actually kept diary notebooks. Stephen Pascal used these notebooks and other outside materials about Lerman's life to put together the book.


MOST IMAGES TAKEN FROM "CHEZ LEO & GRAY", ACNE PAPER #10, STORY BY JOAN JULIET BUCK, PHOTOGRAPHS BY ERIC BOMAN; SUPPLEMENTARY INTERIOR IMAGES TAKEN FROM ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST, OCTOBER 2005, PHOTOGRAPHED BY DERRY MOORE (http://keehnankonyha.com/journal/2010/11/28/leo-lerman-gray-foy.html)



















Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Lerman

Further Readings:

The Grand Surprise: The Journals of Leo Lerman by Leo Lerman and Stephen Pascal
Hardcover: 688 pages
Publisher: Knopf; First Edition (states) edition (April 10, 2007)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1400044391
ISBN-13: 978-1400044399
Amazon: The Grand Surprise: The Journals of Leo Lerman

A remarkable life and a remarkable voice emerge from the journals, letters, and memoirs of Leo Lerman: writer, critic, editor at Condé Nast, and man about town at the center of New York’s artistic and social circles from the 1940s until his death in 1994.

Lerman’s contributions to the world of the arts were large and varied: he wrote on theater, dance, music, art, books, and movies for publications as diverse as Mademoiselle and The New York Times. He was features editor at Vogue and editor in chief of Vanity Fair. He launched careers and trends, exposing the American public to new talents, fashions, and ideas.

He was a legendary party host as well, counting Marlene Dietrich, Maria Callas, and Truman Capote among his intimates, and celebrities like Cary Grant, Jackie Onassis, Isak Dinesen, and Margot Fonteyn as part of his larger circle. But his personal accounts and correspondence reveal him also as having an unusually rich and complex private life, mourning the cultivated émigré world of 1930s and 1940s New York City, reflecting on being Jewish and an openly homosexual man, and intimately evoking his two most important lifelong relationships.

From a man whose literary icon was Marcel Proust comes an unparalleled social and emotional history. With eloquence, insight, and wit, he filled his journals and letters with acute assessments, gossip, and priceless anecdotes while inimitably recording both our larger cultural history and his own moving private story.

More Real Life Romances at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance

Profile

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
reviews_and_ramblings

July 2014

S M T W T F S
   1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 293031  

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 29th, 2014 02:44 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios