Nov. 14th, 2014

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Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer, composition teacher, writer, and later in his career a conductor of his own and other American music. He was instrumental in forging a distinctly American style of composition, and is often referred to as "the Dean of American Composers". He is best known to the public for the works he wrote in the 1930s and 40s in a deliberately more accessible style than his earlier pieces, including the ballets Appalachian Spring, Billy the Kid, Rodeo and his Fanfare for the Common Man. The open, slowly changing harmonies of many of his works are archetypical of what many people consider to be the sound of American music, evoking the vast American landscape and pioneer spirit. However, he wrote music in different styles at different periods of his life: his early works incorporated jazz or avant-garde elements whereas his later music incorporated serial techniques. In addition to his ballets and orchestral works he produced music in many other genres including chamber music, vocal works, opera and film scores.

Aaron Copland was born in Brooklyn of Lithuanian Jewish descent, the last of five children, on November 14, 1900. Before emigrating from Russia to the United States, Copland's father, Harris Morris Copland, Anglicized his surname "Kaplan" to "Copland" while waiting in Scotland en route to America. Throughout his childhood, Copland and his family lived above his parents' Brooklyn shop, H.M. Copland's, at 628 Washington Avenue (which Aaron would later describe as "a kind of neighborhood Macy's"), on the corner of Dean Street and Washington Avenue, and most of the children helped out in the store. His father was a staunch Democrat. The family members were active in Congregation Baith Israel Anshei Emes, where Aaron celebrated his Bar Mitzvah. Not especially athletic, the sensitive young man became an avid reader and often read Horatio Alger stories on his front steps. (P: ©Carl Van Vechten (1880-1964)/LOC ds.00954. Victor Kraft, 1935 (©3))


by George Platt Lynes


Aaron Copland and Victor Kraft
Aaron Copland was an American composer, teacher, writer, and later in his career a conductor of his own and other American music. Among Copland's love affairs, most of which lasted for only a few years yet became enduring friendships, were ones with photographer Victor Kraft, artist Alvin Ross, pianist Paul Moor, dancer Erik Johns, and composer John Brodbin Kennedy. On Copland's love life, Victor Kraft would prove to be the one constant romantic relationship in Copland's life. Originally, a student of music under Copland, Kraft gave up music in pursuit of a career in photography on Copland's urging.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Copland
Shortly before the war, a young Harvard undergraduate named Leonard Bernstein made one of his first visit to Manhattan. On November 14, 1937, Aaron Copland, the great gay American composer, invited the budding musician to a birthday party at his New York loft on West 63d Street. The room was filled with gay and bisexual intellectuals, including Paul Bowles (then known only as a composer) and Virgil Thomson. When Copland learned that Bernstein loved his Piano Variations, he dared the Harvard boy to play them. "It'll ruin the party", said Bernstein. "Not this party", Copland replied, and the guests were mesmerized by Bernstein's performance.
During the next decade, Copland would become an important father figure for Bernstein, as well as his composition adviser. One of Bernstein's biographers, Humphrey Burton, believes Bernstein and Copland may also have been lovers. "He taught me a tremendous amount about taste, style and consistency in music", Bernstein said of his mentor. --The Gay Metropolis: The Landmark History of Gay Life in America by Charles Kaiser
Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
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Roger Margason, who uses the pseudonym of Dorien Grey, is an openly gay American author, (born in Northern Illinois). Margason served in the U.S. Navy and graduated from Northern Illinois University with a BA in English.

Margason is the author of the fourteen-book Dick Hardesty mystery series, which received a WordWeaving Series of Excellence award, and four of which have been finalists for a Lambda Literary Award. He is also the author of the three-book Elliott Smith Paranormal Mystery series. In addition to his two series, he has a stand-alone gay western/romance/adventure novel, Calico, aimed at young adults and traditional western buffs, and a book of blogs, Short Circuits: A Life in Blogs, drawn from blogs published over the past several years.

Aaron's Wait won a 2009 Rainbow Award as Best LGBT Mystery / Thriller and Best Gay Novel. Short Circuits, A Life in Blogs, won a 2011 Rainbow Award as Best LGBT Non Fiction.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorien_Grey

Further Readings:

Short Circuits: A Life in Blogs (Volume I) by Dorien Grey
Publisher: Untreed Reads Publishing (June 24, 2011)
Amazon Kindle: Short Circuits: A Life in Blogs

Lambda-nominated author Dorien Grey (The Dick Hardesty Mysteries, The Elliott Smith Mysteries) knows more than just how to write a great murder novel. He's also had amazing life experiences in the military and around the world. Here, for the first time, are the collected blog and journal writings of this prolific author. As Grey notes, "Sometimes things are more clearly seen through the eyes of others." The hope is that the reader will see similarities to his/her own life, and recognize the commonality of the human condition.

More Rainbow Awards at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, Rainbow Awards/2009 & 2011
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Harry Daley (November 14, 1901 – March 12, 1971), police officer and author, was born at 49 Stevens Street, Lowestoft, Suffolk, on 14 November 1901, the second son and fourth of the five children of Joseph Daley (d. 1911), skipper of a fishing smack, and his wife, Emily Firman, a former parlourmaid. He was educated from the age of three at the local school and, despite considerable financial hardship and the long absences at sea of his bawdy, easy-going, and adored father, his childhood was exceptionally happy. In the great ‘September gale’ of 1911, however, Joseph Daley was one of the many fishermen lost at sea. Instead of going on to secondary school, Harry gave up his education to become a telegram boy. During the First World War, Zeppelin raids and rumours of a German invasion decided Daley's mother to move the family to the relative safety of Dorking, Surrey, where her eldest daughter was living. Here Daley got a job with a grocer, driving a pony and trap round the countryside collecting orders for goods.

Daley was avid for culture and began buying the sort of eclectic volumes sold cheaply from the boxes that stood outside booksellers' shops. Weekends were spent visiting London to explore theatres, cinemas, galleries, and concert halls. At the age of twenty-four he decided, almost on a whim, to join the Metropolitan Police force. He was not the most likely recruit, since he was inclined to plumpness and described himself as ‘well below average plain common sense; sexually both innocent and deplorable; honourable if not exactly honest; trusting; truthful; romantic and sentimental to the point of sloppiness’ (Daley, This Small Cloud, 78). The selection committee nevertheless judged him ‘a good type of chap—just what we want’, and he began training at Peel House in March 1925 (ibid., 77). Having passed his examinations, he was posted to ‘T’ division, based in Hammersmith, west London. His first beat was in Chiswick, but after a few months he was transferred to Hammersmith itself, a lively part of the capital where the police lived in comparative harmony with petty criminals, their relationship eased by small bribes. Daley, who was homosexual, and took no great pains to hide the fact, found himself attracted to the sharply dressed and cheeky young crooks who thronged the streets, and soon numbered several of them among his friends and lovers. When he was obliged to make arrests, most of these young men philosophically accepted it as a ‘fair cop’ and struck dramatic poses when their captor, a keen amateur photographer, snapped them as they were loaded into Black Marias.

Read more... )

Source: Peter Parker, ‘Daley, Harry (1901–1971)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/60647, accessed 4 Nov 2014]

J. R. Ackerley (4 November 1896 – 4 June 1967; his full registered name was Joe Ackerley; Randolph was added later as a tribute to an uncle) was arts editor of The Listener, the weekly magazine of the BBC. He was also openly gay, a rarity in his time.

Ackerley's memoir My Father and Myself, begins: "I was born in 1896 and my parents were married in 1919." His father, Roger Ackerley, was a fruit merchant, known as the "Banana King" of London. Roger had been previously married to an actress named Louise Burckhardt who died young and childless, probably of tuberculosis, in 1892.

Shortly afterward, he met another actress named Janetta Aylward (known as Netta) in Paris, and the two of them moved in together in London. Three years later she gave birth to a boy, Peter, then Joe a year later, and Nancy in 1899. Peter's birth, and possibly Joe's and Nancy's as well, was the result of an "accident" according to Joe's Aunt Bunny, Netta's sister: "Your father happened to have run out of French letters that day," she said. Roger Ackerley had "a cavalier attitude towards contraception."

Ackerley was educated at Rossall School, a public and preparatory school in Fleetwood, Lancashire. While at this school he discovered he was attracted to other boys. His striking good looks earned him the nickname "Girlie" but he was not sexually active, or only very intermittently, as a schoolboy. He described himself as
a chaste, puritanical, priggish, rather narcissistic little boy, more repelled than attracted to sex, which seemed to me a furtive, guilty, soiling thing, exciting, yes, but nothing whatever to do with those feelings which I had not yet experienced but about which I was already writing a lot of dreadful sentimental verse, called romance and love.
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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J.R._Ackerley
All of the early 20th Century’s books by J.R. Ackerley are worth reading. But none are as complex and delicious as Hindoo Holiday, a memoir slash travel book. Ackerly was invited by the middle-aged, immensely wealthy, Shakespeare-obsessed Rajah of Chhondrapur in India to come tutor his teenaged actor boyfriend in English literature and to help run their version of the Royal Shakespeare Theater’s tour of India. The clash of cultures and personalities is by turns perplexing, hilarious and sour-sweet sad. --Felice Picano
Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
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November 2014 marks the 8th anniversary since I opened my first journal on LJ, and the 6th anniversary of the Rainbow Awards and we will have again a 1 month long big bash party. 119 authors, all of them in the 2014 Rainbow Awards, have donated an ebook and I will use them for a Treasure Hunt. Every day, for all November, I will post 4 excerpts (a random page of the book). No reference to title, or author, or publisher. You have to match it with the book ;-) comment on the blog (do not leave anonymous comments, if you post as anonymous, leave a contact email (comments are screened)), you can comment 1 time for more matchings (you can even try for all 4 books if you like, so 4 chances to win every day). Until the end I will not say which matching is right, so you will have ALL month to try. No limit on how many books you can win, the more you try the better chance you have to win. End of November, among the right matchings, I will draw the winners. So now? let the game start!

If at the end of the treasure hunt there will be still unmatched excerpts the giveaway will go to the one who matched more books.

The books are: )

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Today excerpts are:

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