Jan. 13th, 2015

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Ariel Tachna lives outside of Houston with her husband, her daughter and son, and their cat. Before moving there, she traveled all over the world, having fallen in love with both France, where she found her husband, and India, where she dreams of retiring some day. She’s bilingual with snippets of four other languages to her credit, and is as in love with languages as she is with writing.

Conflict in Blood won a 2009 Rainbow Awards as Best LGBT Paranormal / Horror and Best Gay Novel.

Source: www.dreamspinnerpress.com/store/index.php

Further Readings:

Conflict in Blood by Ariel Tachna
Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press (May 11, 2009)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1935192299
ISBN-13: 978-19351922
Amazon: Conflict in Blood
Amazon Kindle: Conflict in Blood

Partnership in Blood Volume 3: Conflict in Blood by Ariel Tachna As the Alliance wizard-vampire partnerships grow stronger, the dark wizards feel the effects and become increasingly desperate to find enough information to counter them, unaware of the growing strain of the blood-magic bonds on the wizards and vampires alike. The conflict is spreading. The strife of uncomfortable relationships, both personal and professional, is threatening to tear up the Alliance from the inside, despite the efforts of Alain Magnier and Orlando St. Clair, Thierry Dumont and Sebastien Noyer, and even Raymond Payet and Jean Bellaiche, leader of the Paris vampires, who is fighting to establish a stable covenant with his own partner so he might lead by example. As the war rages on and heartbreaking casualties mount on both sides, the dark wizards keep searching for clues to understand and counter the strength of the Alliance, while the blood-bound Alliance partners hunt through ancient prejudices and forgotten lore to find an edge that can turn the tide of the war once and for all.

More Rainbow Awards at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, Rainbow Awards/2009
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Penelope Friday hates writing bios because she never quite knows how to describe the eclectic mixture of things she writes about. Her particular strengths are erotic fiction (of all sexualities) and articles on disability issues - but she also writes science fiction, romantic stories, articles on the Regency Period, articles on writing and a lot more besides.

Thrace won a 2011 Rainbow Award as Best Bisexual / Transgender Sci-fi/Paranormal/Fantasy.

Source: www.goodreads.com/author/show/3004448.Penelope_Friday

Further Readings:

Thrace by Penelope Friday
ebook, 174 pages
Published 2010 by Manifold Press
ISBN 97809565

Welcome to the planet Gielgud, crossroads of the galaxy, where the indigenous species has three eyes, a tail - and no gender.
Welcome to the city of Thrace; travellers of all kinds wander through here. Most are just looking for a good time, free of the restrictions of their own cultures, but some of them have a more specific agenda in mind.
And welcome to JJ's bar, where all genders and those who are genderless are welcome. This is where adventures tend to start ...

More Rainbow Awards at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, Rainbow Awards/2011
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Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931 – May 25, 2007) was an American actor, comedian, director, and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in stages, films, children's television, cartoons, and game show panelist.

Reilly did not publicly affirm his homosexuality until his one-man show, Save It for the Stage. However, much like fellow game-show regular Paul Lynde of the same era, Reilly played up a campy on-screen persona. In many episodes of Match Game, he would lampoon himself by briefly affecting a deep voice and the nickname "Chuck," and self-consciously describing how "butch" he was. He mentioned in a 2002 interview with Entertainment Tonight that he felt no need to note this and that he never purposely hid being gay from anyone. Patrick Hughes III, a set decorator and dresser, was Reilly's domestic partner; the two met backstage in 1980 while Reilly appeared on the game show Battlestars. They soon moved together into Reilly's Beverly Hills home, where the two lived a quietly open life. Despite sporting what appeared to be a full head of hair for most of the prime of his career, Reilly was in fact bald, wearing a toupée throughout most of his appearances in the 1970s and 1980s. During the taping of Match Game 74 his toupee became the joke of the filming when Reilly had to go to NYC to have his toupee put back on. During the taping of several episodes Reilly is seen wearing different hats because his toupée is back in NY waiting for him to be fitted. This was the start of the long-running jokes on Match Game about his hair. He abandoned the toupée in the late 1990s and appeared bald in public for the rest of his life. He dramatized the experience in his stage show, The Life of Reilly.

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Nelson_Reilly

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
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Matthew Bourne OBE (born 13 January 1960) is an English choreographer. His work includes contemporary dance and dance theatre. He has received multiple awards and award nominations, including the Laurence Olivier Award, Tony Award and Drama Desk Award, and he has also received several Honorary Doctorates of Arts from UK universities. He had a seven-year relationship with David Manners, who worked for Bourne’s dance company, AMP. In 1995 Bourne began a long-term relationship with Arthur Pita, a principal dancer with AMP.

Matthew Bourne was born in Hackney, England in 1960. He went to William Fitt and Sir George Monoux School in Walthamstow, London. From the ages of 14 to 16 he was an avid autograph hunter, attending most West End opening nights and waiting outside Stage Doors and top London Hotels. In 1978 he left full-time education and worked in various jobs at the BBC (filing clerk), Keith Prowse Theatre Agents (selling theatre tickets) and The National Theatre (bookshop and ushering). Despite having never done a dance class, he ran and directed various amateur Dance Companies in his teenage years. In 1982 he enrolled at the Laban Centre for Movement and Dance (now Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance) in Deptford, southeast London, where he was awarded a B.A. in Dance Theatre. For his final year (1986) he danced with the Laban Centre's Transitions Dance Company. After graduation he formed the dance company Adventures In Motion Pictures with fellow directors, and friends, Emma Gladstone and David Massingham. He has worked as a professional choreographer and director since 1987, becoming sole artistic director of AMP in 1991 and New Adventures in 2002. He now lives in Islington, London and Brighton, East Sussex. (P: Courtesy of Arthur Pita. Arthur Pita (©15))


Matthew Bourne is an English choreographer. His work includes contemporary dance and dance theatre. He has received multiple awards and award nominations, including the Laurence Olivier Award, Tony Award and Drama Desk Award, and he has also received several Honorary Doctorates of Arts from UK universities. He had a seven-year relationship with David Manners, who worked for Bourne’s dance company, AMP. In 1995 Bourne began a long-term relationship with Arthur Pita, a principal dancer with AMP.

Read more... )

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_Bourne

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
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Richard Stewart Addinsell (13 January 1904 – 14 November 1977) was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film Dangerous Moonlight (also known under the later title Suicide Squadron).

Richard Addinsell was born in Woburn Square, London, to William Arthur Addinsell, who was a chartered accountant, and his wife, Annie Beatrice Richards. The younger of two brothers, Addinsell was educated at home before attending Hertford College, Oxford, to study Law but left after just 18 months. He then became interested in music.

In 1925, he enrolled at the Royal College of Music but lasted only two terms before leaving, again without obtaining any formal qualification. By this time Addinsell was already collaborating with Noel Gay, among others, in an André Charlot Revue. More work for Charlot in 1927 was followed in 1928 by a collaboration with Clemence Dane on Adam's Opera at The Old Vic. In 1929, he completed his informal education by touring Europe to visit major theatrical and musical centres such as Berlin and Vienna.

In 1932, with Clemence Dane, he wrote the incidental music for the Broadway adaptation of Alice in Wonderland by Eva Le Gallienne, starring Josephine Hutchinson (produced 1933). In 1947 it was revived, starring Bambi Linn.

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Addinsell

Victor Frank Stiebel (1907- 1976) was a South African-born British couturier.

Born in Durban he arrived in Britain in 1924 to study architecture at Jesus College, Cambridge. Having designed for theatre wardrobe at university, he worked as a dress designer for the House of Reville for three years beginning in 1929 until he opened his own fashion house in Brunton Street in 1932. Terry Reville was a court designer and his fashion house was one of the foremost in London before the First World War. Here Stiebel learned the art of fashion design, this being the method by which the trade was learned prior to fashion design courses being established at the art schools.

He enlisted for the Second World War in 1940, closing his house, but he was allowed to continue designing while involved with the services, his designs being manufactured as part of the war effort using the government stock fabrics which were all that was available at the time. Called "Utility Fashion", each designer produced a coat, dress, suit and shirt or blouse. He returned to designing in 1946, working for Jacqmar, and becoming Chairman of the Incorporated Society of London Fashion Designers. He reopened his own house in 1958, having great initial success, but being forced to close after only 5 years in 1963 on health grounds, having become confined to a wheel chair as a result of multiple sclerosis. Hardy Amies was kind enough to take all 120 of Stiebel's employees.

Stiebel was commissioned to design new uniforms for the WRENS (1951) and the WRAF (1954) whilst also creating the going-away outfit for Princess Margaret on her marriage to Lord Snowdon in 1960.


Victor Stiebel was a South African-born British couturier. Richard Addinsell was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film Dangerous Moonlight. Following the death of Stiebel, in 1976, the frail composer became even more withdrawn. He died little more than one year later, in 1977. The royalties for Warsaw Concerto belonged to author Jilly Cooper's parents, for many years their neighbor, Addinsell probably gave it to them as thanks for being discreet about his relationship with Stiebel.

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Stiebel

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Edmund Valentine White III (born January 13, 1940) is an American author and literary critic. He is a member of the faculty of Princeton University's Program in Creative Writing. Since 1995 he has lived with his partner Michael Carroll (born 1965), a writer; despite this relationship White has strongly mixed feelings on the subject of gay marriage. In part, he agrees with those who dismiss it as buying into “straight” culture, but the old Stonewall rebel in him relishes a fight.

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, he largely grew up in Chicago. White attended Cranbrook School in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan as a boy, then studied Chinese at the University of Michigan. He later worked in New York as a journalist. From 1983 to 1990 he lived in France.

White's best-known work is 
A Boy's Own Story, the first volume of an autobiographical-fiction series that continued with The Beautiful Room Is Empty and The Farewell Symphony, describing stages in the life of a gay man from boyhood to middle age. Several characters in these latter two novels are recognizably based on well-known individuals from White's New York-centered literary and artistic milieu. White was a member of The Violet Quill, a gay writer's group that met briefly from 1980–1981. The Violet Quill included other prolific gay writers like Andrew Holleran and Felice Picano.

An earlier novel Nocturnes for the King of Naples (1978) and a later novel The Married Man (2000) are also gay-themed and draw heavily on White's own life. In 2006 he published a nonfiction autobiography entitled My Lives. It is unusual in that it is organized by theme, rather than chronologically. White's autobiographical works are frank and unapologetic about his promiscuity and his HIV-positive status. In 1982, White helped found the Gay Men's Health Crisis, in New York City. In Paris, in 1984, he was closely involved in the foundation of the French HIV/AIDS NGO AIDES.


Edmund Valentine White III (born January 13, 1940) is an American author and literary critic. He is a member of the faculty of Princeton University's Program in Creative Writing. Since 1995 he has lived with his partner Michael Carroll (born 1965), a writer; despite this relationship White has strongly mixed feelings on the subject of gay marriage. In The Married Man, Austin Smith is pushing fifty, loveless and drifting, until one day he meets Julien, a much younger, married Frenchman.

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_White
"San Francisco is where gay fantasies come true... The problem the city presents is whether, after all, we wanted there particular dreams to be fulfilled - or would we have preferred others? Did we know what price these dreams would exact?" --Edmund White, 1980
A Boy's Own Story is Edmund White's best book, hands down. Like Maxwell, White's writing, sentence for sentence is just gorgeous, surprising and generous to his people and to his world. --Michael Klein
What a happy accident my discovery of Noturnes for the King of Naples by Edmund White was. I was 17-years-old and in NYC to visit Paul (the guy I eventually won my First Amendment right to go to the prom with.) I was in a rush to appear terribly adult, so I pulled a book off the bookstore shelf quickly, as though I knew exactly what I was looking for. Well, the gay gods must have been watching over me that day because this book was my constant companion during senior year in high school. I read this book at the exact right time in my life when I was susceptible to the influence of Mr. White's immaculate way with language, and for that reason it feels as though this book changed my life. In the years since this book's publication, Edmund White has written many other straightforward, less baroque gay stories; but for my money, this is Mr. White letting his freak flag fly. P.S. As much as I respect Gore Vidal's opinions, I have not recognized the "vicious" content of Mr. White's work that Mr. Vidal has publicly complained about recently. --Aaron Fricke
Though I would come to dislike White´s subsequent work, I find A Boy's Own Story to be just about perfect. As a sexual awakening, it´s competitive with The Catcher in the Rye, and I´ll never forget flipping through it in my college bookstore and reading the line, "Go head, fill `er up," and realizing I had to own it. I need to re-read this soon-it never gets old, unlike all boys with their own stories. --Matthew Rettenmund
Edmund White has always mixed the highbrow with the lowlife, the backroom with the salon, in books that are intelligent, frank, outspoken, and not politically correct. He strikes me as someone who has been a lightning rod for readers, who seem to love to pick his opinions apart, even though sentence for sentence, I think he writes better than almost anyone else today. The Beautiful Room is Empty — the follow-up to A Boy’s Own Story — is the one of his I treasure the most. His autobiographical narrator wallows in self-loathing (including some painfully funny therapy sessions with a completely useless analyst) even as he’s having loads of covert sex (in men’s rooms everywhere), all the while inching toward self-definition. It’s a fearless portrait of the middle-class repressiveness that the ’60s obliterated. The novel ends at Stonewall. By the time you get there, you’re ready for a revolution. Related reading: In his memoir My Lives, he covers some of the same ground, but as nonfiction. It makes for a fascinating comparison. --K.M. Soehnlein
Aside from the legend in Gay literature that Edmund White has become, A Boy’s Own Story was perhaps the first truly ‘literate’ work of Gay fiction that I saw myself in. I know that this sort of ‘serious’ literature is not everyone’s cup of tea, but “A Boy’s Own Story” is on some level, to me anyway, every Gay boy’s story, at least in spirit. I don’t know how not to be inspired by White’s prose. Touching. True. And oh so keenly written. --Dan Stone
I suppose this list wouldn’t be complete without an Edmond White mention. I always found his work to be slightly confusing, yet strangely compelling. His work is composed of flowing prose that I can never hope to achieve, nor, I suppose, do I want to. White’s books are intellectually inspiring, delving more into the emotions than the carnal lust. However, A Boy’s Own Story was one of my very first gay romance novels. So it needs to be on this list. --G.A. Hauser
Often labelled the ‘gay Catcher in the Rye’ A Boy’s Own Story is the story of a teen trying to discover himself in a much more unwelcoming period of the 50s. A bit bleak and heavy going at times, this was followed up by two sequels, yet I never found them as appealing as this one. --Sean Kennedy
The novelist, essayist, and biographer Edmund White is skeptical about the notion of a gay sensibility. "What we can discuss... is the gay taste of a given period," he wrote in States of Desire. "A taste cultivated (even by some heterosexuals) or rejected (even by many homosexuals). What we can detect is a resemblance among many gay works of art made at a particular moment - a resemblance partially intended and partially drawn without design from a shared experience of anger or alienation or secret, molten camaraderie." Elsewhere, White argued that "any discussion of a group's sensibility (the "black sensibility"? the "Jewish sensibility"?) is too general to be useful."
The AIDS epidemic would cause more pain and loss than anyone within the gay community had hitherto imagined possible. And the deaths among artists would ravage the creativity of American culture for at least a generation. A typical disaster was the devastation of the Violet Quill, a group of seven novelists formed at the end of the 1970s. Its members were Edmund White, then working on A Boy's Own Story; Felice Picano; Andrew Holleran; Robert Ferro; George Whitmore; Christopher Cox; and Michael Grumnley. Vito Russo, who was writing The Celluloid Closet, was also an occasional visitor. By the end of 1991, only White, Holleran, and Picano were still alive.
"For me these losses were definitive," Edmund White wrote. "The witnesses to my life, the people who had shared references and sense of humor, were gone. The loss of all the books they might have written remains incalculable." --The Gay Metropolis: The Landmark History of Gay Life in America by Charles Kaiser
Edmund White, 1985, by Robert Giard )

Further Readings:

The Married Man by Edmund White
Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: Vintage (September 11, 2001)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0679781447
ISBN-13: 978-0679781448
Amazon: The Married Man

In Edmund White's most moving novel yet, an American living in Paris finds his life transformed by an unexpected love affair.

Austin Smith is pushing fifty, loveless and drifting, until one day he meets Julien, a much younger, married Frenchman. In the beginning, the lovers' only impediments are the comic clashes of culture, age, and temperament. Before long, however, the past begins to catch up with them. In a desperate quest to save health and happiness, they move from Venice to Key West, from Montreal in the snow to Providence in the rain. But it is amid the bleak, baking sands of the Sahara that their love is pushed to its ultimate crisis.

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

More Spotlights at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels
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Josh Lanyon is an American writer of LGBT mystery and adventure fiction, usually with a strong romantic subplot.

Over the past decade Lanyon has written numerous novels, novellas and short stories as well as the non-fiction writing guide Man, Oh Man! Writing Quality M/M Fiction. He is the author of the Holmes & Moriarity comic mysteries as well as the Adrien English mystery novels, including The Hell You Say, winner of the 2006 USABookNews award for GLBT fiction.

Lanyon has collaborated with several other writers including Laura Baumbach (co-writer of the Eppie Award-winning Mexican Heat), Jordan Castillo Price, and Sarah Black.

In December 2009, Lanyon's first foray into spec fiction was published through Blind Eye Books. Strange Fortune is described as an AU British Raj adventure with romantic and fantasy elements.

Lanyon's first novel, Fatal Shadows, was published in 2000 through the now defunct indie British publisher Gay Men's Press. Since then he has published with a variety of presses, both electronic and print, including Samhain Publishing, Carina Press, Loose Id, Blind Eye Books, JCP Books, Liquid Silver, MLR Press, Aspen Mountain Press, Torquere, etc. Lanyon currently lives in Los Angeles, California.

Adrien English Mysteries Fatal Shadows (2000, originally published by MLR Press and Loose Id) - Just Joshin', ISBN 978-1-937909-15-4 (print) + ISBN 978-1-937909-07-9 (ebook)
A Dangerous Thing (2002, originally published by MLR Press and Loose Id) - Just Joshin', ISBN 978-1-937909-16-1 (print) + ISBN 978-1-937909-08-6 (ebook)
The Hell You Say (2006, originally published by MLR Press and Loose Id) - Just Joshin', ISBN 978-1-937909-19-2 (print) + ISBN 978-1-937909-00-0 (ebook)
Death of a Pirate King (2008, originally published by MLR Press and Loose Id) - Just Joshin', ISBN 978-1-937909-26-0 (print) + ISBN 978-0-9847669-0-1 (ebook)
The Dark Tide (2009, originally published by MLR Press and Loose Id) - Just Joshin', ISBN 978-1-937909-51-2 (print) + ISBN 978-1-937909-01-7 (ebook)

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josh_Lanyon
I read Snowball in Hell twice and was blown away by it. Lanyon balances a lot in this relatively short work. Great period detail—it’s 1943. Interesting mystery. But what had me riveted was the characterization of the two leads: Lt. Matthew Spain and reporter Nathan Doyle. Two men falling in love at this time wasn’t easy and, in fact, I was quite sad at times. Very moving, with a strong emotional punch. I'm still hoping for a sequel. --Joely Skye
Honestly, I’ve never read anything by Josh Lanyon that I didn’t like, but The Ghost Wore Yellow Socks and Out of the Blue are my favorites. I think they both showcase Lanyon’s knack for characterization, setting, and whatever that special something is that makes me devour his books as if they were made of chocolate. --Cassandra Gold
Aside from the Adrien English mysteries just being a really fantastic series (I bought The Dark Tide the day it came out and then let it sit for a month because I was so sad to see the series end), Fatal Shadows has the dubious distinction of being the first ebook I ever bought, and it served as my gateway drug to the greater world of e-publishers and m/m romance. Plus, I could easily populate half this list with Lanyon’s books. I think his special gift is the novella; I continue to be impressed by how he can give you everything you need to understand the characters and situations in so few words. --Kate McMurray
I’ve had a LiveJournal account since the day I read “Fatal Shadows” by Josh Lanyon. I came here as an author stalker. I simply don’t have words to describe how much I love the Adrien English series. Something about Jake and Adrien, the constant conflict and the very human and dreadfully unwise choices, really worked for me. I always say I’d read Josh if he wrote drug prescription inserts and it’s as true today as it was that day. I just finished “The Dark Farewell” last night. I still like the mysteries best because they were my first, but looking at this list, it’s possible I just like mysteries. :D --Z.A. Maxfield
Though not a huge history buff, I couldn't resist picking up Josh Lanyon's novella, Out of the Blue. And I'm extremely happy I did. I've enjoyed all the Lanyon's books I've read to date but would have to say, Out of the Blue is some of Lanyon's finest writing—Witty, charming, amazingly sensual, and funny—Well, that describes all Lanyon books, but there was something different about this one. I noticed the style is different, but if anything, his choice aids in the action, making the story concise—fast-paced. Set in France during WWI, Out of the Blue hits all the right buttons in this story of lost love, blackmail, forced seduction, and new beginnings. British ace Bat Bryant and American pilot Cowboy Cooper seem an unlikely pair, yet Lanyon fashions the perfect scenario, feeding into a confrontation that plays out well. Against the odds and despite their wills, Bat and Cowboy work—and they work each other over pretty darn well throughout this story. And Lanyon writes in these two men's emotions so perfectly, the story is utterly romantic on top of erotic. Readers of historical military and/or M/M erotic romance will want to read this one! --Bryl R. Tyne
What do you get when you take murder, an amateur mystery-writing sleuth with a heart condition who wields his sarcastic tongue to deflect suspicion and innuendo…then mix it with a dash of romance including in a hunky cop with commitment issues, a leather fetish, who suffers from a severe case of homophobia despite being one himself? A whole lotta happy readers. I have yet to read the fifth and final book in the The Adrien English Mystery Series, mainly because I know I won’t have to say goodbye as long as I don’t. But this series is brilliantly written and readers are deliciously tormented and teased by the will-they/won’t-they, on again/off again relationship between Adrien and Jake. --Ethan Day
Mexican Heat is possibly one of the best gay detective stories I’ve ever read. Baumbach and Lanyon keep you on the edge of your seat, and turning page after page as they skillfully weave the love affair of Gabriel Sandalini, a feisty undercover cop, and Antonio Lorenzo, against a backdrop of murder and mayhem involving wicked drug lords and hit men. Super! --J.P. Bowie
Okay, everyone knows The Adrien English Series, so it´s sort of like recommending "Star Wars" to sci-fi fans, but seriously, it has to be on my "top 10" list. --Astrid Amara
The Hell You Say was the first of his Adrien English books I read, which led me to all his others. --P.A. Brown
Further Readings:

Fatal Shadows (The Adrien English Mysteries) by Josh Lanyon
Paperback: 196 pages
Publisher: JustJoshin (May 14, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1937909158
ISBN-13: 978-1937909154
Amazon: Fatal Shadows (The Adrien English Mysteries)
Amazon Kindle: Fatal Shadows (The Adrien English Mysteries)

One sunny morning Los Angeles bookseller and aspiring mystery author Adrien English opens his front door to murder. His old high school buddy (and employee) has been found stabbed to death in a back alley following a loud and very public argument with Adrien the previous evening. Naturally the cops want to ask Adrien a few questions; they are none too impressed with his answers, and when a few hours later someone breaks into Adrien's shop and ransacks it, the law is inclined to think Adrien is trying to divert suspicion from himself. Adrien knows better. Adrien knows he is next on the killer's list.

More Spotlights at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels
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A Valet’s Duty by H. Lewis-Foster
Publisher: Amber Quill Press, LLC (July 30, 2014)
Amazon Kindle: A Valet's Duty

At the turn of the twentieth century, Henry Simpkins is a valet at Taverslow, the Earl of Wayshaw’s Somerset home. When the Earl’s younger brother, Rafe, arrives from his villa in Italy, Henry is given the task of caring for his mischievous dogs, Pepe and Paolo. As part of his duties, he also goes to Rafe’s room each night to tidy away his clothes.
One night, Rafe tentatively asks Henry to go beyond his valet duties to relieve Rafe’s sexual tensions. Henry enjoys their increasingly intimate encounters, but he’s soon disturbed to find he feels more for Rafe than mere physical attraction.
Now, Henry faces a difficult decision. Can he remain in the same house as Rafe if his affections are not returned?

Excerpt )



Author Bio: H. Lewis-Foster lives in the North of England, and has always worked with books in one form or another. As a keen reader of gay fiction, she decided to try writing herself, and is now the proud author of several short stories and her debut novel ‘Burning Ashes’.
H. likes to create characters who are talented, funny and quite often gorgeous, but who all have their faults and vulnerable sides, and she hopes that you'll enjoy reading their stories as much as she loves writing them



Tour Dates: January 13, 2015
Tour Stops:
Parker Williams, Rainbow Gold Reviews, Prism Book Alliance, BFD Book Blog, Bayou Book Junkie, Molly Lolly, Amanda C. Stone, Tara Lain, Andrew Q. Gordon, Fangirl Moments and My Two Cents, Love Bytes, My Fiction Nook, Christy Loves 2 Read, Wicked Faerie's Tales and Reviews, Elisa - My Reviews and Ramblings, MM Good Book Reviews, Inked Rainbow Reads, Velvet Panic, Havan Fellows, Elin Gregory, The Hat Party, Scattered Thoughts & Rogue Words, Fallen Angel Reviews, Nephylim, Dawn’s Reading Nook

Rafflecopter Prize: E-copy of ‘A Valet’s Duty’
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