Feb. 22nd, 2015

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Felice Picano (born February 22, 1944) is an American writer. He graduated cum laude from Queens College in 1964 with English department honors. He founded SeaHorse Press in 1977, and The Gay Presses of New York in 1981 with Terry Helbing and Larry Mitchell; he was Editor-in-Chief there. He was an editor and writer for The Advocate, Blueboy, Mandate, Gaysweek, and Christopher Street. He was the Books Editor of The New York Native. At The Los Angeles Examiner, San Francisco Examiner, New York Native, Harvard Lesbian & Gay Review and the Lamdba Book Report, he was a culture reviewer. He has also written for OUT and OUT Traveller. With Andrew Holleran, Robert Ferro, Michael Grumley, Edmund White, Christopher Cox, and George Whitmore, he founded The Violet Quill considered to be the pathbreaking gay male literary nucleus of the 20th Century. (Picture: Felice Picano, portrait by Christopher Oakley)

In his memoir Men Who Loved Me, he describes his close friendship with the poet W. H. Auden. In his later memoir/history, Art & Sex in Greenwich Village, he writes about contacts with Gore Vidal, James Purdy, Charles Henri Ford, Edward Gorey, Robert Mapplethorpe and many contemporary and younger authors.

Among those who Picano introduced to the public via his publishing companies were Dennis Cooper, Harvey Fierstein, Jane Chambers, Brad Gooch, Robert Gluck, Doric Wilson, and Gavin Dillard. Several of his novels have been national and international best-sellers, and they have been translated into fifteen languages.

A long time resident of Manhattan and Fire Island Pines, Picano has resided for periods of time in Los Angeles, San Francisco, London, England, and Berlin, Germany. He now lives in West Hollywood, CA.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felice_Picano
The cover blurb from Edmund White calling Like People in History a “gay Gone with the Wind” is a bit hyperbolic, but this is one of my all-time favorite gay novels. Sweeping from the late 50’s through the early 90’s, it is the story of two gay cousins and their dysfunctional but loving friendship. With scenes at Woodstock to Fire Island in its 70’s heyday to ACT UP demonstrations, this book and its characters follow the development of gay culture from the closet of the 50’s/60’s through the hedonistic early days of freedom and pride through the horror of the AIDS plague. It will make you laugh, it will make you cry, and when you finish it, it will continue to resonate in your mind long after. A masterpiece from one of the community’s greatest writers. --Greg Herren
Felice Picano pretty much tops every writer´s (and reader´s) list of favorite gay authors, myself included. Ambidextrous, the first of five of Picano´s noted memoirs, was also the first coming out book I read that was as unapologetic as it was zany and sexy. It offers a slice of life completely different from my own, yet one I could wholly relate to. But it´s Picano´s style and flair that really stand out here, making this the one book I read in my twenties that grabbed me and shook me and made me want to become a writer myself. Fortunately, I´ve been able to tell that face-to-face with the author himself - numerous times now. --Rob Rosen
If you want to learn what gay men do in bed, The Joy of Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein & Felice Picano is the book. (Although I prefer the illustrations in The Gay Kama Sutra – but sadly, it’s OOP.) If you want to see it in action – watch gay porn! --Cat Grant
Felice Picano, 1985, by Robert Giard  )

Further Readings:

True Stories, Portraits from my past by Felice Picano
Paperback: 224 pages
Publisher: Chelsea Station Editions (March 1, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0984470778
ISBN-13: 978-0984470778
Amazon: True Stories, Portraits from my past

From author Felice Picano, co-founder of the path breaking Violet Quill Club, comes a new collection of memoirs, many of which have never appeared in print. Picano presents sweet and sometimes controversial anecdotes of his precocious childhood, odd, funny, and often disturbing encounters from before he found his calling as a writer and later as one of the first GLBT publishers. Throughout are his delightful encounters and surprising relationships with the one-of-a-kind and the famous-including Tennessee Williams, W.H. Auden, Charles Henri Ford, Bette Midler, and Diana Vreeland

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

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Jorge Luis Flores Sánchez (born February 22, 1974), better known as Nina Flowers, is a Puerto Rican drag queen, DJ, activist, professional make-up artist, and reality television personality who has been performing since 1993. Flowers and his partner, Antonio Purcell de Ogenio, presently reside in Denver, Colorado.

Flowers was born in 1974 in Bayamón, Puerto Rico. He started his drag career in March 1993, where he performed at local San Juan gay venues such as Krash (also known as Eros) and Club Lazer. In 1999, he participated in and won both the Miss Puerto Rico Continental and Miss City Lights Continental pageants. His drag name is a tribute to both one of his musical idols, Nina Hagen, and his last name (from Spanish, his last name - Flores - translates to "Flowers" in English).

Flowers became a cast member on Logo's popular reality series, RuPaul's Drag Race, which premiered on the network in February 2009. Flowers finished in second place and won the Miss Congeniality award during the first season's reunion special. The publicity generated by his participation on the show brought many new opportunities to perform at various national and international LGBT events including Denver Pride, San Juan Pride, Chicago Pride and Vancouver Pride. Besides his participation on RuPaul's Drag Race, Flowers (along with season two contestant Jessica Wild) has performed on the popular Puerto Rican television program Objetivo Fama, which airs throughout the United States and Latin America.

In early 2010, Flowers joined the of cast of Logo's new reality series, RuPaul's Drag U. This summer replacement series premiered on July 19, 2010. On 6 August 2012, it was announced that Flowers was one of twelve past Drag Race contestants selected to join the cast of RuPaul's All Stars Drag Race which premiered on the Logo network on 22 October 2012. Forming Team Brown Flowers along with contestant Tammie Brown, both contestants were eliminated in the second episode of the series which aired on 28 October 2012.


Jorge Luis Flores Sánchez (born February 22, 1974), better known as Nina Flowers, is a Puerto Rican drag queen, DJ, activist, professional make-up artist, and reality television personality who has been performing since 1993. Flowers and his partner, Antonio Purcell de Ogenio, presently reside in Denver, Colorado. On May 29, 2009, Denver's mayor, John Hickenlooper, issued a proclamation declaring May 29 as "Nina Flowers Day" in recognition of Flowers's contributions to the city's LGBT community.

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nina_Flowers

Further Readings )

More LGBT Couples at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance
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Clinton Kelly (born February 22, 1969) is an American fashion consultant and media personality best known for his role as co-host on What Not to Wear, a reality program that features fashion makeovers. He shares on-air duties with Stacy London. Kelly started his career as a freelance writer for several fashion magazines. Although he still continues to write, he has since expanded into fashion consulting and designing. In 2011 Kelly joined the cast of ABC's daytime cooking show The Chew. In 2009, he married Damon Bayles and they currently live in Connecticut. Clinton Kelly is currently estimated to have a net worth of $2 million. (P: Gharbison. Clinton Kelly at Macy's in Tigard, Oregon, outside Portland,

Kelly was born in Panama City, Panama, of Irish and Italian ancestry, and raised in Port Jefferson Station, Long Island, New York. He graduated from Comsewogue High School in 1987. He attended Boston College and graduated with a degree in communications in 1991; he was president of Boston College's University Chorale. After college, he attained his master's degree in journalism, specializing in magazine publishing, from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in 1993.

Before joining What Not to Wear as co-host, Kelly hosted a program on Q2 (part of QVC) and worked as a freelance writer and editor at several publications in New York. Kelly was an editor at Marie Claire and a deputy editor at Mademoiselle, where he contributed under the pseudonym "Joe L'Amour". He later became the executive editor of the Daily News Record, a New York-based weekly men's fashion and retail trade magazine.


Clinton Kelly is an American fashion consultant and media personality best known for his role as co-host on What Not to Wear. He shares on-air duties with Stacy London. Kelly started his career as a freelance writer for several fashion magazines. Although he still continues to write, he has since expanded into fashion consulting and designing. Kelly joined the cast of ABC's daytime cooking show The Chew. In 2009, he married Damon Bayles and they currently live in Connecticut.

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Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinton_Kelly_(TV_personality)

Further Readings )

More LGBT Couples at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance
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Edith Wynne Matthison (November 23, 1875 – September 23, 1955) was an Anglo-American stage actress who also appeared in two silent films.

She was educated in King Edward's Grammar School and Midland Institute, and began at 21 to appear in musical comedy, later joining Ben Greet's company, playing leading parts in The Three Musketeers and Money. She specialized in Shakespeare and classic drama almost from the start of her career. She was acting in the same play, The Merchant of Venice, with the legendary actor Sir Henry Irving the night he died. Irving nearly died in Matthison's arms. She appeared in Greek and mystery plays, old English comedies, and modern plays. In the United States in 1904 she appeared in Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer.

Matthison married the playwright Charles Rann Kennedy in 1898, acted in many of his plays, and advised him during their development. A happy couple who enjoyed a long marriage of 50 years, they had no children. They both taught at Bennett Junior College in Millbrook, New York. At one time her niece Gladys Edith Wynne was married to the stage and silent film star Milton Sills. Matthison died of a stroke in Los Angeles on September 23, 1955.


Main house at Steepletop, where Millay spent the last years of her life
Edna St. Vincent Millay was a lyrical poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was known for her feminist activism and her many love affairs. While playing the lead in her own The Princess Marries the Page at Vassar, she was approached by the British actress Edith Wynne Matthison, who, excited by the performance, came backstage to kiss Millay and invite her to her summer home. Millay felt great passion in the kiss and the two exchanged love letters.


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Wynne_Matthison

Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950) was an American lyrical poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism and her many love affairs. She used the pseudonym Nancy Boyd for her prose work. The poet Richard Wilbur asserted, "She wrote some of the best sonnets of the century." (P: Edna St. Vincent Millay in Mamaroneck, NY, 1914, by Arnold Genthe)

Millay was born in Rockland, Maine, to Cora Lounella Buzelle, a nurse, and Henry Tollman Millay, a schoolteacher who would later become a superintendent of schools. Her middle name derives from St. Vincent's Hospital in New York, where her uncle's life had been saved just before her birth. The family's house was "between the mountains and the sea where baskets of apples and drying herbs on the porch mingled their scents with those of the neighboring pine woods." In 1904, Cora officially divorced Millay's father for financial irresponsibility, but they had already been separated for some years. Cora and her three daughters, Edna (who called herself "Vincent"), Norma Lounella (born 1893), and Kathleen Kalloch (born 1896), moved from town to town, living in poverty. Cora travelled with a trunk full of classic literature, including Shakespeare and Milton, which she read to her children. The family settled in a small house on the property of Cora's aunt in Camden, Maine, where Millay would write the first of the poems that would bring her literary fame.


Edna St. Vincent Millay home 1923–24 at 75½ Bedford St Greenwich Village

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edna_St._Vincent_Millay

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
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Jane Bowles, born in New York City on February 22, 1917, spent her life examining lesbian identity with an honest and sardonic wit. In 1934, on a ship returning from Switzerland, Bowles met the French author Celine, whose work she had been studying, and she suddenly decided that "I am a writer." Her first novel, La Phaeton Hypocrite, a parody of the Phaeton myth, was privately printed. Although admired by her mother, Bowles regarded the novel, no copy of which survives, as a childish exercise. (Picture: Jane Bowles by Carl Van Vechten)

Bowles's adventures in the lesbian and gay bars of Greenwich Village, and her open pursuit of women lovers, caused her mother and her family consternation. In 1937, she was introduced to the novelist and composer Paul Bowles--himself a homosexual--and agreed to marry him. The two soon recognized that their marriage would succeed only as a platonic friendship; both continued their homosexual liaisons.

In mid-May 1940 Paul and Jane Bowles travel to Albuquerque, New Mexico with Robert Faulkner, where Bowles composes a score for Roots in the Soil, a documentary film about the Rio Grande Valley for the Soil Erosion Service. They later go to Mexico and rent a hacienda in Acapulco, where they meet the still unknown Tennessee Williams. In Taxco, Mexico, Jane Bowles meets Helvetia Perkins, a divorcee living in Mexico with her daughter. In Taxco, Jane and Paul Bowles also meet a sixteen-year-old named Ned Rorem, who is travelling through Mexico with his father.


Paul Frederic Bowles was an American expatriate composer, author, and translator. Jane Bowles (born Jane Sydney Auer) was an American writer and playwright. Jane spent her life examining lesbian identity with an honest and sardonic wit. Jane's adventures in the lesbian and gay bars of Greenwich Village, and her open pursuit of women lovers, caused her mother and her family consternation. In 1937, she was introduced to Paul--himself a homosexual--and agreed to marry him.


Jane Bowles was a writer and playwright. Paul Bowles introduced Jane to Cherifa (Amina Bakalia) working in the grain market near the bottom of the Grand Hotel Villa de France, who will become Jane's live-in partner. Later Jane wrote: “I love Tangier. But like a dying person. When Tetum and Cherifa die I might leave. But we are all three of us the same age, more or less. Tetum older, Cherifa a bit younger. I’d like to buy them meat and fish and oil so that they will stay alive longer."

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Citation Information
Author: Gilley, Amy
Entry Title: Bowles, Jane Auer
General Editor: Claude J. Summers
Publication Name: glbtq: An Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Culture
Publication Date: 2002
Date Last Updated May 5, 2005
Web Address www.glbtq.com/literature/bowles_ja.html
Publisher glbtq, Inc.
1130 West Adams
Chicago, IL 60607
Today's Date May 4, 2013
Encyclopedia Copyright: © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc.
Entry Copyright © 1995, 2002 New England Publishing Associates

Paul Frederic Bowles (December 30, 1910 – November 18, 1999) was an American expatriate composer, author, and translator. Following a cultured middle-class upbringing in New York City, during which he displayed a talent for music and writing, Bowles pursued his education at the University of Virginia before making various trips to Paris in the 1930s. He studied music with Aaron Copland, and in New York wrote music for various theatrical productions, as well as other compositions. He achieved critical and popular success with the publication in 1949 of his first novel The Sheltering Sky, set in what was known as French North Africa, which he had visited in 1931.

In 1937 he returned to New York, and over the next decade established a solid reputation as a composer, collaborating with Orson Welles, Tennessee Williams and others on music for stage productions as well as orchestral pieces. In 1938 he married the author and playwright Jane Auer. It was an unconventional marriage: their intimate relationships were with people of their own sex, but they maintained close ties to each other, and despite being frequently anthologised as a gay writer Bowles always regarded such typecasting as both absurd and irrelevant. After a brief sojourn in France they were prominent among the literary figures of New York throughout the 1940s, with Paul working under Virgil Thomson as a music critic at the New York Herald Tribune. His light opera The Wind Remains, based on a poem by García Lorca, was performed in 1943 with choreography by Merce Cunningham and conducted by Leonard Bernstein. His translation of Sartre's play Huis Clos ("No Exit"), directed by John Huston, won a Drama Critic's Award in 1943.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Bowles
As an adult, I rarely get so transported by a book that I forget where I am, what time it is, and whether or not I’ve checked my e-mail. But that happens to me every time I open The Sheltering Sky by Paul Bowles. Like all of Bowles’s writing, it is strange and disturbing. The story of an American couple’s doomed trip into the dessert, it is certainly one of the most gripping novels I can think of. And the ending is so shattering, you simply cannot forget it. Bowles was married but openly gay. --Stephen McCauley
I backed into The Sheltering Sky by Paul Bowles through sidelong glances and full-frontal nudity found. I was 13 years-old and up late watching Bernardo Bertolucci’s film version after my mom went to bed. The story and setting and, well, everything about it turned me on. It’s about a married couple, Port (John Malkovich) and Kit (Debra Winger), on vacation with another man, Tunner (Campbell Scott, who is so obviously their boyfriend). So I searched out the book and fell into a state of love and lust with it, too, though in a different way. Bowles’ novel is quieter, yet no less vivid and erotic. It’s darker, in some ways, and more cerebral. Bowles’ does something in this book that stunned me. He writes both what Port and Kit “say” and what they really wanted to say, but don’t. This creates a level of intimacy between the reader and the characters that is one of the most intense in literature. --Aaron Krach
Shortly before the IIWW, a young Harvard undergraduate named Leonard Bernstein made one of his first visits to Manhattan. On November 4, 1937, Aaron Copland, the great gay American composer, invited the budding musician to a birthday party at his New York loft on West 63d Street. The room was filled with gay and bisexual intellectuals, including Paul Bowles (then known only as a composer) and Virgil Thomson. When Copland learned that Bernstein loved his Piano Variations, he dared the Harvard boy to play them. "It'll ruin the party", said Bernstein. "Not this party", Copland replied, and the guests were mesmerized by Bernstein's performance. --The Gay Metropolis: The Landmark History of Gay Life in America by Charles Kaiser
Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Aiden Shaw (born Aiden Finbar Brady, 22 February 1966, Harrow, Middlesex, United Kingdom) is a British author, musician, model and former gay porn star.

Shaw was born in Harrow, London, on 22 February 1966, the sixth of seven children in an Irish Catholic family. At 14, he began dressing in an "alternative" way, taking an interest in the New Romantic, Punk, & Goth fashion/youth culture scenes that were prominent at that time. At 16 he enrolled on a two-year Creative Arts foundation course at Nelson and Colne College. Then he spent two years at Manchester Youth Theatre. Afterwards he embarked on an Expressive Arts degree at the then Brighton Polytechnic (now University of Brighton), but after only a year he transferred to Harrow College of Higher Education to study Film, Television, Photography & Video. After leaving college he worked for a time directing and art-directing music videos for bands such as Peter Hook's (bass player of New Order) off-shoot project Dead Beat.

Changing his last name, Shaw began working in gay porn in the early 1990s. Since then he has appeared in over 50 films, often working with director Chi-Chi LaRue. In 1991, he won the award for Best Newcomer at the Adult Erotic Gay Video Awards. He retired from the porn industry in 1999 though made a brief reappearance in 2003-04.

In 1991, Shaw collaborated with the New York artist Mark Beard to produce a limited edition publication named Aiden. Beard had been sharing a London flat with Shaw at the time. The book included several portraits (mainly nude and semi-nude) of Shaw, with text written by Beard and Shaw (who at that time was still known by his birth name of Aiden Brady).




This book documents Mark Beard’s experience of living with Aiden, a male prostitute he met while working in London as a set designer. It consists of Beard’s text, his intimate—sometimes explicit—photographs of Aiden, and Aiden’s own words, interwoven Rashomon-like to reveal the coinciding ties and disconnects between sex and desire.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aiden_Shaw

Further Readings )

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Richard Greenberg (born February 22, 1958) is an American playwright and television writer known for his subversively humorous depictions of middle-class American life. He has had more than 25 plays premiere on and off-broadway in New York City and eight at Los Angeles' South Coast Repertory Theatre, including The Violet Hour, Everett Beekin, and Hurrah at Last.

Greenberg is perhaps best known for his 2003 Tony Award winning play, Take Me Out about the conflicts that arise after a Major League Baseball player nonchalantly announces to the media that he is gay. The play premiered first in London and then traveled to New York as the first collaboration between England's Donmar Warehouse and New York's Public Theater. After its Broadway transfer in early 2003, Take Me Out won widespread critical acclaim for Greenberg and numerous prestigious awards.

Greenberg grew up in East Meadow, New York, a middle-class Long Island town in Nassau County, east of New York City. His father, Leon Greenberg, was an executive for New York's Century Theaters movie chain and his mother Shirley was a homemaker. Greenberg graduated from East Meadow High School in 1976 and later went on to attend Princeton University, where he graduated magna cum laude. At Princeton, Greenberg studied creative writing under Joyce Carol Oates and roomed with future Harvard economics professor Greg Mankiw. He later attended Harvard for graduate work in English and American Literature, but later dropped out of the program when he was accepted to the Yale School of Drama's playwriting program in 1985.

Along with Take Me Out, Greenberg's plays include The Dazzle, The American Plan, Life Under Water, and The Author’s Voice. Recently, his adaptation of August Strindberg’s Dance of Death ran on Broadway, starring Ian McKellen, Helen Mirren and David Strathairn. He is a winner of the Oppenheimer Award and the first winner of the PEN/Laura Pels Award for a playwright in mid-career.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Greenberg

Further Readings:

Take Me Out: A Play by Richard Greenberg
Paperback: 128 pages
Publisher: Faber & Faber; First Edition edition (August 6, 2003)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0571211186
ISBN-13: 978-0571211180
Amazon: Take Me Out: A Play

“A funny and troubling look at athletes and identity . . . Take Me Out is a dynamic, involving play.” —Donald Lyons, New York Post

Darren Lemming is the star center fielder for the champion New York Empires. An extraordinary athlete, he fills both his fans and his teammates with awe at his abilities and his presence on the field and off. When he makes the matter-of-fact announcement that he’s gay, he throws his team into turmoil and confusion, while he also emboldens his closeted accountant, Mason Marzac, to come to terms with his own sexuality—and to fully experience the pure joy of watching great athletes play a sport as well as it can be played. But Darren’s announcement brings to the fore the confused and twisted hostilities of the Empires’ brilliantly talented but deeply racist and homophobic pitcher, Shane Mungitt—from whose rage tragic consequences ensue.

The American premiere of Take Me Out took place at the Public Theater in New York City in September 2002. It will move to the Walter Kerr Theatre on Broadway in February 2003.

More Spotlights at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels
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(Arthur William) Douglas Cooper, who also published as Douglas Lord (20 February 1911 – 1 April 1984) was a British art historian, art critic and art collector. He mainly collected Cubist works.

Douglas's mother came from old-established English aristocracy. His biographer and longtime partner John Richardson considered his suffering from the social exclusion of his family by his countrymen to be a defining characteristic of his friend,clarify explaining in particular his Anglophobia. Cooper never visited Australia and proposed that he might have been conceived there during the honeymoon of his parents.

In 1933, he became a partner in the Mayor Gallery in London and planned to show works of Picasso, Léger, Miró and Klee in collaboration with Paris-based art dealers like Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler and Pierre Loeb (1897–1964); however, this collaboration ended fast and unfavourably. Cooper was paid out in works of art.

Cooper attributed this failure not least to the conservative policy of the Tate Gallery; according to Richardson, his resentment was the catalyst for the structure of his own collection, which should prove the backwardness of the Tate Gallery. At the outbreak of the Second World War 1939, he had acquired 137 cubist works, partly with the help of collector and dealer Dr. Gottlieb Friedrich Reber (1880–1959), some of them masterpieces, using a third of his inheritance.


Picasso with John Richardson and Douglas Cooper
Douglas Cooper was a British art historian, art critic and art collector. He mainly collected Cubist works. In 1950, he became acquainted with art historian John Richardson, sharing his life with him for the next 10 years. John Richardson moved to southern France (Provence) in 1952, as Cooper acquired Château de Castille in the vicinity of Avignon and transformed the run-down castle into a private museum of early Cubism. In 1960, Richardson left Cooper and moved to New York City.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Cooper_(art_historian)

Sir John Patrick Richardson, KBE, FBA (born 22 February, 1924 in London) is a British art historian and Picasso biographer. Richardson has also worked as an industrial designer and as a reviewer for The New Observer. He moved to southern France (Provence) in 1952 where he became friends with Picasso, Léger and de Staël. In 1960, he moved back to New York and organized a nine-gallery Picasso retrospective. Christie's then appointed him to open their US office, which he ran for the next nine years. In 1973 he joined New York gallery M. Knoedler & Co., Inc., as Vice President in charge of 19th and 20th-century painting, and later became Managing Director of Artemis, a mutual fund specializing in works of art.

In 1980 he started devoting all his time to writing and working on his Picasso biography. He has also been a contributor to The New Yorker and Vanity Fair. In 1993 Richardson was elected to the British Academy and in 1995 he was appointed Slade Professor of Fine Art at the University of Oxford. In 2011, Richardson was awarded France’s Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and in 2012 was appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

John Patrick Richardson was born on 22 February, 1924, the elder son of Sir Wodehouse Richardson, D.S.O., K.C.B., Quarter-Master General in the Boer War, and founder of London and the British Empire's Army & Navy Stores. His mother was Patty (née Crocker); he had a younger sister (b. 1925) and a younger brother. In 1929, when he was five years old, his father died, and his mother sent him to board at two successive preparatory schools, where he was unhappy. When he was thirteen he became a boarder at Stowe school, where he admired the architecture and landscape and was taught something about the work of Picasso and other innovative painters. By 1939 and the outbreak of World War II he knew that he wanted to become an artist, and, a month short of seventeen, enrolled at the Slade School of Fine Art (at that time 'evacuated' to Oxford), where he became a friend of Geoffrey Bennison and James Bailey. When he was called up, he obtained a position in the Irish Guards, but almost immediately contracted rheumatic fever and was invalided out of the army. During this period he met and made friends with Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud, both of whom portrayed him later. He spent the rest of the war with his mother and siblings in London. During daytime, he worked as an industrial designer before becoming a reviewer for The New Observer. In 1949 he became acquainted with art historian and collector Douglas Cooper, with whom he would share his life for the next ten years.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Richardson_%28art_historian%29

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Karla Jay (born February 22, 1947) is a professor of English and the director of the Women's and Gender Studies program at Pace University. A pioneer in the field of lesbian and gay studies, she is widely published.

Jay was born Karla Jayne Berlin in Brooklyn, New York, to a conservative Jewish family. She attended the Berkeley Institute, a private girls' school in Brooklyn now called the Berkeley Carroll School. Later she attended Barnard College, where she majored in French, and graduated in 1968 after having taken part in the student demonstrations at Columbia University.

While she shared many of the goals of the radical left-wing of the late 1960s, Jay was uncomfortable with the male-supremacist behavior of many of the movement’s leaders. In 1969, she became a member of Redstockings. At around the same time she began using the name Karla Jay to reflect her feminist principles.

When activists founded the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) in the wake of the Stonewall Riots of June 1969, Jay, openly lesbian, was an early member, and became an active participant, balancing attendance at meetings with working and attending graduate school at New York University, majoring in comparative literature. She was one of the few women actively involved in the early gay rights movement on both coasts.

Working with Allen Young (writer) she edited Out of the closets a pioneering anthology which gave voice to the Radicalesbians, Martha Shelley and writers such as Rita Mae Brown.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karla_Jay

Karla Jay, 1991, by Robert Giard  )

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Peter Hujar probably met Joseph Raffael (born February 22, 1933) at San Remo, a mixed queer/artist’s bar near Cooper Union. Later Raffael changed the spelling of his name by dropping the final ‘e.’

Before his involvement with Hujar, Raffael had been in a relationship with Jules Perlmutter.

Peter Hujar and Joe Raffael visited Paul Thek and Peter Harvey in Florida in 1956. Harvey was working when the three others decided to visit the Deering estate, Villa Vizcaya, in Miami’s Dade County. They entered the unrestored boat house and, handing the camera back and forth among themselves, produced a series of images never before publicly exhibited. Peter Harvey notes that even in 1956, they knew James Deering, who built Villa Vizcaya, was queer and that the estate was therefore historically gay ground. These photographs anticipate Hujar’s developing interest in abandoned sites, such as the series done in conjunction with David Wojnarowicz in New Jersey in the 1980s. Beni Montresor, a director and theatrical designer, became involved with Joseph Raffael after the relationship with Hujar ended. (Picture: Peter Hujar, Joseph Raffael in a Forest, c. late 1950s, Vintage gelatin silver print, 12 x 9 in., Copyright 1987 The Peter Hujar Archive, LLC; courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Photographic references: Paul Thek and His Circle in the 1950s, April 12 - July 7, 2013, Co-curated by Jonathan David Katz and Peter Harvey: http://www.leslielohman.org/exhibitions/2013/paul-thek-and-his-circle.html)


Paul Thek, Untitled (Peter Hujar and Joe Raffael in the Deering boathouse ruins), 1956, Digital enlargement, 2013, 10.75 x 10.75 in., Collection of Peter Harvey, L2013.10.51
Peter Hujar probably met Raffael at San Remo, a mixed queer/artist’s bar near Cooper Union. Before his involvement with Hujar, Raffael had been in a relationship with Jules Perlmutter. Beni Montresor, a director and theatrical designer, became involved with Joseph Raffael after the relationship with Hujar ended. After Thek return to New York in 1959, his artistic circle of friends included photographer Peter Hujar, as well as Joseph Raffaele, in addition to Susan Sontag.


Paul Thek and Joe Raffael

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Source: https://www.leslielohman.org/exhibitions/2013/paul-thek-and-his-circle.html

Paul Thek (November 2, 1933 - August 10, 1988) was an American painter and, later, sculptor and installation artist. Born in Brooklyn, he studied locally, at the Art Students League and the Pratt Institute. In 1951 he entered the Cooper Union. (Unknown, Untitled (Paul Thek leaning on tree) 1955, Vintage black and white photograph, 4.75 x 3.25 in., Collection of Peter Harvey L2012.2.1 Photographic references: Paul Thek and His Circle in the 1950s, April 12 - July 7, 2013, Co-curated by Jonathan David Katz and Peter Harvey)

Although Thek began as a painter, he became known later in life for his sculptures and installations. Notable works include Technological Reliquaries (1964–67), a series of wax sculptures of human body parts, and The Tomb, a bright pink pyramid installation or "environment", which was badly damaged in 1981 but is documented in Edwin Klein's black and white photographs. Today his work may be seen in numerous collections, including that of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

Thek, who was bisexual, died of AIDS related illness in New York City in 1988, aged 54

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Thek

Paul Thek met set designer Peter Harvey (born January 2, 1933) in Miami Beach in 1954. He had been supporting himself as a hustler while developing his art. Wilbur Pippin, a friend, introduced Thek and Harvey to the renowned mid-century photographer George Platt Lynes. (P: Paul Thek (1933-1988), Untitled (Peter Harvey), 1955, Digital enlargement, 13.5 x 8.8 in., Collection of Peter Harvey, L2013.10.5)

Born in January 2, 1933, in Quirigua, Guatemala, Peter Harvey was the son of Francis William and ZenaErica (Henriquez) Harvey. He currently resides in New York City. Harvey graduated from the University of Miami in Coral Gables in the spring of 1955 and immediately secured work doing theatrical set design, earning enough money to support Thek and free him from having to hustle to support himself.

Harvey first stage work was as set designer for Pantomime for Lovers (ballet), Dade County Auditorium, Miami, 1954. His last known work was as set designer for Foggy Day, 1987, in New York City. In 1956, on a trip to Key West, Thek and Harvey visited with Tennessee Williams, whose play Orpheus Descending was produced at the Coconut Grove Playhouse with sets by Peter Harvey.

Peter Hujar and Joe Raffael visited Paul Thek and Peter Harvey in Florida in 1956. Harvey was working when the three others decided to visit the Deering estate, Villa Vizcaya, in Miami’s Dade County. They entered the unrestored boat house and, handing the camera back and forth among themselves, produced this series of images never before publicly exhibited. Peter Harvey notes that even in 1956, they knew James Deering, who built Villa Vizcaya, was queer and that the estate was therefore historically gay ground. These photographs anticipate Hujar’s developing interest in abandoned sites, such as the series done in conjunction with David Wojnarowicz in New Jersey in the 1980s.

Harvey and Thek moved to New York City, and they shared a house in Greenhill, Rhode Island. Peter Hujar probably met Joe Raffael at San Remo, a mixed queer/artist’s bar near Cooper Union. Before his involvement with Hujar, Raffael had been in a relationship with Jules Perlmutter. After Thek’s return to New York in 1959, his artistic circle of friends included Hujar, as well as Raffaele, artist Eva Hesse and Ann Wilson, in addition to Gene Swenson and Susan Sontag. During the 1970s, Thek lived in Italy, where he created many works in conjunction with Hujar. Both Hujar than Thek died due to AIDS complications, in 1987 and 1988 respectively.


Wilbur Pippin (1924-2003), Untitled (Peter Harvey and Paul Thek in NYC), 1956, Digital enlargement, 10.75 x 10.75 in., Collection of Peter Harvey
Paul Thek and Peter Harvey met in Miami Beach in 1954, the year Thek left Cooper Union in New York and moved to Florida. He had been supporting himself as a hustler while developing his art. This 1956 photograph of the couple is by their friend, press photographer Wilbur Pippin. Previously, Pippin introduced Thek and Harvey to the renowned mid-century photographer George Platt Lynes. L2013.10.25


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Source: http://www.filmreference.com/film/84/Peter-Harvey.html#ixzz2pEeaI2qA

Peter Hujar (October 11, 1934 – November 26, 1987) was an American photographer known for his black and white portraits. Born in Trenton, New Jersey, United States. Hujar later moved to Manhattan to work in the magazine, advertising, and fashion industries. His subjects also consisted of farm animals and nudes. His most famous photograph is Candy Darling on Her Deathbed which was later used by the group Antony and the Johnsons as cover for their album I Am a Bird Now. (P: Peter Hujar, Young Peter Hujar, n.d., Gelatin silver print, 9.5 x 7.5 in., Copyright 1987 The Peter Hujar Archive, LLC; courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco, L2013.01.13. Photographic references: Paul Thek and His Circle in the 1950s, April 12 - July 7, 2013, Co-curated by Jonathan David Katz and Peter Harvey, http://www.leslielohman.org/exhibitions/2013/paul-thek-and-his-circle.html)

Hujar probably met Joseph Raffaele at San Remo, a mixed queer/artist’s bar near Cooper Union. Later Raffael changed the spelling of his name by dropping the final ‘e.’ Before his involvement with Hujar, Raffael had been in a relationship with Jules Perlmutter, whose Figures in a Garden on another wall.

Peter Hujar and Joe Raffael visited Paul Thek and Peter Harvey in Florida in 1956. Harvey was working when the three others decided to visit the Deering estate, Villa Vizcaya, in Miami’s Dade County. They entered the unrestored boat house and, handing the camera back and forth among themselves, produced this series of images never before publicly exhibited. Peter Harvey notes that even in 1956, they knew James Deering, who built Villa Vizcaya, was queer and that the estate was therefore historically gay ground. These photographs anticipate Hujar’s developing interest in abandoned sites, such as the series done in conjunction with David Wojnarowicz in New Jersey in the 1980s.


Peter Hujar, Nude Self-Portrait, #3, 1966, Purchase, Vital Projects Fund Inc. Gift, through Joyce and Robert Menschel, 2012, MET 2012.215, © 1966, The Peter Hujar Archive
Peter Hujar (1934 – 1987) was an American photographer known for his black and white portraits. Hujar probably met Joseph Raffaele at San Remo, a mixed queer/artist’s bar near Cooper Union. Hujar became lover with Paul Thek, probably along with Raffael. During the 1970s, Thek and Hujar lived together in Italy. One one-time lover, friend and mentor of artist David Wojnarowicz, Hujar died of AIDS complications on November 26, 1987, aged 53. Thek died in August 10, 1988. Raffael is still alive.
Before his death from AIDS in 1987 at age fifty-three, Hujar was an influential figure in New York’s downtown demimonde. (Nan Goldin once said she never would have become a photographer if it had not been for Hujar.) Hujar’s photographic work is held together less by subject or style than by a particular sensibility: intimate and somber, carnal yet formally refined, cool yet oddly emotional, like a sad song with a good beat. He made this compelling self-portrait in a master class taught by Richard Avedon and Marvin Israel that was also attended by Diane Arbus.


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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Hujar

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