Mar. 16th, 2015

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Leverett Saltonstall traveled with Charles William Dabney, Jr., his Harvard classmate, after graduation and generally had a difficult time settling down; it was said that he was forced by his mother, against his will, to marry.

He was the son of Leverett Saltonstall (1783-1845) and Mary Elizabeth Sanders Saltonstall (1788-1858). He graduated from Harvard College in 1844, and received his law degree from Harvard in 1847. He practiced law until 1860, when he became active in the Massachusetts Democratic party, and although he was frequently nominated as a candidate for Congress, he was never elected. In 1876, he was appointed chief Massachusetts commissioner for the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition, and also helped to oversee the 1876 Florida ballot controversy that arose as part of the Tilden-Hayes presidential election. He was appointed the collector of the port of Boston by Pres. Grover Cleveland in 1885, serving until 1889, and was a member of the Board of Overseers of Harvard University from 1889 until his death in 1895.

Saltonstall married Rose Smith Lee (b. 1835), of Salem in 1854, and they lived in Chestnut Hill (Brookline), Massachusetts. His children were Leverett Saltonstall (1855-1863), Richard Middlecott Saltonstall (1859-1922), Rose Lee Saltonstall [West] (1861-1891), Mary Elizabeth Saltonstall [Shaw] (b. 1862), Philip Leverett Saltonstall (1867-1919), and Endicott Peabody Saltonstall (1872-1922).


Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895, right) sitting next to his Harvard classmate Charles William Dabney, Jr. and an unidentified friend, c. 1850.
Leverett Saltonstall traveled with Charles William Dabney, Jr., Harvard classmate, after graduation and generally had a difficult time settling down; it was said that he was forced by his mother, against his will, to marry. He graduated from Harvard College in 1844, and received his law degree from Harvard in 1847. He practiced law until 1860, when he became active in the Massachusetts Democratic party, and although he was frequently nominated as a candidate for Congress, he was never elected.

Source: www.historyproject.org/exhibits/public_faces/9.php

Further Readings:

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Ida Alexa Ross Wylie (Born: Mar 16, 1885 in Melbourne, Australia; Died: Nov 04, 1959 in Princeton, New Jersey), better known as I.A.R. Wylie, was one of the most respected authors of her generation. Sara Josephine Baker (November 15, 1873 – February 22, 1945) was an American physician notable for making contributions to public health, especially in New York City. Sara Josephine Baker wrote very little about her personal life, however she spent much of the later part of her life with Ida Alexa Ross Wylie, a novelist and essayist from Australia, and self-identified as a 'woman-oriented woman'. When Baker retired in 1923, she started to run their household while writing her autobiography. In 1935, Baker and Wylie decided to move to Princeton, New Jersey, together with their friend Louise Pearce. While Baker and Pearce left little documentation of their personal lives, Wylie was open about her orientation, although she did not identify either Baker or Pearce in her writings.

She was an established poet and novelist honored by the journalistic and literary establishments of her time, and known around the world. Her dozen novels sold well enough to earn her a living, but Wylie's non-fiction (including her autobiographical work) was equally well-received, and she was unusual as an author in that she enjoyed both popular and critical success. Born in Melbourne, Australia, in 1885, she was taken by her parents to London in 1888, where her mother died soon after. She was raised by her father, Alexander Coghill Wylie, who utilized his own notions of bringing up children -- she was kept out of school and given large numbers of books to read, and she was taught to rely on her instincts until she was in her teens. She spent three years in finishing school in Belgium, and then studied in England, followed by years of studying in Germany, where she also taught and began writing. She became involved in the women's suffrage movement in England during the early teens, and made her first visit to America, which became her permanent home decades later in 1917.


Unveiling of bust of S. Josephine Baker at Woman's Medical College of Philadelphia, Founders' Day event attended by Jane Wasey, sculptor; Dr. Leona Baumgartner, I.A.R. Wylie (who presented the bust to the College), Dean Marion Fay, Dr. Louise Pearce.
Sara Josephine Baker was an American physician notable for making contributions to public health. Ida Alexa Ross Wylie, better known as I.A.R. Wylie, was one of the most respected authors of her generation. Sara Josephine Baker wrote very little about her personal life, however she spent much of the later part of her life with Wylie, and self-identified as a 'woman-oriented woman'. In 1935, Baker and Wylie decided to move to Princeton, New Jersey, together with their friend Louise Pearce.

Read more... )

I.A.R. Wylie's Books on Amazon: I.A.R. Wylie

Source: http://www.answers.com/topic/i-a-r-wylie

Vintage Covers )

Sara Josephine Baker (November 15, 1873 – February 22, 1945) was an American physician notable for making contributions to public health, especially in New York City. She is best known for (twice) tracking down the infamous index case known as Typhoid Mary, as well as vastly improving hygiene in the immigrant communities of Hell's Kitchen. Her fight against the damage that widespread urban poverty and ignorance once wreaked upon children, especially newborns, is perhaps her most lasting legacy. In 1917, she noted that babies born in the United States faced a higher mortality rate than soldiers fighting in World War I, drawing a great deal of attention to her cause.

Sara Josephine Baker wrote very little about her personal life, however she spent much of the later part of her life with Ida Alexa Ross Wylie, a novelist and essayist from Australia, and self-identified as a 'woman-oriented woman'. When Baker retired in 1923, she started to run their household while writing her autobiography. In 1935, Baker and Wylie decided to move to Princeton, New Jersey, together with their friend Louise Pearce. While Baker and Pearce left little documentation of their personal lives, Wylie was open about her orientation, although she did not identify either Baker or Pearce in her writings.

Baker was born in Poughkeepsie, New York in 1873 to a wealthy Quaker family. At the age of 16, Baker decided on a career in medicine after her father and brother died of typhoid. After studying chemistry and biology at home, she enrolled in the New York Infirmary Medical College, a medical school for women, founded by the sisters and physicians Elizabeth Blackwell and Emily Blackwell, and graduated in 1898. In 1901, Baker passed the civil service exam and qualified to be a medical inspector at the Department of Health, working as a school inspector. After working diligently in the school system, she was offered an opportunity to help lower the mortality rate in Hell's Kitchen, which was considered the worst slum in New York at the turn of the century, with as many as 4,500 people dying every week. Baker decided to focus on the infant mortality rate in particular, as babies accounted for some 1,500 of the weekly deaths. Most of the deaths were caused by dysentery, though parental ignorance and poor hygiene were often indirectly to blame.

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sara_Josephine_Baker

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
John Richard "Jack" Nichols (March 16, 1938 – May 2, 2005) was an American gay rights activist. He co-founded the Washington, D.C. branch of the Mattachine Society in 1961 with Franklin E. Kameny. He appeared in a 1967 documentary under the pseudonym Warren Adkins. (Picture: Jack Nichols & Ted Richards, 1955, by Kay Tobin Lahusen)

Nichols was born in Washington, D.C. to parents of Scottish ancestry. He was raised in Chevy Chase, Maryland and came out as gay to his parents as a teenager. He was inspired at age 15 by the poems of Walt Whitman and the works of Robert Burns. He recalled to Owen Keehnen that, as early as 1955, he was sharing Donald Webster Cory's The Homosexual in America with his gay friends.

Nichols co-founded the Mattachine Society of Washington in 1961 with Frank Kameny, and the Mattachine Society of Florida in 1965. The Mattachine Society of Washington was independent of the national Mattachine Society, which had formally disbanded a few months earlier. (Picture: Lige Clarke by Eric Stephen Jacobs)

Beginning in 1963, he chaired the Mattachine Society of Washington's Committee on Religious Concerns, which later developed into the Washington Area Council on Religion and the Homosexual. This organization was pioneering in forging links between the gay rights movement and the National Council of Churches.


Lige and Jack by Eric Stephen Jacobs
With his partner Lige Clarke, Nichols began writing the column "The Homosexual Citizen" for Screw magazine in 1968. "The Homosexual Citizen", which borrowed its title from the newspaper published by Mattachine D.C., was the first LGBT-interest column in a non-LGBT publication. On February 10, 1975, Clarke was shot and killed in Vera Cruz, Mexico. While his partner Nichols was convinced that the murder was the result of "machismo's homophobic influences", the murder remains officially unsolved.


"Starting as Florida Teen, He Danced Across International Stages" Robert "Bobby" Logan Carter (born May 11, 1954, in Daytona Beach, Florida, died June 23, 1988 in Los Angeles) was an American entertainer and photo model. Logan Carter's two foremost male lovers--Jack Nichols was one-- had, of necessity, to be free from the making of gender-role judgments, able to see him as a person, not as a "star" nor as a cosmetic "woman." Logan died in Hollywood Community Hospital in June, 1988, AIDS.

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Nichols_(activist)
The very first gay-authored account of the Stonewall riots appeared in Screw magazine, the almost entirely heterosexual pornographic tabloid founded by Al Goldstein. Within it, there was a regular column cowritten by Lige Clarke and his lover Jack Nichols, who was now Screw's managing editor. The column reported Ginsberg's visit to the Stonewall, as well as a peace offering from the Electric Circus, a famously hip nightclub on St. Marks Place, which had taken the unprecedented step of inviting openly gay people to mingle with heterosexuals on the dance floor. "If you are tired of raids, Mafia control, and checks at the door," said the Circus, "join us for a beautiful experimenting with social integration between heterosexuals and homosexuals." The evening was a huge success, except for a single "uncool creep" who suddenly started shouting "Goddamn faggots!" He was quickly hustled out of the premises.
The columnists concluded their report with a rousing call to arms:
The revolution in Sheridan Square must step beyond its present boundaries. The homosexual revolution is only a part of a larger revolution sweeping through all segments of society. We hope that "Gay Power" will not become a call for separation, but for sexual integration, and that the young activists will read, study, and make themselves acquainted with all of the facts that will help them carry the sexual revolt triumphantly into the councils of the U.S. Government, into the anti-homosexual churches, into the offices of anti-homosexual psychiatrists, into the city government, and into the state legislatures which make our manner of love-making a crime. It is time to push the homosexual revolution to its logical conclusion. We must crush tyranny wherever it exists and join forces with those who would assist in the utter destruction of the puritanical, repressive, anti-sexual Establishment. --The Gay Metropolis: The Landmark History of Gay Life in America by Charles Kaiser
more pictures )

Jack Nichols, 1998, by Robert Giard  )

Elijah Hadyn "Lige" Clarke (February 22, 1942—February 10, 1975) was an American LGBT activist and journalist. Together with his partner Jack Nichols, Clarke created and wrote "The Homosexual Citizen" in 1968. "The Homosexual Citizen" , which sounded the first call to arms following the Stonewall uprising, running in Screw magazine, was the first regular LGBT-interest column printed in a non-LGBT publication. (Picture: Lige Clarke by Eric Stephen Jacobs)

Lige Clarke was a former U.S. Army Private with top security clearance, assigned to the Army's Chief of Staff at the Pentagon; an organizer of the first gay rights picket line at the White House in 1965; founding member of the Washington Mattachine Society; Hatha Yoga teacher.

Born in the mountains of Southeastern Kentucky, Elijah Clarke, best known as Lige, lived between 1942-1975 in a whirlwind of adventure and excitement. A beautiful, multi-faceted pioneer of the gay liberation movement, he lived out the many paradoxes of his being with an indefatigable aliveness and zest. Fiercely passionate, Lige was also gentle, androgynous and loving. Sharply critical of heterosexist power structures and anal-retentive puritanism alike, he resisted the temptation to relapse into a cheap gay separatism.

From 1964 until his tragic 1975 murder in Mexico, Lige wrote, thought about and fought for same-sex love, for the obliteration of destructive prejudices and boundaries and for a new human being freed from the shackles of traditional conditioning and its resultant moral shackles.

Read more... )

Source: http://gaytoday.com/interview/120102in.asp

Read more... )
The very first gay-authored account of the Stonewall riots appeared in Screw magazine, the almost entirely heterosexual pornographic tabloid founded by Al Goldstein. Within it, there was a regular column cowritten by Lige Clarke and his lover Jack Nichols, who was now Screw's managing editor. The column reported Ginsberg's visit to the Stonewall, as well as a peace offering from the Electric Circus, a famously hip nightclub on St. Marks Place, which had taken the unprecedented step of inviting openly gay people to mingle with heterosexuals on the dance floor. "If you are tired of raids, Mafia control, and checks at the door," said the Circus, "join us for a beautiful experimenting with social integration between heterosexuals and homosexuals." The evening was a huge success, except for a single "uncool creep" who suddenly started shouting "Goddamn faggots!" He was quickly hustled out of the premises.
The columnists concluded their report with a rousing call to arms:
The revolution in Sheridan Square must step beyond its present boundaries. The homosexual revolution is only a part of a larger revolution sweeping through all segments of society. We hope that "Gay Power" will not become a call for separation, but for sexual integration, and that the young activists will read, study, and make themselves acquainted with all of the facts that will help them carry the sexual revolt triumphantly into the councils of the U.S. Government, into the anti-homosexual churches, into the offices of anti-homosexual psychiatrists, into the city government, and into the state legislatures which make our manner of love-making a crime. It is time to push the homosexual revolution to its logical conclusion. We must crush tyranny wherever it exists and join forces with those who would assist in the utter destruction of the puritanical, repressive, anti-sexual Establishment. --The Gay Metropolis: The Landmark History of Gay Life in America by Charles Kaiser
Robert "Bobby" Logan Carter (born May 11, 1954, in Daytona Beach, Florida, died June 23, 1988 in Los Angeles, California) was an American entertainer and photo model.

He appeared alternately as a man or a woman and used the professional alias Roxanne Russell.

Carter was a featured female impersonator at the La Cage nightclub on La Cienega Boulevard in Los Angeles in the early 1980s. There he often performed for celebrities living in the area, sometimes creating a sensation by "doing" one of the famous ladies in the audience.

"Starting as Florida Teen, He Danced Across International Stages" by Jack Nichols

"He's the south's number one gay performer," said Jerry Fitzpatrick, a New York City live entertainment columnist of the Seventies, "but I like him because he's a sharing kind of guy, and he's down to earth. He's as beautiful a man as he is exquisite when dressed as the strong feminine stage personae he's created. That's very rare. Most impersonators are more attractive in drag. But offstage Logan doesn't relate as a woman. He's an actor with a powerful masculine identity. When he impersonates Marilyn Monroe, however, he's the best in the business."



Read more... )

Source: http://www.webcitation.org/5ccMUseX7
I saw "Bobby" perform twice in 1973, at the Horny Bull in Tampa and a club I can't remember the name of in Orlando. He was by far the youngest female impressionist I'd ever seen and friends told me later that he was a teenager. He performed Bette Midler's "You Got to Have Friends" and was amazing. --Connie Bailey
Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Toby Johnson (born 1945 in San Antonio, Texas) is an American novelist and writer in the field of gay spirituality. In 1981, Johnson returned to his hometown where he practiced as an openly gay therapist and served as co-chair of the San Antonio Gay Alliance. Toby and partner Kip Dollar organized Gay Pride celebrations, worked with fledgling AIDS Foundations, and helped found gay business societies in both San Antonio and Austin. From 1988 to 1994, Johnson and Dollar ran Liberty Books, the lesbian and gay community bookstore in Austin at the time. Partners since 1984, they were the first male couple registered as domestic partners in Travis County, TX. To celebrate they 30 years together in August 2013, they took a second honeymoon to France. In 1985, for their first anniversary they visited Paris where Johnson had a high school friend stationed with a big New York law firm, so they had a place to stay. Then 14 years later, they went back to Paris, and this time drove out through the Loire Valley to Mount St. Michel and then to Amsterdam and back to Paris. There is 14 years difference in age between Johnson and Dollar, so 14 is magic number. In 2013, back in March, was their 29th anniversary, so another 14 years later. So they decided to go back to France. There was a gay riverboat cruise through Burgundy and Provence that they found on the Internet. And it started on Johnson's birthday.

Born Edwin Clark Johnson in 1945 in San Antonio, Texas, Johnson attended Catholic parochial school and then the college prep school associated with St. Mary's University, both run by the Brothers of Mary. A writing teacher at Central Catholic, Martin McMurtrey, inspired Johnson as well as such students as novelist Whitley Strieber, college president Larry Goodwin, and Henry Cisneros. Johnson entered religious life after high school, first as a Marianist and then as a Servite, where he was in the first class of students at the Catholic Theological Union, Johnson studied under the influential Scripture scholars Barnabas Ahern, C.P. and John Dominic Crossan, both of whom changed how the modern world perceived sacred writings. After a year in Chicago, Johnson worked in a Hospital Chaplaincy summer training at Metropolitan State Psychiatric Hospital in southern Los Angeles; that summer, he came out as a gay man. Johnson viewed this summer of 1969 an auspicious one because of the Stonewall riot events which sparked the modern LGBT social movements.


Toby Johnson is a novelist and writer in the field of gay spirituality. In 1981, Johnson returned to his hometown where he practiced as an openly gay therapist and served as co-chair of the San Antonio Gay Alliance. Toby and Kip Dollar organized Gay Pride celebrations, worked with fledgling AIDS Foundations, & helped found gay business societies in both San Antonio and Austin. From 1988 to 1994, Johnson and Dollar ran Liberty Books, the lesbian and gay community bookstore in Austin at the time. Their anniversary is on March 16.

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toby_Johnson

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Erling Lae (born 16 March 1947) is a Norwegian county governor and politician for the Conservative Party. He is married to priest Jens Torstein Olsen with whom he has lived with since 1983. He has contributed greatly to put gay political issues on the agenda, including Norway's first action plan against discrimination against gays, lesbians and bisexuals, adopted in June 2006. In June 2007 Lae was awarded the Rainbow Prize in Berlin, for his efforts against discrimination of lesbians and gays. Website Gaysir has named Lae Norway powerful gay man for three consecutive years, in 2006, 2007 and 2008.

He was born in Oslo, and formerly worked as a journalist. From 1981 to 1985 he was a political advisor in the Ministry of Consumer Affairs and Administration. He was elected to Oslo city council in 1991, and was a city commissioner between 1997 and 2000. From 2000 to 2009 he was the Governing mayor of Oslo. As such he headed the executive branch of the city government in the capital city of Norway.


Erling Lae is a Norwegian county governor and politician for the Conservative Party. He is married to priest Jens Torstein Olsen with whom he has lived with since 1983. He has contributed greatly to put gay political issues on the agenda, including Norway's first action plan against discrimination against gays, lesbians and bisexuals, adopted in June 2006. In June 2007 Lae was awarded the Rainbow Prize in Berlin, for his efforts against discrimination of lesbians and gays.

Read more... )

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erling_Lae
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
David Feintuch (July 21, 1944 - March 16, 2006) was a science fiction and fantasy author and attorney.

The Seafort Saga is a military space opera series revolving around the character Nicholas Seafort, an officer in the UNNS. The books are set in a future human society that is largely dominated by unified Christianity. The main protagonist is a naval officer who strives always to do his duty, both to the navy and to his God, at great personal cost. The series and main character are inspired by C. S. Forester's novels about Horatio Hornblower. Shortly before his death, the author announced on his website that an eighth book, Galahad's Hope, had been completed and was in the publication stage; its current status is unknown. Books in the Seafort Saga have been translated into Russian, German, Japanese, Spanish and Czech (published by Talpress).

Feintuch was the 1996 winner of the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer in Science Fiction. He wrote one major science fiction series, the Seafort Saga, and a fantasy series, Rodrigo of Caledon. Feintuch's literary works have been recognized and highlighted at Michigan State University in their Michigan Writers Series.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Feintuch

Further Readings:

The King (Rodrigo of Caledon) by David Feintuch
Mass Market Paperback: 592 pages
Publisher: Ace; First Edition edition (March 25, 2003)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0441010377
ISBN-13: 978-0441010370
Amazon: The King (Rodrigo of Caledon)
Amazon Kindle: The King (Rodrigo of Caledon)

Rodrigo has won the throne of Caledon and mastered the Still’s magic. Now comes the real challenge: He must rule.

When Rodrigo took control of the mystical powers of the Still, he gained the knowledge of his forefathers. On the battlefield, the Still is a potent weapon and Rodrigo proves to be a gifted strategist. But the Still doesn’t make him perfect, and even the wisdom of generations of Caledonian rulers can’t prepare Rodrigo for what will come next.

A sudden betrayal costs Rodrigo the life and companionship of the person he loves most. With the savage King Hriskil advancing on the north, hoping to seize Caledon, Rodrigo must press on toward an earth-shattering magical confrontation.

More Spotlights at my website: www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Harry Kondoleon was a gay American playwright and novelist. He was born on February 26, 1955; and died of AIDS on March 16, 1994, aged 39. He graduated from Hamilton College and the Yale School of Drama. He was awarded the Fulbright, National Endowment for the Arts, Rockefeller and Guggenheim fellowships.

Harry Kondoleon arrived on this planet in 1955 and started observing its inhabitants and their curious customs shortly thereafter. His parents were named Sophocles and Athena, though their friends in Queens called them Cliff and Tina. He shared a birthday with his two-years-older sister Christine. He spent a year in Bali where he saw witches dance and caught typhoid fever. He majored in cutthroat competition at the Yale School of Drama and for more than a decade studied heartbreak and rage with New York City’s daily newspaper critics. Traces of his life on Earth inevitably turned up in his plays: the eerie symbiosis of siblings, the ancient pleasure of putting on a show, the absurd realities of show business, the magic of delirium, the perversity of divine forces wearing masks as mundane as potato salad.

Yet much that goes on in the world of Kondoleon’s imagination escaped any explanation biography has to offer. His sneaky way, for instance, of writing comedies that begin in recognizable living rooms and then spiral imperceptibly into poetry — where does it come from? That, like the love his characters urgently seek, is a mystery that remains intact.

Read more... )

Source: http://harrykondoleon.com/wordpress/?page_id=2

Harry Kondoleon, 1992, by Robert Giard  )

Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Jonathan Williams (March 8, 1929 – March 16, 2008) was an American poet, publisher, essayist, and photographer. He is known as the founder of The Jargon Society, which has published poetry, experimental fiction, photography, and folk art for more than fifty years. He died March 16, 2008 in Highlands, NC from pneumonia.

Based in Scaly Mountain, North Carolina, and for many years also in the Yorkshire Dales in England, both Williams and his publishing venture had long been associated with the Black Mountain Poets. Among the press's offerings are works by Charles Olson, Paul Metcalf, Lorine Niedecker, Lou Harrison, Mina Loy, Joel Oppenheimer, Ronald Johnson, James Broughton, Alfred Starr Hamilton and many other works by the American and British avant-garde.

Once described as a "a busy gadfly who happened somehow to pitch on a slope in western North Carolina," Williams was a living link between the experimental poets of Modernism's "second wave" and the unknown vernacular artists of Appalachia. Guy Davenport likened Williams' use of "found language" to the use of "found footage" by avant-garde filmmakers, as well as describing Williams as a species of cultural anthropologist. Williams for his part explained the fascination of such material in plainer terms:

“Well, as you know, a lot of my poetry is found and that’s, I think, because I think I’m quite a good listener and I’m willing to lay back and listen, and I think it’s something do with living in the country. I mean, this place, Skywinding Farm, there are times when Tom Meyer and I will only see somebody from the outside world once or twice a week. And we’ve known each other so long that we don’t talk as much as we might. Tom can talk up a storm, He’s up there in the Duncan/Olson class. So I like to listen and I like to hear things, so if you listen carefully then you do find things. I do it all the time. I mean, you know the early book, Blues and Roots, which was done in the course of walking a big piece of the Appalachian Trail, I listened to mountain people for over a thousand miles and I really heard some amazing stuff. And I left it pretty much as I heard it. I didn’t have to do anything but organize a little bit, crystallize it, you know. That’s the thing I love about found material, you wake it up, you “make” it into something.”

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Williams_(poet)

Jonathan Williams, 1991, by Robert Giard  )

Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Victor Joseph Garber (born March 16, 1949) is a Canadian film, stage and television actor and singer. Garber is known for playing Jesus in Godspell, John Wilkes Booth in Assassins, Jack Bristow in the television series Alias, Max in Lend Me a Tenor, Thomas Andrews in James Cameron's Titanic, and as Canadian ambassador to Iran, Ken Taylor, in Argo.

Garber referred publicly to his homosexuality in 2012. In 2013, he said "I don't really talk about it but everybody knows." As of 2013, he lives in New York with his partner since 2000, Rainer Andreesen.

Born in London, Ontario, Garber is of Russian Jewish descent; his parents were Joe Garber (died 1995), and wife, Hope Wolf (an actress, singer, and the host of At Home with Hope Garber). He has a brother, Nathan, and a sister, Alisa.

When Garber was twelve, he was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. He attended Ryerson Elementary School. He also was enrolled in the children's program of the Grand Theatre, and at age 16 he was accepted at a six-week summer theatre training program at the University of Toronto taught by Robert Gill. (
Picture: Rainer Andreesen)

Garber began acting at the age of nine, and studied at the University of Toronto's Hart House at age 16. In 1967, after a period working as a folk singer, he formed a folk band called The Sugar Shoppe with Peter Mann, Laurie Hood and Lee Harris. The group enjoyed moderate success, breaking into the Canadian top 40 with a version of Bobby Gimby's song "Canada" in 1967. Three other Sugar Shoppe songs made the lower reaches of the Canadian top 100 in 1967 and '68, and the band even performed on The Ed Sullivan Show and The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson before breaking up.


Victor Joseph Garber is a Canadian film, stage and television actor and singer. Garber is known for playing Jack Bristow in the television series Alias, Max in Lend Me a Tenor, Thomas Andrews in James Cameron's Titanic, and as Canadian ambassador to Iran, Ken Taylor, in Argo.Garber referred publicly to his homosexuality in 2012. In 2013, he said "I don't really talk about it but everybody knows." As of 2013, he lives in New York with his partner since 2000, Rainer Andreesen.

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Garber

Further Readings )

More LGBT Couples at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
6 months ago I released Days of Love. I would have loved to write this post for announcing the good news the book received a nomination to one of the awards I sent it to, but alas, that didn't happen.

I'm true, I was upset, and I almost questioned if I did the right thing publishing it, but then, right today, I received the last confirmation from The Northern Ireland Gay Rights Association, writing about Days of Love: "A book about equality, Days of Love will be a welcome addition to any bookshelf"

So no, the book didn't receive any nomination, but I think you will like to read about the many feedbacks it received, so it's my pleasure to share them with you all:

- A book about equality, Days of Love will be a welcome addition to any bookshelf. By David McFarlane @Northern Ireland Gay Rights Association http://nigra.org.uk/book-review-days-of-love/

- Reading Elisa Rolle’s impressive bio offers a glimpse into how much work she must have done in putting together this exhaustive tome. By David-Elijah Nahmod @Echo Magazine http://www.echomag.com/days-love/

- The book also reminds us that in these times when equality is moving forward, there were a number of people who came before us, paving the way for LGBT rights to be crystallised. By Paul Szabo @The Gay UK http://www.thegayuk.com/magazine/4574334751/BOOK-Days-Of-Love-Celebrating-LGBT-History-One-Love-Story-At-A-Time/9442157

- It serves as a reminder of the importance of love, how powerful it is and how much it should be cherished. By Amie Love @Amazon

- Days of Love lays to rest the well-established myth that LGBT couples aren't capable of sustaining life-long relationships. @Midlands Zone http://issuu.com/midlands-zone/docs/zone_low_res__adrian_/c/sui43wz

- At 750-plus pages, with a full index, it's going to be one of those bedside regulars for at least a year, with a few essays to read each night. By Jim Provenzano @Amazon

- At first, the book seemed like a daunting, scary task to read because of its size, it has over 500 pages. However, once the reader begins to investigate further, the size of the book becomes a non-issue and becomes a brilliant story book. [...] I especially enjoyed reading and learning about those relationships that lasted more than 50 years, and in some cases it was documented that after one of the partner's death, the surviving partner would often die shortly after, as if to say that not even death could separate them. These men and women, members of our LGBT community, were pioneers and started opening doors for civil rights. By JJ Vega @Connextions Magazine http://issuu.com/connextionsmag/docs/issue17/34

- A new book chronicling 2,000 years of same-sex love stories, from Alexander the Great to the latest Literary Award winner, makes the perfect Valentine’s Day gift. By Gordon @Bent Magazine http://mag.bent.com/2015/01/book-days-of-love-celebrates-lgbt-history/

- This is for lovers, Ditch the roses for Valentine's Day and pick up this book of LGBT love stories instead. By Amy McDonnell @DIVA Magazine http://www.divamag.co.uk/category/lifestyle/this-is-for-lovers.aspx

- Thank you so much, Elisa Rolle. Undoubtedly, "Days Of Love" is one of the greatest gifts to the LGBT community. @Amazon

- It's sitting out on our living room coffee table--partly to boast to friends that Kip and I are included in the collection of couples and partly to pick up and read and ponder other gay people's lives and loves down through time. It's a beautiful book. By Toby Johnson @Amazon

- Wonderful book and I will often return to it and enjoy all the photo's and stories. Truly a labour of love. By Sylvia @Amazon

- Ultimately one can only applaud Rolle for her diligence. Despite centuries of history silencing LGBT relationships, a brief perusal of Days of Love should convince any skeptic that there have always been LGBT people seeking love. As we bask in these heady days of social acceptability and legality of same-sex marriage, we are reminded that many people past and present paved the way for our civil rights, not the least of which is the right to love whomever we want. by Brian Bromberger @The Bay Area Reporter http://ebar.com/arts/art_article.php?sec=books&article=892

- Worth it for reference, worth it for the reminder of how much love and art and blood sweat and tears gay people have put into the world, often unknown until after death. By Ajax Bell @Goodreads

- I purchased a print edition for my local PFLAG group, because I believed that in a world where there is so much negativity towards the LGBT community, our members needed to hear the positive message of enduring love. By Eden Winters @Amazon

- The individual stories range from historically interesting to politically important to whimsically charming [...] As we see the world views changing in a positive way towards the LGBT community, some of the people in this book were pioneers without even knowing it. They loved who they loved and didn’t apologise for how they felt. @LOTL, Lesbians on the Loose http://www.lotl.com/Culture/Days-Of-Love-Celebrating-LGBT-History-One-Story-At-A-Time-182/

- Chronicling 2,000 years of gay relationships from Alexander the Great to the latest Lambda Literary Award winner, Elisa Rolle's curated collection of love stories is more than inspiration, it's aspiration! By Jesse Archer DNA Magazine Australia

- It's our history and cannot be ignored! By Fay Jacobs @A&M Books

- A beautiful book of amazing photos and stories. By LeeA P @Amazon

- I was blown away by the wealth of information between these pages. While reading, I was amazed by the research that had gone into it. Just thinking about the time and energy this author has spent compiling these facts about each couple, past and present, is mind boggling. by Lynn @The Novel Approach Reviews http://thenovelapproachreviews.com/2014/09/07/sunday-spotlight-review-days-of-love-by-elisa-rolle/

- Days of Love is sitting on our coffee table--right where it will stay. Great for browsing or reading one story at a time. by Paul Alan Fahey @Amazon

- Thank you to Ms. Rolle for her exhaustive research, her inclusiveness, and for making such a work available. by Lee Lynch @Amazon

- This is a real dip in and out of Tree Book. A glorious history of LGBTQ love stories. By Moogie @Goodreads

- A truly epic and comprehensive directory of LGBT love down the ages. A real achievement. By Jack Scott @Amazon

- It’s truly amazing being included in this books that looks at hundreds of LGBT couples, both historical and present day. By Jeff Adams http://www.jeffandwill.com/2014/08/24/days-of-love-celebrating-lgbt-history-one-story-at-a-time-by-elisa-rolle/

- Through laughter and tears, love endures. By J. Lawrence @Amazon

- Gary and I were honored to be included in Elisa Rolle's historically significant and beautiful book, Days of Love, which chronicles LGBT couples throughout history. Many of the contemporary couples – like Gary and I – share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married. It was a massive undertaking on Elisa's part, and I think it's an important part of our collective history and future. By Wade Rouse. http://waderouse.com/content/other_projects.asp?id=Books

And to close, the best feedback of all. I didn't have an award or either a nomination to put near my book, but probably not many of the other books with a nomination will have the same honor as mine:

Dear Elisa,
Many thanks for sending the wonderful feedbacks for "Days of Love." These are the deserving testimonies to your monumental work. Ralph and I are proud to have been part of it.
The Library of Congress in Washington recently purchased our Sylvester & Orphanos Publication Archive (all the materials that went into creating our twenty-six limited-signed editions), and my Christopher Isherwood Collection (over 500 signed and fully inscribed items), and on June 28th I will give a lecture at the Library regarding both collections, plus my photography.
The library has a copy of your book, and I have asked that it be displayed prominently during my lecture.
Again, thanks for the update.
Best,
Stathis

And to celebrate all these good news, there is a giveaway on Amazon for 1 print copy of Days of Love: giveaway.amazon.com/p/c199bbaff4701bb7

So what you are waiting?

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher

Profile

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
reviews_and_ramblings

April 2019

S M T W T F S
 1234 56
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930    

Most Popular Tags

Disclaimer

All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
I'm associated with Amazon/USA Affiliates Programs.
Books reviewed on this site were usually provided at no cost by the publisher or author. However, some books were purchased by the reviewer and not provided for free. For information on how a particular title was obtained, please contact by email the blog's owner.
Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Apr. 19th, 2019 02:28 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios