Mar. 19th, 2015

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Jae grew up amidst the vineyards of southern Germany. She spent her childhood with her nose buried in a book, earning her the nickname "professor." The writing bug bit her at the age of eleven. For the last eight years, she has been writing mostly in English.

She used to work as a psychologist but gave up her day job in December 2013 to become a full-time writer and a part-time editor. When she's not writing, she likes to spend her time reading, indulging her ice cream and office supply addictions, and watching way too many crime shows.

Departure from the Script won a 2014 Rainbow Award as Best Lesbian Contemporary & Erotic Romance and True Nature won The Cate Culpepper Award for Best Lesbian Paranormal Romance.

Further Readings:

Departure from the Script by Jae
Paperback: 270 pages
Publisher: Ylva Verlag e.Kfr. (June 30, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 3955331954
ISBN-13: 978-3955331955
Amazon: Departure from the Script
Amazon Kindle: Departure from the Script

Aspiring actress Amanda Clark and photographer Michelle Osinski are two women burned by love and not looking to test the fire again. And even if they were, it certainly wouldn't be with each other. Amanda has never been attracted to a butch woman before, and Michelle personifies the term butch. Having just landed a role on a hot new TV show, she's determined to focus on her career and doesn't need any complications in her life. After a turbulent breakup with her starlet ex, Michelle swore she would never get involved with an actress again. Another high-maintenance woman is the last thing she wants, and her first encounter with Amanda certainly makes her appear the type. But after a date that is not a date and some meddling from Amanda's grandmother, they both begin to wonder if it's not time for a departure from their usual dating scripts.

True Nature by Jae
Paperback: 468 pages
Publisher: Ylva Verlag e.Kfr. (October 31, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 3955330346
ISBN-13: 978-3955330347
Amazon: True Nature
Amazon Kindle: True Nature

When wolf-shifter Kelsey Yates discovers that fourteen-year-old shape-shifter Danny Harding is living with a human adoptive mother, she is sent on a secret mission to protect the pup and get him away from the human. Successful CEO Rue Harding has no idea that the private teacher she hires for her deaf son isn't really there to teach him history and algebra-or that Danny and Kelsey are not what they seem to be. But when Danny runs away from home and gets lost in New York City, Kelsey and Rue have to work together to find him before his first transformation sets in and reveals the shape-shifter's secret existence to the world.

More Rainbow Awards at my website: elisarolle.com, Rainbow Awards/2014
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Alice French (March 19, 1850 – January 9, 1934), better known as Octave Thanet, was an American novelist and short fiction writer. By 1890, she had been settled in her comfortable life-long partnership with Jane Allen Crawford (1851-1932) for close to a decade, dividing their year between their home in Davenport, Iowa, and their plantation in Arkansas. The two women shared their lives, except for Jane's four-year marriage (the ending of which is mysterious) and Jane's European tour.

She was born at Andover, Massachusetts, a daughter of George Henry and Frances Wood French. Her mother was the daughter of Massachusetts Governor Marcus Morton. Alice graduated from Abbot Academy in Andover in 1868.

She began her literary career about 1878 with studies of a social and economic bent, but soon turned to short stories, especially after her move to Davenport, Iowa. Iowa and Arkansas gave her opportunities for exploiting regions hitherto little attempted in fiction. Her stories “The Bishop's Vagabond,” “The Hay of the Cyclone,” and “Whitsun Harp, Regulator” were popular. These, with other articles, initially appeared in the Atlantic Monthly and Scribner's Magazine. Later they appeared in her books. Her novel Expiation (1890), won high praise.

Two of Alice French's houses have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places:


The Alice French House, home to the author Octave Thanet, is located at 321 E. 10th St. in Davenport, Iowa. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Alice French (March 19, 1850 – January 9, 1934), better known as Octave Thanet, was an American novelist and short fiction writer. By 1890, she had been settled in her comfortable life-long partnership with Jane Allen Crawford for close to a decade, dividing their year between their home in Davenport, Iowa, and their plantation in Arkansas. The two women shared their lives, except for Jane's four-year marriage (the ending of which is mysterious) and Jane's European tour.



Alice French & Jane Crawford are both buried at Oakdale Memorial Gardens, Davenport, Scott County, Iowa, USA, in the French family plot, section 1, Lot 13.

Read more... )

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_French

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
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The new younger leaders of the '70 were social dropouts and castaways. Martin "Marty" Robinson  (1943 - March 19, 1992) was the son of a Brooklyn doctor who gave up a prosperous home and future to live openly as a gay man. He worked all his life as a union carpenter.

"In the heady days immediately before the world's first Gay Pride parade in 1970, Marty Robinson's photograph--along with his lover Tom Doerr--appeared on the cover of America's first gay weekly newspaper.

Doerr, a graphic artist, had designed a symbol--the Lambda--to represent the new movement. "It represents energy too," he explained. Doerr's lover, Marty, was clearly a young man with energy, a winning kind of vitality, truly macho on the surface, but deeply caring within. Without him, the Stonewall era would have been poorer indeed. New York's gay activists-- especially in those years after the Stonewall uprising--pointed to the handsome journeyman carpenter with pride. They knew he was one gay man who wasn't afraid to be, and that he spoke truth with passion. With the Gay Activists Alliance President, Jim Owles he walked without worry into the thick of battle, struggling hand to hand, even, with oppressive police.

At a meeting of the Village Independent Democrats (VID), an influential political club, Marty delivered an impassioned attack on society's treatment of gays generally, and demanded that the club assist gays in halting police harassment. Result: a call for a moratorium on all such raids, directed at Mayor Lindsay by the VID.


©Diana Davies/Manuscripts and Archives Division, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations. Tom Doerr and Marty Robinson during Gay Activists Alliance sit-in, 1970 (©15)
"In the heady days immediately before the world's first Gay Pride parade in 1970, Marty Robinson's photograph--along with his lover Tom Doerr--appeared on the cover of America's first gay weekly newspaper. Doerr, a graphic artist, had designed a symbol--the Lambda--to represent the new movement. "It represents energy too," he explained. Doerr's lover, Marty, was clearly a young man with energy, a winning kind of vitality, truly macho on the surface, but deeply caring within." --Jack Nichols

Read more... )

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/1992/03/23/nyregion/martin-robinson-leader-of-protests-for-gay-rights-49.html

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
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Daniel Curzon (born March 19, 1938) is the pen name of Daniel R. Brown. He is the author of Something You Do in the Dark, first published by G. P. Putnam in 1971 and which may be considered as one of the first gay protest novels. It is the story of a gay man's attempt to avenge his entrapment by a Detroit vice squad police officer by murdering him.

Curzon has written other novels, including The Misadventures of Tim McPick (original title: Queer Comedy), From Violent Men, Among the Carnivores, The World Can Break Your Heart, Curzon in Love, The Bubble Reputation, or Shakespeare Lives!, and What a Tangled Web. His non-fiction books include The Big Book of In-Your-Face Gay Etiquette and Dropping Names: The Delicious Memoirs of Daniel Curzon. This last was described by Ian Young in Torso as "ferociously honest and very funny" and by Philip Clark in Lambda Book Report as "a blunt, hilarious, page-turning ride that is...impossible to put down."

Curzon edited and published the early homophile magazine "Gay Literature: A New Journal" in 1975 and 1976. The magazine included poetry, fiction, literary reviews, essays, photography, and short plays. Curzon's own written work sometimes was included. Curzon contributed articles for other magazines such as "Gay Times" in 1976 and "Alternate" in 1978.

In the theater, Curzon won the 1999 National New Play Contest for Godot Arrives, and has won many other play contests, such as the Great Platte River Play Contest. His play My Unknown Son was produced off-Broadway at the Circle Rep Lab in 1987 and at the Kaufmann Theatre in 1988, as well as in Los Angeles in 1997. Baker's Plays published Curzon's one-act play, A Fool's Audition. Seven volumes of his Collected Plays have been published as POD books through BookSurge.

Curzon is currently a retired professor of English.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Curzon
Something You Do in the Dark has been described (in Amazon.com) as ―the first gay protest novel‖ and as a ―revenge novel with a social protest theme. Georges-Michel Sarotte, in his literary study Like a Brother, Like a Lover: Male Homosexuality in the American Novel and Theater from Herman Melville to James Baldwin (1978), called Dark ―a well-written, lucid, intelligent and militant novel and Cole himself ―the faithful image of the American — the Western — homosexual of the 1970s. When I first read Dark 29 years ago, I viewed Cole Ruffner as a post-Stonewall, ―angry young gay who was informed by the new gay militancy. However, as Curzon himself said in a recent published conversation with his life partner John W. Gettys,
When I wrote Something You Do in the Dark, I had never heard of the Stonewall Rebellion in NYC or gay liberation. People wrongly think one event caused all the subsequent events. I just knew that I was a good person and the world was saying I was so despicable that we couldn‘t even discuss what you people do sexually. It took me until the age of twenty-six to overcome this social disapproval and become a sexual human being.
[...]
Like Curzon‘s other great novels — 1978's Among the Carnivores and 1984's The World Can Break Your Heart — Something You Do in the Dark is a hard-hitting novel that tells it as it is, not as we want it to be. This novel‘s (and its author‘s) refusal to compromise is perhaps why it has been out of print for much of the past 35 years. Most recently republished by Curzon himself through his own IGNA Press, Something You Do in the Dark deserves to be back in print, and to be read by a new generation of avid gay readers. --Jesse Monteagudo, The Lost Library: Gay Fiction Rediscovered
Daniel Curzon, 1988, by Robert Giard  )

Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

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