Jan. 2nd, 2017

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Buried: Taos Pueblo Cemetery, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, New Mexico, USA

Mabel Dodge Luhan was a wealthy American patron of the arts. She was actively bisexual during her early life and frankly detailed her passionate physical encounters with young women in her autobiography Intimate Memories (1933). Her first marriage was to Karl Evans, the son of a steamship owner in 1900. Karl died in a hunting accident leaving her a widow at the age of 23. Later she married Edwin Dodge, a wealthy architect. The Dodges lived in Florence from 1905 to 1912. At her palatial Medici villa—the Villa Curonia in Arcetri, not far from Florence—she entertained local artists, as well as Gertrude Stein, her brother Leo, Alice B. Toklas, and other visitors from Paris, including André Gide. In mid-1912, the Dodges returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village. Often in attendance were such luminaries as Carl Van Vechten, Margarett Sargent, Emma Goldman, Charles Demuth, "Big Bill" Haywood, Max Eastman, Lincoln Steffens, Hutchins Hapgood, Neith Boyce, Walter Lippmann, and John “Jack” Reed (who became her lover). In 1916, Dodge married Maurice Sterne. In 1919 Dodge, her husband, and Elsie Clews Parsons moved to Taos, New Mexico, and started a literary colony there. In 1923, after divorcing Sterne, she married Tony Luhan, a Native American. The couple lived together until Mabel died, a year before Tony did.
Together from 1923 to 1962: 39 years
Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
Tony Luhan (died in 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Mabel Dodge Luhan House, also known as Big House and St. Teresa House, is a house in Taos, New Mexico. It was a home of artist Mabel Dodge Luhan and was a haven for artists and writers.
Address: 240 Morada Ln, Taos, NM 87571, USA (36.40837, -105.56653)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 575-751-9686
National Register of Historic Places: 78001832, 1978. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The house is "one of the earliest examples of Pueblo Revival style in Taos." It is located on Luhan Lane, off Morada Lane, in Taos. It is now used as a hotel and conference center.
Life
Who: Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan, née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
Mabel Dodge Luhan was a wealthy patron of the arts. She is particularly associated with the Taos art colony. Her first marriage, in 1900 at the age of 21, was to Karl Evans, the son of a steamship owner. They had one son, and Karl died in a hunting accident two and a half years later, leaving her a widow at the age of 23. Her family sent her to Paris because she was having an affair with a prominent Buffalo gynecologist. Later that year she married Edwin Dodge, a wealthy architect. She was actively bisexual during her early life and frankly details her passionate physical encounters with young women in her autobiography “Intimate Memories” (1933.) In mid-1912, the Dodges returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village. She sailed to Europe at the end of June 1913. Her new acquaintance John Reed (Jack)—worn out from having recently organized the Paterson Pageant—travelled with her. They became lovers after arriving in Paris, where they socialized with Stein and Pablo Picasso. They moved down to the Villa Curonia, where the guests this time included Arthur Rubinstein. They returned to New York in late September 1913. In October 1913 Reed was sent to report on the Mexican Revolution by Metropolitan Magazine. Dodge followed him to Presidio, a border town, but left after a few days. Over 1914–16 a deep and continuing relationship developed between the intelligentsia of Greenwich Village and Provincetown. In 1915 she went to Provincetown with painter Maurice Sterne. She then moved to Finney Farm, a large Croton estate. In 1919 Dodge, her by then husband, Maurice Sterne, and Elsie Clews Parsons moved to Taos, New Mexico, and started a literary colony there. On the advice of Tony Luhan, a Native American whom she would marry in 1923, after divorcing Sterne, she bought a 12-acre (49,000 m2) property. D.H. Lawrence accepted an invitation from her to stay in Taos and he arrived, with Frieda his wife, in early September 1922. Dodge and Luhan hosted a number of influential artists and poets including Marsden Hartley, Arnold Ronnebeck, Louise Emerson Ronnebeck, Ansel Adams, Willa Cather, Robinson Jeffers and his wife Una, Florence McClung, Georgia O’Keeffe, Mary Hunter Austin, Frank Waters, Jaime de Angulo, and others. Dennis Hopper bought the Mabel Dodge Luhan House after seeing it while filming “Easy Rider.” Dodge died at her home in Taos in 1962 and was buried in Kit Carson Cemetery (Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos, NM 87571). Antonio "Tony" Lujan (1879-1963) is buried at Taos Pueblo Cemetery (Taos Pueblo, NM).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Married: June 13, 2014

Mark Merlis is an American writer, author of the novels American Studies and An Arrow’s Flight. His new novel JD is coming soon from the University of Wisconsin Press. His work has won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Lambda Literary Award, and the Ferro-Grumley Award for distinction in gay writing. Bob Ashe retired as an executive of Janssen Pharmaceuticals, part of Johnson & Johnson. They live in Philadelphia, where they were married on June 13, 2014. “We met in Leon’s, a dive bar in Baltimore, in 1982. Each of us was cruising someone else; each of us struck out; it was last call. We saw each other and thought, ‘This will do for one night.’ We’ve been together ever since.”
Together since 1982: 32 years.
Bob Ashe (born January 2, 1954)
Mark Merlis (born March 9, 1950)
Married: June 13, 2014



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Lived: Greenwood Plantation, GA 84, Thomasville, GA 31792, USA
The Book Basement, 9 College Way, Charleston
Buried: Laurel Hill Cemetery, Thomasville, Thomas County, Georgia, USA

Edwin Tralona Davis married Martha Tallulah Jones, daughter of Thomas Jones and his wife Lavinia Young. They had two daughters, Martha Davis (b. 28 Feb. 1867), who married Edmund Dutcher on 28 Aug. 1902, and Marion Davis (b. 26 Sep 1873), who married J. W. Peacock on 12 Sep. 1893, 8 children, one of whom was Edwin Peacock.
Address: GA 84, Thomasville, GA 31792, USA (30.85423, -84.01696)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 76000650, 1976
Place
Greenwood Plantation is a plantation in the Red Hills Region of southern Georgia, just west of Thomasville. The original Greek Revival mansion on the property was designed by British architect John Wind and built about 1838 for Thomas and Lavinia Jones. The house was completed in 1844, and the Jones family occupied the plantation until it was sold in 1889 to S.R. Van Duzer of New York. Van Duzer later sold the home Col. Oliver Hazard Payne, who bequeathed the home in 1916 to his nephew, the millionaire and horse racing enthusiast Payne Whitney. After Payne's death, Greenwood was inherited in 1944 by his son Jock Whitney, who was responsible for arranging the financing for the movie version of “Gone with the Wind,” which premiered in Atlanta in December 1939, with Jock Whitney in attendance. The plantation reportedly served as "a model of southern elegance for the movie." In 1899, Payne engaged noted architect Stanford White of the firm McKim, Mead & White to add two small, symmetric side wings and additional living and kitchen space in the rear of the main house. In 1942, Jock married Betsey Cushing, former wife of James Roosevelt. The Whitneys, who also owned a number of other homes in New York and England, regularly visited Greenwood as their winter home, often bringing their thoroughbred race horses with them. Jock served as the American ambassador to the Court of St. James's from 1957 to 1961 under President Dwight Eisenhower, who while a visitor at Greenwood enjoyed quail and turkey hunting. Many other famous friends of the Whitneys stayed at Greenwood over the years, including the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and Fred Astaire. In February 1964, shortly after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, his widow Jackie spent several weeks at the plantation as a guest of the Whitneys, who provided her a much-needed refuge from media attention. Mrs. Kennedy's visit again in 1967 provided some fodder for the tabloids of the day as Lord Harlech, the ambassador to the US from the Court of St. James's, was also a guest during her stay. The main house was renovated and restored in 1965, and redecorated by society decorator Sister Parish in 1993; but just when the redecoration had been completed, a fire broke out, gutting the interior but leaving the external walls intact. Jock died in 1982, and his widow in 1998; upon her death, she left the plantation to the family's Greentree Foundation, who maintained the property according to a conservation plan created by her and expert consultants. In 2013, the foundation offered the plantation for sale. The plantation includes 5,200 acres of forest used for quail hunting with 1,000 acres of old-growth longleaf pines, some up to 500 years old.
Life
Who: Edwin D. “Eager Wings” Peacock (January 2, 1910 – August 23, 1989) and John Asbury Zeigler, Jr (February 5, 1912 – October 2, 2015)
Edwin Peacock and John Zeigler, Jr. were together for 50 years. Edwin was born in Thomasville, Georgia in 1910; John was born in Manning, South Carolina two years later. “Edwin and John: A Personal History of the American South” is a Southern love story set against the backdrop of WWII and the post-war South, where they opened a bookshop in what was then the small town of Charleston. How these two men forged a relationship that endured the conflicts of war and emotion, openly shared their lives, and dealt with tragedy and death is Edwin and John's story. This is also a tale of two boys growing up gay in the South during an era in which "gay" was simply an ordinary word and discussion of any type of sexuality was, at the very least, impolite. Edwin was raised in a large family. His father was a druggist, and his mother, born on her family's ante-bellum Greenwood Plantation, had moved to Thomasville at the turn of the century. While Edwin had few sexual experiences growing up, he knew his attractions were to men. He enjoyed the friendship of women, telling stories and pulling harmless pranks. His greatest childhood love, though, was botany. After graduating from high school and a couple of years working in his father's drugstore, the twenty-something Edwin moved to Columbus, Georgia for work in the Civilian Conservation Corps. It was there he met Carson Smith, an adolescent pianist who had suffered from rheumatic fever. The two formed a lifelong friendship as Edwin encouraged her writing interest. Carson would later fictionalize Edwin as the homosexual deaf-mute, John Singer, in her first novel, “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter.” John's family moved from town to town before settling in Florence, South Carolina when he was five years old. His father also had been a druggist but soon began a newspaper, in which he editorialized against the Klan and venal Southern politicians. Although less outgoing than Edwin, John found more opportunities for same-sex relationships, including a lad who became his lifelong friend. John moved to Charleston to enter The Citadel in 1928, where he fell in love with poetry and with his second-year roommate. Edwin died in 1989 and is buried alongside his parents at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Thomasville. John died in 2015 and his body was donated to medical science, to The Medical University of South Carolina.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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The ground floor of 9 College Way, owned by relatives of John Zeigler, housed The Book Basement, the leading independent bookstore in the city of Charleston for decades; it was where most College of Charleston library books were purchased. It was owned and run by Edwin Peacock (1910-1989) and John Zeigler, (born 1912) one of the city’s most prominent gay couples. Not only was it a meeting place for various civil rights groups, but gay people visiting and passing through Charleston, including the likes of children’s author Maurice Sendak and Harlem Renaissance poet and writer Langston Hughes, stopped here and became friends of the owners. Edwin Peacock introduced bisexual southern writer Carson Smith (1917-1967) to her eventual husband Reeves McCullers. Carson McCullers is remembered today for “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter,” “The Member of the Wedding” and other works. Peacock was a good friend to her for her entire life, and some believe that Peacock, hard of hearing and universally pleasant to all, may have been an inspiration for John Singer, the central mute character in “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter.” Peacock and Zeigler opened their bookstore on Carson’s birthday in 1946 and she was a frequent guest here. This might be the only site in Charleston mentioning a gay couple. Although their names are linked only as business partners, their names are together on the plaque in front of the building. Their relationship is detailed in Zeigler’s’ cycle of memorial poems, “The Edwin Poems” and in his autobiography, “Edwin and John: A Personal History of the American South.” A drawing of the building by gay artist Prentiss Taylor was often used on postcards advertising events at the store. Of further gay interest is the fact that John Zeigler appears renamed as “Nicky” in the book “Jeb and Dash: A Gay Life, 1918-1945” published from the diaries of Carter Bealer, edited by his niece Ina Russell.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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George Henry Boker was an American poet, playwright, and diplomat.
Born: October 6, 1823, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: January 2, 1890, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Princeton University
People also search for: Thomas Buchanan Read, Henry Taylor, Sculley Bradley
Buried: Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA, Plot: Section A, Lot 91

Bayard Taylor was an American poet, literary critic, translator, and travel author. Taylor had a close relationship with poet/diplomat George Henry Boker, founder of Nassau Monthly. Taylor was famous for his books about the Gold Rush in California, including Eldorado and California Life. He also wrote about passionate relationships between men, including Twin Love and the poem To a Persian Boy. Joseph and His Friend is considered the first American novel to deal with gay feelings. It recounts an intimate friendship between two men and is believed to be inspired by the poets Fitz-Greene Halleck and Joseph Rodman Drake, who died in young age: during a train ride Joseph Asten's eyes settle on a stranger, passenger Philip Held. Feeling his stare, Philip looks back. “[t]he usual reply to such a gaze is an unconscious defiance…but the look which seems to answer, 'We are men, let us know each other!' is, alas! Too rare in this world.” In time, yielding to “manly love...as tender and true as the love of woman,” they kiss. Yet, Joseph finds a potential bride, leaving Philip “vicariously happy, warmed in [his] lonely sphere by the far radiation of [Joseph's] nuptial bliss.”
They met in 1848, friends until Bayard Taylor’s death in 1878: 30 years
Bayard Taylor (January 11, 1825 – December 19, 1878)
George Henry Boker (October 6, 1823 - January 2, 1890)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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At Laurel Hill Cemetery (3822 Ridge Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19132) is buried George Henry Boker (1823-1890), American poet, playwright, and diplomat. Bayard Taylor and Richard Henry Stoddard would be long-lasting friends. Also buried here is Anna Lukens (1844-1917), graduated from the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, in 1870. A member of the class attending clinics in the Pennsylvania Hospital, November, 1869, when the students from the Woman's Medical College were hissed by the male members of the clinic. Miss Lukens and a Miss Brumall led the line of women students who passed out of the hospital grounds amid the jeers and insults of the male students, who even threw stones and mud at them, but these brave women were not discouraged by such conduct and might be considered to have blazed the way for other women who today enjoy the privilege.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Jess Collins, simply known today as Jess, was an American visual artist.
Born: August 6, 1923, Long Beach, California, United States
Died: January 2, 2004, San Francisco, California, United States
Known for: Visual arts
Artwork: Narkissos, The Mouse's Tale, Paste-Ups by Jess, Fig. 4 -- Far And Few...: Translation #15, Ex. 4-Trinity's Trine
Education: California Institute of Technology
San Francisco Art Institute

Robert Duncan was an American poet and a devotee of H.D. and the Western esoteric tradition who spent most of his career in and around San Francisco. Ending his relationship with Jerry Ackerman, Duncan wondered if he would ever find a stable domestic situation. Then, one of the audience members at a 1949 reading of The Venice Poem in Berkeley was a painter and literature enthusiast, Jess Collins. They began a collaboration and partnership that lasted until Duncan's death. In 1952, in San Francisco, Jess, with Duncan and painter Harry Jacobus, opened the King Ubu Gallery, which became an important venue for alternative art and which remained so when, in 1954, poet Jack Spicer reopened the space as the Six Gallery. Many of Duncan's poems--such as These Past Years: Passages 10--celebrate his love for Jess Collins. From January 14 to March 29, 2014, New York University’s Grey Art Gallery presented the first overview to highlight their rich artistic production alongside works by their remarkable circle of friends: An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle.
Together from 1949 to 1988: 39 years.
Jess Collins (August 6, 1923 - January 2, 2004)
Robert Duncan (January 7, 1919 – February 3, 1988)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Konstanty Aleksander Jeleński was a Polish essayist.
Born: January 2, 1922, Warsaw, Poland
Died: May 4, 1987, Paris, France
Awards: Kościelski Award

Leonor Fini was an Argentine surrealist painter. Fini married only once, for a brief period, to Fedrico Veneziani. They were divorced after she met the Italian Count, Stanislao Lepri, who abandoned his diplomatic career shortly after meeting Fini and lived with her thereafter. She met the Polish writer Konstanty Jeleński, known as Kot, in Paris right after the war. She was delighted to discover that he was the illegitimate half-brother of Sforzino Sforza, who had been one of her most favorite lovers. Kot joined Fini and Lepri in their Paris apartment in 1952 and the three remained inseparable until their deaths. She later employed an assistant to join the household, which he described as "a little bit of prison and a lot of theatre". One of his jobs was to look after her beloved Persian cats. Over the years, she acquired 17 of them; they shared her bed and, at mealtimes, were allowed to roam the dining-table selecting tasty morsels - and woe betide the guest who complained.
Together from 1952 to 1980: 28 years.
Konstanty Jeleński (January 2, 1922 - May 4, 1987)
Leonor Fini (August 30, 1907 – January 18, 1996)
Count Stanislao Lepri (1905 - 1980)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Born: Jacksonville, Florida, United States
People also search for: Perry Ellis, Tyler Alexandra Gallagher Ellis, Edwin Ellis, Winifred Rountree Ellis
Buried: Fairview Cemetery, Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, USA

Perry Ellis was an American fashion designer who founded a sportswear house in the mid-1970s. In 1981, Ellis began a relationship with divorced attorney Laughlin Barker. Later that year, Ellis appointed Barker the President of licensing division of Perry Ellis International. They remained together until Barker's death in January 1986. In February 1984, Ellis and his long-time friend television producer and writer Barbara Gallagher conceived a child together via artificial insemination. Their daughter, Tyler Alexandra Gallagher Ellis, was born in Nov. 1984. Ellis bought a home for Gallagher and their daughter in Brentwood, Los Angeles, and would visit frequently. In 2011, Tyler released her first line of handbags using the name Tyler Alexandra. Ellis' health rapidly declined after Barker's death. By May 1986, Ellis had contracted viral encephalitis which caused paralysis on one side of his face. Despite his appearance, he insisted on appearing at his Fall fashion show held in New York City on May 8. At the end of the show, Ellis attempted to walk the runway for his final bow but was so weak, he had to be supported by two assistants. It was his final public appearance. Ellis was hospitalized soon after and he slipped into a coma. He died of viral encephalitis on May 30, 1986.
Together from 1981 to 1986: 5 years.
Laughlin McClatchy Barker (1949 - January 2, 1986)
Perry Edwin Ellis (March 3, 1940 – May 30, 1986)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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At Fairview Cemetery (1134 Cerrillos Rd, Santa Fe, NM 87505) is buried Laughlin McClatchy Barker (1948-1986). In 1981, Barker began a relationship with fashion designer Perry Ellis. Later that year, Ellis appointed Barker the President of the licensing division of Perry Ellis International. They remained together until Barker's death in January 1986. Ellis died on May 30, 1986.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Martha Carey Thomas was an American educator, suffragist, linguist, and second President of Bryn Mawr College.
Born: January 2, 1857, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Died: December 2, 1935, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Other name: Carey Thomas
Books: The Making of a Feminist, COL PAPER READ BEFORE THE INTL
Education: Cornell University
Leipzig University
Johns Hopkins University
University of Zurich
Sorbonne
Organizations founded: Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr School
Buried: Bryn Mawr College Grounds, Bryn Mawr, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA, Plot: Cloisters of Thomas Hall (ashes)

Martha Carey Thomas was an American educator, suffragist, linguist, and second President of Bryn Mawr College. She was part of the “Friday Night Group”: Julia Rebecca Rogers, the daughter of a prosperous Baltimore iron and steel merchant; Mary Elizabeth Garrett, daughter of John Work Garret, the president of the B&O Railroad; Elizabeth King; M. Carey Thomas and Mamie Gwinn. In 1879, accompanied by Mamie Gwinn, her “devoted companion,” Thomas went off to Europe to study and received a Ph.D. from the University of Zurich in 1882. Both then came to Bryn Mawr to teach, and Thomas was soon appointed dean. In 1885, Thomas, together with Garrett, Gwinn, King, and Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. The school would produce well-educated young women who met the very high entrance standards of Bryn Mawr College. Carey Thomas lived for many years in a relationship with Gwinn. After Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry Alfred Hodder (1866-1907) (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein’s Fernhurst), Thomas moved in with Garrett; they shared the campus home, living together until Garrett's death in 1915. Thomas spent the last two decades of her life traveling the world in luxury, including trips to India, the Sahara, and France.
Together from 1878 to 1904: 26 years.
Martha Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857 - December 2, 1935)
Mary "Mamie" Mackall Gwinn (1861-1940)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Mary Garrett was the daughter of John W. Garrett, president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O). She became the wealthiest "spinster woman" in the country with the demise of her father. Miss Garrett, who had been prominent in suffrage work and a benefactor of Bryn Mawr, left to President M. Carey Thomas $15,000,000 to be disposed of as she saw fit. Helen Horowitz's book Power and Passion suggests very strongly that the relationship was longstanding even during M. Carey Thomas’s relationship with Mamie Gwinn, and that Thomas in fact was deeply engaged with Garrett throughout it. Carey Thomas acknowledged Mary as the source of her “greatest happiness” and the one who was responsible for her “ability to do work.” Nor was the fleshly aspect missing, as Carey wrote to her “lover.” “A word or a photo does all, and the pulses beat and heart longs in the same old way.” Carey Thomas had firm views on marriage, and in a letter to her mother, she described it as a "loss of freedom, poverty, and a personal subjection for which I see absolutely no compensation." Thomas retired in 1922, at age sixty-five. She left the college in the capable hands of Marion Edwards Park. Her ashes were scattered on the Bryn Mawr College campus in the cloisters of the Thomas Library.
Together from 1904 to 1915: 11 years.
Martha Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857 - December 2, 1935)
Mary Elizabeth Garrett (March 5, 1854 - 1915)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Bryn Mawr College is a private women’s liberal arts college founded in 1885 in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, in Pennsylvania, four miles (6.4 km) west of Philadelphia. The phrase bryn mawr means "big hill" in Welsh.
Address: 101 N Merion Ave, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010, USA (40.02665, -75.31439)
Type: Education facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 610-526-5000
National Register of Historic Places: Bryn Mawr College Historic District (Morris Ave., Yarrow St. and New Gulph Rd.), 79002299, 1979. M. Carey Thomas Library is also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Martha Carey Thomas was president at Bryn Mawr College from 1894 until 1922 and remained as Dean until 1908. Bryn Mawr is one of the Seven Sister colleges, and is part of the Tri-College Consortium along with two other colleges founded by Quakers—Swarthmore College and Haverford College. The school has an enrollment of about 1300 undergraduate students and 450 graduate students. Bryn Mawr was the name of an area estate granted to Rowland Ellis by William Penn in the 1680s. Ellis’s former home, also called Bryn Mawr, was a house near Dolgellau, Merionnydd, Gwynedd, Wales. The College was largely founded through the bequest of Joseph W. Taylor, and its first president was James Evans Rhoads. Bryn Mawr was the first higher education institution to offer graduate degrees, including doctorates, to women. The first class included 36 undergraduate women and eight graduate students. Bryn Mawr was originally affiliated with the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), but by 1893 had become non-denominational. In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked it 25th in Best Liberal Arts Colleges. In 1912, Bryn Mawr became the first college in the United States to offer doctorates in social work, through the Department of Social Economy and Social Research. This department became the Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research in 1970. In 1931, Bryn Mawr began accepting men as graduate students, while remaining women-only at the undergraduate level. From 1921 to 1938 the Bryn Mawr campus was home to the Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, which was founded as part of the labor education movement and the women’s labor movement. The school taught women workers political economy, science, and literature, as well as organizing many extracurricular activities. On February 9, 2015, the Board of Trustees announced approval of a working group recommendation to expand the undergraduate applicant pool. Trans women and intersex individuals identifying as women may now apply for admission, while trans men may not. This official decision made Bryn Mawr the fourth women’s college in the United States to accept trans women.
Notable queer alumni and faculty at Bryn Mawr:
• Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979), upon receiving a substantial ($2,500) traveling fellowship (Lucy Martin Donelly Fellowship) in 1951, set off to circumnavigate South America by boat.
• Ethel Collins Dunham (1883-1969), and her life partner, Martha May Eliot, devoted their lives to the care of children.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health.
• H.D. (1886-1961) attended Bryn Mawr College to study Greek literature, but left after only three terms due to poor grades and the excuse of poor health.
• Edith Hamilton (1867-1963), educator and author who was "recognized as the greatest woman Classicist.”
• Margaret Hamilton (1871-1969), taught English at Bryn Mawr and took over as head of the school when her sister Edith retired.
• Katherine Hepburn (1907-2003), began to act while studying at Bryn Mawr College.
• Ellen Kushner (born 1955), writer of fantasy novels.
• Clara Landsberg (1873-1966), after graduating from Bryn Mawr, became a part of Hull House in Chicago, founded by Jane Addams, and shared a room with Alice Hamilton (sister of Edith.) She eventually left Hull House to teach Latin at Bryn Mawr while Edith was headmistress.
• Frieda Miller (1909-1973) was an economics professor at Bryn Mawr College.
• Tracy Dickinson Mygatt (1885-1973), writer and pacifist, co-founder with Frances M. Witherspoon of the War Resisters League, and longtime officer of the Campaign for World Government.
• Martha Carey Thomas (1857-1935), notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music, at Bryn Mawr she studied literature and the theater arts.
• Eva Palmer-Sikelianos (1874-1952), who had a long-lasting special friendship with Natalie Clifford Barney.
• Paula Vogel (born 1951) is an American playwright and university professor. She received the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for her play How I Learned to Drive.
• Agnes E. Wells (1876-1959), one of the American’s leading educators, and a vigorous standard bearer in the women’s equal rights movement
• Frances May Witherspoon (1886-1973), writer and activist, co-founder with Tracy Dickinson Mygatt of the War Resisters League, and executive secretary of the New York Bureau of Legal Advice, a forerunner of the American Civil Liberties Union.
Life
Who: Martha Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857 – December 2, 1935)
Martha Carey Thomas was an educator, suffragist, linguist, and second President of Bryn Mawr College. In 1882, Thomas wrote a letter to the trustees of Bryn Mawr College, requesting that she be made president of the university. She was not granted the position, however, as the trustees were concerned about her relative youth and lack of experience. Instead, Thomas entered in 1884 as the dean of the college and chair of English. Despite not receiving her desired role at Bryn Mawr, Thomas was active in the college’s administration, working closely with then President James Rhoads. According to the biographical dictionary Notable American Women: 1607–1950, by 1892 she was "acting president in all but name.” In 1885 Thomas, together with Mary Elizabeth Garrett (1854-1915), Marie “Mamie” Gwinn (1861-1940), Elizabeth King, and Julia Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. The school would produce well-educated young women who met the very high entrance standards of Bryn Mawr College. In 1894, President Rhoads died, and Thomas was narrowly elected to succeed him on September 1, 1894. With respect to the President Rhoads’s recent death, Thomas was not given any ceremony. For many years Thomas maintained an intimate relationship with long-time friend, Mamie Gwinn. Thomas and Gwinn lived together at Bryn Mawr College in a small cottage that came to be known as "the Deanery.” When Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein’s “Fernhurst”) Alfred Hodder, a fellow Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, Thomas pursued a relationship with Mary Elizabeth Garrett. Thomas shared her campus home, the Deanery, with Garrett and together they endeavored to grow Bryn Mawr’s resources. Upon her death, Garrett, who had been prominent in suffrage work and a benefactor of Bryn Mawr, left to President Thomas "a sum which would, in 1994, be close to $15,000,000" to be disposed of as she saw fit. M. Carey Thomas had firm views on marriage, and in a letter to her mother she described it as a "Loss of freedom, poverty, and a personal subjection for which I see absolutely no compensation." Thomas retired in 1922, at age sixty-five. Mary Garrett left a considerable fortune to Thomas, who spent the last two decades of her life traveling the world in luxury, including trips to India, the Sahara, and France. Thomas died at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on December 2, 1935 of a coronary occlusion. She had returned to the city to address Bryn Mawr College on the fiftieth anniversary of its founding. Her ashes were scattered on the Bryn Mawr College campus in the cloisters of the Thomas Library.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lived: Asthall Manor, Asthall, Burford, Oxfordshire OX18 4HW, UK (51.79999, -1.58293)
Batsford Arboretum & Estate, Batsford, Moreton-in-Marsh GL56 9QB, UK (51.99006, -1.73599)
Swinbrook House, Swinbrook, Burford, Oxfordshire OX18 4EL, UK (51.82794, -1.58444)
Buried: St Mary, Pebble Court, Swinbrook, Oxfordshire, OX18 4DY

Early in the XX century the house was the childhood home of the Mitford siblings. Thomas Mitford, educated at Eton, was a close friend of James Lees-Milne, who was in love with him. Regular lover of Tilly Losch during her marriage to Edward James. Died as a soldier in Burma. According to Jessica’s letters, he supported British fascism and was stationed in Burma after refusing to fight in Europe.
Address: Asthall, Burford, Oxfordshire OX18 4HW, UK (51.79999, -1.58293)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 253558 (Grade II, 1955)
Place
Built in about 1620, Altered and Enlarged in about 1916
Asthall Manor is a gabled Jacobean Cotswold manor house in Asthall, Oxfordshire. A vernacular two-storey house with attics, built of local Cotswold limestone on an irregular H-plan with mullioned and mullioned-transomed windows and a stone-slated roof typical of the area. There are records of a house on the site since 1272 when Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, owned a house on the site worth 12d. In 1304 the curia, garden and fish pond were valued at 10 shillings. The core of the current building at Asthall was built for Sir William Jones on the site of the mediaeval hall. In 1688 the estate was sold to Sir Edmund Fettiplace; it stayed in branches of the same family for the next 130 years when it was sold to John Freeman-Mitford, 1st Baron Redesdale in 1810. During their 116-year tenure the Freeman-Mitfords made many alterations to the house including the installation in 1899 of an electric power system powered by a water turbine fed by the River Windrush. The architect Charles Bateman altered and enlarged the house in 1916. In 1920 a former barn was converted to a ballroom and joined to the main house by a cloister. In 1926 the house was sold to Thomas Hardcastle and was purchased by the current owners in 1997 on the death of Hardcastle’s son. The garden at Asthall Manor covers 6 acres (2.4 ha). It was created for the current owners of Asthall by Julian and Isobel Bannerman (best known for their work for Prince Charles at Highgrove House) and includes traditional gardens of herbaceous borders and lawns, contemporary parterres and areas of wild woodland and wildflowers running down to water-meadows by the River Windrush. Asthall Manor remains primarily a private family home, although the ballroom is occasionally used for functions and Asthall Manor’s garden provides the setting for "On Form,” a biennial exhibition of contemporary sculpture in stone as well as small outdoor musical events.
Life
Who: Thomas Mitford (January 2, 1909 – March 30, 1945) and (George) James Henry Lees-Milne (August 6, 1908 – December 28, 1997)
David Freeman-Mitford, 2nd Baron Redesdale (2nd creation), father of the Mitford sisters, inherited Asthall Manor on the death of his father in 1916 and in 1919 moved his family there from Batsford Park. The youngest of the Mitford sisters Deborah, later Duchess of Devonshire, was born at Asthall in 1920. Her sister Diana had an appendectomy on the spare-bedroom table. The Mitfords were great socialites, and Asthall hosted frequent hunting and shooting weekend parties, regular guests included Clementine Churchill, Frederick Lindemann and Walter Sickert. Nancy Mitford’s fictional Alconleigh in “The Pursuit of Love” is based largely on Asthall, and family life there is described in Jessica Mitford’s autobiographical “Hons and Rebels.” Redesdale had never planned to make Asthall Manor a permanent home, and in 1926 the family moved into nearby Swinbrook House which Redesdale had had built on the site of a derelict farm.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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The estate of Batsford Park was inherited in 1886 by Algernon Freeman-Mitford, 1st Baron Redesdale. He had travelled widely in Asia and developed the garden as a "wild" landscape with natural plantings inspired by Chinese and Japanese practice. The house was sold in 1919 to Gilbert Alan Hamilton Wills, later the 1st Lord Dulverton and in 1984 Batsford Park was donated to a charitable trust founded by the 2nd Lord Dulverton to ensure the future of the arboretum.
Address: Batsford, Moreton-in-Marsh GL56 9QB, UK (51.99006, -1.73599)
Type: Public Park (open to public)
Phone: +44 1386 701441
English Heritage Building ID: 128635 (Grade II, 1960)
Place
Built 1888-92, Design by Sir Ernest George and Peto
Ashlar~ concrete tile roof with limestone gable coping and stack. Plan: main body with two wings projecting forward right and left. Stone polygonal stair turret from left wall~ 2- storey central gabled porch. Service wing set back from facade on left. Cotswold Elizabethan style. 3-storey main body; wings 3 storeys and attic. Buttresses to main body and wings. 1:8:2 windowed. All stone ovolo-moulded casements. Third floor windows to main body and left wall of right wing all 3-light windows with stilted heads. Hall on left of the main body lit by tall 2-light mullioned and transomed windows with stilted heads, similar lights in left wall of right wing. Other windows 2, 3 and 4-1ight with mullions and transoms. String courses above and below third floor windows of main body, another over tall windows to central hall. Decorative rainwater heads dated 1889. Gabled central porch with lion finial at apex and eroded finials at eaves. Large heraldic shield over panelled round-headed porch door in moulded surround with Tudor Rose decoration. Saddleback coping and hollow pointed finials at eaves. Numerous multi-angular stacks with moulded caps and skirtings. Bell with ogee arched metal canopy over, attached to axial stack on left wing of main body. 4-storey service wing left of similar style to main body with 1 and 2 storey outbuildings far left. Interior: Large central hall open to first floor with stone balustrade to stairs and gallery and heraldic glass in windows: ballroom in right wing with enclosed wooden corner stairs ornate stone fireplaces in all major rooms. King Edward VII stayed here.
Life
Who: Thomas Mitford (January 2, 1909 – March 30, 1945)
Algernon Freeman-Mitford, 1st Baron Redesdale died in 1916 and was succeeded by David Freeman-Mitford, 2nd Baron Redesdale, who was father of the famous Mitford sisters. They lived at Batsford during World War I, and Nancy Mitford based the early part of her novel “Love in a Cold Climate” on their time at Batsford. Thomas Mitford, known as "Tom". Educated at Eton, where he was a close friend of James Lees-Milne. In 1919 the estate was sold to cover death duties to Gilbert Wills, 1st Baron Dulverton, an heir to the W.D. & H.O. Wills tobacco fortune. His wife Victoria further developed the garden and specimen tree plantings. After neglect during World War II the arboretum was revived by (Frederick) Anthony Hamilton Wills, 2nd Baron Dulverton (1915–1992), who succeeded in 1956. He consolidated and expanded the collections and brought Batsford into international repute. To ensure the survival of the arboretum he donated Batsford Park to a charitable trust in 1984. Apart from the arboretum, the remainder of the 5,000-acre (20 km2) historic Batsford Estate is privately owned by (Gilbert) Michael Hamilton Wills, 3rd Baron Dulverton (born 1944).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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David Freeman-Mitford, 2nd Baron Redesdale had Swinbrook House built 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of the village, where the family moved in 1926
Address: Swinbrook, Burford, Oxfordshire OX18 4EL, UK (51.82794, -1.58444)
Type: Private Property
Place
Swinbrook House was badly damaged in a fire in 2012. The blaze began in the drawing room and firemen said it affected “a substantial amount of the property.” The mansion was built in 1926 by the second Baron Redesdale, David Freeman-Mitford, the father of Nancy, Pamela, Diana, Unity, Jessica and Deborah Mitford. The youngest of the clan, now the Dowager Duchess of Devonshire, owns a nearby pub in the village - The Swan - which was left to the Mitford family by the previous owner. Swinbrook is a village on the River Windrush, about 2 miles (3 km) east of Burford in Oxfordshire. The village is in the civil parish of Swinbrook and Widford. Widford is a hamlet about 1⁄2 mile (800 m) west of Swinbrook. The 2011 Census recorded Swinbrook and Widford's parish population as 139. The Church of England parish church of Saint Mary the Virgin dates from about 1200. Its unusual open-sided bell-tower was added in 1822. The church is noted for its XVII-century Fettiplace monuments. Four of six daughters of David Freeman-Mitford, 2nd Baron Redesdale, are buried in the parish churchyard: Nancy, Unity, and Diana are buried side by side, while Pamela is buried northwest of the tower. Also Tom Mitford (January 2, 1909 –March 30, 1945) is buried at St Mary (Pebble Court, Swinbrook, Oxfordshire, OX18 4DY). St Mary's has also a monument to the officers and men of the Royal Navy submarine HMS P514, and especially its commander, Lieutenant W.A. Phillimore, whose parents lived at Swinbrook. In 1942 P514 failed to identify herself to the Royal Canadian Navy minesweeper HMCS Georgian. The Canadian ship therefore assumed the submarine to be an enemy vessel and rammed P514, sinking her with the loss of all hands.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Charles William "Billy" Haines, known professionally as William Haines, was an American film actor and interior designer. Haines was discovered by a talent scout and signed with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1922.
Born: January 2, 1900, Staunton, Virginia, United States
Died: December 26, 1973, Santa Monica, California, United States
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Parents: George Adam Haines, Laura Virginia Haines
Siblings: George Haines Jr., Henry Haines, Lillian Haines, Ann Haines
Lived: 1712 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046, USA (34.10212, -118.35583)
601 Lorna Ln, Los Angeles, CA 90049, USA (34.05636, -118.46985)
651 Paseo El Mirador, Palm Springs, CA 92262, USA (33.83959, -116.53862)
Buried alongside: Jimmie Shields

William Haines was an American film actor and interior designer. On a trip to New York in 1926, Haines met James "Jimmie" Shields, probably as a pick-up on the street. Haines convinced Shields to move to Los Angeles, promising to get him work as an extra. In 1933, Haines was asked to choose between a sham marriage and his relationship with Shields. Haines chose Shields. Haines and Shields remained together for the rest of their lives. Haines died from lung cancer; soon afterward Shields, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease, put on Haines' pajamas, took an overdose of pills, and crawled into their bed to die. They were interred side by side in Woodlawn Memorial Cemetery. Joan Crawford, with whom the two men maintained a lifelong friendship, called them "the happiest married couple in Hollywood."
Together from 1926 to 1973: 47 years.
Jimmie Shields (1905 - 1974)
William Haines (January 2, 1900 – December 26, 1973)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The duplex at 1712 N. Stanley Avenue was once the home of Billy Haines, the legendary interior designer beloved by Old Hollywood actresses such as Joan Crawford, Carol Lombard, and Claudette Colbert.
Address: 1712 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046, USA (34.10212, -118.35583)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1926
Rare and beautiful, very large English townhouse style Duplex. Designer William Haynes lived and worked here. According to the book “Tallulah!,” William Haines also rented the home to his friend Tallulah Bankhead for a time in the early 1930s. Floorplan features 4 bedrooms, grand staircase, 2 fireplaces, incredible living room with high ceilings and fireplace, patio/garden, gated, formal entry with amazing panelling, spacious kitchen, beautiful hardwood detailing throughout, hardwoodfloors, 12 Ft ceiling, kitchen and kitchenette, beautiful courtyard patio, den or office, 3 bedrooms. Monthly rent for the unit in 2010 was $3,995. In September, 1926, after meeting Jimmie Shields, William Haines bought the house at 1712 North Stanley Drive, just off Sunset Boulevard, from Charles and Bettie Kimble. While most of the movie elite was moving into Beverly Hills, Billy opted to stay right in the heart of Hollywood. He paid $12.500 (along with a trust deed of record for $8.000) for the plain, two-story Spanish home. Billy was determined to transform his house into a showplace. One of the older homes in the area, 1712 North Stanley was built soundly, with deep foundations and heavy timbers. Such solid construction had attracted Billy, as it could withstand significant structural changes. He and Jimmie moved in and began taking measurements, drawing up rough floor plans. He abhorred the mishmash of historical styles that so characterized Hollywood architecture of the time, especially the pseudo-Spanish style that had been the rage of the 1910s and early 1920s. When Billy and Jimmie moved from their elegant movie-star house in Hollywood to a more modest but infinitely better located address in Brentwood, Billy didn’t sell the house on North Stanley right away; for a time he rented it out to the actor John Garfield.
Life
Who: Charles William "Billy" Haines (January 2, 1900 – December 26, 1973) and Jimmie Shields (May 24, 1905 – March 5, 1974)
William Haines was a film actor and interior designer. Haines was discovered by a talent scout and signed with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) in 1922. His career gained momentum when he was loaned out to Columbia Pictures where he received favorable reviews for his role in “The Midnight Express.” Haines returned to MGM and was cast in the 1926 film “Brown of Harvard.” The role solidified his screen persona as a wisecracking, arrogant leading man. By the end of the 1920s, Haines had appeared in a string of successful films and was a popular box office draw. On a trip to New York in 1926, Haines met James "Jimmie" Shields, possibly as a pick-up on the street. Haines convinced Shields to move to Los Angeles, promising to get him work as an extra. The pair were soon living together and viewed themselves as a committed couple. His career was cut short by the 1930s due to his refusal to deny his homosexuality. Haines quit acting in 1935 and started a successful interior design business with his life partner Jimmie Shields, and was supported by friends in Hollywood. Among their early clients were friends such as Joan Crawford, Gloria Swanson, Carole Lombard, Marion Davies and George Cukor. Their lives were disrupted in June 1936 when approximately 100 members of a white supremacist group dragged the two men from their El Porto home (221 Moonstone Street, El Porto, Manhattan Beach) and beat them, because a neighbor had accused the two of propositioning his son. The incident was widely reported at the time, but Manhattan Beach police never brought charges against the couple’s attackers. The child molestation accusations against Haines and Shields were unfounded and the case was dismissed due to a lack of evidence.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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While old timers refer to the area as “behind El Mirador,” a realtor coined the phrase “Movie Colony” as many old time stars had elected to own homes in the area east of the El Mirador Hotel.
Address: 853 E Paseo El Mirador Palm Springs, CA 92262, USA (33.83959, -116.53862)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1928, Design by Walker & Eisen (Albert R. Walker (1881-1958) and Percy A. Eisen (1885-1946))
El Mirador Hotel opened its doors on New Year’s Eve, 1928, and quickly became a hot spot for Hollywood stars and the corporate elite. Built by Palm Springs pioneer Prescott Thresher Stevens at a cost of $1 million, the hotel’s 20 acres included an Olympic-size swimming pool, tennis courts, stables, the desert’s first golf course, and a striking Spanish-Colonial Revival-style bell tower that became a city landmark. The stock market crash of October 1929 brought the party to a standstill. Stevens, unable to sustain the debt, sold the hotel at auction in 1932 for $300,000. The new owners hired Tony Burke and, later, Frank Bogert, to publicize the property. Innovative and creative, they invited photographers and news cameramen to stay for free, and established Palm Springs as an international playground. The hotel’s heyday hit another rough patch in the summer of 1942 when the United States entered WWII. The U.S. Army bought and converted the hotel into the 1,600-bed Torney General Hospital for wounded soldiers. After the war, El Mirador saw several different owners until it reopened in 1952. In the interim, the 38-bed Palm Springs Community Hospital — later named Desert Hospital — opened adjacent to the hotel grounds. Purchasing the entire property in 1972, Desert Hospital transformed the once-glamorous hotel into a modern hospital. In 1989, hours after the hospital’s board of directors voted to reinforce the fragile El Mirador bell tower and reconstruct its one remaining building, a fire destroyed them both. The hospital moved quickly to rebuild the tower from the original plans, and it reopened in 1991. Following the demise of the golf course at El Mirador, El Mirador Estates (1935-36) was subdivided by Prescott Stevens' daughter Sallie Stevens Nichols and her realtor husband Culver Nichols, along with local developer Ernest Off. These large parcels continued the elite residential development agenda for the area around the El Mirador Hotel. Given its prime location and large parcels, the tract quickly became home to prominent Villagers who built architecturally significant homes. These include the James V. Guthrie Residence (1935, Clark and Frey) at 666 Mel Avenue, Frey House #1 (1940, Clark and Frey; demolished), the Halberg Residence (1936, Clark and Frey) at 723 E. Vereda del Sur, the Williams Residence (E. Stewart Williams) at 1250 Paseo El Mirador, and the Sieroty Residence (1941, Clark and Frey) at 695 E. Vereda del Sur. Residents of El Mirador Estates included a number of historically significant personages including: famed interior designer William Haines (651 Paseo El Mirador, demolished), movie star Eddie Cantor (720 Paseo El Mirador), across the street from the old hotel, MGM Screenwriter living Brecher (723 E. Vereda Sur), bandleader and television personality Lawrence Welk (730 Paseo El Mirador) until the late 1970s, writer Truman Capote (853 Paseo El Mirador), built in 1955, singer Keely Smith (1055 Paseo El Mirador), former wife of Louie Prima, still lives there, and artist Dale Chihuly (1250 Paseo El Mirador). As a result, El Mirador Estates contributed significantly to the larger area's reputation as the "Movie Colony."
Life
Who: Truman Streckfus Persons (September 30, 1924 – August 25, 1984) and John Paul "Jack" Dunphy (August 22, 1914 – April 26, 1992)
Truman Capote first rented and then bought 853 East Paseo El Mirador in 1968. It was built in 1955, has 5 bedrooms and 4 baths, with 3,825sf of interior space and sits on a 14,810sf lot with a pool. While in the desert Capote paraded a bevy of beefcake male lovers to parties hosted by other celebs.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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William Haines’s companion of nearly 50 years was devastated by his lover’s death. On the evening of March 5, 1974, Jimmie Shields, 69, telephoned several friends from the Brentwood home at 601 Lorna Lane he had shared with Haines for many years. After making the last call, he swallowed an entire bottle of sleeping pills.
Address: 601 Lorna Ln, Los Angeles, CA 90049, USA (34.05636, -118.46985)
Type: Private Property
Place
L.A.’s most iconic designers, William Haines, lived at 601 Lorna Ln., in a 3,500 sq. ft. home, on a 22,000 sq. ft. lot. Completely out of place in this neighborhood of 3,000-5,000 sq. ft. houses. Haine’s home was considered, by celebrities, and designers alike, to be one of the most tasteful, elegant homes in town. After the grandeur of the previous house in North Stanley, many of Billy’s friends and associates were surprised by his choice. The new house was set in a modest neighbourhood on a small lot, built by the previous owners with a loan from the Federal Housing Administration. (Billy would joke that he decorated castles, but lived in an FHA house.) The property was purchased for just $5.600 from Arthur James Zander on May 22, 1944. Notably, for the first time, Jimmie’s name was included on the deed. Both he and Billy were granted an “undivided, one-half interest” in the property. Billy called in an architect, made plans to raise the ceilings by four feet, then took off for Europe with Jimmie. By the time they’d returned, the house had begun its transformation. “This is where I bring clients and prospective clients,” Billy said. “If we were selling automobiles, this would be our demonstration car. Not that we take pen and ink in hand and sign a client at the table. It’s simply the best way to expose them to a certain quality of life as I live it. Showing is always more meaningful than telling over the barren top of a desk.” He filled his new home with the treasures of his old residence: the antique chairs, the magnificent chandeliers, the priceless paintings. In the living room, a XIX century white marble fireplace rose from the center of the floor. He knocked down a few walls and installed large glass windows overlooking the pool. Outside, Greek and Roman statuary stood among the cypress trees. Most memorable, however was the hand-painted wallpaper that formed an elaborate mural, “Les Incas,” in the sunken living room and the bar area. It was so beautiful that Jack Warner instisted he needed it for a film. Billy agreed to have it all peeled off very carefully and sent over to the studio. In 1951 they’d marked their silver anniversary – 25 years – with an intimate gathering at Lorna Lane. Clifton Webb was there, and Orry-Kelly, and, of course, Joan Crawford and Eleanor Boardman. The house on Lorna Lane was sold in March 1975 for over $200.000 to a husband and wife, both physicians.
Note: Part of Truman Capote (1924-1984) and Jack Dunphy (1914-1992)’s ashes are at Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery (1218 Glendon Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90024).
Life
Who: Charles William "Billy" Haines (January 2, 1900 – December 26, 1973) and Jimmie Shields (May 24, 1905 –March 5, 1974)
William Haines and Jimmie Shields settled in the Hollywood community of Brentwood and their business prospered until their retirement in the early 1970s, except for a brief interruption when Haines served in WWII. Their clients included Betsy Bloomingdale and Ronald and Nancy Reagan when Reagan was governor of California. Haines and Shields remained together until Haines’ death. Joan Crawford described them as "the happiest married couple in Hollywood." On December 26, 1973, Haines died from lung cancer in Santa Monica, California at the age of 73. Soon afterward, Shields took an overdose of sleeping pills. His suicide note read in part, "Goodbye to all of you who have tried so hard to comfort me in my loss of William Haines, whom I have been with since 1926. I now find it impossible to go it alone, I am much too lonely." They were interred side by side in Woodlawn Memorial Cemetery in Santa Monica (1847 14th St, Santa Monica, CA 90404). In the same cemetery is also buried Dame Christabel Pankhurst (September 22, 1880 –February 13, 1958)



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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