Jan. 3rd, 2017

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Lived: Germaine Tailleferre’s Villa, 06130 Grasse, France (43.66015, 6.92649)
Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor, Suffolk County, New York, USA
Buried alongside: Robert Fizdale

Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale were an American two-piano ensemble. Gold and Fizdale met during their student years at the Juilliard School. In 1944, the pianists formed a duo that survived until their retirement in 1982, based around their common interests of music, travel and cooking. It has often been said that Gold and Fizdale revolutionized the art of performing as a two-piano duo. They did commission and première many of the most important works for two-piano ensemble in the second half of the 20th century, including works by John Cage (A Book of Music (1944) which is one of Cage's earliest experiments in using the prepared Piano), Paul Bowles, Virgil Thomson, Ned Rorem and many other important American Composers. They were fixtures in New York's artistic community, being friends with literary and cultural figures such as Truman Capote, James Schuyler, George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, among others. In 1984 they published The Gold and Fizdale Cookbook, which is dedicated to their friend George Balanchine, "In whose kitchen we spent many happy hours...“ They are buried together at Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor, New York.
Together from (before) 1944 to 1990: 46 years.
Arthur Gold (February 6, 1917 – January 3, 1990)
Robert Fizdale (April 12, 1920 – December 6, 1995)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Historic Villa with sea views in Grasse, French Riviera, France, for sale for €2,490,000
Address: 06130 Grasse, France (43.66015, 6.92649)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in the late XIX century
A beautiful property set in the hills of the French Riviera overlooking the Mediterranean coastline with views over the entire bay of Cannes and eastwards over the countryside. The villa was home to one of America's most famous painters, the impressionist Mary Cassat, from Pennsylvania. She called this historic Belle Epoque villa home in the early part of the 1900's and hosted some of the world's most renowned artists of the time including Edgar Degas and Pierre-Auguste Renoir. After Cassat's tenure as owner, the villa was purchased by the famous composer and harpist Germaine Tailleferre and the property was known to be frequented and also used as a performing venue by her group "Les Six" of which she was the only female member. Prior to these two famous artists ownership, the villa was home to one of Grasse's perfume producers. Today the villa stands in all of its former and present glory having been renovated and continuously lived in throughout the years. The grounds around the home total 3,000 m2 and the homes interior of 320 m2 includes 5 bedrooms on the upper floors with a main living floor including, grand entrance hall, living room, lounge, dining room, kitchen, morning room, office, gym, "morrocan style" courtyard and below a full basement. Outdoors there is a sizeable swimming pool compete with fully equipped pool house inclusive of covered lounge/dining, summer kitchen and bathroom. The garden itself is lush and mature with local flower and fauna and provides various points for outdoor leisure. In the north eastern corner of the garden is a studio style open space cottage ready to be kitted out and connected to electrics and plumbing.
Life
Who: Arthur Gold (February 6, 1917 – January 3, 1990) and Robert Fizdale (April 12, 1920 – December 6, 1995.)
Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale were an American two-piano ensemble; they were also authors and television cooking show hosts. Gold and Fizdale met during their student years at the Juilliard School. In 1944, they formed a lifelong gay partnership based around their common interests of music (forming one of the most important piano duos of the XX century), travel and cooking. They were fixtures in New York's artistic community, being friends with literary and cultural figures such as Truman Capote, James Schuyler, George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, among others. In 1948, they were one of the wave of American artists, musicians and writers who took advantage of the first possibility since the end of WWII to freely travel in Europe. "The Boys,” as they were called by their friends, arrived in Paris with a letter of introduction from Marcelle de Manziarly to Germaine Tailleferre of “Les six” who invited them to a lunch with Francis Poulenc and Georges Auric. This lunch ended with Auric and Tailleferre taking the score of Thomson's "The Mother of Us All,” which Thomson had given as a gift, turning it upside down on the piano and having Poulenc singing all of the roles (including Susan B. Anthony) in nonsense English syllables which were supposedly an imitation of Gertrude Stein's Libretto while Tailleferre and Auric improvised a four-hands version of Thomson's score. After this memorable day, Tailleferre invited the couple to her home in Grasse to spend two months while she was writing her ballet Paris-Magie and her opera “Il était Un Petit Navire.” She wrote two-piano versions of both works and gave them to the duo as a gift. These manuscripts were later donated to the Library of Congress after the death of Robert Fizdale. Tailleferre later dedicated two other works to Gold and Fizdale: her “Toccata for Two Pianos” and her “Sonata for Two Pianos.” Francis Poulenc also wrote his own “Sonata for Two Pianos” for "the Boyz" (as he called them), a commission which was paid by their mutual friend the American Soprano and arts patron Alice Swanson Esty, according to Poulenc's correspondence. The duo also recorded a number of recordings featuring works by “Les six,” Vittorio Rieti, and other composers, as well as a series of Concerto recordings with Leonard Bernstein and The New York Philharmonic, including the Poulenc Concerto for Two Pianos, The Mozart Two Piano Concerto and Saint-Saëns's "Carnival of the Animals.”Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale are buried together at Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor, New York.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale are buried together at Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor.
Address: 62-298 Suffolk St, Sag Harbor, NY 11963, USA (40.99239, -72.29374)
Type: Cemetery (open to publich)
National Register of Historic Places: Sag Harbor Village District (Roughly bounded by Sag Harbor, Rysam, Hamilton, Marsden, Main and Long Island Ave.), 73001274, 1973 & (Roughly bounded by Sag Harbor, Bay, Eastville, Grand, Joel'sLn., Middle Line Hwy., Main, Glover and Long Island), 94000400, 1994
Place
Oakland Cemetery is a public, not-for-profit cemetery located in the village Sag Harbor, New York. It was founded in 1840 and currently sits on 26 acres bounded by Jermain Ave to the north, Suffolk St to the east, and Joels Ln to the west. It is the permanent resting place of over 4,000 people, including more XVIII and XIX century sea captains than in any other Long Island cemetery. It was incorporated in 1884. Prior to the opening of Oakland Cemetery in 1840, Sag Harbor’s most notable cemetery was the Old Burial Ground, opened in 1767 on the corner of Union and Madison Streets next to the First Presbyterian Church. At total of 17 veterans of the American Revolution and one representative to the New York Provincial Congress of 1775 are buried there. Unfortunately, years of neglect left the Old Burial Ground in a state of disrepair. In 1840 Oakland Cemetery was founded, covering just 4 acres, enclosed with stone posts and chestnut pickets. One hundred thirty nine graves from the Old Burial Ground were moved to Oakland Cemetery, including Ebenezer Sage and Captain David Hand and his five wives. During the mid-1800’s, in the center of the property which is now Oakland Cemetery, sat of a group of buildings known as Oakland Works. John Sherry had them built in 1850 to house his brass foundry. He soon took on a partner, Ephraim N. Byram, a clock maker and astronomer who was later buried in the cemetery. They enlarged the building to make room for Byram’s clock manufactory and named the place the Oakland Brass Foundry and Clock Works. The business was in operation for 12 years. In 1863 the building was leased to Abraham DeBevoise and B. & F. Lyon for use as a stocking factory. In 1865 a second building and another bleach house were added to the property. This business closed after three years. Over the next ten years two other industries occupied the Oakland Works. First, a barrel-head and stave factory owned by George Bush; then, a Morrocco leather business owned by Morgan Topping. Both proved unsuccessful. A final attempt to operate a business on the site was made in 1880 when Edward Chapman Rogers opened the Oakland Hat Manufactory. This venture also failed. In 1882, unoccupied for almost two years, the old wooden structures caught fire and burned to the ground. The site was purchased by Joseph Fahys and Stephen French and donated to the cemetery. In September, 1884 the Oakland Cemetery Association purchased the remaining Oakland Works property for $400, adding a third section and extending the cemetery east to its present boundary at Suffolk St for a total of ten acres. In October, 1903 the Ladies Village Improvement Society unveiled a new memorial gate. The Broken Mast Monument in Oakland Cemetery, sculpted by Robert Eberhard Launitz, commemorates those "Who periled their lives in a daring profession and perished in actual encounter with the monsters of the deep."
Notable queer burials at Oakland Cemetery:
• George Balanchine (1904-1983), ballet choreographer and co-founder of the New York City Ballet.
• Arthur Gold (February 6, 1917 – January 3, 1990) and Robert Fizdale (April 12, 1920 –December 6, 1995) were a two-piano ensemble; they were also authors and television cooking show hosts. Gold and Fizdale met during their student years at the Juilliard School. They formed a lifelong gay partnership and shared interests in music (forming one of the most important piano duos of the XX century), travel, and cooking. Works written for Gold and Fizdale: Paul Bowles, "Concerto for Two Pianos” (1946–47), "Sonata for Two Pianos” (1947), "Night Waltz for Two Pianos” (1949), "A Picnic Cantata for Two Pianos” (1953); John Cage, "A Book of Music for Two Pianos”; Francis Poulenc, “L’embarquement pour Cythère” (1951), “Sonate for Two Pianos” (1952-53), “Elegy for Two Pianos” (1959); Germaine Tailleferre, “Il était un Petit Navire Suite for Two Pianos,” “Paris-Magie version for Two Pianos,” “Toccata for Two Pianos,” “Sonata for Two Pianos”; Samuel Barber, “Souvenirs,” Op. 28.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Constance Spry was a famous British educator, florist and author in the mid-20th century.
Born: December 5, 1886, Derby, United Kingdom
Died: January 3, 1960, Cranbourne, Berkshire, United Kingdom
Books: The Constance Spry Cookery Book, Flower Decoration, more
People also search for: Rosemary Hume, Harold Piercy, Anthony Marr, Edward V of England
Lived: 64 South Audley Street, Mayfair, W1K
Winkfield Ln, Winkfield, Windsor SL4, UK (51.45266, -0.69276)

English painter Peter Gluck, portrayed by Romaine Brooks in Peter, A Young English Girl, in 1923 or 24, was born as Hannah Gluckstein to a wealthy and close-knit Jewish family. In 1944, Gluck moved to Chantry House in Steyning, Sussex, living with lover Edith Shackleton Heald until her death. Edith, dramatic critic and leader writer on the Evening Standard and book reviewer, had been W.B. Yeats’s close friend and possible lover. Gluck was the child of Joseph Gluckstein, whose brothers Isidore and Montague had founded J. Lyons and Co., a British coffee house and catering empire. Gluck's American-born mother, Francesca Halle, was an opera singer. One of Gluck's best-known paintings, Medallion, is a dual portrait of Gluck and Gluck's lover Nesta Obermer, inspired by a night in 1936 when they attended a Fritz Busch production of Mozart's Don Giovanni. According to Gluck's biographer Diana Souhami, "They sat in the third row and she felt the intensity of the music fused them into one person and matched their love." Gluck referred to it as the "YouWe" picture. Gluck also had a romantic relationship with the British floral designer Constance Spry (December 5, 1886 – January 3, 1960), whose work informed the artist's paintings.
Together from 1944 to 1976: 32 years.
Constance Spry (December 5, 1886 – January 3, 1960)
Hannah Glukstein aka Peter Gluck (August 13, 1895 – January 10, 1978)
Edith Shackleton Heald (died November 5, 1976)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 64 South Audley Street, Mayfair, W1K Constance Spry (1886-1960), “Designer in Flowers worked here 1934-1960.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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In 1946, Constance Spry opened a domestic science school with her friend, the accomplished cook Rosemary Hume, at Winkfield Place, at Cranbourne in Winkfield, Berkshire. Constance lived at Orchard Lea, across the road, and then over the stable block at the Place.
Address: Winkfield Ln, Winkfield, Windsor SL4, UK (51.45266, -0.69276)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 489489 (Grade II, 1972)
Place
The basis of Winkfield Place, at Winkfield Street, is probably late XVII century. In the first half of the following century, it was the home of the Edwards family who where closely involved with the running of the Ranelagh School. In 1751, however, the building was almost entirely rebuilt by the then owner, Richard Buckley. There were various gentlemanly owners throughout the Victorian era. During the WWII, the house was used by the Canadian Red Cross and then became the college of Constance Spry of “Cordon Bleu'” cookery and flower-arranging fame. The flowers for Queen Elizabeth II's wedding were arranged by Winkfield Place staff; but the establishment moved out to Farnham (Surrey) in 1989. Winkfield Place has been divided into Private Apartments. It can however, be easily seen from the entrance. Large country house. Late XVIII century, altered and extended mid and late XIX century, altered XX century. Painted render, hipped and gabled slate roofs. Rectangular plan with extensions and service wing on north-west. Part 3 storeys, part 2 storeys with attics. Entrance front, south-east, symmetrical. First build on left of 5-bays. 3 storeys with plinth, moulded string at first and second floor sills, moulded cornice and plain parapet. Centre ridge chimney with corniced head and clay pots. Sash windows with glazing bars and moulded architraves. 6-panel entrance door under prostyle Tuscan porch with plain frieze and pediment. To right of this and set back, 2 later builds. First of 2 storeys and attics, with plain parapet and 4-bays of sash windows with glazing bars. Second build, slightly set back from first of 2 storeys and 4-bays of sash windows without glazing bars. 2 large ridge chimneys with corniced heads and clay pots on first section, and rectangular chimney with similar heads and pots, projecting from front wall, at right hand end.
Note: Lovel Dene (Woodside Rd, Winkfield, Windsor SL4 2DP, UK) is the weekend retreat of Norman Hartnell (1901–1979), the leading British fashion designer, best known for his work for the ladies of the Royal Family. Lovel Dene, a Queen Anne cottage in Windsor Forest, Berkshire, was extensively re-modelled for him by architect Gerald Lacoste (1909–1983).
Life
Who: Constance Spry (December 5, 1886 –January 3, 1960)
Constance Spry was a famous British educator, florist and author in the mid-XX century. According to the biographer Diana Souhami, the lesbian painter Gluck had a romantic relationship with Spry, whose work informed the artist's admired floral paintings. At Winkfield Place, Spry devoted years to the cultivation of particular varieties of antique roses, which she was instrumental in bringing back into fashion; David Austin's first rose introduction, in 1961, was named after her and is considered to be foundation of his "English rose" series. In 1956, she and Hume published the best-selling “Constance Spry Cookery Book,” thereby extending the Spry style from flowers to food. On January 3, 1960, she slipped on the stairs at Winkfield Place and died an hour later. Her last words were supposedly, "Someone else can arrange this". Spry's books remained in print for many years after her death and her floristry business thrived. An exhibition entitled “Constance Spry: A millionaire for a few pence” at the Design Museum, London, in 2004, was controversial in many quarters and resulted in the resignation of the museum's chairman, inventor James Dyson, who considered the show unworthy.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Dorothy Arzner, born Dorothy Emma Arzner, was an American film director whose career in feature films spanned from the silent era of the late 1920s into the early 1940s.
Born: January 3, 1897, San Francisco, California, United States
Died: October 1, 1979, La Quinta, California, United States
Education: University of Southern California
Lived: 2249 Mountain Oak Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.11136, -118.30977)

Dorothy Arzner was an American film director. Her directorial career in feature films spanned from the late 1920s into the early 1940s. Throughout that time, she was the only woman working in the field. She lived much of her life with her companion, choreographer Marion Morgan. They met in 1927 on the set of Fashions for Women, Azner the director, Morgan hired to choreograph the film tableaus. The Arzner-Morgan House was built in 1930 by architect W.C. Tanner for Arzner and Morgan. The home is about 3600 square feet and features three bedrooms and three bathrooms and beautifully terraced gardens designed by famed landscape duo Florence Yoch and Lucile Council (partners as well). Arzner and Morgan lived there together for more than 40 years, until Miss Morgan died in 1971. Arzner died aged 82, in La Quinta, California. R.M. Vaughan's 2000 play, Camera, Woman depicts the last days of Arzner's career. According to the play, Harry Cohn fired her over a kiss scene between Merle Oberon and fictitious actress Rose Lindstrom.
Together from 1927 to 1971: 44 years.
Dorothy Arzner (January 3, 1897 – October 1, 1979)
Marion Morgan (January 4, 1881 – November 10, 1971)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Ona Munson was an American actress perhaps best known for her portrayal of prostitute Belle Watling in Gone with the Wind (1939). When David O. Selznick was casting his production Gone with the Wind, he first announced that Mae West was to play Belle, but this was a publicity stunt. Tallulah Bankhead refused the role as too small. Munson herself was the antithesis of the voluptuous Belle: freckled and of slight build. Munson’s career was stalemated by the acclaim of Gone with the Wind; for the remainder of her career, she was typecast in similar roles. Two years later, she played a huge role as another madam, albeit a Chinese one, in Josef von Sternberg's film noir The Shanghai Gesture. Her last film was The Red House, released in 1947. She was married three times, to actor and director Edward Buzzell in 1926, to Stewart McDonald in 1941, and designer Eugene Berman in 1949. These have been termed "lavender" marriages, in that they were intended to conceal her bisexuality and her affairs with women, including filmmaker Dorothy Arzner and playwright Mercedes de Acosta. Munson has been listed as a member of a group called the "Sewing circle", a clique of lesbians organized by actress Alla Nazimova. In 1955, plagued by ill health, she committed suicide at the age of 51 with an overdose of barbiturates in her apartment in New York. A note found next to her deathbed read, "This is the only way I know to be free again...Please don't follow me.“
Dorothy Arzner (January 3, 1897 – October 1, 1979)
Ona Munson (June 16, 1903 – February 11, 1955)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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A Greek temple villa designed for film director Dorothy Arzner and her lifelong companion, dancer-choreographer Marion Morgan. The original gardens were designed by the distinguished Southern Californa lanscape architect Florence Yoch, with "elaborate horticultural layouts" i.e. hanging gardens. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, the residence was last on the market in 2012 for $3,495,000.
Address: 2249 Mountain Oak Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.11136, -118.30977)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1930, Design by W. C. Tanner
For over twenty years, this Greek Revival-style residence in Los Feliz was home to Dorothy Arzner, a pioneering film director and one of the most prominent lesbians working in Hollywood before WWII. Arzner was very open about her sexuality and was infamous for pursuing and having affairs with the actresses in her films. She was one of the most successful and well-known openly queer women in Hollywood of her time. For the last forty years of her life, Arzner lived with her partner, modern dance choreographer Marion Morgan. The couple resided in the Los Feliz home from 1930 to 1951. Arzner passed away in 1979. The building was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM) in 1986.
Life
Who: Dorothy Arzner (January 3, 1897 – October 1, 1979) and Marion Morgan (1881–1971)
In 1919, Dorothy Arzner enrolled at the University of Southern California as a medical student. She served as an ambulance driver during WWI. Her career path changed when she was hired by William de Mille as a typist in the Paramount Pictures script department. Arzner eventually rose through the ranks to become a highly regarded editor, yet her career stalled in the late 1920s. In 1927, she leveraged an employment offer from Harry Cohn at Columbia Pictures, threatening B. P. Shulberg (then head of Paramount) to leave the studio if he didn’t let her direct. She remained with Paramount until 1932. In 1936, Arzner became the first woman to join the Directors Guild of America. Over the course of her career, she directed popular films such as “First Comes Courage”; “Dance, Girl, Dance”; “The Bride Wore Red”; and “Honor Among Lovers.” Her films often featured strong feminist and lesbian undertones and themes. She is credited for launching the careers of actresses including Lucille Ball, Katharine Hepburn, and Rosalind Russell. In 1943, she stopped working on feature-length films and began directing television and military training films. She also became a professor at UCLA’s film school, where her graduate students included well-known directors such as Francis Ford Coppola.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Elizabeth Palmer Peabody was an American educator who opened the first English-language kindergarten in the United States.
Born: May 16, 1804, Billerica, Massachusetts, United States
Died: January 3, 1894, Jamaica Plain, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Parents: Nathaniel Peabody
Siblings: Sophia Hawthorne, Mary Tyler Peabody Mann
Nephew: Julian Hawthorne
Lived: 15 West St, Boston, MA 02111
Buried: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA

Elizabeth Peabody (1804-1894) was known for starting the first English language kindergarten and was an early advocate for play-based education. What many don’t realize is that she helped stoke the fire of women’s and LGBT rights, simply by opening up her parlor (15 West St, Boston, MA 02111). At a time when people shunned alternative political views, Peabody allowed people who were then social radicals to meet in her home—including Margaret Fuller, author of “Women of the Nineteenth Century,” a book that supported same-sex relationships.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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At Sleepy Hollow Cemetery (34 Bedford St, Concord, MA 0174) is buried Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of the “Vanity Fair”, who is rumoured to have been the unrequited love of Herman Melville. Also his sister-in-law, Elizabeth Peabody (1804-1894), education reformer, is buried here.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Born: September 11, 1916, Rochester, New York, United States
Died: January 3, 2000, Victoria, Canada
People also search for: Jane Rule, Arthur Richards Rule, Carlotta Jane
Buried: Galiano Island Cemetery, Galiano Island, BC V0N 1P0, Canada (48.92364, -123.44147)
Buried alongside: Jane Rule

Jane Vance Rule, CM, OBC was a Canadian writer of lesbian-themed novels and non-fiction. Rule studied at Mills College in California. She graduated in 1952, moved to England for a short while and entered in a relationship with critic John Hulcoop. She taught at Concord Academy in Massachusetts where she met Helen Sonthoff and fell in love with her. Rule moved with Hulcoop to work at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver in 1956, but Sonthoff visited her and they began to live together until Sonthoff's death in 2000. Rule died in 2007 at her home on Galiano Island due to complications from liver cancer, refusing any treatment that would take her from the island, opting instead for the care and support that could be provided by her niece, her partner, her many Galiano friends and neighbors. The ashes of Jane Vance Rule were interred in the Galiano Island Cemetery next to those of her beloved Helen. In 1964, Rule published Desert of the Heart: the novel featured two women who fall in love with each other; Donna Deitch (1985) later made it into a movie, which quickly became a lesbian classic.
Together from 1954 to 2000: 46 years.
Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff (September 11, 1916 - January 3, 2000)
Jane Vance Rule (March 28, 1931 – November 27, 2007)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Jane Rule died at the age of 76 on November 27, 2007 at her home on Galiano Island due to complications from liver cancer, refusing any treatment that would take her from the island, opting instead for the care and support that could be provided by her niece, her partner, her many Galiano friends and neighbours. The ashes of Jane Vance Rule were interred in the Galiano Island Cemetery next to those of her beloved Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff.
Address: Galiano Island, BC V0N 1P0, Canada (48.92364, -123.44147)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Place
Unobviously located near the Mt. Galiano trailhead at the island’s south end, the atmospheric graveyard is set in a pretty waterfront wood overlooking Georgeson Bay, where seals lollop about in the shallows of Collinson Reef. It’s a serene location, where the silence is broken only by unobtrusive wind chimes, rustling branches or the occasional seal bark. The graves here differ greatly, from simple burial mounds marked by humble homemade tributes to the more traditional and decorative, many bearing personal effects laid down by family and friends. Like any cemetery it offers an intimate, moving and fascinating look into the past of the community it serves, so should be considered a must-see.
Life
Who: Jane Vance Rule, CM, OBC (March 28, 1931 – November 27, 2007) and Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff (September 11, 1916 – January 3, 2000)
Jane Rule was a Canadian writer of lesbian-themed novels and non-fiction. Rule studied at Mills College in California. She graduated in 1952, moved to England for a short while and entered in a relationship with critic John Hulcoop. She taught at Concord Academy in Massachusetts where she met Helen Sonthoff and fell in love with her. Rule moved with Hulcoop to work at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1956, but Sonthoff visited her and they began to live together. Rule and Sonthoff lived together until Sonthoff’s death in 2000. Rule surprised some in the gay community by declaring herself against gay marriage, writing, "To be forced back into the heterosexual cage of coupledom is not a step forward but a step back into state-imposed definitions of relationship. With all that we have learned, we should be helping our heterosexual brothers and sisters out of their state-defined prisons, not volunteering to join them there."



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Henry Symes "Harry" Lehr was an American socialite during the Gilded Age.
Born: March 28, 1869, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Died: January 3, 1929, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Spouse: Elizabeth Wharton Drexel (m. 1901)
Parents: Robert Oliver Lehr
Lived: Hôtel de Canvoie, 52 Rue des Saints-Pères, 75007 Paris, France (48.85411, 2.3297)
Buried: Green Mount Cemetery

Henry “Harry” Symes Lehr was a socialite and the husband of Elizabeth Wharton Drexel. He was the son of Robert Oliver Lehr, a tobacco and snuff importer who became the German consul in Baltimore. Harry was a social climber who duped his wife into a lavender marriage and refused to sleep with her on their wedding night. She stayed in a loveless, unconsummated marriage for 28 years, not wishing to upset her conservative, staunchly Catholic mother, née Lucy Wharton. Her father was Joseph William Drexel, the son of Francis Martin Drexel, the immigrant ancestor of the Drexel banking family in the United States. She married John Vinton Dahlgren I; Dahlgren died on August 11, 1899, in Colorado Springs, Colorado, where he had gone in hopes of recovering from an illness. She married Henry Symes Lehr in June 1901. In 1915, the Lehrs were in Paris, and Elizabeth worked for the Red Cross. They remained in Paris after World War I, where they bought in 1923 the Hôtel de Canvoie at 52, rue des Saints-Pères in the VIIe arrondissement. Harry Lehr died on January 3, 1929, of a brain tumor in Baltimore. On May 25, 1936, she married John Beresford, 5th Baron Decies. His first wife had been Helen Vivien Gould. He died on January 31, 1944. She died in June 13, 1944, at the Hotel Shelton.
Together from 1901 to 1929: 28 years.
Elizabeth Wharton Drexel (April 22, 1868 – June 13, 1944)
Henry Symes Lehr (March 28, 1869 – January 3, 1929)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The full-length portrait of Mrs. Harry (Elizabeth Drexel) Lehr was executed in Paris in 1905 by the artist Giovanni Boldini. It now hangs inside The Elms (367 Bellevue Ave, Newport, RI 02840). Born Elizabeth Wharton Drexel, she was the daughter of Joseph William Drexel, partner of J. Pierpont Morgan, and Lucy Smith Wharton. She married Joseph Vinton Dahlgren in 1889 and following his death, married Harry Symes Lehr in 1901. In her autobiography “King Lehr and the Gilded Age” (1935), Mrs. Lehr describes how her new husband revealed on their wedding night that theirs was to be a marriage in name only, and that he was only interested in her money. Harry Lehr was said to have had a long intimate relationship with Charles Greenough, unknown to Elizabeth, and later to the woman Greenough married. After Lehr’s death, Elizabeth married John Beresford, 5th Baron Decies in 1936. Her sister Lucy married Elizabeth's first husband's brother and after her divorce was known as Mrs. Drexel Dahlgren, builder of Champs Soleil (601 Bellevue Ave, Newport, RI 02840).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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52, rue des Saints-Peres, before Bernard Tapie, had illustrious tenants.
Address: 52 Rue des Saints-Pères, 75007 Paris, France (48.85411, 2.3297)
Type: Private Property
Place
The hotel had several owners, all noble, earls or marquises, until 1923, when the earl of Beaufort sold it to Lady Lehr (two interlaced L on the porch testify it), wealthy American who began to restore it. Currently private home of Bernard Tapie, also known as Hôtel de Canvoie, was auctioned in Dec. 15, 1994, with a starting price of 70 million francs. The general distribution of the plan shows what could be the design of a wealthy Parisian home in the middle of the XVII century. This element was rarely preserved, in most cases changed over the centuries. Purchased for more than 100 million in 1986, facades, roofs, gates, staircase and some parts are classified in Inventory of Historic Monuments since 1949. Acquired in 1981 by Hubert de Givenchy for 26.5 million francs, the hotel was bought by the company Financière et Immobilière Bernard Tapie for over 100 million in 1986. The hotel had since 1640, date of its construction, many residents; the first was Jean-Hugo de Groot, also known as "Grotius,” Dutch diplomat expelled from his country for his liberal views and refugee in France. In 1661, Marie-Sidonia Lénoncourt, wife of the Marquis de Courcelles, inherited it. The woman is known to have been the mistress of Louvois de Cavoye and many others. Convicted of adultery in 1669, she was free again in 1680, after eleven years of trial. On 18 July, 1679, Marie-Sidonia sold the hotel to Louis d’Oger, Marquis of Cavoye, grand maréchal des logis. Louis d’Oger was raised with Louis XIV. Very nice man, his success with women earned him a duel with the husband of Marie-Sidonia and two years’ imprisonment at the Conciergerie. The hotel was the center of a selected company, including Racine and Boileau. D’Oger engaged Mansart et Lepautre, the architect of the Duke of Orleans, to embellish it and died there in 1716. A commission for historical preservation in Paris, in 1927, described it: "The facades were cleaned and consolidated, reconstituted western pediment, the old Louis XIV staircase repaired, the French garden retraced (...) Magnificent Louis XV woodwork decorates the great hall on the ground floor. Charming, Louis XVI wood paneling and a precious pink marble fireplace restored (...) a boudoir of the former hotel Crillon (...) If spirits of the Marquis de Cavoye and Marquise de Courcelles could return, they would find it much more beautiful than they have ever known." The hotel de Cavoye remains remarkable today for its sobriety and its distribution. On the ground floor, the small and large lounges; in the vestibule, the staircase that leads to the state apartments. The workroom has retained its Regency woodwork. The rooms on the garden, are decorated in style Louis XV and Louis XVI. To the left of the stairs opens a library with gallery and, after it, a small Restoration boudoir.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Wharton "Bessie" Drexel (April 22, 1868 – June 13, 1944)
Elizabeth Wharton Drexel was an American author and Manhattan socialite. She is the lady with the orange dress in a famous 1905 portrait by Giovanni Boldini. On June 29, 1889, Elizabeth married John Vinton Dahlgren I (1869–1899), the son of Admiral John Adolph Dahlgren (1809–1870.) Dahlgren died Aug. 11, 1899, in Colorado Springs, Colorado, where he had gone in hopes of recovering from an illness. Elizabeth married Henry Symes Lehr (1869–1929), aka Harry Lehr in June 1901. Symes Lehr was homosexual and the marriage was never consummated. In 1915 the Lehrs were in Paris, and Elizabeth worked for the Red Cross. They remained in Paris after WWI, where they bought in 1923 the Hôtel de Canvoie at 52, rue des Saints-Pères in the 7th arrondissement. Harry Lehr died on January 3, 1929 of a brain malady in Baltimore. On May 25, 1936 she married John Beresford, 5th Baron Decies. His first wife had been Helen Vivien Gould. He died on January 31, 1944. She died in 1944 at the Hotel Shelton. She was buried in the Dahlgren Chapel at Georgetown University, which she and her first husband had built as a memorial to their son, Joseph Drexel Dahlgren, who died in infancy. As with her prior book “King Lehr and the Gilded Age” (1935), Lady Decies’ “Turn of the World” (1937) is a fascinating semi-autobiographical history of American high society during the Gay Nineties through WWI. Upon the book’s publication, The Pittsburgh Press wrote, "The magnificent spectacle that went on behind the scenes in pre-war days of society’s Gilded Age at Saratoga, Newport, New York and Paris is detailed by an insider, Elizabeth, Lady Decies, who was Miss Elizabeth Wharton Drexel interesting, amusing and sometimes revolting, as with evident nostalgia she tells of extravagant parties and fortunes spent for clothes and jewels."



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Green Mount Cemetery is a historic cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland. Established on March 15, 1838, and dedicated on July 13, 1839, it is noted for the large number of historical figures interred in its grounds as well as a large number of prominent Baltimore-area families. It retained the name Green Mount when the land was purchased from the heirs of Baltimore merchant Robert Oliver.
Address: 1501 Greenmount Ave, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA (39.30922, -76.60588)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 410-539-0641
National Register of Historic Places: 80001786, 1980
Place
Green Mount is a treasury of precious works of art, including striking works by major sculptors including William H. Rinehart and Hans Schuler. Nearly 65,000 people are buried here, including the poet Sydney Lanier, philanthropists Johns Hopkins and Enoch Pratt, Napoleon Bonaparte's sister-in-law Betsy Patterson, John Wilkes Booth, and numerous military, political and business leaders. In addition to John Wilkes Booth, two other conspirators in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln are buried here, Samuel Arnold and Michael O'Laughlen. It is common for visitors to the cemetery to leave pennies on the graves of the three men; the one-cent coin features the likeness of the president they successfully sought to murder. Until a 1965 agreement with Queen Elizabeth II, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor had planned for a burial in a purchased plot in Rose Circle at Green Mount Cemetery, near where the father of the Duchess was interred. The 1965 agreement allowed for the former King Edward VIII and wife, the Duchess of Windsor, to be buried near other members of the royal family in the Royal Burial Ground near Windsor Castle.
Notable queer burials at Green Mount Cemetery:
• Mary Elizabeth Garrett (1854-1915), American suffragist and philanthropist. At her death, she gave $15,000,000 to M. Carey Thomas, the president of Bryn Mawr College, with whom she was romantically involved and had lived with at Bryn Mawr in the Deanery.
• Mamie Gwinn (1860-1940). In 1885 M. Carey Thomas, together with Mary Garrett, Mamie Gwinn, Elizabeth King, and Julia Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. For many years Thomas maintained an intimate relationship with long-time friend, Mamie Gwinn. Thomas and Gwinn lived together at Bryn Mawr College in a small cottage that came to be known as "the Deanery". When Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein's “Fernhurst”) Alfred Hodder, a fellow Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, Thomas pursued a relationship with Mary Elizabeth Garrett.
• Harry Lehr (1869-1929), American socialite during the Gilded Age. He was known for staging elaborate parties alongside Marion "Mamie" Fish, such as the so-called "dog's dinner", in which 100 pets of wealthy friends dined at foot-high tables while dressed in formal attire At a later party, he impersonated the Czar of Russia, and was henceforth dubbed "King Lehr". He was married to heiress Elizabeth "Bessie" Wharton Drexel. He refused to sleep with her on their wedding night.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Pietro Antonio Domenico Trapassi, better known by his pseudonym of Pietro Metastasio, was an Italian poet and librettist, considered the most important writer of opera seria libretti.
Born: January 3, 1698, Rome
Died: April 12, 1782, Vienna, Austria
Libretti: La clemenza di Tito, Il re pastore, L'isola disabitata, more
Books: Three Melodramas by Pietro Metastasio, more
Parents: Francesca Galasti, Felice Trapassi
Buried: Michaelerkirche, Vienna, Wien Stadt, Vienna (Wien), Austria, Plot: Crypt

Metastasio was an Italian poet and librettist, considered the most important writer of opera seria libretti. The famous prima donna Marianna Benti-Bulgarelli took Metastasio under her wing and gave him entrée into the world of music. At the age of thirty-two, he was appointed court composer to Emperor Charles VI of Vienna. There he met his lifelong companion Nicolo Martines or von Martinez. Nicolo’s father was a Spanish soldier who had settled in Naples. He grew up there and for a time pursued a career as a soldier. He later changed careers, serving in Vienna as Maestro di Camera (major-domo) at the papal nuncio, the Pope's embassy to the Austrian Empire. For service to the Empire, Nicolo’s sons in 1774 acquired a patent of nobility, hence the "von" in the family surname. In 1730, Metastasio was called to Vienna to serve as the Poet Laureate of the Empire. He resided with the Martines family for the entire rest of his life (from about 1734 to 1782). His presence would prove crucial to Nicolo’s daughter, Marianne's career. Marianna was an Austrian singer, pianist and composer of the classical period. The Martines family lived in rooms in a large building on the Michaelerplatz, "a stately building still standing in the Kohlmarkt. “
Together from 1734 to 1782: 48 years.
Pietro Antonio Domenico Trapassi aka Metastasio (January 3, 1698 – April 12, 1782)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Pola Negri was a Polish stage and film actress who achieved worldwide fame during the silent and golden eras of Hollywood and European film for her tragedienne and femme fatale roles.
Born: January 3, 1897, Lipno, Lipno County, Poland
Died: August 1, 1987, San Antonio, Texas, United States
Height: 1.52 m
Spouse: Prince Serge Mdivani (m. 1927–1931), Count Eugeniusz Dambski (m. 1919–1922)
Parents: Eleonora Kiełczewska, Jerzy Chalupec
Lived: 907 Fifth Avenue
Studied: Vaganova Academy of Russian Ballet
Buried: Calvary Cemetery, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Main Mausoleum, Block 56, Crypt E-19

Pola Negri was a Polish stage and film actress who achieved worldwide fame during the silent and golden eras of Hollywood and European film for her tragedienne and femme fatale roles. Negri was romantically linked at various times to Polish Count Eugene Dambski, Charlie Chaplin, Rudolph Valentino, and Adolf Hitler. Most of these affairs were for publicity value only, however, as her true passion was for other women. Tallulah Bankhead dismissed Negri as “The biggest phony in Hollywood, dahling! A lying lesbo, a Polish publicity hound. Had a mustache and couldn’t act her way out of a paper bag!” In the 40s, Pola Negri became close friends with Margaret West, an oil heiress and vaudeville actress that she had originally met in the 1930s. The two became housemates, and moved from Los Angeles to San Antonio, Texas, in 1957. Negri would live with Margaret West until the latter's death in 1963. After West's death, Negri moved out of the home she had shared with West into a townhome located at 7707 Broadway in San Antonio. She spent the remainder of her years there, largely out of the public eye.
Together from (around) 1940 to 1963: 23 years.
Apolonia Chałupiec aka Pola Negri (January 3, 1897 – August 1, 1987)
Margaret West (September 10, 1903 – July 29, 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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While other great mansions along Central Park were being converted to museums or condominiums, the Henry Cook house remained intact. In 1977 it was purchased by highly-successful businessman Victor Shafferman for $600,000. Shafferman died in 2009 leaving No. 973 Fifth Avenue with much of the original interior detailing: plaster moldings, marble mantles and paneled rooms.
Address: 5th Ave, New York, NY 10075, USA
Type: Private Property
Notable queer residents at Fifth Avenue:
- No. 973 Fifth Avenue: Victor Shafferman (November 8, 1941- October 19, 2009) Henry H. Cook made his fortune in railroads and banking. When he began planning to build his enormous mansion in 1880 at the north corner of 5th Avenue and 78th Street across from Central Park he had no intentions of commercial interlopers in his neighborhood. That year Cook purchased the entire block from Fifth Avenue to Madison Avenue, between 78th and 79th Streets for $500,000 and laid out stringent building restrictions: no structure other than a private home could be built on what was known as the Cook Block. The restrictions survive today. The Cook and Whitney houses were completed in 1907, architect Stanford White. By 1912 James B. Duke had demolished the original Cook mansion to erect his own white marble mansion that survives today. Henry Cook left the house to his daughter but, according to Christopher Gray, she rarely used it. In 1919 Cook’s daughter sold the house to the socially-prominent Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Fuller Feder. A year after their daughter Odette’s debut, a glittering reception was held on Dec. 26, 1921 for her wedding to the dashing British Royal Air Force Major J. Ronald McCrindle. (Eight years later Odette filed for divorce.) Mrs. Feder continued to entertain lavishly in the house until her husband’s death on 11 May, 1944. Mr. Feder lived there with his wife and family, 29 years later in 1948, the family sold it to the Mormon Church. The Mormons used it as a training center. In 1978, they sold it to Victor Shafferman, a real estate investor, for a reported $600,000. The estate of Victor Shafferman, who died in 2009, sold 973 5th Avenue in 2011 for $49 million.
- No. 907 Fifth Avenue: In the 1950s Pola Negri resided at 907 Fifth Avenue. Neighbors reported that a great portrait of Valentino hung in a prominent place in her foyer. By the end of the decade, she had moved into the San Antonio mansion of oil heiress Margaret West. When Miss West died in 1963, she willed Pola her jewelry and lifetime use of her Texas house. When Pola died in 1987, she was still living in Texas. The twelve-story, limestone-faced building is located at Fifth Avenue and 72nd Street on a site once occupied by the 1893 residence of James A. Burden, which had been designed by R. H. Robertson. The apartment block, built in 1916, was the first apartment building to replace a private mansion on Fifth Avenue above 59th Street. It was converted to a cooperative in 1955. J. E. R. Carpenter was the architect; he would be called upon to design many of the luxury apartment buildings that gave a new scale to Fifth Avenue in the ‘teens and twenties of the XX century. The building won him the 1916 gold medal of the American Institute of Architects. The building has the aspect of an Italian Renaissance palazzo, built around a central court. Its first four floors are lightly rusticated; deep quoins carry the rusticated feature up the corners to the boldly projecting top cornice. A strong secondary cornice above the fourth floor once made a conciliatory nod to the cornice lines of the private houses that flanked it, whose owners had fought its construction in court. When it opened, there were two twelve-room apartments on most floors.
- No. 820 Fifth Avenue: a luxury cooperative in Manhattan, New York City, located on Fifth Avenue at the Northeast corner of East 63rd Street on the Upper East Side. The 12 story limestone-clad neo-Italian Renaissance palazzo is one of the most expensive and exclusive apartment houses in the city. It was designed by Starrett & Van Vleck and built by Fred T. Ley in 1916. The land upon which it was built was previously occupied by the Progress Club. The frontage was 100.5 feet on Fifth Avenue and 100 feet on 63rd Street. Construction cost was 1 million dollars, exclusive of the land (which cost another million.) The building comprises 12 apartments. The fourth floor is one of only a couple of units at 820 that have changed hands multiple times in the last 10 or 20 years. For many years, the 18-room sprawler was owned by poet, philanthropist, and paper heiress Louise Crane whose family concern, Crane & Co., manufactures high-grade stationary and has provided the paper on which U.S. currency has been printed for nearly 150 years. Crane was about as old as money gets in America young country. After Crane’s death in 1997, the apartment was sold to khaki pants king Tommy Hilfiger who somehow scooched by the notoriously fussy and stringent board and reportedly scooped the apartment up in the spring of 1999 for around $10,000,000. After jumping through all the board’s crazy hoops and demands and finally finessing his way into the building, Hilfiger did the unthinkable, he quickly changed his mind about living up in 820 and flipped the apartment back onto the market at a much higher price than he paid.
- No. 536 Fifth Avenue: With her partner, Mattie Edwards Hewitt, a successful freelance home and garden photographer in her own right, Francis Benjamin Johnston opened a studio in New York in 1913 at 536 Fifth Avenue, and moved in with her mother and aunt. She lectured at New York University on business for women and they produced a series of studies of New York architecture through the 1920s. In early 1920 her mother died in New York.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Pola Negri (1899-1987), Polish stage and film actress, is buried at Calvary Cemetery (4201 Whittier Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90023). In the early 1940s, she became close friends with Margaret West, an oil heiress and vaudeville actress that she had originally met in the 1930s. The two became housemates, and moved from Los Angeles to San Antonio, Texas, in 1957. Margaret West (1903-1963) is buried at Mission Park Cemetery (1700 SE Military Dr, San Antonio, TX 78214). Also Ramón Novarro (1899–1968) is buried at Calvary Cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Robert Flemyng OBE, MC was an English film and stage actor.
Born: January 3, 1912, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Died: May 22, 1995, London, United Kingdom
Spouse: Carmen Martha Sugars (m. ?–1994)
Education: Haileybury and Imperial Service College
University of Oxford
TV shows: Compact

The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university located in Oxford.
Address: Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1, UK (51.75663, -1.2547)
Type: Student Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1865 270000
Place
While having no known date of foundation, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's second-oldest surviving university. It grew rapidly from 1167 when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled northeast to Cambridge where they established what became the University of Cambridge. The two "ancient universities" are frequently jointly referred to as "Oxbridge". The university is made up of a variety of institutions, including 38 constituent colleges and a full range of academic departments which are organised into four divisions.
Notable Queer Alumni and Faculties at University of Oxford:
• Harold Acton (1904-1994) went up to Oxford in October 1923 to read Modern Greats at Christ Church, and while there he co-founded the avant garde magazine The Oxford Broom, and published his first book of poems, “Aquarium” (1923). In this phase of life and following it, Acton moved in the circles of, was influenced by, and he himself influenced many intellectual and literary figures of pre-war Britain; Acton is noted by Evelyn Waugh for having inspired, in part, the character of Anthony Blanche “Brideshead Revisited” (1945).
• Richard Addinsell (1904-1977) was educated at home before attending Hertford College, to study Law but went down after just 18 months. He then became interested in music.
• W.H. Auden (1907-1973) went up to Christ Church in 1925, with a scholarship in biology; he switched to English by his second year. Friends he met at Oxford include Cecil Day-Lewis, Louis MacNeice, and Stephen Spender; these four were commonly though misleadingly identified in the 1930s as the "Auden Group" for their shared (but not identical) left-wing views. Auden left Oxford in 1928 with a third-class degree. In 1956–61 he was Professor of Poetry at Oxford; his lectures were popular with students and faculty and served as the basis of his 1962 prose collection “The Dyer's Hand.” In 1972, Auden moved his winter home from New York to Oxford, where his old college, Christ Church, offered him a cottage, while he continued to summer in Austria.
• Sir Edmund Trelawny Backhouse, 2nd Baronet (1873–1944) attended Winchester College and Merton College. While at Oxford he suffered a nervous breakdown in 1894, and although he returned to the university in 1895, he never completed his degree, instead fleeing the country due to the massive debts he had accumulated.
• Katharine Lee Bates (1859-1929) studied at Oxford University during 1890–91.
• Francis Beaumont (1584–1616) was educated at Broadgates Hall (now Pembroke College) at age thirteen. Following the death of his father in 1598, he left university without a degree and followed in his father's footsteps by entering the Inner Temple in London in 1600.
• George Benson (1613–1692) matriculated at Queen's College, on November 21, 1628, aged 15; BA, on May 10, 1631; MA from St Edmund's Hall, on February 11, 1633 or 1634; DD from Queen's College, on August 2, 1660. Prebendary of Chichester. Rector of Chetton (Sallop), 1638. Canon and archdeacon of Hereford, 1660; canon of Worcester, 1671; Dean of Hereford, from September 10, 1672 to August 24, 1692. He married Katherine Fell, daughter of Samuel Fell, at Christ Church, Oxford. He died aged 78 years and is buried beside his friend Bishop Croft underneath the throne in the Choir of Hereford Cathedral.
• Lennox Berkeley (1903-1989) was born in Oxford, and educated at the Dragon School, Gresham's School and Merton College.
• Maurice Bowra (1898-1971) was an English classical scholar and academic, known for his wit. He was Warden of Wadham College, from 1938 to 1970, and served as Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford from 1951 to 1954. In his long career as an Oxford don Bowra had contact with a considerable portion of the English literary world, either as students or as colleagues. The character of Mr Samgrass in Evelyn Waugh's “Brideshead Revisited” is said to have been modelled on Bowra. Cyril Connolly, Henry Green, Anthony Powell and Kenneth Clark knew Bowra quite well when they were undergraduates. Clark called Bowra "the strongest influence in my life". Waugh marked his friend's election as Warden of Wadham by presenting him with a monkey-puzzle tree for his garden. As an undergraduate in Oxford in the 1920s Bowra was fashionably homosexual and was known to cruise for sex. He used the term "the Homintern" and privately referred to his leading position in it, also calling it "the Immoral Front" or "the 69th International". Bowra retired in 1970, but continued to live in rooms in the college that had been granted to him in exchange for a house he owned. He became an honorary fellow of Wadham and was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Civil Law. He died of a sudden heart attack in 1971 and was buried in Holywell Cemetery (St Cross Church, St.Cross Rd, City Centre, Oxford OX1 3TP, UK).
• Edwin Emmanuel Bradford (1860–1944) was an English clergyman and Uranian poet and novelist. He attended Exeter College, received his B.A. in 1884, and was awarded a D.D. He was vicar of Nordelph, Downham Market, Norfolk, from 1909 to 1944.
• Beau Brummell (1778-1840) attended Oxford University, where, by his own example, he made cotton stockings and dingy cravats a thing of the past. While an undergraduate at Oriel College in 1793, he competed for the Chancellor's Prize for Latin Verse, coming second to Edward Copleston, who was later to become provost of his college. He left the university after only a year at the age of sixteen.
• Peter Burra (1909-1937) attended Christ Church College and edited Farrago, founded by Simon Nowell-Smith as a rival to Oxford Poetry. Farrago ran for six issues, from February 1930 to June 1931, and quickly established a reputation a long way from Oxford; The Times was soon calling it “that very excellent undergraduate literary review,” while the London Mercury hailed it as “the best undergraduate journal published since the War.” Burra was occasionally successful in attracting contributions from figures such as Evelyn Waugh, Robert Bridges, the artist Edward Burra (Peter’s cousin) and Max Beerbohm, but the magazine was identified closely with the group of poets, artists and musicians around the Oxford University Orchestral Society.
• Richard Francis Burton (1821-1890) matriculated at Trinity College, on 19 November 1840. Before getting a room at the college, he lived for a short time in the house of Dr. William Alexander Greenhill, then physician to the Radcliffe Infirmary. Here, he met John Henry Newman, whose churchwarden was Dr. Greenhill. Despite his intelligence and ability, Burton was antagonised by his teachers and peers. During his first term, he is said to have challenged another student to a duel after the latter mocked Burton's moustache. Burton continued to gratify his love of languages by studying Arabic; he also spent his time learning falconry and fencing. In April 1842, he attended a steeplechase in deliberate violation of college rules and subsequently dared to tell the college authorities that students should be allowed to attend such events. Hoping to be merely "rusticated" – that is, suspended with the possibility of reinstatement, the punishment received by some less provocative students who had also visited the steeplechase – he was instead permanently expelled from Trinity College.
• Robert Carr, 1st Earl of Somerset, (1587–1645), was a politician, and favourite of King James VI and I. His alma mater was Queen's College.
• Cyril Connolly (1903-1974) achieved academic success in 1922 winning the Rosebery History Prize, and followed this up with the Brackenbury History scholarship to Balliol College. After his cloistered existence as a King's Scholar at Eton, Connolly felt uncomfortable with the hearty beer-drinking rugby and rowing types at Oxford. His own circle included his Eton friends Mynors and Dannruthers, who were at Balliol with him, and Kenneth Clark, whom he met through Bobbie Longden at Kings. He wrote: "The only exercise we took was running up bills." His intellectual mentors were the Dean of Balliol, "Sligger" Urquhart, who organised reading parties on the continent, and the Dean of Wadham, Maurice Bowra.
• Paul Dehn (1912-1976) was educated at Shrewsbury School, and attended Brasenose College. While at Oxford, he contributed film reviews to weekly undergraduate papers.
• Alfred Douglas (1870-1945) was educated at Wixenford School, Winchester College (1884–88) and Magdalen College (1889–93), which he left without obtaining a degree. At Oxford, he edited an undergraduate journal, The Spirit Lamp (1892–3), an activity that intensified the constant conflict between him and his father.
• Edward Douglas-Scott-Montagu (1926-2015) attended St Peter's Court, a prep school at Broadstairs in Kent, then Ridley College in Canada, Eton College and finally New College. He read Modern History at Oxford, but during his second year an altercation between the Bullingdon Club, of which he was a member, and the Oxford University Dramatic Society led to his room being wrecked, and he felt obliged to leave.
• Tom Driberg (1905-1976) won a classics scholarship to Christ Church. Oxford in 1924 featured an avant-garde aesthetic movement in which personalities such as Harold Acton, Brian Howard, Cyril Connolly and, a little later, W. H. Auden were leading lights. Driberg was soon immersed in a world of art, politics, poetry and parties: "There was just no time for any academic work", he wrote later. A poem of Driberg's in the style of Edith Sitwell was published in Oxford Poetry 1926; when Sitwell came to Oxford to deliver a lecture, Driberg invited her to have tea with him, and she accepted. After her lecture he found an opportunity to recite one of his own poems, and was rewarded when Sitwell declared him "the hope of English poetry." The consequence of his various extracurricular involvements was neglect of his academic work; failure in his final examinations was inevitable, and in the summer of 1927 he left Oxford without a degree.
• Robert Flemyng (1912–1995) was an English film and stage actor. Flemyng was married to Carmen Sugars, who died in 1994, and they had one daughter. According to “Alec Guinness: The Authorised Biography,” a biography of Alec Guinness by Piers Paul Read, he "[fell] in love with a younger man in [his] middle age." He could not act upon his repressed feelings because male homosexuality was illegal in the United Kingdom (until 1967) and because he was married. Therefore, "he had a nervous breakdown and then a stroke and had a really terrible time."
• Peter Glenville (1913-1996) was the son of Sean Glenville and Dorothy Ward, a highly successful double act in the pantomime. Dorothy Ward, with famously beautiful legs, played the principal “boy” and Sean Glenville the “dame”. It was hardly surprising, Glenville used to say, that he was queer. Since Dorothy Ward was Roman Catholic, she provided the funds to send Peter to Stonyhurst, the public school run by the Jesuits in Lancashire. From there Glenville went to Christ Church, where he joined OUDS. The OUDS at that time was a distinctly homosexual society with some very good-looking young men, among them Peter Glenville, Robert Flemyng and Terence Rattigan, all of whom were keen to cluster around the visiting star. The “visiting star” was John Gielgud who, in 1932, came to direct “Romeo and Juliet”. In 1934, Glenville was elected president of OUDS, and after graduation made his first professional stage appearance at the Manchester Repertory Company in Louis Jourdan’s role as the tutor, Dr. Agi, in Ferenc Molnar’s “The Swan”.
• Alastair Graham (1904-1982), one of the three Oxford lovers of Evelyn Waugh (in order Richard Pares, Alistair Graham and Hugh Lygon.) Paula Byrne said that while he was "candid" about the relationships with Pares and the well-heeled Graham in his autobiography, Waugh refrained from explicitly describing them as homosexual.
• Robert Graves (1895-1985) won a classical exhibition to St John's College, but did not take his place there until after the war. His most notable Oxford companion was T. E. Lawrence, then a Fellow of All Souls', with whom he discussed contemporary poetry and shared in the planning of elaborate pranks. In 1961 he became Professor of Poetry at Oxford, a post he held until 1966.
• Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889) studied classics at Balliol College (1863–67). Hopkins was an unusually sensitive and shy student and poet, as witnessed by his class-notes and early poetic pieces. At Oxford he forged a lifelong friendship with Robert Bridges (eventual Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom) which would be of importance in his development as a poet and in his posthumous acclaim. Hopkins was deeply impressed with the work of Christina Rossetti and she became one of his greatest contemporary influences, meeting him in 1864. During this time he studied with the prestigious writer and critic Walter Pater, who tutored him in 1866 and who remained a friend until Hopkins left Oxford in September 1879. In July 1866, he decided to become a Roman Catholic, and he traveled to Birmingham in September to consult the leader of the Oxford converts, John Henry Newman. Newman received him into the Roman Catholic Church on 21 October 1866.
• A. E. Housman (1859-1936) won an open scholarship to St John's College, where he studied classics. Although introverted by nature, Housman formed strong friendships with two roommates, Moses Jackson and A. W. Pollard. Jackson became the great love of Housman's life, but he was heterosexual and did not reciprocate Housman's feelings.
• Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) graduated from Balliol College, with a first in English literature. In 1916 he edited Oxford Poetry and in June of that year graduated BA with First Class honours.
• Evelyn Irons (1900-2000) graduated from Somerville College.
• (Edward) Eardley Knollys (1902-1991) was an English artist of the Bloomsbury School of artists, art critic, art dealer and collector, active from the 1920s to 1950s. He was educated at Winchester and Christ Church.
• T. E. Lawrence (1888-1935) studied History at Jesus College from 1907 to 1910. In 1910 Lawrence was offered the opportunity to become a practising archaeologist in the Middle East, at Carchemish, in the expedition that D. G. Hogarth was setting up on behalf of the British Museum. Hogarth arranged a "Senior Demyship", a form of scholarship, for Lawrence at Magdalen College in order to fund Lawrence's work at £100/year. In 1919, he was elected to a seven-year research fellowship at All Souls College, providing him with support while he worked on “Seven Pillars of Wisdom.”
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) was denied admission to several colleges, and several Rhodes Scholars from the American South refused to live in the same college or attend events with Locke. He was finally admitted to Hertford College, where he studied literature, philosophy, Greek, and Latin, from 1907–1910. In 1910, he attended the University of Berlin, where he studied philosophy. Locke wrote from Oxford in 1910 that the "primary aim and obligation" of a Rhodes Scholar "is to acquire at Oxford and abroad generally a liberal education, and to continue subsequently the Rhodes mission [of international understanding] throughout life and in his own country. If once more it should prove impossible for nations to understand one another as nations, then, as Goethe said, they must learn to tolerate each other as individuals".
• James Lees-Milne (1908-1997) attended Lockers Park School in Hertfordshire, Eton, and Oxford University from which he graduated with a Third Class in History in 1931.
• Matthew Lewis (1775-1818), like his father, entered Christ Church, on 27 April 1790 at the age of fifteen. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in 1794 and earned a master's degree from the same college in 1797.
• Hugh Patrick Lygon (1904-1936) was educated at Eton and Pembroke College. He was a friend of Evelyn Waugh's at Oxford (A. L. Rowse believed the two to be lovers), where both were members of the Hypocrites' Club, along with their contemporary Murray Andrew McLean.
• William Lygon (1872-1938) was educated at Eton and Christ Church, where he showed an interest in evangelism, joining the Christian Social Union.
• Compton Mackenzie (1883-1972) was educated at St Paul's School, London, and Magdalen College, where he graduated with a degree in modern history.
• Christabel Marshall (1871-1960) took a BA in Modern History at Somerville College.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) studied at Oxford University, as a Rhodes Scholar earning a B.Litt. in 1925.
• Raymond Mortimer (1895–1980) was educated at Malvern College, and Balliol College, which he entered in 1913 to read history. His studies were interrupted by service in a hospital in France from 1915; and then work in the Foreign Office. He did not complete his degree.
• John Henry Newman (1801-1890), originally an evangelical Oxford University academic and priest in the Church of England, then became drawn to the high-church tradition of Anglicanism. He became known as a leader of, and an able polemicist for, the Oxford Movement, an influential and controversial grouping of Anglicans who wished to return to the Church of England many Catholic beliefs and liturgical rituals from before the English Reformation. However, in 1845 Newman, joined by some but not all of his followers, left the Church of England and his teaching post at Oxford University and was received into the Catholic Church. He was quickly ordained as a priest and continued as an influential religious leader, based in Birmingham. In 1879, he was created a cardinal by Pope Leo XIII in recognition of his services to the cause of the Catholic Church in England. He was instrumental in the founding of the Catholic University of Ireland, which evolved into University College Dublin, today the largest university in Ireland.
• Beverley Nichols (1898–1983) went to school at Marlborough College then Balliol College, and was President of the Oxford Union and editor of Isis.
• Harold Nicolson (1886–1968) was educated at Wellington College and Balliol College.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951) won a scholarship to Magdalen College School, where he was a solo treble in the college choir.
• Richard Pares (1902–1958) won scholarships at Winchester College and at Balliol College, where he took a first-class degree in literae humaniores in 1924. On obtaining his Oxford degree, he was elected to a fellowship of All Souls College, which he retained until 1945.
• Ralph Partridge (1894-1960) rowed with Noel Carrington while at the University of Oxford. In 1918 Noel introduced him to his sister, Dora Carrington, who was on holiday in Scotland. After surviving the WWI, Partridge returned to Oxford, and became a regular visitor to Tidmarsh. He soon fell in love with Carrington - whilst Strachey fell in love with him, rechristening him “Ralph,” as he would thereafter be known.
• Walter Pater (1839-1894) went to Queen's College in 1858. After graduating, Pater remained in Oxford and taught Classics and Philosophy to private students. His years of study and reading now paid dividends: he was offered a classical fellowship in 1864 at Brasenose on the strength of his ability to teach modern German philosophy, and he settled down to a university career. Pater was at the centre of a small but gifted circle in Oxford – he had tutored Gerard Manley Hopkins in 1866 and the two remained friends till September 1879 when Hopkins left Oxford – and he gained respect in the London literary world and beyond, numbering some of the Pre-Raphaelites among his friends. He is buried at Holywell Cemetery (St Cross Church, St.Cross Rd, City Centre, Oxford OX1 3TP, UK).
• Peter Pears (1910–1986) went to Keble College in 1928, to study music. He was not at this stage sure whether his musical future was as a singer or as player; during his brief time at the university he was appointed temporary assistant organist at Hertford College, which was useful practical experience. Headington comments that a musical conservatoire such as the Royal College of Music would have suited Pears better than the Oxford course, but at the time it was seen as a natural progression for an English public school boy to continue his education at Oxford or Cambridge. In the event Pears did not take to Oxford's academic regime, which required him to study a range of subjects before specialising in music. He failed the first-year examinations (Moderations) and though he was entitled to resit them he decided against doing so, and went down from Oxford.
• John Pope-Hennessy (1913-1994) was educated at Downside School, a Roman Catholic boarding independent school for boys, in the village of Stratton-on-the-Fosse in Somerset, followed by Balliol College, where he read modern history. At Oxford, he was introduced by Logan Pearsall Smith (a family friend from the United States) to Kenneth Clark, who became a mentor to the young Pope-Hennessy.
• Terence Rattigan (1911-1977) was educated at Sandroyd School from 1920 to 1925, at the time based in Cobham, Surrey (and now the home of Reed's School), and Harrow School. Rattigan played cricket for the Harrow First XI and scored 29 in the Eton–Harrow match in 1929. He was a member of the Officer Training Corps and organised a mutiny, informing the Daily Express. Even more annoying to his headmaster, Cyril Norwood, was the telegram from the Eton OTC, "offering to march to his assistance". He then went to Trinity College. A troubled homosexual, who saw himself as an outsider, his plays "confronted issues of sexual frustration, failed relationships and adultery", and a world of repression and reticence. Rattigan had numerous lovers but no long-term partners, a possible exception being his "congenial companion ... and occasional friend" Michael Franklin.
• Mary Renault (1905-1983) was educated at St Hugh's College, then an all-women's college, receiving an undergraduate degree in English in 1928. In 1933 she began training as a nurse at the Radcliffe Infirmary in Oxford. During her training she met Julie Mullard, a fellow nurse with whom she established a lifelong romantic relationship.
• Cecil Rhodes (1853-1902) was admitted to Oriel College, but stayed for only one term in 1873. He returned to South Africa and did not return for his second term at Oxford until 1876. He was greatly influenced by John Ruskin's inaugural lecture at Oxford, which reinforced his own attachment to the cause of British imperialism. Among his Oxford associates were James Rochfort Maguire, later a fellow of All Souls College and a director of the British South Africa Company, and Charles Metcalfe. Due to his university career, Rhodes admired the Oxford "system". Eventually he was inspired to develop his scholarship scheme: "Wherever you turn your eye—except in science—an Oxford man is at the top of the tree".
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), following her graduation at Radcliffe College, received a Guggenheim Fellowship to study at Oxford for a year. Following a visit to Florence, she chose not to return to Oxford, and spent her remaining time in Europe writing and exploring Italy.
• Philip Sassoon (1888-1939) was educated at Farnborough Prep school, Eton before going up to Oxford. Old Etonian Arthur Balfour recommended the Debating Society to him. His father was also friendly with Frances Horner, wife of Sir John Horner, a longtime friend of Gladstone who lived at Mells Manor in Somerset. His house master was a member of the secret society of liberals the Young Apostles. And a near contemporary was Osbert Sitwell, the Yorkshireman and author (Sitwell’s long-time companion was David Horner, from the Horner’s family at Mells Manor). A French scholar, he learnt the language doing classes at Windsor Castle. Sassoon was taught aesthetics by Henry Luxmoore giving an insight into philosophy and social realism. However he chose to read Modern History at Christ Church. He was one of only 25 Jewish undergraduates, but was invited to join the Bullingdon Club. He joined the East Kent Yeomanry while still at Oxford and commissioned a second lieutenant.
• John Schlesinger (1926-2003), after St Edmund's School, Hindhead, Uppingham School and Balliol College, Oxford, where he was involved in the Oxford University Dramatic Society, he worked as an actor.
• Vida Dutton Scudder (1861-1954) and Clara French (1863-1888) were the first American women admitted to the graduate program at Oxford in 1885, where Scudder was influenced by York Powell and John Ruskin.
• Desmond Shawe-Taylor (1907-1995) was sent to be educated in England, at Shrewsbury School and Oriel College, where he graduated in 1930 with a first class degree in English
• Philip Sidney (1554-1586) was educated at Shrewsbury School and Christ Church.
• Sacheverell Sitwell (1897-1988) was educated at Eton College and Balliol College.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) was awarded an American Association of University Women's fellowship for the 1957–1958 academic year to St Anne's College, where she traveled without her husband, Philip Rieff, and son. There, she had classes with Iris Murdoch, Stuart Hampshire, A. J. Ayer and H. L. A. Hart while also attending the B. Phil seminars of J. L. Austin and the lectures of Isaiah Berlin. Oxford did not appeal to her, however, and she transferred after Michaelmas term of 1957 to the University of Paris.
• Stephen Spender (1909-1995) came up to University College in 1927. His autobiography "World within World" (1951) suggests that he did not have a very happy time at Oxford, and he never took a degree, but in 1973 he was elected an Honorary Fellow of the College, and stayed in contact with it until his death.
• Major Honorable James “Hamish” Alexander Wedderburn St. Clair-Erskine (1909-1973), second son of James Francis Harry St. Clair-Erskine, 5th Earl of Rosslyn and Vera Mary Bayley. He was educated at Eton College, and New College. He gained the rank of Major in the service of the Coldstream Guards. He fought in the WWII between 1939 and 1942, where he was wounded, mentioned in despatches twice and became a POW. He was decorated with the award of the Military Cross (M.C.) in 1943. Nancy Mitford fell in love with him. He was the least suitable partner of all, "the most shimmering and narcissistic of all the beautiful butterflies". The pair met in 1928 and became unofficially engaged, despite his homosexuality (of which Nancy may not have been aware). Against a backdrop of negativity from family and friends—Waugh advised her to "dress better and catch a better man"— the affair endured sporadically for about 5 years. He eventually converted to homosexuality and called the wedding off. He died unmarried in December 1973
• Ambrose St. John (1815-1875) was educated at Westminster School, and Christ Church, where he graduated M.A., forming a lifelong friendship with Cardinal Newman.
• Eric Stenbock (1860-1895) attended Balliol College but never completed his studies. While at Oxford, Eric was deeply influenced by the homosexual Pre-Raphaelite artist and illustrator Simeon Solomon. He is also said to have had a relationship with the composer and conductor Norman O'Neill and with other "young men". In Oxford, Stenbock also converted to Roman Catholicism taking for himself the name Stanislaus. Some years later Eric also admitted to having tried a different religion every week in Oxford. At the end of his life, he seemed to have developed a syncretist religion containing elements of Catholicism, Buddhism and idolatry.
• Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837-1909) attended Balliol College (1856–60) with a brief hiatus when he was rusticated from the university in 1859 for having publicly supported the attempted assassination of Napoleon III by Felice Orsini. He returned in May 1860, though he never received a degree.
• John Addington Symonds (1840-1893) studied classics under Benjamin Jowett at Balliol College, and later worked with Jowett on an English translation of Plato's Symposium. Jowett was critical of Symonds' opinions on sexuality, but when Symonds was falsely accused of corrupting choirboys, Jowett supported him, despite his own equivocal views of the relation of Hellenism to contemporary legal and social issues that affected homosexuals.
• Wilfred Thesiger (1910-2003) was educated at Eton College followed by Magdalen College, where he took a Third in History. Between 1930 and 1933, Thesiger represented Oxford at boxing and later (in 1933) became captain of the Oxford boxing team. He was awarded a boxing Blue for each of the four years that he was at Oxford. Whilst at Oxford, Thesiger was also elected Treasurer of the Oxford University Exploration Club (1931–32).
• Colin Turnbull (1924-1994) was educated at Westminster School and Magdalen College, where he studied politics and philosophy. Joseph Allen Towles moved to New York City in 1957 to pursue a career as an actor and writer. He met Turnbull in 1959 and they exchanged marriage vows the following year. From 1965 to 1967, Turnbull and Towles conducted fieldwork among the Ik of Northern Uganda in Africa. Towles' health declined slowly from 1983. He died from complications of AIDS in 1988. Colin Turnbull asked his name to be added to Joe's gravestone since, basically, his soul died when his partner died too. He died in Virginia in 1994, aged 69.
• Edward Perry Warren (1860-1928) received his B.A. from Harvard College in 1883 and later studied at New College, earning his M.S. in Classics. His academic interest was classical archeology. At Oxford he met archeologist John Marshall (1862–1928), a younger man he called "Puppy," with whom he formed a close and long-lasting relationship, though Marshall married in 1907, much to Warren's dismay.
• Evelyn Waugh (1903-1966) was educated at Lancing College and then at Hertford College. During his first two terms, he generally followed convention; he smoked a pipe, bought a bicycle, and gave his maiden speech at the Oxford Union, opposing the motion that "This House would welcome Prohibition". The arrival in Oxford in October 1922 of the sophisticated Etonians Harold Acton and Brian Howard changed Waugh's Oxford life. Acton and Howard rapidly became the centre of an avant-garde circle known as the Hypocrites, whose artistic, social and homosexual values Waugh adopted enthusiastically; he later wrote: "It was the stamping ground of half my Oxford life". He began drinking heavily, and embarked on the first of several homosexual relationships, the most lasting of which were with Richard Pares and Alastair Graham.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) proved himself to be an outstanding classicist, first at Dublin, then at Magdalen College. He became known for his involvement in the rising philosophy of aestheticism, led by two of his tutors, Walter Pater and John Ruskin.
• Peter Wildeblood (1923–1999) won a scholarship to Radley College and then went up to Trinity College, in 1941, but dropped out after ten days because of ill health.
• Emlyn Willians (1905-1987), aged 11, won a scholarship to Holywell Grammar School. At the end of his time at the grammar school he won a scholarship to Christ Church, where he read French and Italian and joined the Oxford University Dramatic Society (OUDS). His first full-length play, Full Moon, was premiered at the original Oxford Playhouse in 1927, the year he joined a repertory company and began his stage career.
• Angus Wilson (1913-1991) was educated at Westminster School and Merton College, and in 1937 became a librarian in the British Museum's Department of Printed Books, working on the new General Catalogue.
• Carl Winter (1906-1966) was educated at Xavier College and Newman College, University of Melbourne. He came to England in 1928 and attended Exeter College.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Sophia B. Packard was an American educator, cofounder in Atlanta, Georgia, of a school for African American women that would eventually become Spelman College.
Born: January 3, 1824, United States of America
Died: June 21, 1891, Washington, D.C., United States
Organization founded: Spelman College
Buried: Silver Lake Cemetery, Athol, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA, Plot: sec 11 lot 244-246 sp 4
Buried alongside: Harriet E. Giles

Harriet E. Giles and Sophia B. Packard, two teachers from the Oread Institute of Worcester, Massachusetts, established The Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary on April 11, 1881, in the basement of Friendship Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia. Giles and Packard had met around 1855 while Giles was a student and Packard the preceptor of the New Salem Academy in New Salem, Massachusetts, and fostered a lifelong friendship there. The two of them traveled to Atlanta specifically to found a school for black freedwomen, and found support from Frank Quarles, the pastor of Friendship Baptist Church. In 1884, the name of the school was changed to the Spelman Seminary in honor of Laura Spelman, John D. Rockefeller's wife, and her parents, who were longtime activists in the anti-slavery movement. Packard was appointed as Spelman's first president in 1888, after the charter for the seminary was granted. The first college degrees were awarded in 1901. Packard died in 1891, and Giles assumed the presidency until her death in 1909. They never married and considered each other their "companions”. They are buried together at Silver Lake Cemetery, Athol, Massachusetts.
Together from (around) 1855 to 1891: 36 years.
Harriet Elizabeth “Hattie” Giles (1828 - November 12, 1909)
Sophia B. Packard (January 3, 1824– June 21, 1891)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Spelman College is a four-year liberal arts women’s college located in Atlanta, Georgia.
Address: 350 Spelman Ln SW, Atlanta, GA 30314, USA (33.74521, -84.41148)
Type: Education facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 404-681-3643
Place
The college is now part of the Atlanta University Center academic consortium in Atlanta. Founded in 1881 as the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary, Spelman was the fourth historically black female institution of higher education to receive its collegiate charter in 1924. It thus holds the distinction of being one of America’s oldest historically black colleges for women.
Note: one of the only 13 self-described feminist bookstores still in existence today in the United States and Canada is Charis Books and More (1189 Euclid Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30307). Sara Luce Look and Angela Gabriel co-own Charis Books and More, which celebrated its 40th anniversary in Nov. 2014. The bookstore’s bestsellers include a mix of literary fiction, popular lesbian fiction, queer cultural studies, global/feminist politics, spirituality and multicultural children’s books.
Life
Who: Harriet E. Giles (1828 - November 12, 1909) and Sophia B. Packard (January 3, 1824 – June 21, 1891)
The Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary was established on April 11, 1881 in the basement of Friendship Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia, by two teachers from the Oread Institute of Worcester, Massachusetts: Harriet E. Giles and Sophia B. Packard. Giles and Packard had met while Giles was a student, and Packard the preceptress, of the New Salem Academy in New Salem, Massachusetts, and fostered a lifelong friendship there. The two of them traveled to Atlanta specifically to found a school for black freedwomen, and found support from Frank Quarles, the pastor of Friendship Baptist Church. Giles and Packard began the school with 11 African-American women and $100 given to them by the First Baptist Church in Medford, Massachusetts., and a promise of further support from the Women’s American Baptist Home Missionary Society (WABHMS), a group with which they were both affiliated in Boston. Although their first students were mostly illiterate, they envisioned their school to be a liberal arts institution - the first circular of the college stated that they planned to offer "algebra, physiology, essays, Latin, rhetoric, geometry, political economy, mental philosophy (psychology), chemistry, botany, Constitution of the United States, astronomy, zoology, geology, moral philosophy, and evidences of Christianity.” Over time, they attracted more students; by the time the first term ended, they had enrolled 80 students in the seminary. The WABHMS made a down payment on a nine-acre (36,000 m²) site in Atlanta relatively close to the church they began in, which originally had five buildings left from a Union Civil War encampment, to support classroom and residence hall needs. In 1882 the two women returned to Massachusetts to bid for more money and were introduced to wealthy Northern Baptist businessman John D. Rockefeller at a church conference in Ohio. Rockefeller was impressed by Packard’s vision. In April 1884, Rockefeller visited the school. By this time, the seminary had 600 students and 16 faculty members. It was surviving on generous donations by the black community in Atlanta, the efforts of volunteer teachers, and gifts of supplies; many Atlanta black churches, philanthropists, and black community groups raised and donated money to settle the debt on the property that had been acquired. Rockefeller was so impressed that he settled the debt on the property. Rockefeller’s wife, Laura Spelman Rockefeller; her sister, Lucy Spelman; and their parents, Harvey Buel and Lucy Henry Spelman, were also supportive of the school. The Spelmans were longtime activists in the abolitionist movement. Thus, in 1884 the name of the school was changed to the Spelman Seminary in honor of Laura Spelman, John D. Rockefeller’s wife, and her parents. Rockefeller also donated the funds for what is currently the oldest building on campus, Rockefeller Hall, which was constructed in 1886. Packard was appointed as Spelman’s first president in 1888, after the charter for the seminary was granted. Packard died in 1891, and Giles assumed the presidency until her death in 1909. Sophia and Harriet are buried together at Silver Lake Cemetery, Athol, Massachusetts. Spelman Seminary became Spelman College in 1924, and in 1929 it became affiliated, along with Morehouse College, with Atlanta University.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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At Silver Lake Cemetery (Athol, MA 01331), Harriet Elizabeth "Hattie" Giles (1828 - November 12, 1909) and Sophia B. Packard (January 3, 1824- June 21, 1891), founders of Spellman College in Georgia, are buried together.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Sophie Elkan, née Salomon, was a Swedish-Jewish writer and translator. A street in Gothenburg, Sophie Elkans gata, is named after her.
Born: January 3, 1853, Gothenburg, Sweden
Died: April 5, 1921, Stockholm, Sweden
Books: An Exiled King, Gustaf Adolf IV. of Sweden - Scholar's Choice Edition, John Hall, EXILED KING GUSTAF ADOLF IV OF
People also search for: Valborg Olander, Selma Lagerlöf, Hutchinson and Co
Buried: Gamla begravningsplatsen Svingeln (Old Cemetery), Göteborg, Göteborgs kommun, Västra Götalands län, Sweden

Selma Ottilia Lovisa Lagerlöf was a Swedish author. She was the first female writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1914, and most widely known for her children's book Nils Holgerssons underbara resa genom Sverige (The Wonderful Adventures of Nils). Lagerlöf‘s letters to Sophie Elkan, Du lär mig att bli fri (You Teach Me to Be Free), published in 1992, tell a passionate love story that began in 1894 and apparently remained the most important relationship of Lagerlöf’s life until Elkan's death in 1921. Lagerlöf dedicated her novel Jerusalem (1901) to "Sophie Elkan, my companion in life and letters." Over many years, Elkan and Lagerlöf reviewed each other's work. Lagerlöf wrote of Elkan's strong influence on her work, often disagreeing sharply with the direction Lagerlöf wanted to take in her books. With Elkan, Lagerlöf traveled to Italy, and she traveled to Palestine and other parts of the East. She moved in 1897 to Falun, and there met Valborg Olander, who became her literary assistant, friend, and associate. Elkan's jealousy of Olander was a complication in their relationship.
Together from 1894 to 1921: 27 years.
Selma Lagerlöf (November 20, 1858 - March 16, 1940)
Sophie Elkan (January 3, 1853 - April 5, 1921)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Mårbacka is a mansion in Sunne Municipality in Värmland, Sweden. Author Selma Lagerlöf was born and raised at Mårbacka.
Address: Mårbacka, Sunne SO, Sweden (59.7809, 13.2333)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +46 565 310 27
Place
Built in 1793, Rebuilt in 1921-1923, Design by Isak Gustaf Clason (1856-1930)
The estate was owned from about 1720 by the assistant vicar Olof Morell and then was inherited by two of his successors in office. In 1801 it was inherited by the Lagerlöf family and when Selma Lagerlöf’s father Lieutenant Gustaf Lagerlöf died in 1885 his son Johan took over, but he was unsuccessful running the farm and went bankrupt. He moved to America and the mansion had to be sold. The family lost the ownership of the estate in 1889. Selma Lagerlöf bought back the main building in 1907 and in 1910, she could buy back the whole estate with the help of the prize money she received from the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1909. After Lagerlöf had the building reconstructed, not much of the original appearance of her childhood home remained. The original red-painted cottage was extended eastward, a new floor and an attic were added and the grand facade completed its transformation into an elegant mansion. Mårbacka is now kept as a memorial estate, as a result of the author writing in her testament that Mårbacka should be preserved and shown to the public in the condition it was at her death. By paid entrance, visitors can get a guided tour of the main building and next to the building is also a garden, a cafe and a bookstore. In the barn there is a memorial exhibition of Lagerlöf’s life and writings.
Life
Who: Selma Ottilia Lovisa Lagerlöf (November 20, 1858 – March 16, 1940) and Sophie Elkan (January 3, 1853 - April 5, 1921)
Selma Lagerlöf was a Swedish author. She was the first female writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, and is best remembered for her children’s book “Nils Holgerssons underbara resa genom Sverige” (The Wonderful Adventures of Nils.) She met Sophie Elkan in 1894. A Swedish writer of Jewish origin, Elkan became her friend and companion and their letters suggest Lagerlöf fell deeply in love with her. Over many years, Elkan and Lagerlöf critiqued each other’s work. Lagerlöf wrote of Elkan’s strong influence on her work, often disagreeing sharply with the direction Lagerlöf wanted to take in her books. With Elkan, she traveled to Italy, and she also traveled to Palestine and other parts of the East. In Italy, a legend of a Christ Child figure that had been replaced with a false version inspired Lagerlöf’s novel “Antikrists mirakler” (The Miracles of the Antichrist.) Set in Sicily, the novel explores the interplay between Christian and socialist moral systems. However, most of Lagerlöf’s stories were set in Värmland. She moved in 1897 to Falun, and met Valborg Olander (1861-1943), who became her literary assistant and friend, but Elkan’s jealousy of Olander was a complication in the relationship. Olander, a teacher, was also active in the growing women’s suffrage movement in Sweden. The relationship between Selma Lagerlöf, Valborg Olander and Sophie Elkan was portryayed in a TV Series written by Åsa Lantz in 2008, with Helena Bergström as Selma Lagerlöf, Ingela Olsson as Valborg Olander and Alexandra Rapaport as Sophie Elkan. Selma Lagerlöf is buried at Östra Ämterviks kyrkogård, Sunne.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Sophie Elkan, née Salomon (January 3, 1853-April 5, 1921), was a Swedish-Jewish writer and translator. A street in Gothenburg, Sophie Elkans gata (Sophie Elkan Street), is named after her. As a person, she has been described as egocentric and nervous, but also as hospitable and charming. In 1894, she became acquainted with Selma Lagerlöf, who, as is evident from their correspondence, was in love with her. The two women visited Italy in 1895, and traveled to Egypt, Palestine, Italy, France, Belgium and Holland in 1899. After her death, Lagerlöf inherited her personal possessions, which she used to decorate a room in her home Mårbacka to a museum over Elkan: Elkanrummet (Elkan Room). Elkan is buried at Gamla kyrkogården (Gothenburg, Sweden).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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William North was an American soldier and politician.
Born: 1755, Bristol, Maine, United States
Died: January 3, 1836, Duanesburg
Spouse: Mary Duane (m. 1787)
Party: Federalist Party
Previous office: Senator, NY (1798–1798)
Succeeded by: James Watson
Books: Baron Von Steuben: Major General Continental Army
Buried: Christ Episcopal Church, Duanesburg, Schenectady County, New York, USA

Friedrich Wilhelm August Heinrich Ferdinand von Steuben, also referred to as the Baron von Steuben, was a Prussian-born military officer who served as inspector general and Major General of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. Peter Stephen Du Ponceau or DuPonceau was a French linguist, philosopher, and jurist. DuPonceau immigrated to America in 1777, at age 17, with Baron von Steuben. DuPonceau served as a secretary for von Steuben. After the war, he settled in Philadelphia, where he would spend the rest of his life. He was a good friend of Lafayette. Von Steuben “adopted” John W. Mulligan, Jr., when he and his friend, Charles Adams, son of then-Vice President John Adams, had to search shelter after their families opposed to their friendship. Du Ponceau was apparently much happier with his longtime companion Tench Coxe (May 22, 1755 – July 17, 1824), an American political economist and a delegate for Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress in 1788-1789. According to biographer Jacob E. Cooke, “Du Ponceau was one of Coxe’s closest associates, his legal adviser, one of the assignees to whom he handed over management of his property, and a constant companion.”
They met (before) 1777 and remained friends until 1783: 6 years.
Friedrich Wilhelm August Heinrich Ferdinand von Steuben (September 17, 1730 - November 28, 1794)
Pierre-Étienne (Peter Stephen) Du Ponceau (June 3, 1760 - April 1, 1844)
William North (1755 – January 3, 1836)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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At Christ Episcopal Church (132 Duanesburg Churches Rd, Duanesburg, NY 12056) is buried General William North (1755 – January 3, 1836), aide-de-camp to Baron Steuben. The bulk of Baron Steuben's property was bequeathed to General North, who divided it among his military companions.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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