Jan. 4th, 2017

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Studied: Bryn Mawr
Buried: Oakwood Cemetery, Saginaw, Saginaw County, Michigan, USA, Plot: Section 28

Dr. Agnes E. Wells not only was one of the American's leading educators, she also was a vigorous standard bearer in the women's equal rights movement. After graduation from the former West Side Saginaw High School she spent one year at the Saginaw County Training School for Teachers. Then she studied in Dresden, Germany, and at Bryn Mawr College before obtaining a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Michigan in 1903. In 1916 she earned her Master of Arts degree from Carleton College, Minnesota. In 1917 she was faculty member at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. There she was acting dean of women and social director of the Helen Newberry Residence. Then she went to Indiana University as dean of women, a post she held from 1919 to 1938. Dr. Wells was nationally known as an authority on women's guidance and housing. She taught mathematics and astronomy after retiring as dean of women. In 1949 she became chairman of the National Women's Party. In a letter in 1946, Wells explained to an acquaintance in the Party that her “friend of 41 years and house-companion for 28 years” had just died. (Agnes Wells to Anita Pollitzer, August 24, 1946). Morrison Hall is one of four buildings of the Agnes E. Wells quadrangle at Indiana University, along with Sycamore Hall, Memorial Hall, and Goodbody Hall---all built between 1925-1940. Morrison Hall is the home of The Kinsey Institute; founded in 1938, named after Alfred Kinsey, pioneer of human sexuality research.
Together from 1905 to 1946: 41 years.
Agnes Ermina Wells (January 4, 1876 – July 6, 1959)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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At Oakwood Cemetery (Saginaw, MI 48638) is buried Dr Agnes E. Wells (January 4, 1876 – July 6, 1959), Dean of Women at Indiana University and professor of mathematics and astronomy there. Wells is best remembered for her contributions to guidance and housing for women students. She was active in many educational associations, the National Woman's Party, and the Michigan State Society.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood was an English-American novelist.
Born: August 26, 1904, Wyberslegh Hall, United Kingdom
Died: January 4, 1986, Santa Monica, California, United States
Movies: A Single Man, Christopher and His Kind, Cabaret, more
Siblings: Richard Isherwood
Plays: The Dog Beneath the Skin, On the Frontier, The Ascent of F6
Lived: 24 Wybersley Rd, High Lane, Stockport SK6 8HB, UK (53.36556, -2.05745)
36 St Mary Abbot’s Terrace, W14
19 Pembroke Gardens, W8
Institute for Sexual Science, In der Zelten 10, Tiergarten, Berlin
Wassertorstraße 21a, Berlin
Admiralstraße 38, Berlin
Nollendorfstraße 17, 10777 Berlin, Germany
George Washington Hotel, 23 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10010
145 Adelaide Dr, Santa Monica, CA 90402, USA (34.02865, -118.51404)
Studied: King's College London
University of Cambridge
Buried: Body Donated to the UCLA Medical School
Anniversary: February 14, 1953

Christopher Isherwood was an Anglo-American novelist. Donald Jess "Don" Bachardy is an American portrait artist. On Valentine's Day 1953, at the age of 48, Isherwood met teenaged Don Bachardy among a group of friends on the beach at Santa Monica. Reports of Bachardy's age at the time vary, but Bachardy later said, "At the time I was, probably, 16." In fact, Bachardy was 18. Despite the age difference, this meeting began a partnership that, though interrupted by affairs and separations, continued until the end of Isherwood's life. The two became a well-known and well-established couple in Southern Californian society with many Hollywood friends. Isherwood's finest achievement was his 1964 novel A Single Man that depicted a day in the life of George, a middle-aged, gay Englishman who is a professor at a Los Angeles university, and probably inspired by a temporary split between Isherwood and Bachardy. The 2008 film Chris & Don: A Love Story chronicled Isherwood and Bachardy's lifelong relationship.
Together from 1953 to 1986: 33 years.
Christopher Isherwood (August 26, 1904 - January 4, 1986)
Don Bachardy (born May 18, 1934)
Anniversary: February 14, 1953



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Wyberslegh Hall (sometimes spelled Wybersley Hall) is a large house dating from the XVI century, on the edge of the village of High Lane. Now in private ownership, Wyberslegh Hall was formerly the home of eldest sons of the Bradshaw family. Of unusual design, it has castellated gables with a rather ungainly castellated wall between them, above the main entrance: hardly a handsome house but an historic one. The author Christopher Isherwood was born there.
Address: 24 Wybersley Rd, High Lane, Stockport SK6 8HB, UK (53.36556, -2.05745)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 441908 (Grade II, 1967)
Place
Built in XVIII century and later.
Dressed roughly coursed stone with slate roof. 2-bay central range with projecting gabled crosswings to either side, all of 2 storeys. Central studded door with moulded- ashlar surround and a 3-light casement window with plain stone surround on either side to each floor. Each wing projects considerably and has a segmental arched recess with sash windows on the upper level and a door to the left on the lower level. The windows have flat stone keystone arches. The gables and parapet are castellated. 4 similar window openings to left elevation one of which is blind. The rear has 3 gabled bays, one of which is XX century and brick.
Life
Who: Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood (August 26, 1904 – January 4, 1986)
Christopher Isherwood was an English novelist. Isherwood was born in 1904 on his family's estate close to the Cheshire-Derbyshire border. He was the elder son of Frank Bradshaw Isherwood, a professional soldier who fought in the Boer War, by his wife Kathleen (née Machell Smith), whose family were successful merchants. Frank Isherwood was the son of John Henry Isherwood, head of the landed gentry family of Isherwood of Marple Hall and Wyberslegh Hall, Cheshire, and a descendant of the regicide John Bradshaw. The Isherwood family estates came into their possession on the marriage of Mary Bradshaw (of the family that had held them for centuries) to Nathaniel Isherwood, a felt-maker from Bolton, Lancashire, in the early 1700s.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In the summer of 1929, Christopher Isherwood’s mother, Kathleen, decided that the family should leave 36 St Mary Abbot’s Terrace, W14. She hadn’t cared much for the house since the death of her mother Emily, and now it was getting noisy and shook continually as the traffic along Kensington High Street grew heavier, year by year. In 1934-1935, the Terrace was demolished and a big block of flats was built on its site. They moved into 19 Pembroke Gardens, W8. Pembroke Gardens were only a few minutes’ walk away, on the south side of the High Street, leading out of Edwardes Square. Number 19 was a smaller but much pleasanter house than the other, and the street was very quiet. Toward the end of 1929, Christopher settled down in Berlin and only returned to London on fairly short visits.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Christopher Isherwood arrived in Berlin in March, 1929, for a weeks holiday to visit his friend W.H. Auden. He visited the city three times in that year and it was in November that he chose to stay indefinitely. His first permanent residence was in a room in an apartment at Magnus Hirschfeld’s Institute for Sexual Science at In der Zelten 10, in the Tiergarten district of the city (no longer existing near the House of World Cultures). He stayed there until October, 1930, when he briefly moved in with his boyfriend, Otto Nowak, a young working-class Berliner, and this latter family to Wassertorstraße 21a, near Hallesches Tor (was actually Simeonstraße, no longer existing near St. Simeon Church). From there, a month later, he moved into an apartment at Admiralstraße 38, near Kotbusser Tor. In December, 1930, he moved into the boarding house of Fraulein Thurau at Nollendorfstraße 17.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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The George Washington Hotel was a hotel and boarding house (23 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10010) open in 1928. The building was occupied by many famous writers, musicians, and poets including W. H. Auden, who called it “the nicest hotel in town,” and Christopher Isherwood who lived there in the 1930s. Much of the space is currently under sublease to the School of Visual Arts except for apartments still occupied by original (non-student) tenants who pay stabilized rent, and who are still protected under NYC rent laws.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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The residence at 145 Adelaide Drive was home to acclaimed author Christopher Isherwood and his partner, artist Don Bachardy, for thirty years.
Address: 145 Adelaide Dr, Santa Monica, CA 90402, USA (34.02865, -118.51404)
Type: Private Property
Place
As Christopher Isherwood's home for three decades, the house on Adelaide Drive was the backdrop to the creation of seminal works within the fields of literature, theater, television, and fine art. In 1963, the residence played a key role in events that would later inspire Isherwood's most famous novel, “A Single Man.” Following an incident with Don Bachardy that nearly ended their relationship, Isherwood temporarily moved out of the home that they had shared for seven years. It was this event, as well as Isherwood's jealousy around Bachardy's affairs and the emotional turmoil that followed, that served as creative material for “A Single Man.”
Life
Who: Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood (August 26, 1904 – January 4, 1986)
Born near Manchester, England in 1904, Isherwood became a U.S. citizen in 1946 and lived in Southern California until his death in 1986. Professionally, Isherwood was a well-known novelist, playwright, screenwriter, autobiographer, and diarist. He identified as gay and often explored this identity as a central theme in his literary work. One of his most celebrated accomplishments was his classic American novel, “A Single Man,” which was published in 1964. Isherwood was good friends with Dr. Evelyn Hooker and lived with her at 400 South Saltair Avenue from 1952 to 1953. In 1953, Isherwood met and fell in love with Don Bachardy, considered by many as Los Angeles' most celebrated portrait painter. Despite their thirty-year age difference, the couple lived together in this hillside residence from 1956 until Isherwood's death. Isherwood died at age 81 in 1986 in Santa Monica, California, from prostate cancer. His body was donated to the UCLA Medical School. Over the course of their relationship, Isherwood and Bachardy collaborated on many artistic projects, including the television film “Frankenstein: The True Story” and their diary-portrait series “October.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Frances Alice Kellor was an American social reformer and investigator, who specialized in the study of immigrants to the United States and women.
Born: October 20, 1873, Columbus, Ohio, United States
Died: January 4, 1952, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Cornell University
University of Chicago
Cornell Law School
Lived: 118 E 54th St
19 E. 26th Street
Buried: Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA, Plot: Section 167, Lot 17004

Mary Dreier was a New York social reformer along with her sister Margaret. Two other sisters, Dorothea and Katherine, were painters. She never married, but shared a home with fellow reformer Frances Kellor from 1905 until the latter's death in 1952. Kellor was an American social reformer and chief investigator for the Bureau of Industries and Immigration of New York State in 1910-13, who specialized in the study of immigrants to the United States and women. Mary Elisabeth Dreier represents the involved philanthropist of the early 20th century. From a financially secure family, she constantly contributed time, funds, and organizing talents to a variety of feminist causes, most notably women workers and the suffrage movement. Her social prominence and social commitments led to her service on local and regional boards and commissions, particularly those dealing with labor and with penal reform. The correspondence between Kellor and Dreier spans the length of their almost fifty-year relationship. The letters document the close and affectionate nature of their friendship; there is some discussion of their work, especially in the early years. After Kellor’s death, Dreier lived alone for the rest of her life until dying in 1963, at her summer home in Bar Harbor, Maine.
Together from 1905 to 1952: 47 years.
Frances Alice Kellor (October 20, 1873 – January 4, 1952)
Mary Dreier (September 26, 1875 - August 15, 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Born in 1875, Mary Dreier was a labor and social reform activist in New York. She served as president of the Women's Trade Union League. She and her partner Frances Kellor (herself an active social reformer) were together for 50 years. They lived at 118 E 54th St. Before Dreier lived at 6 Montague Terrace, Brooklyn, and Kellor at 19 E. 26th Street.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Kings County, New York.
Address: 500 25th St, Brooklyn, NY 11232, USA (40.65901, -73.99569)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 7.45-17.00
National Register of Historic Places: 97000228, 1977 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Located in Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn, it lies several blocks southwest of Prospect Park, between Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, Borough Park, Kensington, and Sunset Park. Paul Goldberger in The New York Times, wrote that it was said "it is the ambition of the New Yorker to live upon the Fifth Avenue, to take his airings in the Park, and to sleep with his fathers in Green-Wood.” The Pierrepont papers deposited at the Brooklyn Historical Society contain material about the organizing of Green-Wood Cemetery.
Notable queer burials at Green-Wood Cemetery:
• Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988), was one of the most important artists of the XX century. In 2006, Equality Forum featured Jean-Michel Basquiat during LGBT history month.
• Henry Ward Beecher (1813–1887), was a Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer, and speaker, known for his support of the abolition of slavery.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990), was a composer, conductor, author, music lecturer, and pianist. In a book released in October, 2013, “The Leonard Bernstein Letters,” his wife reveals his homosexuality.
• Elizabeth M. Cushier (died 1931). Doctors Emily Blackwell (1826-1910) and Elizabeth Cushier had a Boston Marriage. Blackwell co-founded the New York Infirmary for Women and Children (1857) and its Women's Medical College. Cushier was professor of medicine at the college and Blackwell's life-partner for twenty-eight years. About the relationship, Dr. Cushier wrote, “Thus the years happily passed” until in 1910 “a sad blow came in the death of Dr. Blackwell, making an irreparable beak in my life.” Dr. Blackwell is buried at Chilmark Cemetery, Massachusetts.
• Mary Elisabeth Dreier (September 26, 1875- August 15, 1963), was a New York social reformer along with her sister Margaret. Two other sisters, Dorothea and Katherine, were painters. She never married, but shared a home with fellow reformer Frances Kellor (buried alongside her). After Kellor’s death, Dreier lived alone for the rest of her life until dying in 1963, at her summer home in Bar Harbor, Maine.
• Fred Ebb (1928–2004), was a musical theatre lyricist who had many successful collaborations with composer John Kander. Ebb is interred in a mausoleum with Edwin “Eddie” Aldridge (1929–1997) and Martin Cohen (1926–1995) on the banks of Sylvan Water. In addition to the names and dates of each man, the phrase, “Together Forever” is also chiseled on the front of the mausoleum.
• Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829–1869), was a composer and pianist, best known as a virtuoso performer of his own romantic piano works.
• Richard Isay (1934–2012), was a psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, author and gay activist. Isay is considered a pioneer who changed the way that psychoanalysts view homosexuality.
• Paul Jabara (1948–1992), was an actor, singer, and songwriter. Paul Jabara died from AIDS complications after a long illness in Los Angeles, California.
• Frances Alice Kellor (October 20, 1873 – January 4, 1952), shared a home with fellow reformer Mary Dreier from 1905 until her death in 1952. Kellor was an American social reformer and chief investigator for the Bureau of Industries and Immigration of New York State in 1910-13, who specialized in the study of immigrants to the United States and women.
• Violet Oakley (1874–1961), was the first American woman to receive a public mural commission. Oakley and her friends, the artists Elizabeth Shippen Green and Jessie Willcox Smith, all former students of Howard Pyle, were named the Red Rose girls by him.
• Emma Stebbins (1815–1882), was among the first notable American woman sculptors, companion to actress Charlotte Cushman.
• Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933), artist. His daughter, Dorothy Trimble Tiffany (1891–1979), as Dorothy Burlingham, became a noted psychoanalyst and lifelong friend and partner of Anna Freud.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Sir Isaac Newton FRS was an English physicist and mathematician who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time and a key figure in the scientific revolution.
Born: January 4, 1643, Woolsthorpe-by-Colsterworth, United Kingdom
Died: March 31, 1727, Kensington, London, United Kingdom
Buried: Trinity College (memorial)
Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA
Education: Trinity College, Cambridge
The King's School, Grantham
Lived: 87 Jermyn Street, St. James’s, SW1Y
Bullingham Mansions, Kensington Church Street, W8

Sir Isaac Newton’s work laid the foundation for physics that prevailed until the theories of Einstein and Planck in the 20th century. (Newton’s laws do still apply, except on very small scales where quantum mechanics takes over.) Newton had been reluctant to publish his calculus because he feared controversy and criticism. He was close to the Swiss mathematician Nicolas Fatio de Duillier, whom he met in London around 1690. In 1691, Duillier started to write a new version of Newton's Principia. In 1693, the relationship between Duillier and Newton deteriorated, at the same time Newton suffered a nervous breakdown, and the book was never completed. Some of their correspondence has survived. Newton never married. Although it is impossible to verify, it is commonly believed that he died a virgin, as has been commented on by such figures as mathematician Charles Hutton, economist John Maynard Keynes, and physicist Carl Sagan. In 1733, Voltaire publicly stated that Newton "had neither passion nor weakness; he never went near any woman".
They met (around) 1690 and remained friends until 1693: 3 years.
Sir Isaac Newton PRS MP (December 25, 1642 – March 20, 1727)
Nicolas Fatio de Duillier (alternative names are Facio or Faccio; February 26, 1664 – May 12, 1753)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 87 Jermyn Street, St. James’s, SW1Y Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727), "Lived here"



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727), one of the worlds renown and influential scientists and natural philosopher, who made many groundbreaking discoveries including the Laws of Gravity and Newtonian Mechanics died at Bullingham Mansions, Kensington Church Street, W8.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In the chapel of St John the Baptist in Westminster Abbey there is the tomb of Mary Kendall (died March 13, 1709/1710) dating from 1710 with an inscription recording: "That close Union and Friendship, In which she lived, with the Lady Catharine Jones (died April 23, 1740); And in testimony of which she desir’d That even their Ashes, after Death, Might not be divided.”
Address: 20 Dean’s Yard, Westminster, London SW1P 3PA, UK (51.49929, -0.1273)
Type: Religious Building (open to public)
Hours: Monday and Tuesday 9.30-15.30, Wednesday 9.30-18.00, Thursday and Friday 9.30-15.30, Saturday 9.30-13.30
Phone: +44 20 7222 5152
Place
Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the most notable religious buildings in the United Kingdom and has been the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. Between 1540 and 1556 the abbey had the status of a cathedral. Since 1560, however, the building is no longer an abbey nor a cathedral, having instead the status of a Church of England "Royal Peculiar"—a church responsible directly to the sovereign. The building itself is the original abbey church. According to a tradition first reported by Sulcard in about 1080, a church was founded at the site (then known as Thorn Ey (Thorn Island)) in the VII century, at the time of Mellitus, a Bishop of London. Construction of the present church began in 1245, on the orders of King Henry III. Since 1066, when Harold Godwinson and William the Conqueror were crowned, the coronations of English and British monarchs have been held there. There have been at least 16 royal weddings at the abbey since 1100. Two were of reigning monarchs (Henry I and Richard II), although, before 1919, there had been none for some 500 years.
Notable queer burials at Westminster Abbey:
• Anne, Queen of Great Britain (1665-1714). Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, became close to the young Princess Anne in about 1675, and the friendship grew stronger as the two grew older. Correspondence between the Duchess and the Queen reveals that the two women enjoyed a royally passionate romance. They called each other pet names: Sarah was “Mrs. Freeman” and Anne was “Mrs. Morley.” When Anne came to the throne in 1702, she named Sarah “Lady of the Bedchamber.” Anne and Sarah were virtually inseparable; no king’s mistress had ever wielded the power granted to the Duchess. Over time, Sarah became overconfident in her position and developed an arrogant attitude toward Anne, even going to far as to insult the queen in public. A cousin of Sarah’s, Abigail Hill, caught the Queen’s eye during Sarah’s frequent absences from Court, and eventually replaced her in Anne’s affections. After her final break with Anne in 1711, Sarah and her husband were dismissed from the court. Sarah enjoyed a "long and devoted" relationship with her husband of more than 40 years, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough. The money she inherited from the Marlborough trust left her one of the richest women in Europe.
• Sir Frederick Ashton (1904–1988), ballet dancer and choreographer, Memorial in Poet’s Corner (buried St Mary the Virgin Churchyard, Yaxley)
• W. H. Auden (1907-1973), poet and essayist. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey in 1974, adjoining the grave of John Masefield. Another memorial is at Christ College Cathedral, Oxford, where he graduated (buried Kirchstetten, Austria) (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Robert Baden-Powell (1857–1941) was a British Army officer, writer, author of Scouting for Boys which was an inspiration for the Scout Movement, founder and first Chief Scout of The Boy Scouts Association and founder of the Girl Guides. In the south aisle of the nave of Westminster Abbey, against the screen of St George’s chapel, there is a memorial stone to Lord and Lady Baden-Powell, by W.Soukop. Both are buried in Kenya and each had a memorial service held at the Abbey (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), Prime Minister, memorial. A memorial to Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, was unveiled in the nave of Westminster Abbey in 1997. Designed by Donald Buttress and cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Francis Beaumont (1584–1616) was a dramatist in the English Renaissance theatre, most famous for his collaborations with John Fletcher (1579–1625.) According to a mid-century anecdote related by John Aubrey, they lived in the same house on the Bankside in Southwark, "sharing everything in the closest intimacy." About 1613 Beaumont married Ursula Isley, daughter and co-heiress of Henry Isley of Sundridge in Kent, by whom he had two daughters, one posthumous. Francis Beaumont and his brother Sir John Beaumont are both buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, at the entrance to St Benedict's chapel near Chaucer's monument. Fletcher died in 1625 and is buried inside the Southwark Cathedral, London Bridge, SE1. On 16 November 1996 the cathedral became a focus of controversy when it hosted a twentieth-anniversary service for the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement. In 1997 openly gay cleric, Jeffrey John became Canon Chancellor and Theologian of the Cathedral (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Aphra Behn (1640-1689) was a British playwright, poet, translator and fiction writer from the Restoration era. Behn’s close association with royalty, especially her friendship with the King’s mistress, Nell Gwyn, and her long-standing liaison with John Hoyle, whose affairs with other men were notorious, made Behn a prime subject for court and theater gossip. Just as Behn was notorious for presenting sensational subjects on stage despite societal taboos, she achieved a reputation for unusually explicit accounts of erotic and sexual episodes in her poems. Many of these celebrated gay male and lesbian relationships. She was buried in the east cloister of Westminster Abbey, near the steps up into the church. The inscription on her tombstone, written by John Hoyle, reads: "Here lies a Proof that Wit can never be Defence enough against Mortality." John Hoyle was stabbed to death on May 1692 and is buried in the vault of the Inner Temple church, Temple, EC4Y) (Location in the Abbey: Cloisters; East Cloister).
• William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland (1649–1709) and King William III of England (1650-1702), are buried next to Queen Mary II. King William III is buried in great simplicity in the South Aisle of the Chapel of Henry VI, and his companion William Bentinck is buried in a vault nearby. Several members of the Bentinck family are buried in the Ormond vault at the eastern end of Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey. None have monuments but their names and dates of death were added to the vaultstone in the late XIX century (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Rupert Brooke (1887-1915) died at 4:46 pm on 23 April 1915 in a French hospital ship moored in a bay off the island of Skyros in the Aegean on his way to the landing at Gallipoli. As the expeditionary force had orders to depart immediately, he was buried at 11 pm in an olive grove on Skyros, Greece. His grave remains there today. On 11 November 1985, Brooke was among 16 WWI poets commemorated on a slate monument unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey.
• Benjamin Britten (1913-1976), musician and composer. In the north choir (or Musicians) aisle in Westminster Abbey there is a memorial stone. Britten refused a formal burial since he wanted to be buried beside his partner Peter Pears (Location in the Abbey: North Quire Aisle).
• Robert Browning (1812-1889), poet, is buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. He was born on 7 May 1812 in London, a son of Robert Browning (1782-1866) and Sarah (Wiedemann). He married Elizabeth Barrett, a famous poet in her own right, in September 1846 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• George, 6th Baron Byron (1788-1824). The memorial stone in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey was given by the Poetry Society and unveiled on 8 May 1969 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Noël Coward (1899-1973), composer and playwright. A memorial was unveiled in 1984 in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. The black marble stone was cut by Ralph Beyer. Thanked by Coward’s partner, Graham Payn, for attending, the Queen Mother replied, "I came because he was my friend" (Location in the Abbey: South Quire Aisle).
• Major-General Sir Herbert Edwardes (1819–1868) was an administrator, soldier, and statesman active in the Punjab, India. He is buried in Highgate Cemetery. A memorial by sculptor William Theed junior, is on the wall of the west aisle of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. He is also commemorated by a stained glass window in the chapel of King’s College London. Brigadier-General John Nicholson (1822–1857) was a Victorian era military officer known for his role in British India. Nicholson never married, the most significant people in his life being his brother Punjab administrators Sir Henry Lawrence and Herbert Edwardes. At Bannu, Nicholson used to ride one hundred and twenty miles every weekend to spend a few hours with Edwardes, and lived in his beloved friend’s house for some time when Edwardes’ wife Emma was in England. At his deathbed he dictated a message to Edwardes saying, "Tell him that, if at this moment a good fairy were to grant me a wish, my wish would be to have him here next to my mother." The love between him and Edwardes made them, as Edwardes’ wife latter described it "more than brothers in the tenderness of their whole lives.” In the retaking of Delhi, India, Nicholson led 2,000 men (mostly British, Pathan, and Punjabi troops) through the Kashmiri Gate in Delhi. Mortally wounded he died at the hour of British victory and is buried at New Delhi (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Eliot (1819-1880) was not buried in Westminster Abbey because of her denial of the Christian faith and her "irregular" though monogamous life with Lewes. She was buried in Highgate Cemetery (East), Highgate, London, in the area reserved for religious dissenters and agnostics, beside the love of her life, George Henry Lewes. On 21 June 1980 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. Stone by John Skelton (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Thomas Gray (1716-1771)’s biographer William Mason erected a memorial to him, designed by John Bacon the Elder, in the east aisle of Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey in 1778. (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner)
• Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), Poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in 1975 in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. By sculptor David Peace (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• A. E. Housman (1859-1936), poet, has a memorial panel in the window above Chaucer's monument in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Henry James (1843-1916), American born novelist. On 17 June 1976 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets’ Corner Westminster Abbey by his great grand-nephew. Cut by Will Carter (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• James Kendall, politician and governor of Barbados, is buried in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. James’s niece Mary Kendall was buried in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Abbey and has a monument there with a kneeling alabaster figure of herself. The inscription, written by the Dean of Westminster Francis Atterbury, reads: "Mrs Mary Kendall daughter of Thomas Kendall Esqr. and of Mrs Mary Hallet, his wife, of Killigarth in Cornwall, was born at Westminster Nov.8 1677 and dy’d at Epsome March 4 1709/10, having reach’d the full term of her blessed Saviour’s life; and study’d to imitate his spotless example. She had great virtues, and as great a desire of concealing them: was of a severe life, but of an easy conversation; courteous to all, yet strictly sincere; humble, without meanness; beneficient, without ostentation; devout, without superstition. These admirable qualitys, in which she was equall’d by few of her sex, surpass’d by none, render’d her every way worthy of that close uion and friendship in which she liv’d with the Lady Catherine Jones; and in testimony of which she desir’d that even their ashes, after death, might not be divided: and, therefore, order’d her selfe here to be interr’d where, she knew, that excellent Lady design’d one day to rest, near the grave of her belov’d and religious mother, Elizabeth, Countess of Ranelagh. This monument was erected by Capt. Charles Kendall." Her name was inscribed on the vault stone in front of the monument in the late XIX century. Mary’s father Thomas Kendall, son of a merchant, died in 1684 and Mary lived with the Earl of Ranelagh’s family while James was in the West Indies. Lady Catherine Jones (d.1740) was the Earl’s daughter. Charles was Mary’s cousin and was in the Royal Navy. Her estates were left to her cousin Canon Nicholas Kendall. The coats of arms show those for Kendall and also "or, a chief gules overall on a bend engrailed sable three bezants" for Hallet.
• Herbert, 1st Earl Kitchener (1850-1916), Sirdar of the Egyptian army (Commander in Chief), is remembered on the altar in the south aisle of the Lady Chapel (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel)
• D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930), novelist and poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey on 16 November 1985. By David Parsley (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• In July 2002, a memorial window to Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) – a gift of the Marlowe Society – was unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey. Controversially, a question mark was added to the generally accepted date of death. On 25 October 2011 a letter from Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells was published by The Times newspaper, in which they called on the Dean and Chapter to remove the question mark on the grounds that it "flew in the face of a mass of unimpugnable evidence.” In 2012, they renewed this call in their e-book Shakespeare Bites Back, adding that it "denies history,” and again the following year in their book Shakespeare Beyond Doubt. (Buried St Nicholas Churchyard, Deptford)
• Just inside the west door of Westminster Abbey there is a memorial brass, by Christopher Ironside, to Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900-1979) and his wife, Countess Mountbatten of Burma. He was Admiral of the Fleet (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• It has been said that the greatest love of Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727)’s life was with a fellow mathematician, Fatio de Duillier. They collaborated for several years, and when they broke up over an argument in 1693, Newton suffered symptoms of a nervous breakdown. Fatio assisted John Conduitt (Newton’s nephew) in planning the design, and writing the inscription for Newton’s monument in Westminster Abbey. His large monument is by William Kent and J.M.Rysbrack. Newton has also a Memorial at Trinity College, Cambridge. Fatio died in 1753 and was buried at the church of St. Nicholas, Worcester (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• After being ill for the last twenty-two years of his life, Laurence Olivier (1907-1989) died of renal failure on 11 July 1989 at his home near Steyning, West Sussex. His cremation was held three days later. The ashes of the greatest actor of his generation, are buried in the south transept of Westminster Abbey. His stone was cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: South Transept).
• Wilfred Owen (1893-1918), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. The inscription on the stone is taken from Owen’s "Preface" to his poems; "My subject is War, and the pity of War. The Poetry is in the pity." (Buried Ors Communal Cemetery, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France)
• Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902). A small tablet was unveiled in Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey in 1953 (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Seigfried Sassoon (1886-1967), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. (Buried St Andrew Churchyard, Mells, Somerset)
• Henry John Alexander Seely (1899-1963), 2nd Lord Mottistone, of the architect firm of Seely & Paget, re-built several of the houses in Little Cloister, Westminster Abbey, after war damage. A statue by Edwin Russell remembers him (Location in the Abbey: St Catherine's Chapel Garden; Little Cloister).
• Robert Stewart (1769-1822), Viscount Castlereagh and 2nd Marquis of Londonderry, politician, was buried in the centre of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. His statue is by sculptor John Evan Thomas (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592-1628) and King James I of England (1566-1625) are buried in the Henry VII Chapel. King James I’s tomb was lost and not rediscovered until 1869. On His Majesty’s left is the magnificent tomb of his lover George Villiers. On his right is the tomb (with huge bronze figures representing Hope, Truth, Charity and Faith) of Ludovic Stuart, Duke of Richmond and Lennox (1574-1624), son of one of his earliest lovers, Esme Stuart.
• On 14 February 1995 a small stained glass memorial was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey for Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wilde (1854-1900), playwright and aesthete (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lived: 2249 Mountain Oak Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.11136, -118.30977)
Buried: Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale), Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: The Great Mausoleum, Dahlia Terrace, Florentine Columbarium (back/north wall elevation, 1/3rd right/eastern portion), Niche 8446 (bronze niche face cover, 4 rows up, 2 columns in from right corner; above couch container glass face niche)

Dorothy Arzner was an American film director. Her directorial career in feature films spanned from the late 1920s into the early 1940s. Throughout that time, she was the only woman working in the field. She lived much of her life with her companion, choreographer Marion Morgan. They met in 1927 on the set of Fashions for Women, Azner the director, Morgan hired to choreograph the film tableaus. The Arzner-Morgan House was built in 1930 by architect W.C. Tanner for Arzner and Morgan. The home is about 3600 square feet and features three bedrooms and three bathrooms and beautifully terraced gardens designed by famed landscape duo Florence Yoch and Lucile Council (partners as well). Arzner and Morgan lived there together for more than 40 years, until Miss Morgan died in 1971. Arzner died aged 82, in La Quinta, California. R.M. Vaughan's 2000 play, Camera, Woman depicts the last days of Arzner's career. According to the play, Harry Cohn fired her over a kiss scene between Merle Oberon and fictitious actress Rose Lindstrom.
Together from 1927 to 1971: 44 years.
Dorothy Arzner (January 3, 1897 – October 1, 1979)
Marion Morgan (January 4, 1881 – November 10, 1971)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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A Greek temple villa designed for film director Dorothy Arzner and her lifelong companion, dancer-choreographer Marion Morgan. The original gardens were designed by the distinguished Southern Californa lanscape architect Florence Yoch, with "elaborate horticultural layouts" i.e. hanging gardens. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, the residence was last on the market in 2012 for $3,495,000.
Address: 2249 Mountain Oak Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.11136, -118.30977)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1930, Design by W. C. Tanner
For over twenty years, this Greek Revival-style residence in Los Feliz was home to Dorothy Arzner, a pioneering film director and one of the most prominent lesbians working in Hollywood before WWII. Arzner was very open about her sexuality and was infamous for pursuing and having affairs with the actresses in her films. She was one of the most successful and well-known openly queer women in Hollywood of her time. For the last forty years of her life, Arzner lived with her partner, modern dance choreographer Marion Morgan. The couple resided in the Los Feliz home from 1930 to 1951. Arzner passed away in 1979. The building was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM) in 1986.
Life
Who: Dorothy Arzner (January 3, 1897 – October 1, 1979) and Marion Morgan (1881–1971)
In 1919, Dorothy Arzner enrolled at the University of Southern California as a medical student. She served as an ambulance driver during WWI. Her career path changed when she was hired by William de Mille as a typist in the Paramount Pictures script department. Arzner eventually rose through the ranks to become a highly regarded editor, yet her career stalled in the late 1920s. In 1927, she leveraged an employment offer from Harry Cohn at Columbia Pictures, threatening B. P. Shulberg (then head of Paramount) to leave the studio if he didn’t let her direct. She remained with Paramount until 1932. In 1936, Arzner became the first woman to join the Directors Guild of America. Over the course of her career, she directed popular films such as “First Comes Courage”; “Dance, Girl, Dance”; “The Bride Wore Red”; and “Honor Among Lovers.” Her films often featured strong feminist and lesbian undertones and themes. She is credited for launching the careers of actresses including Lucille Ball, Katharine Hepburn, and Rosalind Russell. In 1943, she stopped working on feature-length films and began directing television and military training films. She also became a professor at UCLA’s film school, where her graduate students included well-known directors such as Francis Ford Coppola.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries
Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries is a corporation that owns and operates a chain of cemeteries and mortuaries in Los Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties in Southern California.
Addresses:
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cathedral City), 69855 Ramon Rd, Cathedral City, CA 92234, USA (33.81563, -116.4419)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Covina Hills), 21300 Via Verde Drive, Covina, CA 91724, USA (34.06783, -117.84183)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cypress), 4471 Lincoln Ave, Cypress, CA 90630, USA (33.8337, -118.0552)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Glendale), 1712 S Glendale Ave, Glendale, CA 91205, USA (34.12524, -118.24371)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Hollywood Hills), 6300 Forest Lawn Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.14688, -118.32208)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Long Beach), 1500 E San Antonio Dr, Long Beach, CA 90807, USA (33.84384, -118.17116)
Place
The company was founded by a group of San Francisco businessmen in 1906. Dr. Hubert Eaton assumed management control in 1917 and is credited with being Forest Lawn’s "founder" because of his origination of the "memorial-park" plan. The first location was in Tropico which later became part of Glendale, California. Its facilities are officially known as memorial parks. The parks are best known for the large number of celebrity burials, especially in the Glendale and Hollywood Hills locations. Eaton opened the first mortuary (funeral home) on dedicated cemetery grounds after a long battle with established funeral directors who saw the "combination" operation as a threat. He remained as general manager until his death in 1966 when he was succeeded by his nephew, Frederick Llewellyn.
Notable queer burials at Forest Lawn Memorial Parks:
• Lucile Council (1898-1964), Section G, Lot 5 Space 9, Glendale. Florence Yoch (1890–1972) and Lucile Council were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California
• George Cukor (1899-1983), Garden of Honor (Private Garden), Glendale. American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
• Brad Davis (1949-1991), Court of Remembrance/Columbarium of Valor, G64054, Hollywood Hills. American actor, known for starring in the 1978 film Midnight Express and 1982 film Querelle. Davis married Susan Bluestein, an Emmy Award-winning casting director. They had one child, Alex, a transgender man born as Alexandra. Davis acknowledged having had sex with men and being bisexual in an interview with Boze Hadleigh.
• Helen Ferguson (1901-1977), Ascension, L-7296, space 1, Glendale. For nearly thirty years, former actress and publicist Helen Ferguson had an intimate relationship with Barbara Stanwyck. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, Loretta Young and Robert Taylor, among others.
• Edmund Goulding (1891–1959), Wee Kirk Churchyard, L-260, Space 4, Glendale. He was a British film writer and director. As an actor early in his career he was one of the Ghosts in the 1922 British made Paramount silent “Three Live Ghosts” alongside Norman Kerry and Cyril Chadwick. Also in the early 1920s he wrote several screenplays for star Mae Murray for films directed by her then husband Robert Z. Leonard. Goulding is best remembered for directing cultured dramas such as “Love” (1927), “Grand Hotel” (1932) with Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, “Dark Victory” (1939) with Bette Davis, and “The Razor's Edge” (1946) with Gene Tierney and Tyrone Power. He also directed the classic film noir “Nightmare Alley” (1947) with Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell, and the action drama “The Dawn Patrol.” He was also a successful songwriter, composer, and producer.
• Howard Greenfield (March 15, 1936- March 4, 1986) and Tory Damon (September 29, 1939- March 30, 1986), Hollywood Hills. Plot: Courts of Remembrance, wall crypt #3515. Damon’s epitaph reads: Love Will Keep Us Together..., Greenfield’s continues: ... Forever.
• Francis Grierson aka Jesse Shepard (1849-1927), Glendale, Great Mausoleum, Coleus Mezzanine Columbarium. Composer and pianist.
• Edward Everett Horton (1886-1970), Whispering Pines section, Map #03, Lot 994, Ground Interment Space 3, at the top of the hill. American character actor, he had a long career in film, theater, radio, television, and voice work for animated cartoons.
• Charles Laughton (1899–1962), Court of Remembrance, C-310 (wall crypt), Hollywood Hills. English stage and film character actor, director, producer and screenwriter.
• W. Dorr Legg (1904-1994), Eternal Love, Map E09, Lot 1561, Space 3, Hollywood Hills. W. Dorr Legg was a landscape architect and one of the founders of the U.S. gay rights movement, then called the homophile movement.
• David Lewis (1903-1987) and James Whale (1889-1957), Columbarium, Glendale. When David Lewis died in 1987, his executor and Whale biographer, James Curtis, had his ashes interred in a niche across from Whale’s.
• Liberace (1919-1987), Courts of Remembrance section, Map #A39, Distinguished Memorial – Sarcophagus 4, Hollywood Hills. American pianist, singer, and actor. A child prodigy and the son of working-class immigrants, Liberace enjoyed a career spanning four decades of concerts, recordings, television, motion pictures, and endorsements.
• Paul Monette (1945-1995) and Roger Horwitz (1941-1986), Hollywood Hills. Horwitz’s headstone reads: “My little friend, we sail together, if we sail at all.”
• Marion Morgan (1881-1971), The Great Mausoleum, Dahlia Terrace, Florentine Columbarium, Niche 8446, Glendale. Choreographer, longtime companion of motion picture director Dorothy Arzner.
• George Nader (1921-2002), Mark Miller, with friend Rock Hudson (1925-1985), Cenotaph, Cathedral City. Nader inherited the interest from Rock Hudson’s estate after Hudson’s death from AIDS complications in 1985. Nader lived in Hudson’s LA home until his own death. This is a memorial, George Nader’s ashes were actually scattered at sea.
• Alla Nazimova (1879-1945), actress,Whispering Pines, lot 1689, Glendale.
• Orry-Kelly (1897-1964), prominent Australian-American Hollywood costume designer. 3 times Oscar Winner. His partner was Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was acknowledged also by Kelly's mother. When Orry-Kelly died, his pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and Jack Warner read his eulogy.
• Charles Pierce (1926–1999), Columbarium of Providence, niche 64953, Hollywood Hills. He was one of the XX century's foremost female impersonators, particularly noted for his impersonation of Bette Davis. He performed at many clubs in New York, including The Village Gate, Ted Hook's OnStage, The Ballroom, and Freddy's Supper Club. His numerous San Francisco venues included the Gilded Cage, Cabaret/After Dark, Gold Street, Bimbo's 365 Club, Olympus, The Plush Room, the Venetian Room at the Fairmont Hotel, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, and the War Memorial Opera House. He died in North Hollywood, California, aged 72, and was cremated. His memorial service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park was carefully planned and scripted by Pierce before his death.
• George Quaintance (1902-1957), Eventide Section - Lot 2116 - Space 1, Glendale. American artist famous for his "idealized, strongly homoerotic" depictions of men in physique magazines. In 1938, he returned home with his companion Victor Garcia, described as Quaintance's "model, life partner, and business associate". In the early 1950s, Quaintance and Garcia moved to Rancho Siesta, which became the home of Studio Quaintance, a business venture based around Quaintance's artworks.
• Robert J. Sandoval (1950–2006), Glendale. Sandoval was a judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Sandoval and his long-time partner, Bill Martin, adopted a son in 1992, making them one of the first gay male couples in Los Angeles County to adopt a child. The couple named their son Harrison Martin-Sandoval, combining their last names to symbolize their familial unity. Sandoval died in 2006. He is survived by his partner of 24 years, Bill Martin, and his son, Harrison Martin-Sandoval. After his death, his alma mater McGeorge School of Law honored his contributions by placing him on the Wall of Honor.
• Emery Shaver (1903-1964) and Tom Lyle (1896-1976), Sanctuary, Glendale. Tom Lyle was the founder of Maybelline.
• Ethel Waters (1896-1977), Ascension Garden, Glendale. African-American blues, jazz and gospel vocalist and actress. In 1962. Ethel Waters had a lesbian relationship with dancer Ethel Williams that led to them being nicknamed “The Two Ethels.”
• Paul Winfield (1941–2004) was an American television, film and stage actor. He was known for his portrayal of a Louisiana sharecropper who struggles to support his family during the Great Depression in the landmark film “Sounder,” which earned him an Academy Award nomination. He portrayed Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 1978 television miniseries “King,” for which he was nominated for an Emmy Award. Winfield was also known to science fiction fans for his roles in “The Terminator,” “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” and “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” Winfield was gay, but remained discreet about it in the public eye. His partner of 30 years, architect Charles Gillan, Jr., died on March 5, 2002, of bone cancer. Winfield died of a heart attack in 2004 at age 62, at Queen of Angels – Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles. Winfield and Gillan are interred together.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Marsden Hartley was an American Modernist painter, poet, and essayist.
Born: January 4, 1877, Lewiston, Maine, United States
Died: September 2, 1943, Ellsworth, Maine, United States
Period: American modernism
Education: National Academy Museum and School
Parsons School of Design
Cleveland Institute of Art
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts, US & Canada
Buried: over the Androscoggin River, Maine (ashes)

Marsden Hartley (1877-1943) returned to Maine in 1937, after declaring that he wanted to become "the painter of Maine" and depict American life at a local level. This aligned Hartley with the Regionalism movement, a group of artists active from the early- to-mid XX century that attempted to represent a distinctly "American art." He continued to paint in Maine, primarily scenes around Lovell and the Corea coast, until his death in Ellsworth in 1943. His ashes were scattered on the Androscoggin River.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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