Jan. 5th, 2017

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Anne-Louis Girodet was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings.
Born: January 5, 1767, Montargis, France
Died: December 9, 1824, Paris, France
Period: Romanticism
Known for: Painting
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France

Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.
Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on May 21, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”
Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942), buried together.
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) was a French actress.
• Oscar Wilde’s tomb in Père Lachaise was designed by sculptor Sir Jacob Epstein, at the request of Robert Ross (1869-1918), who also asked for a small compartment to be made for his own ashes. Ross's ashes were transferred to the tomb in 1950.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. They are buried together.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. The modernist angel depicted as a relief on the tomb was originally complete with male genitals. They were broken off as obscene and kept as a paperweight by a succession of Père Lachaise Cemetery keepers. Their current whereabouts are unknown. In the summer of 2000, intermedia artist Leon Johnson performed a 40 minute ceremony entitled Re-membering Wilde in which a commissioned silver prosthesis was installed to replace the vandalised genitals.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Annie Adams Fields was an American writer.
Born: June 6, 1834, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Died: January 5, 1915
Lived: 148 Charles Street, Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (42.35779, -71.06874)
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA

Sarah Orne Jewett was an American novelist and short story writer, best known for her local color works set along or near the southern seacoast of Maine. She never married but established a close friendship with writer Annie Adams Fields and her husband, publisher James Thomas Fields, editor of the Atlantic Monthly. After the sudden death of Fields in 1881, Jewett and Annie Fields lived together for the rest of Jewett's life in what was then termed a "Boston marriage.“ Some modern scholars have speculated that the two were lovers. "The two women found friendship, humor, and literary encouragement" in one another's company, traveling to Europe together and hosting "American and European literati." On September 3, 1902, Jewett was injured in a carriage accident that all but ended her writing career. She was paralyzed by a stroke in March 1909, and she died on June 24 after suffering another. The Georgian home of the Jewett family, built in 1774 overlooking Central Square at South Berwick, is now a National Historic Landmark and Historic New England museum called the Sarah Orne Jewett House.
Together from 1881 to 1909: 28 years.
Annie Adams Fields (June 6, 1834 – January 5, 1915)
Sarah Orne Jewett (September 3, 1849 – June 24, 1909)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Beacon Hill is a historic neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the population of Boston’s Beacon Hill neighborhood is 9,023.
Address: Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (42.35779, -71.06874)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Beacon Hill Historic District (Bounded by Beacon St., the Charles River Embankment, and Pinckney, Revere, and Hancock Sts.), 66000130, 1966
Place
The window on the top 92 Mount Vernon Street marked the studio for two decades of sculptor Anne Whitney, who was part of a group of American women sculptors gathering around actress Charlotte Cushman in Rome in the mid-XIX century. In 1878, Addy Manning and Anne were living and working in their new studio in Boston. In 1888, Anne purchased 225 acres in Shelbourne (476 North Rd, Shelburne, NH 03581), and Adeline and her spent theirs summer on the farm. Although the home of Annie Adams Fields and her husband, publisher James T. Fields, at 148 Charles Street, does not survive, it was the site of their important literary salon. Prescott Townsend was a significant figure in local GLBT civil rights history. Toward the end of his life, his two remaining properties on the Hill were on its North Slope, traditionally the side where servants of patrician South Slope residents lived. He accommodated a motley collection of tenants, mostly young gay men, in an eight-unit building at 75 Phillips Street; Prescott himself inhabited an old brick townhouse at the end of Lindall Place, a cul-de-sac that terminated just behind the Philips Street apartments. A subterranean corridor lined with cubicles connected the basements of the two buildings. The tunnel was said to have housed runaway slaves in transit on the Underground Railway prior to the Civil War. The Drawing-Room at 148 Charles Street with Miss Jewett and Mrs. Fields, from a photograph lent by Mr. M. A. DeW. Howe, in Sarah Orne Jewett, by Francis Otto Matthiessen, 1929
Life
Who: Anne Whitney (September 2, 1821 – January 23, 1915), Annie Adams Fields (June 6, 1834 – January 5, 1915) and Prescott Townsend (June 24, 1894 – May 23, 1973)
Anne Whitney had a “Boston marriage” with her longtime partner Adeline “Addy” Manning (1836-1906.) During the late Victorian era, such marriages between women, generally professional and upper class, were both common and accepted by society at large. After the death of James T. Fields in 1881, his wife Annie Fields continued to support the work of many women writers, including Sarah Orne Jewett (1849-1909), who spent winters with her, poet Louise Imogen Guiney (1861-1920), and Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-96.) Fields was also active in charitable works. She spent many hours at the Charity House on Chardon Street and cofounded the Cooperative Society of Visitors, a case review agency that made recommendations to the central administration of Boston’s relief organizations for aid disbursement. The Society was absorbed into the Associated Charities of Boston. Fields’s book “How to Help the Poor” (1884) served as an unofficial guide to the programs and policies of Associated Charities. Prescott Townsend was an American cultural leader and gay rights activist, from the 1930s through the early 1970s. He was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, the fourth child (third son) of Kate Wendell and Edward Britton Townsend; his mother was both a descendant of Myles Standish and other Mayflower passengers, and the great-granddaughter of the American founding father Roger Sherman. He attended the Volkman School, graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year. He spent the summer of 1914 in logging camps in Montana and Idaho, and traveled to North Africa and the Soviet Union. He returned to Boston's Beacon Hill neighborhood, where he began a relationship with theater producer Elliot Paul, with whom he founded the experimental Barn Theatre in 1922. Paul introduced Townsend to numerous avant-garde creatives, including openly-gay writer André Gide. Townsend operated speakeasies, restaurants, and theaters, cultivating a bohemian neighborhood on Beacon Hill's Joy Street. He pioneered the popularity of A-frame houses, building several in Provincetown. He was later a founder of the Provincetown Playhouse, where the works of Eugene O'Neill were first performed. In the 1930s, Townsend repeatedly addressed the Massachusetts legislature as an acknowledged homosexual man advocating for the repeal of sodomy legislation, urging the lawmakers "to legalize love." He was indulged due to his Boston Brahmin status, but ignored. While working at the Fall River shipyard during WWII, Townsend was arrested on Jan. 29, 1943 for participating in an "unnatural and lascivious act". The Mid-Town Journal headline reported, "Beacon Hill 'Twilight' Man Member of Queer Love Cult Seduced Young Man". He didn't deny it, and was sentenced to eighteen months in the Massachusetts House of Corrections on Deer Island. No one in his influential family applied any pressure to shorten his jail time. A month later he was officially stricken from both the New York and Boston Social Registers. Townsend had, for years, been suffering from failing health brought on by Parkinson's Disease, and on May 23, 1973 his body was found in the Beacon Hill apartment of John Murray who had been caring for him during the final years of his life. The police reported that "when we came in to take charge of the body, Mr. Townsend was found in a kneeling prayer position at his bedside." Of his entire family, only one sister, a nephew and a great-nephew attended his memorial service at the Arlington Street Church.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston.
Address: 580 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37479, -71.14449)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +1 617-547-7105
National Register of Historic Places: 75000254, 1975. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, Mount Auburn Cemetery marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery,” derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. It is Watertown’s largest contiguous open space and extends into Cambridge to the east, adjacent to the Cambridge City Cemetery and Sand Banks Cemetery.
Notable queer burials are at Mount Auburn Cemetery:
• Roger Brown (1925–1997), professor at Harvard University from 1952 until 1957 and from 1962 until 1994, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1957 until 1962. During his time at the University of Michigan, he met Albert Gilman (died 1989), later a Shakespeare scholar and a professor of English at Boston University. Gilman and Brown were partners for over 40 years until Gilman's death from lung cancer in 1989. Brown's sexual orientation and his relationship with Gilman were known to a few of his closest friends, and he served on the editorial board of The Journal of Homosexuality from 1985, but he did not come out publicly until 1989. Brown chronicled his personal life with Gilman and after Gilman's death in his memoir. Brown died in 1997, and is buried next to Gilman.
• Katharine Ellis Coman (1857-1915), author on economic subjects who lived with Katharine Lee Bates (Author of "America the Beautiful"), and died at her home, was cremated at Mount Auburn Cemetery but was buried with her parents at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
• Abby Adeline Manning (1836-1906), painter, and her partner, Anne Whitney (1821-1915), poet and sculptor, together.
• Amy Lowell (1874–1925), poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
• Annie Adams Fields (1834–1915), author and hostess; wife of James Thomas Fields, later companion to Sarah Orne Jewett.
• Charlotte Cushman (July 23, 1816 – February 18, 1876), actress, her last partner was lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins, who sculpted Angels of the Water on Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, New York City.
• Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924) was a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. She founded the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.
• Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908), sculptor. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton (died 1864). Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie. Hosmer was good friend with Charlotte Cushman and Matilda Hays, Cushman’s partner, left Charlotte for her.
• Alice James (1848-1892) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American diarist. The only daughter of Henry James, Sr. and sister of psychologist and philosopher William James and novelist Henry James, she is known mainly for the posthumously published diary that she kept in her final years. Her companion was Katherine Peabody Loring and from their relationship it was conied the term “Boston Marriage”.
• Henry James (1843-1916) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of XIX century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
• Stewart Mitchell (November 25, 1892–November 3, 1957) was an American poet, editor, and professor of English literature. Along with Gilbert Seldes, Mitchell’s editorship of The Dial magazine signaled a pivotal shift in content from political articles to aesthetics in art and literature. In 1929 he became the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Richard Cowan (1909-October 24, 1939)’s diary, which he started while he was a student at Cornell, chronicles the life of a young gay man in Boston in the 1930s. Cowan committed suicide at the age of thirty. His forty-seven-year old mentor and long-term lover, Stewart Mitchell, was devastated. Mitchell resigned as president of the Massachusetts Historical Society on account of a “personal misfortune,” and wrote a friend, “There is no running away from a broken heart.” According to the Boston Herald Nov. 9, 1957: “Mitchell directed that the urn containing his mortal remains be buried, “but not in winter,” in the lot “where my dear friends Georgine Holmes Thomas and Richard David Cowan now repose”.”
• Francis Williams Sargent (1848 - 1920) and Jane Welles Hunnewell Sargent (1851 - 1936), Margarett Williams Sargent’s parents. Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) was born into the privileged world of old Boston money; she was a distant relative of John Singer Sargent.
• Henry Davis Sleeper (1878-1934), a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator, who had a long lasting friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, an economist, an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, the founder and director of the American Ambulance Field Service during WWI, and a United States Representative from Massachusetts.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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George Washington Carver, was an American botanist and inventor. The exact day and year of his birth are unknown; he was born into slavery in Missouri, either in 1861, or January 1864.
Born: Diamond, Missouri, United States
Died: January 5, 1943, Tuskegee, Alabama, United States
Education: Iowa State University
Simpson College
Minneapolis High School
Books: The Pickling and Curing of Meat in Hot Weather
Siblings: James Carver

George Washington Carver (1860–1943), was an American botanist and inventor. He was born into slavery in Missouri. Carver's reputation is largely based on publicity regarding his promotion of alternative crops to cotton, such as peanuts and sweet potatoes. In 1941, Time magazine dubbed Carver a "Black Leonardo." Carver never married. At age forty, he began a courtship with Sarah L. Hunt, an elementary school teacher and the sister-in-law of Warren Logan, Treasurer of Tuskegee Institute. This lasted three years until she took a teaching job in California. In her 2015 biography, Christina Vella reviews Carver’s relationships and suggests that Carver was bisexual and constrained by mores of his historic period. When he was seventy, Carver established a friendship and research partnership with the scientist Austin W. Curtis, Jr. This young black man, a graduate of Cornell University, had some teaching experience before coming to Tuskegee. Carver bequeathed to Curtis his royalties from an authorized 1943 biography by Rackham Holt. After Carver died in 1943, Curtis was fired from Tuskegee Institute. He left Alabama and resettled in Detroit. There he manufactured and sold peanut-based personal care products. Carver died January 5, 1943, at the age of 78 from complications resulting from a fall. He was buried next to Booker T. Washington at Tuskegee University (Tuskegee, AL 36088).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Joe Cino was an Italian-American theatrical producer and café-owner. The beginning of the Off-Off-Broadway theatre movement is generally credited to have begun at Cino’s Caffe Cino. The first performances at Caffe Cino were done on the café floor. Eventually, Cino constructed a makeshift 8’ x 8’ stage from milk cartons and carpet remnants, which was used for some productions. The limited space dictated a need for small casts and for minimal sets, usually built from scraps Cino found in the streets. Cino relied heavily on lighting designer John P. Dodd, who lit the stage using electricity stolen from the city grid by Joe Cino’s lover, electrician Jon Torrey. Cino eventually became addicted to amphetamines as he struggled to keep up the pace that Caffé Cino demanded from him. On January 5, 1967, Jon Torrey was electrocuted and died in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. Though his death was ruled accidental, skeptical insiders claimed that he committed suicide. The event sent Cino into a depressive spiral. On March 30, 1967, Cino hacked his arms and stomach with a kitchen knife. On April 2, Jon Torrey’s birthday, Joe Cino died. Though friends tried to keep Caffe Cino open, it closed in 1968.
Together from (around) 1960 to 1967: 7 years.
Jonathan Torrey (died January 5, 1967)
Joseph “Joe” Cino (November 16, 1931 – April 2, 1967)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Kay Lahusen, also known as Kay Tobin Lahusen or Kay Tobin, is the first openly gay American woman photojournalist.
Born: January 5, 1930 (age 86), Cincinnati, Ohio, United States
Books: The gay crusaders
Lived: 651 Duncan St, San Francisco
Buried alongside: Barbara Gittings

Barbara Gittings and Kay Tobin, two of the original "gay pioneers,” met in 1961 at a picnic in Rhode Island. "We hit it off, we started courting. I flew to Boston to visit her and got off the plane with a big bunch of flowers in my hand. I couldn't resist. I did not care what the world thought. I dropped the flowers, grabbed her and kissed her." Gittings organized the New York chapter of the Daughters of Bilitis (DOB), edited the national DOB magazine The Ladder, and worked closely with Frank Kameny on the first picket lines that brought attention to the ban on employment of gay people by the US government. Gittings was most involved in the American Library Association to promote positive literature about homosexuality in libraries. She was a part of the movement to get the American Psychiatric Association to drop homosexuality as a mental illness. Kay Lahusen is considered the first openly gay photojournalist of the gay rights movement. Lahusen's photographs appeared on several of the covers of The Ladder while her partner was the editor. She helped with the founding of the original Gay Activists Alliance (GAA), contributed to a New York-based weekly newspaper named Gay Newsweekly, and co-authored The Gay Crusaders with Randy Wicker.
Together from 1961 to 2007: 46 years.
Barbara Gittings (July 31, 1932 – February 18, 2007)
Kay Tobin Lahusen (born January 5, 1930)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon founded the Daughters of Bilitis in 1955. They were also activists for LGBTQ rights. 651 Duncan St, San Francisco, is given as the mailing address of the Lesbian Mothers Union in a list of community resources in a 1972 edition of "Motive." Lyon and Martin were the first couple married in California after the marriage ban was overturned. Del and Phyllis lived together in the house from the 1950s until Del passed away in 2008. Phyllis still lives in the house. Built in c. 1908, the house appears to be largely unchanged since the c. 1950s when the couple bought it.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The Congressional Cemetery or Washington Parish Burial Ground is a historic and active cemetery located at 1801 E Street, SE, in Washington, D.C., on the west bank of the Anacostia River.
Address: 1801 E St SE, Washington, DC 20003, USA (38.88128, -76.98056)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 202-543-0539
National Register of Historic Places: 69000292, 1969. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
It is the only American "cemetery of national memory" founded before the Civil War. Over 65,000 individuals are buried or memorialized at the cemetery, including many who helped form the nation and the city of Washington in the early XIX century. Though the cemetery is privately owned, the U.S. government owns 806 burial plots administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Congress, located about a mile and a half (2.4 km) to the northwest, has greatly influenced the history of the cemetery. The cemetery still sells plots, and is an active burial ground. From the Washington Metro, the cemetery lies three blocks east of the Potomac Avenue station and two blocks south of the Stadium-Armory station. Many members of the U.S. Congress who died while Congress was in session are interred at Congressional Cemetery. Other burials include early landowners and speculators, the builders and architects of early Washington, Native American diplomats, Washington mayors, and Civil War veterans. XIX century Washington, D.C. families unaffiliated with the federal government also have graves and tombs at the cemetery. In all, there are one Vice President, one Supreme Court justice, six Cabinet members, 19 Senators and 71 Representatives (including a former Speaker of the House) buried there, as well as veterans of every American war, and the first director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, J. Edgar Hoover. Peter Doyle, (June 3, 1843-April 19, 1907), a veteran of the Confederate Army, and the greatest love of poet Walt Whitman is buried here. They met in Washington, D.C. on the horse-drawn streetcar for which Doyle was the conductor who later recalled, “We were familiar at once – I put my hand on his knee – we understood. He did not get out at the end of the trip – in fact went all the way back with me.” Whitman wrote in one letter to him, “I will imagine you with my arm around my neck saying Good night, Walt - & me – Good night, Pete.”
Notable queer burials at Congressional Cemetery:
• Everett Lysle Boyer (1927-1998) & Forrest Leroy Snakenberg (1932-1986). Boyer's tombstone reads: Arise up my love, Tis the time of singing birds (Song of Solomon 2:12), Snakenberg's, same style of that of Everett, reads: So be truely glad there is wonderful joy ahead (Peter 1:6)
• Kenneth Dresser (1938-1995) and Charles Fowler (1931-1995) are buried together. Dresser designed the Electric Light Parade at Disneyland, the Electric Water Pageant at Epcot, and the Fantasy of Lights at Callaway Gardens, Georgia. Fowler was an arts educator and writer, director of National Cultural Resources, Inc, and a guest professor at several American universities.
• James Richard Duell (1947-1992) and Larry Martin Worrell (1954-1989). The tombstone reads: "Two most excellent adventures"
• John Frey (1929-1997) and Peter Morris (1929-2010), together 43 years, met while at college together. Frey was a Fulbright Scholar, professor of Romance Languages at George Washington University, and author of books on Victor Hugo and Emile Zola. Morris was an expert French cook, and on the Board of Directors of the gay Catholic organization Dignity for whom he coauthored a community cookbook.
• Barbara Gittings (1932-2007) helped convince the American Psychiatric Association to declassify homosexuality as a mental illness. She founded the New York chapter of the lesbian rights organization the Daughter of Bilitis. The tombstone reads: Gay Pioneers who spoke truth to power: Gay is good. Partners in life, Married in our hearts.
• Dan Hering (1925-2012) was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and served 20 years in the U.S. Army. He and his partner Joel were members of one of the earliest gay right groups, the Society for Individual Rights (SIR) formed in 1964. They were founding members of the earliest known gay boat club, San Francisco’s Barbary Coast Boating Club. Dan was also a member of Service Academy Gay & Lesbian Alumni (SAGLA) and Knights Out, the association of gay West Point graduates. His partner Joel Leenaars (born 1935) lives at 1533 Weybridge Cir, Naples, FL.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) was a WWII veteran and the father of the modern gay rights movement.
• T. Sgt. Leonard Matlovich (1943-1988), was a gay civil rights and AIDS activist, his tombstone reads: "When I was in the military they gave me a medal for killing two men and a discharge for loving one."
• William Boyce Mueller (1942–1993) was the gay grandson of the founder of the Boy Scout of America. Mueller helped create the first organization to lobby today’s Scout oligarchs to end their ban on gay Scouts and Scout leaders, Forgotten Scouts.
• Frank Warren O’Reilly (1922-2001) was a WWII veteran with a Ph.D. in International Relations, and a music critic for The Washington Times, and founder of Miami’s Charles Ives Centennial Festival and the American Chopin Foundation which sponsors an annual national Chopin competition.
• Emanuel “Butch” Zeigler (1951-2009) was a onetime elementary school teacher, and co-owner of Capital Promoting Service whose clients include Heads of State and major corporations.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lincoln Edward Kirstein was an American writer, impresario, art connoisseur, philanthropist, and cultural figure in New York City, noted especially as co-founder of the New York City Ballet.
Born: May 4, 1907, Rochester, New York, United States
Died: January 5, 1996, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Spouse: Fidelma Cadmus (m. 1941–1991)
Parents: Rose Stein
Movies: Glory
Lived: 128 East 19th Street
Carrington House, Lewis Walk (at eastern terminus of Ocean Walk, Fire Island Pines, NY
Studied: Harvard University

Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) was an American writer, impresario, art connoisseur, philanthropist, and cultural figure in New York City, noted especially as co-founder of the New York City Ballet. Kirstein's eclectic interests, ambition and keen interest in high culture, funded by independent means, drew a large circle of creative friends from many fields of the arts. These included: Glenway Wescott, Monroe Wheeler, George Platt Lynes, Jared French, Bernard Perlin, Pavel Tchelitchev, Katherine Anne Porter, Barbara Harrison, Gertrude Stein, Jensen Yow, Jonathan Tichenor, Donald Windham, Cecil Beaton, Jean Cocteau, W. H. Auden, George Tooker, Margaret French Cresson, Walker Evans, Sergei Eisenstein and others. In 1941 he married Fidelma Cadmus, a painter and the sister of the artist Paul Cadmus. Some of his boyfriends lived with them in their 128 East 19th Street house; "Fidelma was enormously fond of most of them." An unidentified designer put some trim Art Moderne ironwork up on the house, probably after Kirstein bought it in 1953.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Carrington House (Lewis Walk, at eastern terminus of Ocean Walk, Fire Island Pines, NY; National Register of Historic Places: 13001057, 2014) is one of the earliest extant residential properties in the resort communities of Cherry Grove and the Pines and among the earliest known vacation homes on Fire Island, a 32-mile-long barrier island known primarily as a summer resort. Built ca. 1912 as a summer home by Frederick Marquet, the cottage is associated with the earliest wave of development of Fire Island as a popular recreational destination. The cottage is a distinctive, intact example of a typical early XX-century beach bungalow, characterized by a single-story side-gable form, front porch, and wood shingle cladding. The property is an important link to the development of Fire Island (particularly the Fire Island Pines and Cherry Grove) as a community friendly to both gay culture and the arts because of its association with Frank Carrington, a prominent theater director and patron of the arts with a large circle of acquaintances whom he introduced to Fire Island. Carrington acquired the property in 1927 and in the 1930s or 1940s was responsible for enlarging the main house with two wood-frame additions that closely matched the original design. In 1947 he purchased two outbuildings from the abandoned Lone Hill Lifesaving Station and combined and reconfigured them as a guesthouse. In 1950, he also constructed a garage, said to be the only one constructed historically in Cherry Grove or the Pines since cars have never been in general us in this part of Fire Island. In addition to Carrington, the property has been linked to several other prominent artists who rented the property from Carrington, including Truman Capote, who wrote his famous novella “Breakfast at Tiffany's” there. In 1969 Carrington deeded the house to the National Park Service.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Stephen Decatur, Jr. was a United States naval officer and commodore notable for his naval victories in the early 19th century.
Born: January 5, 1779, Sinepuxent, Maryland, United States
Died: March 22, 1820, Washington, D.C., United States
Buried: Saint Peter's Episcopal Churchyard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA
Award: Congressional Gold Medal
Battles and wars: Quasi-War, Second Battle of Tripoli Harbor, more
Books: CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN THE LAT
Lived: Decatur House, 748 Jackson Pl., NW., Washington, DC 20006-4907, USA (38.89994, -77.03845)
Studied: Episcopal Academy
University of Pennsylvania

Stephen Decatur was one of America’s first naval heroes. As a commander, he endured the loss of his closest friend and companion, Richard Somers. Battling the Barbary Pirates in 1804, Somers volunteered to blow up the pirates’ coastal stronghold. Instead, it was Somers and his crew that went up in smoke, while Decatur watched helplessly from the deck of his own vessel. Prior to the fatal mission, Somers had given Decatur a gold ring, which the aggrieved seaman wore for the rest of his life. At the direction of his father, Decatur attended the Protestant Episcopal Academy, at the time an all-boys school that specialized in Latin, mathematics and religion; however, Decatur had not applied himself adequately, and barely graduated from the academy. He then enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania in 1795 for one year where he better applied himself and focused on his studies. At the university, Decatur met and became friends with Charles Stewart and Richard Somers, who would later become naval officers themselves.
They met in 1795 and remained friends until Somers’ death in 1804: 9 years
Richard Somers (1778 or 1779 – September 4, 1804)
Stephen Decatur, Jr. (January 5, 1779 – March 22, 1820)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Decatur House is a historic home in Washington, D.C., named after its first owner and occupant Stephen Decatur.
Address: 748 Jackson Pl., NW., Washington, DC 20006-4907, USA (38.89994, -77.03845)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 6.00-21.00, Saturday 8.00-19.00, Sunday 9.00-21.00
Phone: +1 202-842-0917
National Register of Historic Places: 66000858, 1966. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built in 1818, Design by Benjamin Henry Latrobe (1764-1820)
Decatur House is one of the oldest surviving homes in Washington, D.C., and one of only three remaining houses in the country designed by neoclassical architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. Completed for naval hero Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan, the Federal Style house is located northwest of Lafayette Square, at the southwest corner of Jackson Place and H Street, near the White House. A museum, it now serves as the National Center for White House History, of the White House Historical Association. It was successively home to Henry Clay, Martin Van Buren, Edward Livingston, who collectively made Decatur House the unofficial residence of the Secretary of State from 1827 to 1833, each renting the house while they served in that post. In 1836 John Gadsby and his wife Providence moved into the house and brought their house slaves. They built a two-story structure at the back which became the slave quarters for those workers, who previously lived in the main house. This structure remains as one of the few examples of slave quarters in urban areas. It is physical evidence of African Americans’ having been held "in bondage in sight of the White House." Following John Gadsby’s death, the home was again rented to a series of prominent tenants. In order, these tenants were Vice President George M. Dallas, publisher and former Mayor of Washington Joseph Gales, Congressmen and brothers John A. King and James G. King, Rep. William Appleton, Speaker of the House James Lawrence Orr and Sen. Judah Benjamin. During the Civil War it was used as Army offices and then it sat empty for 6 years. Decatur House was purchased in 1872 by Edward Fitzgerald Beale, a frontiersman and explorer who later became a rancher and diplomat. Beale’s daughter-in-law, Marie, bequeathed Decatur House to the National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1956. Decatur House, now a museum, is located at 748 Jackson Place, N.W., on President’s Park (Lafayette Park.) The lower floor is kept in the style of the early XIX century while the upper floor shows more modern renovations of the early XX century. Because of the centrality of its location, the status of its residents, and the fact that urban slaves worked there across from the White House, the house now contains more material interpreting African American history. Among the compelling stories is that of Charlotte Dupuy, who in 1829 sued her master Henry Clay, then Secretary of State, for her freedom and that of her two children. While she lost her court case, Clay finally freed Dupuy and her daughter in 1840, and her son in 1844. A special exhibit on African American history through 1965 has recently been added to the museum and its website.
Life
Who: Stephen Decatur, Jr. (January 5, 1779 – March 22, 1820)
Stephen Decatur was one of America’s first navel heroes. He endured the loss of his closest friend and companion, Richard Somers (ca. 1778-1804, killed during a daring assault on Tripoli), whom he met at college in 1795; prior to a fatal mission, Somers had given Decatur a gold ring, which Decatur wore for the rest of his life.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Society Hill (313 Pine St, Philadelphia, PA 19106) is buried Stephen Decatur, Jr (1779-1820), United States naval officer and commodore notable for his many naval victories in the early XIX century.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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