Jan. 8th, 2017

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Cecchino Bracci was a pupil of Michelangelo. He died at the age of sixteen and is buried in Santa Maria in Aracoeli, in a tomb designed by Michelangelo.
Born: 1527, Florence
Died: January 8, 1544, Rome
Buried: Chiesa di Santa Maria di Aracoeli, Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy

Cecchino dei Bracci, a student of Michelangelo, died at age 16. His uncle, Luigi del Riccio, distraught at the death of the youth, prevailed on Michelangelo to write 40 verses as a tribute. He also designed the sepulture. He is buried inside the Chiesa di Santa Maria di Aracoeli (Scala dell'Arce Capitolina, 00186 Roma).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Edward Perry Warren, known as Ned Warren, was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum.
Born: January 8, 1860, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
Died: December 28, 1928, London, United Kingdom
Education: Harvard University
Books: A Defence of Uranian Love, A Defense of Uranian Love, more
People also search for: Osbert Burdett, Edgar Henry Goddard, Michael Matthew Kaylor
Lived: Lewes House, 23 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU, UK (50.87371, 0.01296)
Buried: English Cemetery, Bagni di Lucca, Provincia di Lucca, Toscana, Italy
Buried alongside: John Marshall

Ned Warren was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum, which he did not attempt to sell during his lifetime because of its explicit depiction of homoerotic scenes. At Oxford, he met John Marshall, whom he called "Puppy." Ned and John lived together at Lewes House in East Sussex, for a time with John’s wife, Mary. On February 15, 1928, John retired for the evening, saying that he was not feeling well. Ned gave him a kiss and joined him in bed, but John died during the night. Marshall's took his last breath while Ned sat at his bedside. Servants reported that Ned's final words to the dying man were, “Goodbye, Puppy." Warren died less than one year later. Mary, John and Ned were buried in the non-Catholic cemetery in Bagni di Lucca, Italy, a town known as a spa in Etruscan and Roman times; that was John and Ned’s expressed desire, including having Mary near them. The same cemetery is the final resting place of Evangeline Whipple and Rose Cleveland.
Together from 1885 to 1928: 43 years.
Edward Perry "Ned" Warren (January 8, 1860 – December 28, 1928)
John Marshall (1862 - February 15, 1928)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The principal rooms, known to Ned Warren as the Business Room, the Red Drawing Room, the Hepplewhite Bedroom and the Dining Room, remain as originally constructed and require only the return of some of their former furnishings to recreate the grace and elegance of a typical XVIII Century country gentleman’s retreat.
Address: 23 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU, UK (50.87371, 0.01296)
Type: Administrative Building (open to public)
Phone: +44 01273 471600
English Heritage Building ID: 293121 (Grade II, 1952)
Place
Ned Warren and John Marshall lived together at Lewes House, a large residence in Lewes, East Sussex, where they became the center of a circle of like-minded men interested in art and antiquities who ate together in a dining room overlooked by Lucas Cranach’s “Adam and Eve,” now in the Courtauld Institute of Art. One account said that "Warren’s attempts to produce a supposedly Greek and virile way of living into his Sussex home" produced "a comic mixture of apparently monastic severity (no tea or soft chairs allowed) and lavish living." The early Georgian features of Lewes House probably date from 1733. The earlier two-storey part of the present house was probably built, or remodelled, around the late mediaeval core, either by John Tabor, a “Doctor of Physick” or his son-in-law, William Kempe. At the close of the XVIII Century, the property was in the ownership of Henry Humphrey. It was during his occupation that the building was sketched in 1783 by James Lambert. A copy of the drawing hangs in Lewes House and shows the house at that time to be of its original two storeys with a gabled roof and entrance porch with living accommodation over, supported by Ionic columns. A garden occupied the site of the front and western parts of the present house. It was enclosed by a high flint wall and entered by an imposing gateway on its High Street frontage. By 1812 the property had passed to Humphrey’s nephew, Henry Jackson, who was responsible for the addition of the west wing, rebuilding the front of the house and extending the property northwards to the High Street. Jackson’s new structure was of three storeys and incorporated the more fashionable high ceilings in the newly-created rooms. The work also included the construction of the present Doric porch and the flight of stone steps to pavement level, bringing the house to the appearance which it has today. By 1836 Lewes House was in the ownership of Edward Shewell, who died in 1838. Edward fathered no fewer than 20 children by two wives, the second of whom, having borne him six of those children, outlived her husband by 45 years. She died in the house on Mar. 22, 1883 aged 80 years. The property then descended to Edward’s grandsons of his first marriage, Edward Louis Shewell and Henry Shewell. E.L. Shewell was drowned at sea on May 5, 1887, during a voyage from Barcelona to Marseilles, in a collision between the two steamships “Asic” and “Ajaccio.” This left the property in the sole ownership of Henry, a Major General in the British Army, who sold the property in August 1887 to his distant aunt, Elizabeth Cooper. By 1890 the occupant was Edward Perry Warren, the third son of Samuel Denis Warren of Massachusetts who founded the Cumberland Paper Mills at Maine. He furnished the house with fine examples of antique furniture. Oriental carpets and rugs. He hung the walls with tapestries and primitive paintings, filled the bookcases with rare books and displayed his vast collection of vases, bronzes, ivories and other priceless antiquities throughout the house. In 1928 Warren had made a gift of this house (and also School Hill House, an adjoining Georgian property) to the man who began his association with Warren as Private Secretary but who was to become one of Warren’s most trusted and highly valued business associates and friend, H. Asa Thomas Esq. On April 1, 1974, following the reorganisation of local government, the house came into the ownership of the present occupant and custodian, Lewes District Council, whose principal offices are located here. The house itself is virtually unaltered except for the conversion of the domestic quarters into offices and storage accommodation.
Life
Who: Edward Perry “Ned” Warren (January 8, 1860 – December 28, 1928) and John Marshall (1862–1928)
Edward Perry Warren was born in 1860, educated at Harvard (Class of 1883) and later entered Oxford to read Classics where he gained his MA degree. From an early age Warren’s interest was antiquities – particularly Grecian – and, like his father and mother, he became a great collector of pictures, fine arts and china. Edward had little interest in the family business and, following his father’s death in 1888 (at which time he was in England) he was happy to leave those affairs in the hands of a trust so that he was free to follow his own pursuits of travel and collecting on his recently acquired income of £10,000 a year. Warren did not enjoy good health and was plagued with eye problems which necessitated early withdrawal from his studies at Oxford. However, he found the lifestyle at Lewes House very much to his liking and, as his health improved, he began the serious collection of fine arts, not only for his own satisfaction, but also, for a time, on behalf of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in America. His extensive circle of friends reflected his interest in the arts and he entertained regularly. Large parties were common and included numerous members of the Bloomsbury Group, one of whom, the artist Roger Fry, painted a water colour of the house and garden in 1910 which was presented to the Council and is now on display in the house. Warren, his lifelong friend and resident assistant John Marshall, the constant stream of visitors, whose lifestyles were quite alien to the average Lewesian, the Arab horses and the six St. Bernard dogs gave the house a reputation of eccentricity and few local people, except for his household staff, ever saw it from the inside.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Bagni di Lucca (formerly Bagno a Corsena) is a comune of Tuscany, Italy, in the Province of Lucca with a population of about 6,500. Bagni di Lucca with its thermal baths reached its greatest fame during the XIX century, especially during the French occupation.
Address: Cimitero Inglese, Via Letizia, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00566, 10.58808)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Address: Via Bagno alla Villa, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00971, 10.5879)
Type: Private Property
Address: Villa San Francesco, Via S. Francesco, 6, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00832, 10.58725)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +39 333 765 8629
Place
The town became the summer residence of the court of Napoleon and his sister, Elisa Baciocchi. A casino was built, where gambling was part of social nightlife, as well as a large hall for dances. At the Congress of Vienna (1814), the Duchy of Lucca was assigned to Maria-Louisa of Bourbon as ruler of Parma. It continued as a popular summer resort, particularly for the English, who built a Protestant church there. The church now has been converted to the Bagni di Lucca Biblioteca (library) and holds archives and records that date back to centuries ago. In 1847 Lucca with Bagni di Lucca was ceded to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, under the domain of the Grand Duke Leopold II of Lorraine. His rule started a period of decline for the springs and casino as a destination, since he was used to a secluded life. In 1853 the casino was closed. It was reopened after 1861, when Lucca became part of the unified Kingdom of Italy. In the 1940s, during the German invasion of Italy, Bagni di Lucca, along with many other towns located in the Apennines, was occupied, as they were along the Gothic Line. Several houses and mansions in the area were used as residences for German soldiers and some residents born after 1940 in this region have German ancestry. The English cemetery is a sacred place which is located in Bagni di Lucca, about 300 meters from the Church of England, on the other side of the river Lima. In 1842 Carlo Ludovico di Borbone granted to the British colony of Bagni di Lucca the faculty to establish a Protestant cemetery. They chose a place called "al Prato Santo (the Holy Meadow)" and, although the works were finished in 1844, the first burial happened immediately after the purchase. The graveyard was in operation until 1953 and there are 137 people who rest there. In 1982, with the exhaustion of a legacy for maintenance, the holy site was purchased by the town of Bagni di Lucca. The cemetery is currently managed by the Fondazione Michel de Montaigne and Istituto Storico Lucchese and is accessible to visitors every day (except Sunday) from 10.00 to 18.00. Among the people buried here, often in tombs made by famous sculptors such as Benjamin Gibson, Joseph Norfini and Emilio Duccini, are the novelist Ouida, Henry and Elizabeth Stisted and Irish entomologist Alexander Henry Haliday.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Inglese di Bagni di Lucca:
• Rose Elizabeth Cleveland (June 13, 1846 – November 22, 1918), was the First Lady of the United States from 1885 to 1886, during the first of her brother U.S. President Grover Cleveland’s two administrations.
• Nelly Erichsen (1862-1918) was an English illustrator and painter. From 1912 until Nov. 1918, Erichsen was living in the quiet Tuscan spa town of Bagni di Lucca with two companions - Evangeline Whipple and Rose Cleveland. Whipple was the widow of the American Episcopal Bishop Henry Whipple, known for his evangelical work among the native Indian population. Whipple and Cleveland had first met in the winter of 1889–1890, and resumed their relationship in 1901 (after the death of Henry Whipple), moving from the USA to Italy in 1910. In 1918 tragedy struck, when both Rose Cleveland and Nelly Erichsen were carried off by the 1918 flu pandemic which decimated the post-war World. Evangeline Whipple died in London in 1930, but she was laid to rest in Bagni di Lucca next to the tombs of the two friends who had preceded her.
• Ouida (1839-1908) was the pseudonym of the English novelist Maria Louise Ramé (although she preferred to be known as Marie Louise de la Ramée.)
• Edward Perry Warren (1860-1928), known as Ned Warren, was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum. At Oxford Edward Perry Warren met archeologist John Marshall (1862–1928), a younger man he called "Puppy," with whom he formed a close and long-lasting relationship, though Marshall married in 1907. Beginning in 1888, Warren made England his primary home. He and Marshall lived together at Lewes House (with Marshall’s wife, Mary), a large residence in Lewes, East Sussex, where they became the center of a circle of like-minded men interested in art and antiquities who ate together in a dining room overlooked by Lucas Cranach’s “Adam and Eve,” now in the Courtauld Institute of Art. Ned Warren, John Marshall and Mary are all buried together in Bagni di Lucca.
• Evangeline Marrs Whipple (1860-1930), widow for the second time (she first married the wealthy businessman Michael Hodge Simpson and then bishop Henry Benjamin Whipple), visited Bagni di Lucca in 1910, lodging at Hotel Continental and then taking residence at Casa Bernardini at Bagno alla Villa. This is the house she shared with Rose Cleveland and Nelly Ericksen. Rose and Nelly died in 1918. In 1928 Evangeline wrote “A Famous Corner of Tuscany” about Bagni di Lucca. Around this time she bought Casa Burlamacchi, completing restoring the “Casa Piccola” (Little House, now Villa San Francesco), in front of the garden at the back of the “Casa Grande” (Big House.)



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Graham Arthur Chapman was an English comedian, writer, actor, author and one of the six members of the surreal comedy group Monty Python.
Born: January 8, 1941, Stoneygate, Leicester, United Kingdom
Died: October 4, 1989, Maidstone, United Kingdom
Height: 1.88 m
Partner: David Sherlock (1966–1989)
Books: A Liar's Autobiography, The Pythons, more
Lived: 89 Southwood Lane, N6
Studied: University of Cambridge
King Edward VII School, Melton Mowbray
Emmanuel College, Cambridge
Buried: in Wales during a fireworks display on New Years Day, 2000

Graham Chapman (1941–1989) was an English comedian, writer, actor, and one of the six members of the surreal comedy group Monty Python. He played authority figures such as the Colonel and the lead role in two Python films, “Holy Grail” and “Life of Brian.” Chapman was openly homosexual and a strong supporter of gay rights, and was in a relationship with David Sherlock for most of his adult life. Chapman died of tonsil and spinal cancer on October 4, 1989, on the eve of Monty Python's 20th anniversary, and his life and legacy were commemorated at a private memorial service at St Bartholomew's with the other Pythons. Graham Chapman lived with his partner David Sherlock at 89 Southwood Lane, N6, from the late 1960s until his death in 1989. Ten years after Chapman's death, his ashes were first rumoured to have been "blasted into the skies in a rocket" with assistance from the Dangerous Sports Club. In a second rumour, Chapman's ashes had been scattered on Snowdon, North Wales. Since Chapman's death, subsequent gatherings of the Pythons have included an urn said to contain Chapman's ashes. At the 1998 Aspen Comedy Arts festival, the urn was "accidentally" knocked over by Terry Gilliam, spilling the "ashes" on-stage. The apparently cremated remains were then removed with a dust-buster. Idle recalled meeting Sherlock saying "I wish he [Chapman] was here now" and Sherlock replied "Oh, but he is. He's in my pocket!"



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Gypsy Rose Lee was an American burlesque entertainer famous for her striptease act. She was also an actress, author, and playwright whose 1957 memoir was made into the stage musical and film Gypsy.
Born: January 8, 1911, Seattle, Washington, United States
Died: April 26, 1970, Los Angeles, California, United States
Parents: John Hovick, Rose Thompson Hovick
Books: Gypsy: A Memoir, The G-String Murders, Mother finds a body, G-String Murders Counter Display
Siblings: June Havoc
Lived: February House, 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Buried: Inglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Pinecrest Plot, Lot 1087, Grave 8. Across from Utopia Plot

February House was the most fertile and improbable live-in salon of the XX century. Its residents included, among others, Carson McCullers, W. H. Auden, Paul Bowles, and the famed burlesque performer Gypsy Rose Lee (January 8, 1911 – April 26, 1970). This ramshackle Brooklyn brownstone was host to an explosion of creativity, an extraordinary experiment in communal living, and a nonstop yearlong party fueled by the appetites of youth. Here these burgeoning talents composed many of their most famous, iconic literary works while experiencing together a crucial historical moment--America on the threshold of WWII.
Address: 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
In 1940, George Davis, an editor recently fired from Harper's Bazaar, rented a dilapidated house in Brooklyn Heights in which he installed brilliant, volatile artists, who spent the next year working, fighting, and drinking. Carson McCullers sipped sherry while, down the hall, the burlesque star Gypsy Rose Lee typed her mystery novel with three-inch fingernails, and, downstairs, Benjamin Britten and Paul Bowles fought over practice space. W. H. Auden was housemother, collecting rent, assigning chores, and declaring no politics at dinner. Like all bohemian utopias, February House (so named because of the residents' February birthdays) was unable to withstand the centrifugal force of its constituent egos. The artists dispersed—to return home, serve in the military, or follow wayward lovers—and the house was demolished to make way for the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Edith Wynne Matthison (1875-1955), Anglo-American stage actress who also appeared in two silent films, is buried at Inglewood Park Cemetery (720 E Florence Ave, Inglewood, CA 90302). Rumored to have had a relationship with Edna St Vincent Millay (1892-1950). Oher notable queer burials at Inglewood Park Cemetery: Sylvester James, Jr. (1947-1988), who used the stage name of Sylvester, American singer-songwriter; Gypsy Rose Lee (1911–1970), actress and burlesque dancer; Cesar Romero (1907-1994), American actor, singer, dancer, voice artist, and comedian who was active in film, radio, and television for almost 60 years (Romero never married and had no children, but made frequent appearances at Hollywood events escorting actresses, such as Joan Crawford, Linda Darnell, Barbara Stanwyck, Lucille Ball, Ann Sheridan, Jane Wyman, and Ginger Rogers; he was almost always described in interviews and articles as a "confirmed bachelor". Many Hollywood historians have speculated that Romero was a closeted gay man); Lawrence W. Tonner (1861-1947), Jesse Shepard's devoted secretary and companion for over forty years.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Jared French was an American painter who specialized in the medium of egg tempera. He was one of the artists attributed to the style of art known as magic realism along with contemporaries George Tooker and Paul Cadmus.
Born: February 4, 1905, Ossining
Died: 1988, Rome
Education: Amherst College
Art Students League of New York
Lived: Fire Island Pines

The Great Hurricane of 1938 devastated much of Fire Island and made it appear undesirable to many. However, Duffy's Hotel remained relatively undamaged. According to legend, the gay aura of the town arose when Christopher Isherwood and W. H. Auden arrived dressed as Dionysus and Ganymede, carried aloft on a gilded litter by a group of singing followers. Duffy’s attempted to ban same-sex dancing until after midnight. The gay influence was continued in the 1960s when former male model John B. Whyte developed Fire Island Pines. The Pines currently has some of the most expensive property on the island and accounts for two-thirds of the island's swimming pools.
Fire Island Pines, Fire Island, NY 11782, USA (40.66537, -73.06816)
Cherry Grove, Fire Island, NY 11980, USA (40.65906, -73.08921)
Cherry Grove dates its modern history to the 1868 purchase by Archer and Elizabeth Perkinson. They bought the land between Lone Hill (now Fire Island Pines) and the Cherry Grove Hotel from the ocean to the bay for 25 cents per acre and named the area for the black-cherry trees in the area. The Perkinsons opened a hotel in 1880. According to local legend Oscar Wilde stayed at the Perkinson Hotel. In 1921 the Perkisons sold all the land east of Duryea Walk to Lone Hill, and then divided what was left, into 109 building lots. A lot 50 x 80 feet (24 m) could be bought for $250 or less, and ocean-front lots cost no more than a dollar a front foot. Buildings from the newly deactivated Camp Upton in Yaphank, New York, were ported over to form the core of the new colony. A post office was established in 1922 at the site of where "Tides" (formerly “The Monster”) is today; The first boardwalks were built in 1929. In 1930 Duffy’s Hotel replaced the original hotel and was the only place with electricity and a phone. The Great Hurricane of 1938 destroyed much of Cherry Grove and discouraged mainlanders from coming. In their stead a new generation started coming from Manhattan including Greta Garbo, Xavier Cugat, Paulette Goddard, Pola Negri, Arlene Francis, and Earl Blackwell (publisher of the International Celebrity Register). Duffy’s burned on September 27, 1956, and was replaced by the Ice Palace Hotel which has remained a popular destination. John Eberhardt, a developer who died in 2014, was credited for building the Belvedere Hotel and many other properties in the hamlet, from 1956 to the 1970s. Former model John B. Whyte encouraged Fire Island Pines’ reputation as a gay destination after buying the Botel Pines and Dunes Yacht Club in the 1960s (Cherry Grove was already a gay destination when Whyte developed the Pines). Whyte bought the property after a May 31, 1959 fire destroyed the entire complex. The Botel, which was known as The Hotel Ciel from 2004 to 2012, is still the central landmark and only hotel in the Pines. The conversion to a gay destination proved divisive among the initial owners. A large sign near the dock headlined, "Welcome to Fire Island Pines A Family Community." It also proclaimed "We believe in a community that is clean both morally and physically." Whyte bent rules to accommodate the gay crowd. "We had a hully-gully line right here in the restaurant. I would put a girl at each end -- men weren't allowed to dance with men back then -- and everyone would have a good time." Visitors in the 1960s included Hedy Lamarr, Betty Grable and Zachary Scott. Whyte, who owned 80 percent of the commercial property in the Pines, instituted the community’s central social activity schedule of “Low Tea” (drinks—particularly the "Blue Whale" cocktail of Curaçao liqueur and vodka that turned patrons' tongues blue—at the Blue Whale from 5 PM to 8 PM) followed by “High Tea” (drinks at the Pavilion from 8 to 10 PM) followed by an evening of dancing at the Pavilion (all of which were Whyte establishments). Two of the Pines's most famous events are the Pines Party, an all-night dance party held each July on the beach, and the Invasion of the Pines, a drag-queen parade held each year on July 4, commemorating the time when Whyte refused service to a drag queen. After promenading through the Pines, the drag queens proclaim victory and return to Cherry Grove. The ashes of Janet Flanner (1892-1978), journalist and author, with those of her last partner, Natalia Danesi Murray (1902-1994), were scattered at Cherry Grove. "Janet, My Mother, and Me" is a charming, captivating memoir about a boy growing up in a household of two extraordinary women. William Murray was devoted to his mother, Natalia Danesi Murray, and to his mother's longtime lover, writer Janet Flanner.
Who: Jared French (1905–1988) and Frank Carrington (September 13, 1893 – July 3, 1975)
Jared French was a painter who specialized in the ancient medium of egg tempera. He was one of the masters of magic realism, part of a circle of friends and colleagues who all painted surreal imagery in egg tempera. Others included George Tooker and Paul Cadmus. He met and befriended Cadmus in New York City, became his lover, and persuaded Cadmus to give up commercial art for "serious painting". In 1937 French married Margaret Hoening, another artist. For the next eight years Cadmus and the Frenches summered on Fire Island and formed a photographic collective called PAJAMA ("Paul, Jared, and Margaret"). Frank Carrington was the co-founder with Antoinette Scudder in 1938 of the Paper Mill Playhouse in Millburn, New Jersey. He was a resident of Millburn, New Jersey, near the Playhouse. The Frank Carrington Excellence in the Arts Award is given in his honor. Born in 1894 had been interested in the theater from a young age. He became a theater director and co-founded the Cherry Lane Theatre in New York City. He began his greatest work, the creation of Millburn's Paper Mill Playhouse, in 1934. In 1927, he purchased the cottage on Fire Island from Frederick Marquet, a fellow resident of Millburn, New Jersey. Carrington was active in the growing arts community of Cherry Grove. He rented the property to his friends in the community, including Truman Capote. Other guests included New York City Ballet co-founder Lincoln Kerstein, fashion designer Bill Blass, actor Henry Fonda, actress Gertrude Lawrence, and acrtress Katharine Hepburn. Carrington owned the house for almost fifty years, then sold it to the US government as part of Fire Island National Seashore under the condition that he be able to live there for the rest of his life. When he died, National Park Service Ranger Bob Freda lived there for the next twenty years. Frank Carrington is buried at Saint Stephens Episcopal Cemetery, Millburn, New Jersey.


The Shower, 1943


Point O' View, 1945, Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, Massachusetts


Fences


Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Kerwin Mathews was an American actor best known for playing the titular heroes in The 7th Voyage of Sinbad, The Three Worlds of Gulliver and Jack the Giant Killer.
Born: January 8, 1926, Seattle, Washington, United States
Died: July 5, 2007, San Francisco, California, United States
Education: Beloit College
Joseph A. Craig High School
TV shows: NBC Matinee Theater

Kerwin Mathews was an American actor best known for playing the titular heroes in The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (which featured stop-motion animated creatures created by special effects legend Ray Harryhausen: "He was very good in it," Harryhausen said "I get a lot of fan mail saying they think he was the best Sinbad. We've had three or four different Sinbads.“), The Three Worlds of Gulliver and Jack the Giant Killer. Science fiction and fantasy film expert Tom Weaver said that "as an actor in the 1950s, Kerwin Mathews came across as the all-American, farm-boy-next-door type -- as unlikely a candidate to play an Arabian Nights hero as could possibly be imagined. But for young American monster movies fans, that made him the perfect identification figure, and he became our favorite hero in that fairy-tale-monster genre.” He retired from acting in 1978 and moved to San Francisco, where he ran a clothing and antiques shop. He died in his sleep in San Francisco at the age of 81, survived by his partner of 46 years, Tom Nicoll (originally from England). They met in 1961 when Nicoll was a display manager at Harvey Nichols. The City of Janesville subsequently renamed a one-block street adjacent to the former Janesville High School "Kerwin Mathews Court".
Together from 1961 to 2007: 46 years.
Kerwin Mathews (January 8, 1926 – July 5, 2007)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Studied: University of Utah, 201 Presidents Cir, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA (40.76493, -111.8421)
Buried: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA, Plot: M_8_8_2W

The university was established in 1850 as the University of Deseret by the General Assembly of the provisional State of Deseret, making it Utah's oldest institution of higher education. It received its current name in 1892, four years before Utah attained statehood, and moved to its current location in 1900.
Address: 201 Presidents Cir, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA (40.76493, -111.8421)
Type: Student Facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 801-581-7200
Place
The University of Utah (also referred to as the U, the U of U, or Utah) is a public coeducational space-grant research university in Salt Lake City, Utah. As the state's flagship university, the university offers more than 100 undergraduate majors and more than 92 graduate degree programs. Graduate studies include the S.J. Quinney College of Law and the School of Medicine, Utah's only medical school. As of Fall 2015, there are 23,909 undergraduate students and 7,764 graduate students, for an enrollment total of 31,673. Academically, the university has produced or cultivated 22 Rhodes Scholars, 3 Nobel Prize winners, 3 MacArthur Fellows, 2 Gates Cambridge Scholars, and 1 Churchill Scholar. In addition, the university's Honors College has been ranked as one of the top 50 in the country. The university's athletic teams, the Utes, participate in NCAA Division I athletics (FBS for football) as a member of the Pac-12 Conference. Its football team has received national attention for winning the 2005 Fiesta Bowl and the 2009 Sugar Bowl. According to Cynthia Blood's University of Utah transcripts, she took Speech and Drama classes from Joseph F. Smith. Blood claimed that "everybody on campus knew" that Maud May Babcock and Joseph F. Smith, both from the university's Drama Department, "were queer", but it was pretty much "unspoken". Blood reported that "Professor Smith flitted amongst the boys and Maud flitted amongst us girls. We adored it! I guess we were all a little queer back then." When I asked her what she meant by that, she replied, "Oh, we all had crushes on each other at one time or another." I asked if the boys did too. "I suppose, in their own way - but they didn't call them crushes. I do remember two young men who mooned over each other for several months - I don't remember their names. But they were real handsome boys. Very intelligent, very proper all the time." Drama students? I asked. "Oh yes. Yes they were." According to the rumors, Joseph Fielding Smith was in a relationship with Norval Service (1905-1971), a student at the University of Utah.
Life
Who: Maud May Babcock (May 2, 1867 – December 31, 1954) and Joseph Fielding Smith Jr. (July 19, 1876 – July 2, 1972)
Maud Babcock was the first female member of the University of Utah's faculty. She taught at the university for 46 years, beginning in 1892. While there she established the University Theater, originated the first college dramatic club in the United States, directed over 800 plays and occasionally taught. Babcock was born in East Worcester, New York to William Wayne Babcock and Sarah Jane Butler. She was educated in the public schools of New York then received degrees from Welles College in New York, Philadelphia National School of Oratory and, in 1890, the American Academy of Dramatic Art. Babcock was studying and teaching at Harvard University when she met noted Utahn and daughter of Brigham Young Susa Young Gates who, impressed by Babcock's work as a summer course instructor in physical culture, convinced her to move to Salt Lake City. She established UU's first physical training curriculum, of which speech and dramatics were part for several years. After a separate speech and drama department was formed, she headed that. At other times in her professional life, she studied at the University of Chicago and schools in London and Paris; served as president of the National Association of Teachers of Speech; and, for twenty years, a trustee for the Utah State School for Deaf and Blind. She wrote five books on speech and elocution, and was a renowned traveler and lecturer. In addition to her professional interests in drama and elocution, she was also a crusader against wasp-waist corsets. She was also famed in Utah for her success in bringing big-name talent to the state. She joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served for several years on the general board of the Young Women's Mutual Improvement Association. She lived at 273 E 11th Ave (Salt Lake City, UT 84103). She died at the age of 87. Joseph Fielding Smith was an American religious leader and writer who served as the tenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1970 until his death in 1972. He was the son of Joseph F. Smith, who was the sixth president of the LDS Church, and grandson of Hyrum Smith, brother of LDS Church founder Joseph Smith. Smith was named to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in 1910, when his father was the church's president. When Smith became president of the LDS Church, he was 93 years old; he began his presidential term at an older age than any other president in church history. Smith's tenure as President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles from 1951 to 1970 is the third-longest in church history; he served in that capacity during the entire presidency of David O. McKay. Smith spent some of his years among the Twelve Apostles as the Church Historian and Recorder. He was a religious scholar and a prolific writer. Many of his works are used as references for church members. Doctrinally, Smith was known for rigid orthodoxy and as an archconservative with regards to his views on evolution and race. Smith was the first son of Julina Lambson Smith, the second wife and first plural wife of Joseph F. Smith, then a member of the Quorum of the Twelve. By agreement between his parents, Smith was given his father's name, even though Joseph F. Smith's third and fourth wives had previously had sons. Growing up, Smith lived in his father's large family home at 333 West 100 North in Salt Lake City, Utah Territory. The house was opposite the original campus of the University of Deseret (modern University of Utah), on a site now occupied by the LDS Business College. Smith died at Salt Lake City shortly before his 96th birthday. He was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery. Patriarch Smith's supposed lover Norval M. Service is also buried in the Salt Lake City cemetery. Ada Dwyer Russell, actress and rumoured partner of Amy Lowell, is buried at Salt Lake City Cemetery (200 N St E, Salt Lake City, UT 84103) as well.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Paul-Marie Verlaine was a French poet associated with the Symbolist movement. He is considered one of the greatest representatives of the fin de siècle in international and French poetry.
Born: March 30, 1844, Metz, France
Died: January 8, 1896, Paris, France
Spouse: Mathilde Mauté de Fleurville (m. 1870)
Education: Lycée Condorcet
Children: Georges Verlaine
Lived: Rue Haute Pierre, 57000 Metz, France (49.11712, 6.17148)
Buried: Batignolles Cemetery, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 11

Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud was a French poet born in Charleville, Ardennes. Paul-Marie Verlaine was a French poet associated with the Symbolist movement. Rimbaud sent Verlaine two letters containing several of his poems. Verlaine, who was intrigued by Rimbaud, sent a reply that stated, "Come, dear great soul. We await you; we desire you." Rimbaud arrived in late September 1871. Rimbaud and Verlaine began a short and torrid affair. Their stormy relationship eventually brought them to London in September 1872. In late June 1873, Verlaine returned to Paris alone, but quickly began to mourn Rimbaud's absence. On 8 July, he telegraphed Rimbaud, asking him to come to the Hotel Liège in Brussels. On the morning of 10 July, 1873, Verlaine bought a revolver. That afternoon Verlaine fired two shots at Rimbaud, wounding him. Rimbaud and Verlaine met for the last time in Mar. 1875, in Stuttgart, Germany. Rimbaud travelled extensively on three continents before his death from cancer just after his 37th birthday.
Together from 1871 to 1875: 4 years.
Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud (October 20, 1854 – November 10, 1891)
Paul-Marie Verlaine (March 30, 1844 – January 8, 1896)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The House of Verlaine, Verlaine’s birthplace in Metz, is a museum dedicated to the poet’s life and artworks.
Address: Rue Haute Pierre, 57000 Metz, France (49.11712, 6.17148)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +33 06 34 52 22 34
Life
Who: Paul-Marie Verlaine (March 30, 1844 – January 8, 1896)
Paul Verlaine was a French poet associated with the Symbolist movement. He is considered one of the greatest representatives of the fin de siècle in international and French poetry. In September 1871 Verlaine received the first letter from Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1896.) Verlaine was intrigued by Rimbaud, and replied, "Come, dear great soul. We await you; we desire you," sending him a one-way ticket to Paris. Rimbaud arrived in late September 1871 and resided briefly in Verlaine’s home. Verlaine’s wife, Mathilde Mauté, was seventeen years old and pregnant, and Verlaine had recently left his job and started drinking. In later published recollections of his first sight of Rimbaud at the age of seventeen, Verlaine described him as having "the real head of a child, chubby and fresh, on a big, bony, rather clumsy body of a still-growing adolescent,” with a "very strong Ardennes accent that was almost a dialect.” His voice had "highs and lows as if it were breaking." By 1872, they were lovers. Rimbaud and Verlaine’s stormy affair took them to London in September 1872, a period over which Rimbaud would later express regret. During this time, Verlaine abandoned his wife and infant son (both of whom he had abused in his alcoholic rages.) In England they lived in considerable poverty in Bloomsbury and in Camden Town, scraping a living mostly from teaching, as well as an allowance from Verlaine’s mother. Rimbaud spent his days in the Reading Room of the British Museum where "heating, lighting, pens and ink were free.” The relationship between the two poets grew increasingly bitter. In late June 1873, Verlaine returned to Paris alone, but quickly began to mourn Rimbaud’s absence. On July 8, he telegraphed Rimbaud, asking him to come to the Hotel Liège in Brussels. The reunion went badly, they argued continuously, and Verlaine took refuge in heavy drinking. On the morning of July 10, Verlaine bought a revolver. About 16:00, "in a drunken rage,” he fired two shots at Rimbaud, one of them wounding the 18-year-old in the left wrist. Rimbaud initially dismissed the wound as superficial but had it dressed at the St-Jean hospital nevertheless. He did not immediately file charges, but decided to leave Brussels. About 20:00, Verlaine and his mother accompanied Rimbaud to the Gare du Midi railway station. On the way, by Rimbaud’s account, Verlaine "behaved as if he were insane.” Fearing that Verlaine "might give himself over to new excesses,” Rimbaud "ran off" and "begged a policeman to arrest him.” Verlaine was charged with attempted murder, then subjected to a humiliating medico-legal examination. He was also interrogated about his correspondence with Rimbaud and the nature of their relationship. The bullet was eventually removed on July 17, and Rimbaud withdrew his complaint. The charges were reduced to wounding with a firearm, and on August 8, 1873 Verlaine was sentenced to two years in prison. Rimbaud and Verlaine met for the last time in March 1875, in Stuttgart, after Verlaine’s release from prison and his conversion to Catholicism. By then Rimbaud had given up writing in favour of a steady, working life. Some speculate he was fed up with his former wild living, or that the recklessness itself had been the source of his creativity. Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud was a French poet born in Charleville, Ardennes. He influenced modern literature and arts, and prefigured surrealism. He started writing poems at a very young age, while still in primary school, and stopped completely before he turned 21. He was mostly creative in his teens (17–20.) the critic Cecil Arthur Hackett wrote that his "genius, its flowering, explosion and sudden extinction, still astonishes.” Rimbaud was known to have been a libertine and for being a restless soul. He traveled extensively on three continents before his death from cancer just after his thirty-seventh birthday.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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At Batignolles Cemetery (8 rue saint just, 75017 Paris) is buried Paul Verlaine (1844-1896), French poet associated with the Symbolist movement. He is considered one of the greatest representatives of the fin de siècle in international and French poetry.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Lieutenant General Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell, OM GCMG GCVO KCB DL, also known as B-P or Lord Baden-Powell, was a British Army officer, writer, author of Scouting for ...
Born: February 22, 1857, Paddington, London, United Kingdom
Died: January 8, 1941, Nyeri, Kenya
Buried: Saint Peter's Cemetery, Nyeri, Nyeri, Kenya
Education: Charterhouse School
Lived: 9 Hyde Park Gate, Kensington, London SW7 5DH, UK

Virginia Woolf was born Adeline Virginia Stephen at 22 Hyde Park Gate in Kensington, London. Her parents were Sir Leslie Stephen (1832–1904) and Julia Prinsep Duckworth Stephen (née Jackson, 1846–1895.)
Address: Hyde Park Gate, Kensington, London SW7 5DH, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Hyde Park Gate is a street in central London, which applies to two parallel roads in Kensington on the southern boundary of Kensington Gardens. It is probably most famous for having the former residence and death place of Sir Winston Churchill. It is in a picturesque part of London and a very expensive place to live.
Notable queer residents at Hyde Park Gate:
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 9 Hyde Park Gate, SW7 Robert Baden-Powell (1857-1941), “Chief Scout of the World lived here.”
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 22 Hyde Park Gate, SW7 Sir Leslie Stephen (1832-1904), “Scholar and writer lived here.”
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)
Leslie Stephen was a notable historian, author, critic and mountaineer. He was a founding editor of the Dictionary of National Biography, a work that would influence Virginia Woolf’s later experimental biographies. Julia Stephen was born in British India to Dr. John and Maria Pattle Jackson. She was the niece of the photographer Julia Margaret Cameron and first cousin of the temperance leader Lady Henry Somerset. Julia moved to England with her mother, where she served as a model for Pre-Raphaelite painters such as Edward Burne-Jones. Julia named her daughter after the Pattle family: Adeline after Lady Henry’s sister, who married George Russell, 10th Duke of Bedford; and Virginia, the name of yet another sister (who died young) but also of their mother, Julia’s aunt. Woolf was educated by her parents in their literate and well-connected household. Her parents had each been married previously and been widowed, and, consequently, the household contained the children of three marriages. Julia had three children by her first husband, Herbert Duckworth: George, Stella, and Gerald Duckworth. Leslie had first married Harriet Marian (Minny) Thackeray (1840–1875), the daughter of William Thackeray, and they had one daughter: Laura Makepeace Stephen, who was declared mentally disabled and lived with the family until she was institutionalised in 1891. Leslie and Julia had four children together: Vanessa Stephen (later known as Vanessa Bell) (1879), Thoby Stephen (1880), Virginia (1882), and Adrian Stephen (1883.) Sir Leslie Stephen’s eminence as an editor, critic, and biographer, and his connection to William Thackeray, meant that his children were raised in an environment filled with the influences of Victorian literary society. Henry James, George Henry Lewes, and Virginia’s honorary godfather, James Russell Lowell, were among the visitors to the house. Julia Stephen was equally well connected. She came from a family of beauties who left their mark on Victorian society as models for Pre-Raphaelite artists and early photographers, including her aunt Julia Margaret Cameron who was also a visitor to the Stephen household. Supplementing these influences was the immense library at the Stephens’ house, from which Virginia and Vanessa were taught the classics and English literature. Unlike the girls, their brothers Adrian and Julian (Thoby) were formally educated and sent to Cambridge, a difference that Virginia would resent. The sisters did, however, benefit indirectly from their brothers’ Cambridge contacts, as the boys brought their new intellectual friends home to the Stephens’ drawing room. After the death of their parents and Virginia’s second nervous breakdown, Vanessa and Adrian sold 22 Hyde Park Gate and bought a house at 46 Gordon Square in Bloomsbury.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Sighsten Herrgård was a Finnish-born Swedish fashion designer and major trendsetter in Stockholm. Herrgård was the first Swedish celebrity with AIDS to go public about it, "giving AIDS a face".
Born: January 8, 1943, Helsinki, Finland
Died: November 20, 1989
Buried: Bromma kyrkogård, Stockholm, Stockholms kommun, Stockholms län, Sweden, Plot: FB/377

Sighsten Herrgård was a Swedish fashion designer. Herrgård was the first Swedish celebrity with AIDS to go public about it, "giving AIDS a face". He received his fashion education at Beckmans School of Design in Stockholm and at the pattern development academies in Stockholm and Copenhagen. His career took off in 1966 when he won the Courtauld International Design Competition with a collection of unisex clothing. In the 1970s, Herrgård established internationally in Paris and North America; he also started a company in Stockholm and worked with television, magazines and shows. Herrgård wrote his memoirs with Carl Otto Werkelid just before he died. In 1969 he was one of the world's ten best-dressed men. The saddest thing in Herrgård's memoirs, Sighsten, is the portrayal of Roar, the man who lived with Herrgård for a number of years. Roar, who was a monogamous type like Herrgård, was the one who first succumbed to the virus, which eventually ended also Sighsten's life. Klingenberg was the first Swedish patient to be diagnosed with AIDS, even though he was not the first to die due to it.
Together from (around) 1970 to 1984: 14 years.
Roar Klingenberg (died on September 21, 1984)
Sighsten Herrgård (January 8, 1943 – November 20, 1989)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Sighsten Herrgård (1943-1989) is buried at Bromma kyrkogård (Terserusvägen 3A, 168 59 Bromma). Fashion desgined Sighsten died 5 years after his partner Roar Klingenberg, who was the first AIDS patient diagnosed in Sweden.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Winnaretta Singer, Princesse Edmond de Polignac was a musical patron and heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune. Born in America, she lived most of her adult life in France.
Born: January 8, 1865, Yonkers, New York, United States
Died: November 26, 1943, London, United Kingdom
Spouse: Prince Edmond de Polignac (m. 1893–1901), Louis de Scey-Montbéliard (m. 1887–1892)
Siblings: Mortimer Singer, Washington Singer, more
Parents: Isabella Eugénie Boyer, Isaac Singer
Grandparents: Ruth Benson, Louis Noel Boyer, Adam Singer, Pamilla Boyer
Lived: Oldway Mansion, Torquay Rd, Paignton, Torbay TQ3 2TY, UK (50.44304, -3.56768)
Fondation Singer-Polignac, 43 Avenue Georges Mandel, 75116 Paris, France (48.8634, 2.28158)
Buried: Torquay Crematorium, Torquay, Torbay Unitary Authority, Devon, England

Prince Edmond Melchior Jean Marie de Polignac was a French composer. Polignac, inept with money and impoverished through investments in a series of get-rich-quick schemes, was destitute; the solution was marriage to a woman of appropriate means. Élisabeth Greffulhe, cousin of his friend Comte Robert de Montesquiou, suggested the name of Winnaretta Singer. Although known within private social circles to be lesbian, Winnaretta had married at the age of 22 to Prince Louis de Scey-Montbéliard. The marriage was annulled in 1892 by the Catholic church, five years after a wedding night that reportedly included the bride's climbing atop an armoire and threatening to kill the groom if he came near her. Polignac and Winnaretta married on December 15, 1893. Although it was a mariage blanc (unconsummated marriage), or indeed a lavender marriage, it was based on profound love, mutual respect, understanding, and artistic friendship. Among Winnaretta’s lovers, history counts: Violet Trefusis, Romaine Brooks, Renata Borgatti, Olga de Meyer, and Alvilde Chaplin. Edmond was interred in the Singer crypt in Torquay.
Together from 1893 to 1901: 8 years.
Edmond Melchior Jean Marie de Polignac (April 19, 1834 – August 8, 1901)
Winnaretta Eugenie Singer (January 8, 1865 – November 26, 1943)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Dame Ethel Smyth was an English composer and a member of the women's suffrage movement. Smyth had several affairs in her life, most of them with women. Her philosopher-friend and the librettist of some of her operas, Henry Bennet Brewster, may have been her only male lover. In 1892, she wrote to him: "I wonder why it is so much easier for me to love my own sex passionately than yours. I can't make it out for I am a very healthy-minded person." Smyth was in love, not reciprocated, with Emmeline Pankhurst and Virginia Woolf, who, both alarmed and amused, said it was "like being caught by a giant crab", but the two became friends. Later she fell in love with Winnaretta Singer. The affronted husband of one of Singer’s lovers once stood outside the princess's Venetian palazzo, declaring, "If you are half the man I think you are, you will come out here and fight me.“ Ethel Smyth's dog, called Marco, was a half-breed St. Bernard that had been given to her by a friend in 1887. Marco's unruly temperament was notorious and he had once almost ruined a rehearsal of Brahms's Piano Quintet at Adolph Brodsky's house by bursting into the room and overturning the cellist's desk.
They met around 1905 and remained friends until 1920: 15 years.
Dame Ethel Mary Smyth, DBE (April 23, 1858 – May 8, 1944)
Winnaretta Singer, Princesse Edmond de Polignac (January 8, 1865 – November 26, 1943)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The Singer-Polignac Foundation, created in 1928 in Paris through a donation by Winnaretta Singer, is a public administrative establishment under the supervision of the Ministère de Interior, dedicated to the patronage of the arts, letters and science. The foundation receives no assistance from the state and its activities are financed by its own funds. Its current president is Yves Pouliquen, of the French Academy .
Address: 43 Avenue Georges Mandel, 75116 Paris, France (48.8634, 2.28158)
Type: Private Property
Phone: +33 1 47 27 38 66
Place
Built in 1890
On the death of Winnaretta Singer, the Singer-Polignac Foundation inherited her mansion, located at 43, avenue Georges-Mandel, Paris, and moved there in 1945. In 1926 Winnaretta Singer, Princess Edmond de Polignac, wanted to support the work of the Collège de France and planned to bequeath her fortune to them. After seeking advice from Maurice Palaeologus, and with the support of Raymond Poincaré and Joseph Bedier, she chose to create a corporation named Singer-Polignac Foundation which takes its legal form in 1928. This creation is accompanied by an endowment of 300,000 francs. Since the death of Winnaretta Singer, the foundation received from the Royal Trust Co. in Montreal an amount ranging from 150 000-180 000 Canadian dollars and presented as an anonymous donation “in memory of Winnaretta Singer, Princess Edmond de Polignac.”
Life
Who: Winnaretta Singer, Princesse Edmond de Polignac (January 8, 1865 – November 26, 1943)
In 1894 Winnaretta Singer and her husband Prince Edmond de Polignac established a salon in Paris in the music room of their mansion on Avenue Henri-Martin (today, Avenue Georges-Mandel.) The Polignac salon came to be known as a haven for avant-garde music. First performances of Chabrier, d’Indy, Debussy, Fauré, and Ravel took place in the Polignac salon. The young Ravel dedicated his piano work, “Pavane pour une infante défunte,” to the Princesse de Polignac. Many of Marcel Proust’s evocations of salon culture were born during his attendance at concerts in the Polignac drawing room. After her husband’s death, Winnaretta Singer-Polignac used her fortune to benefit the arts, sciences, and letters. She decided to honor his memory by commissioning several works of the young composers of her time, amongst others Igor Stravinsky’s “Renard,” Erik Satie’s “Socrate” (by her intercession Satie was kept out of jail when he was composing this work), Darius Milhaud’s “Les Malheurs d’Orphée,” Francis Poulenc’s “Concerto for Two Pianos” and “Organ Concerto,” Jean Françaix’s “Le Diable boîteux” and “Sérénade pour douze instruments,” Kurt Weill’s “Second Symphony,” and Germaine Tailleferre’s “First Piano Concerto.” Manuel de Falla’s “El retablo de maese Pedro” was premiered there, with the harpsichord part performed by Wanda Landowska. In addition to Marcel Proust and Antonio de La Gandara, the Princesse de Polignac’s salon was frequented by Isadora Duncan, Jean Cocteau, Claude Monet, Serge Diaghilev, and Colette. She was also patron to many others, including Nadia Boulanger, Clara Haskil, Arthur Rubinstein, Vladimir Horowitz, Armande de Polignac, Ethel Smyth, Le Corbusier, Adela Maddison, the Ballets Russes, l’Opéra de Paris, and the Orchestre Symphonique de Paris. In addition to performing as pianist and organist in her own salon, she was an accomplished painter who exhibited in the Académie des Beaux-Arts. One canvas eventually appeared in the showcase of an art gallery, advertised as being a Manet.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Oldway Mansion is a large house and gardens in Paignton, Devon. It was built as a private residence for Isaac Merritt Singer, and rebuilt by his third son Paris Singer in the style of the Palace of Versailles.
Address: Torquay Rd, Paignton, Torbay TQ3 2TY, UK (50.44304, -3.56768)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1803 207933
English Heritage Building ID: 383869 (Grade II, 1951)
Place
Design by George Soudon Bridgman (1839-1925)
Around 1871 the Fernham estate in Paignton was purchased by Isaac Merritt Singer, the founder of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The old buildings on the site were demolished and he built a new mansion as his home. Isaac Merritt Singer died on 23 July, 1875, shortly before work on the original mansion was completed. Paris Eugene Singer, Isaac Singer’s third son, supervised the alterations at Oldway Mansion between 1904 and 1907. The rebuilding work was modelled on the Palace of Versailles, and the eastern elevation of the building was inspired by the Place de la Concorde in Paris. The interior of the building is noted for its grand staircase made from marble and balusters of bronze. The ceiling of the staircase is decorated with an ornate painting based on an original design for the Palace of Versailles by the French painter and architect Joseph Lebrun. The ceiling is a replica painted by Carl Rossner. Above the grand staircase there is a reproduction of the first version of Jacques-Louis David’s painting “The Crowning of Josephine by Napoleon.” The original was purchased by Paris Singer in the late XIX century. The painting was sold to the French government in 1946 and now hangs in the Palace of Versailles. The reproduction at the mansion, which is in the same place as the original, is a colour photocopy and was unveiled in 1995. The gallery on the first floor is a reproduction of the Hall of Mirrors in Versailles, and is floored in parquet. The gallery leads into the ballroom, which contains walls of gilt panelling and mirrors. Above the fireplace there is an oil painting of Louis of Bourbon dating from 1717. Oldway Mansion is set in 17 acres (69,000 m2) of gardens, which are laid out on an Italian theme by the French landscape gardener Achille Duchesne. Beneath the eastern elevation of the building is the maze, which consists of dwarf box hedging and flower beds. To the south of the mansion there is the grotto garden where a waterfall passes over a rocky cave into a pool below. The grounds of the mansion contain many sub-tropical plants and shrubs. Opposite the main entrance to the mansion is a large round building known as The Rotunda. This was built in 1873, and was used originally as a horse riding pavilion and exercise area. Isaac Merritt Singer gave this building the nickname of "The Wigwam.” Following the end of an affair with the dancer Isadora Duncan in 1917, Paris Singer became an American citizen and went to live in the United States. This was done partly for tax reasons, and after 1918 Oldway Mansion was no longer the permanent home of the Singer family. During the period of WWI from 1914 to 1918, Oldway Mansion was transformed into the American Women’s War Relief Hospital. The Rotunda was converted to house rows of beds for the wounded soldiers being brought back to England from the trenches of France and Belgium. Oldway Mansion became the Torbay Country Club in 1929. During this period tennis courts and a bowling green were added to the grounds. Torbay Golf & Country Club opened in 1933. Oldway Mansion was used as the club house, with the course in the hills above the Mansion. The course closed in the mid 1950s. During WWII from 1939 to 1945, Oldway was used in the war effort by housing RAF cadets training to be aircrew. In 1943 Oldway was damaged in an air raid, along with many other buildings in Paignton. Paignton Urban District Council purchased Oldway Mansion from the Singer family in 1946 for £45,000. It is estimated that around £200,000 was spent on building the mansion. Until 2013, the building was used as council offices and for civil marriage ceremonies. On April 30, 2012, plans for Oldway Mansion to be converted into a luxury hotel and sheltered retirement flats were approved by Torbay Council. On December 21, 2005, the ballroom at Oldway Mansion was the location for Devon’s first civil partnership. The registration was officially witnessed by the Mayor of Torbay and his dignitaries.
Life
Who: Winnaretta Singer, Princesse Edmond de Polignac (January 8, 1865 – November 26, 1943)
Winnaretta Singer was a musical patron and heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune. She was the twentieth of the 24 children of Isaac Singer. Her mother was his Parisian-born second wife, Isabella Eugenie Boyer. Winnaretta was born in Yonkers, New York. After the American Civil War, the Singer family moved to Paris, where they remained until the Franco-Prussian War. The family then settled in England, first in London, and then to Paignton, Devon where they moved to Oldway Mansion a 115-room palace built by her father. After Isaac Singer’s death in 1875, Isabelle and her children moved back to Paris. Although known within private social circles to be lesbian, Winnaretta married at the age of 22 to Prince Louis de Scey-Montbéliard. The marriage was annulled in 1892 by the Catholic church, five years after a wedding night that reportedly included the bride’s climbing atop an armoire and threatening to kill the groom if he came near her. In 1893, at the age of 29, she stepped companionably into an equally chaste marriage with the 59-year-old Prince Edmond de Polignac (1834-1901), a gay amateur composer. Although it was a mariage blanc (unconsummated marriage), it was based on profound love, mutual respect, understanding, and artistic friendship, expressed especially through their love of music. She had affairs with numerous women, never making attempts to conceal them, and never going for any great length of time without a female lover. She had these affairs during her own marriage and afterward, and often with other married women. The affronted husband of one of her lovers once stood outside the princess’s Venetian palazzo, declaring, "If you are half the man I think you are, you will come out here and fight me." Singer had a relationship with painter Romaine Brooks (1874-1970), which had begun in 1905, and which effectively ended her affair with Olga de Meyer (1871-ca. 1930), who was married at the time and whose godfather (and purported biological father) was Edward VII. Composer and conductor Ethel Smyth (1858-1944) fell deeply in love with her during their affair. In the early 1920s Singer became involved with pianist Renata Borgatti (1894-1964.) From 1923 to 1933 her partner was the British socialite and novelist Violet Trefusis (1894-1972), with whom she had a loving but often turbulent relationship. Alvilde Chaplin (1909-1994), future wife of the author James Lees-Milne (1908-1997), was involved with Singer from 1938 to 1943; the two women were living together in London at the time of Winnaretta’s death. Winnaretta and her husband are buried together at Torquay Cemetary (Torquay, Torbay TQ2).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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