Jan. 11th, 2017

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Buried: Cimetière Miséricorde, Nantes, Departement de la Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France

Annemarie Schwarzenbach was a Swiss writer, journalist, photographer and traveler. In 1930 a relationship developed with Erika Mann, which much to Annemarie's disappointment did not last long, although they always remained friends. Still smarting from Erika's rejection, she spent the following year in Berlin. There she found a soul-mate in Klaus Mann, brother of Erika, and settled in with the Manns as an extended family. In 1932 Annemarie planned a car trip to Persia with Klaus and Erika Mann, and a childhood friend of the Manns, Ricki Hallgarten. The evening before the trip was due to start, on May 5, Ricki, suffering from depression, shot himself in his house in Utting on the Ammersee. In 1935 she returned to Persia where, despite her lesbian outlook, she married the French diplomat Claude Clarac, also a homosexual. In June, 1939 she embarked on a trip to Afghanistan with the ethnologist Ella Maillart. The adventure was made into a movie, The Journey to Kafiristan, in 2001. On September 7, 1942, in the Engadin, she fell from her bicycle and sustained a serious head injury, and she died on November 15. During her final illness her mother permitted neither Claude Clarac, who had rushed to Sils from Marseille, nor her friends, to visit her in her sick bed. After Annemarie's death, her mother destroyed all her letters and diaries. Claude died at the age of 96 in Thailand, where he first went as Ambassador of France. He leaves an adopted son, Henri Pageau-Clarac.
Together from 1935 to 1942: 7 years.
Annemarie Schwarzenbach (May 23, 1908 – November 15, 1942)
Achille “Claude“ Clarac (1903 – January 11, 1999)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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At Cimetière de Miséricorde (4 Rue de la Pelleterie, 44000 Nantes) is buried Achille "Claude" Clarac (1903-January 11, 1999). In 1935 Annemarie Schwarzenbach (May 23, 1908 – November 15, 1942) returned to Persia where she married the French diplomat Achille-Claude Clarac, also a homosexual. They had known each other for only a few weeks, and it was a marriage of convenience for both of them, since she obtained a French diplomatic passport which enabled her to travel without restrictions. They lived together for a while in Teheran but when they fled to an isolated area in the countryside, to escape the summerly heath, their lonely existence had an adverse effect on Annemarie, who became addicted to morphine. She returned to Switzerland for a holiday, taking in Russia and the Balkans by car. In June, 1942 in Tétouan she met up again with her husband Claude Clarac before returning to Switzerland. It was the last time they met, Schwarzenbach died in Nov. 1942 and is buried at Horgen Friedhof (Friedhofstrasse, 8800 Thalwil, Switzerland).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Alice Paul was an American suffragist, feminist, and women's rights activist, and the main leader and strategist of the 1910s campaign for the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which prohibits sex discrimination in the right to vote.
Born: January 11, 1885, Mount Laurel Township, New Jersey, United States
Died: July 9, 1977, Moorestown, New Jersey, United States
Education: American University
Swarthmore College
Washington College of Law
University of Pennsylvania
Woodbrooke Quaker Study Centre, Birmingham
Moorestown Friends School
Parents: William Mickle Paul, Tacie Parry Paul
Siblings: Willam Paul, Helen Paul, Parry Paul
Lived: Paulsdale, 128 Hooton Rd, Mt Laurel, NJ 08054, USA (39.95582, -74.93007)
Buried: Westfield Friends Burial Ground, Cinnaminson, Burlington County, New Jersey, USA

Alice Paul, the founder and leading-light of the National Woman’s Party, inspired devotion that bordered on worship. From her side, Paul cared deeply for her old friend Nina Allender, the cartoonist of the suffrage movement. Allender, who lived alone in Chicago, wrote to Paul in 1947 of her memories of their long association: “No words can tell you what that (first) visit grew to mean to me & to my life… I feel now as I did then – only more intensely – I have never changed or doubted – but have grown more inspired as the years have gone by… There is no use going into words. I believe them to be unnecessary between us.” (Nina Allender to Alice Paul, January 5, 1947) Paul wrote that she thought of Allender often and sent her “devoted love.” (Alice Paul to Nina Allender, March 9, 1950) She worried about Allender’s loneliness and gently encouraged her to come to Washington to live at Belmont House, the Woman’s Party headquarters, where she would be surrounded by loving friends who appreciated the work she had done for the women’s movement. (Alice Paul to Nina Allender, Nov. 20, 1954) Paul failed to persuade her to move, however. Two years later Paul responded to a request from Allender’s niece for help with the costs of a nursing home with a $100 check and a promise to contact others who might be able to help. (Alice Paul to Kay Boyle, March 5, 1957) But Allender died, within a month, at the age of 83.
They met (before) 1913 and remained friends until Allender’s death in 1957: 44 years.
Alice Stokes Paul (January 11, 1885 – July 9, 1977)
Nina E. Allender (December 25, 1873 - April 2, 1957)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Paulsdale, in Mount Laurel Township, Burlington County, New Jersey, was the birthplace and childhood home of Alice Paul, a major leader in the Women’s suffrage movement in the United States.
Address: 128 Hooton Rd, Mt Laurel, NJ 08054, USA (39.95582, -74.93007)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +1 856-231-1885
National Register of Historic Places: 89000774, 1989. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The Paul family purchased 173 acres (0.70 km2) and the 1840 farmhouse around 1883. During the 1950s, Paulsdale was divided into two parcels: 167 acres (0.68 km2) of farmland and the remaining 6 acres (24,000 m2) which included the house and farm buildings. Both parcels were sold in the 1950s. The larger became a housing development, the smaller was a private residence until it was purchased by the Alice Paul Institute in 1990. The house has been restored to the condition when Alice Paul lived there. It now serves as a house museum and a home for the Institute. Paul attended Moorestown Friends School (110 E Main St, Moorestown, NJ 08057), where she graduated at the top of her class.
Life
Who: Alice Paul (January 11, 1885 – July 9, 1977)
Alice Paul was a suffragist, feminist, and women’s rights activist, and the main leader and strategist of the 1910s campaign for the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which prohibits sex discrimination in the right to vote. Along with Lucy Burns and others, Alice strategized the events, such as the Silent Sentinels, which led the successful campaign that resulted in its passage in 1920. After 1920 Alice spent a half century as leader of the National Woman’s Party, which fought for her Equal Rights Amendment to secure constitutional equality for women. She won a large degree of success with the inclusion of women as a group protected against discrimination by the Civil Rights Act of 1964. She insisted that her National Woman’s Party focus on the legal status of all women and resisted calls to address issues like birth control. Alice Paul had a very active social life until she moved to Washington in late 1912. She enjoyed close relationships with women and befriended, sometimes dated, men. Paul did not preserve private correspondence for the most part, so few details are available. Once Paul devoted herself to winning the vote, she placed the suffrage effort first in her life. Nevertheless, Elsie Hill and Dora Kelly Lewis, two women she met early in her work for NAWSA, remained close to her all their lives. She knew William Parker, a scholar she met at the University of Pennsylvania, for several years; he may have tended a marriage proposal in 1917. The more thorough discussion of Paul’s familial relations and friendships is found in J.D. Zahniser’s biography. Alice continued fighting for equal rights until she suffered a debilitating stroke in 1974. She died at the age of 92 on July 9, 1977 at the Greenleaf Extension Home, a Quaker facility in Moorestown, New Jersey, less than a mile from her birthplace and childhood home at Paulsdale, and is buried at Westfield Friends Burial Ground (2201 Riverton Rd, Cinnaminson, NJ 08077).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Bayard Taylor was an American poet, literary critic, translator, travel author, and diplomat.
Born: January 11, 1825, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: December 19, 1878, Berlin, Germany
Lived: Cedarcroft, Cedarcroft Rd, Kennett Square, PA 19348, USA (39.85522, -75.72202)
Buried: Longwood Cemetery, Kennett Square, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA

Bayard Taylor was an American poet, literary critic, translator, and travel author. Taylor had a close relationship with poet/diplomat George Henry Boker, founder of Nassau Monthly. Taylor was famous for his books about the Gold Rush in California, including Eldorado and California Life. He also wrote about passionate relationships between men, including Twin Love and the poem To a Persian Boy. Joseph and His Friend is considered the first American novel to deal with gay feelings. It recounts an intimate friendship between two men and is believed to be inspired by the poets Fitz-Greene Halleck and Joseph Rodman Drake, who died in young age: during a train ride Joseph Asten's eyes settle on a stranger, passenger Philip Held. Feeling his stare, Philip looks back. “[t]he usual reply to such a gaze is an unconscious defiance…but the look which seems to answer, 'We are men, let us know each other!' is, alas! Too rare in this world.” In time, yielding to “manly love...as tender and true as the love of woman,” they kiss. Yet, Joseph finds a potential bride, leaving Philip “vicariously happy, warmed in [his] lonely sphere by the far radiation of [Joseph's] nuptial bliss.”
They met in 1848, friends until Bayard Taylor’s death in 1878: 30 years
Bayard Taylor (January 11, 1825 – December 19, 1878)
George Henry Boker (October 6, 1823 - January 2, 1890)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Cedarcroft, also known as Bayard Taylor House, is a home in Chester County, Pennsylvania, formerly the home of writer Bayard Taylor (1825–1878.)
Address: Cedarcroft Rd, Kennett Square, PA 19348, USA (39.85522, -75.72202)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 71000693, 1971. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built in 1859-1860
Bayard Taylor built the mansion he named Cedarcroft near Kennett Square, Pennsylvania. He personally supervised its construction, including its two-foot walls and tall tower, and later wrote a series of articles about it. He also owned the surrounding 200 acres of land which he had spent several years acquiring. He described the building’s design as "large and stately, simple in its forms, without much ornament... expressive of strength and ornament." He lived here with his wife Marie Hansen, the daughter of the Danish/German astronomer Peter Andreas Hansen, whom he married in 1857. Several of Taylor’s writings were either written at Cedarcroft or reference it, including his 1863 book “The Poet’s Journal,” which he dedicated to his wife as "the Mistress of Cedarcroft.” Taylor pushed to complete the new home shortly after the birth of his daughter Lilian in 1858 and increased his writings for periodicals and offered several lectures to acquire the necessary revenue. Taylor laid the cornerstone for the house’s tower on June 9, 1859, with a hidden time capsule. That zinc box, he wrote, contains coins, a newspaper, a copy of his book “Views Afoot,” as well as "an original poem by me, to be read five hundred years hence by somebody who has never heard of me." Upon moving into the home in 1860, Taylor’s family performed a farcical play co-written with Richard Henry Stoddard. In addition to Stoddard, Cedarcroft hosted several other literary figures, including George Henry Boker, Edmund Clarence Stedman, James Russell Lowell, James Thomas Fields, and Ralph Waldo Emerson. Outside the house, Taylor planted a number of fruits and vegetables, including Latakia tobacco and melons. Plants included a giant sequoia from California, ivy, Dutchman’s pipe, Virginia creeper, wisteria, and trumpet flower. After visiting the house, Sidney Lanier wrote a poem called "Under the Cedarcroft Chestnut" about a tree there that was alleged to be 800 years old. The first work which Taylor himself wrote while living in Cedarcroft was his semi-autobiographical poetic series “The Poet’s Journal,” written within a month after moving in, though not published until 1862. The construction of the home cost $15,000 by February 1860, which was $5,000 more than anticipated and left Taylor in debt. His life in Kennett Square was further complicated by the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861. As he wrote to Stoddard in April, "Everything here is upside down. We live almost in a state of siege, with the rumors of war flying about us. At present we don’t know what is going on. We have reckless secessionists within twelve miles of us." Out of precaution, Taylor acquired weapons and buried his manuscripts before leaving the country and visiting Europe. Because of financial and political issues, Taylor only spent four out of the first eight summers at Cedarcroft. Instead, he traveled, gave lectures, and continued his literary work in New York. In the spring of 1862, he was chief war correspondent for the New York Tribune and visited the army at the lines in Virginia and reported on Congress in Washington, D.C. Later that year, he took a diplomatic job as chargé d’affaires at Saint Petersburg in Russia. The job was short-lived, however, and his financial problems continued. Further, Taylor had some difficulty with his neighbors, mostly conservative Quakers, who disapproved of his use of alcohol and cigars as well as his late-night gatherings. By 1870, Taylor complained to his mother, "If I had known, in 1859, how prices were to change, and labor to be dear and unreliable, and the neighborhood to go backwards instead of forwards, I never should have built (Cedarcroft) at all." Further, he admitted he wanted to live in New York and considered his experiment at a country life combined with literature was "a dead failure, and I have been carrying it on now for several years... out of stubborn unwillingness to admit that I was mistaken." By 1875, he left the home to the care of his parents, sister and brother-in-law. Taylor died in Germany on December 19, 1878. The home remained in the Taylor family until 1882, when his widow Marie and daughter Lilian sold the house and the 116 acres that remained from the original estate to Isaac Warner Jr. for $14,050. In September, 1905, the home, along with a new 3-story building behind it, was opened as a private preparatory school for boys. The first class included seven boys under the leadership of Principal Jesse Evans Philips, though later years saw between 32 and 40 enrolled for each class. Among the school’s students was future professional baseball player Herb Pennock. At 18 years old, Pennock was signed to the Philadelphia Athletics in 1912; he was later traded to the Boston Red Sox and then the New York Yankees. Pennock, nicknamed "The Squire of Kennett Square,” was posthumously inducted into the baseball hall of fame in 1948. The house stands surrounded by suburban neighborhood of mostly single-story tract housing built in the 1950s. The street is now named Gatehouse Road.
Life
Who: Bayard Taylor (January 11, 1825 – December 19, 1878)
Bayard Taylor wrote about passionate relationships between men, including “Twin Love” and the poem “To a Persian Boy.” “Joseph and His Friend” is considered the first American novel to deal with gay feelings, and is believed to be inspired by the poets Fitz-Greene Halleck (1790-1867) and Joseph Rodman Drake (1795-1820.) Taylor himself had a close relationship with poet/diplomat George Henry Boker (1823-1890), founder of Nassau Monthly. Taylor is buried at Longwood Cemetery (Kennett Square, PA 19348). Boker is buried at Laurel Hill Cemetery (Philadelphia.)
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At Wilmington & Brandywine Cemetery (701 Delaware Ave, Wilmington, DE 19801) is buried Alice Dunbar Nelson (1876-1935), American poet, journalist and political activist. Her first husband was the poet Paul Laurence Dunbar; she then married physician Henry A. Callis; and last married Robert J. Nelson, a poet and civil rights activist. She and Paul Dunbar separated in 1902 but were never divorced. He was reported to have been disturbed by her lesbian affairs. Paul Dunbar died in 1906.
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Louisa D'Andelot Carpenter (1907-1976) was a du Pont heiress, Jazz Age socialite and aviator. Her circle of friends, socialites, acquaintances and lovers included Evelyn Eugenia (known as "Sister") and her sister Tallulah Bankhead, Louise Brooks, Marion Carstairs, Noël Coward, Greta Garbo, Libby Holman, Jane Bowles and Z. Smith Reynolds. She is buried at Du Pont de Nemours Cemetery (215 Buck Rd, Wilmington, DE 19807).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Jane Chambers was one of the first American playwrights to create openly lesbian characters who were comfortable with their own homosexuality. She believed that this would help eliminate homophobia. While at Goddard, she met Beth Allen, who was to become her lover, manager, and devoted lifelong companion. Subsequently Chambers’s death, Allen published a collection of her poetry as a memorial to her courage and spirit. The Women in Theatre Program of the Association for Theatre in Higher Education honored Chambers by creating the Jane Chambers Playwriting Award to encourage the writing of plays that reflect women's experience. As Chambers told the New York Times, "As we become more comfortable with ourselves, the rest of the world will become comfortable with us." She opened the door for other playwrights who wished to write affirming plays about lesbians.
Together from 1968 to 1983: 15 years.
Beth A. Allen (born 1959)
Jane Chambers (March 27, 1937 - February 15, 1983)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Lived: Villa Torri di Gattaia, Viuzzo di Gattaia, 9, 50125 Firenze, Italy (43.75812, 11.26701)
Buried: Cimitero Evangelico degli Allori, Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy

Villa Torri di Gattaia, the Florentine residence in which Charles Loeser housed his important collection of Italian Renaissance art, soon became a popular haunt of scholars and art lovers from all over the world.
Address: Viuzzo di Gattaia, 9, 50125 Firenze, Italy (43.75812, 11.26701)
Type: Private Property
Place
In 1888 Loeser took up residence in Florence, at Villa Torri di Gattaia, where he met and married young German pianist Olga Lebert Kaufmann. Music lovers were invited to the villa to attend concerts by the Lener String Quartet, with whom Olga often played. Loeser was also one of the first to recognise the artistic talent of Cézanne and to purchase his paintings, which he hung in the villa's private rooms. Charles Loeser died while on a visit to New York in 1928, on the very eve of his return to Florence. He is buried in the Evangelical Cemetery "agli Allori". His villa now houses the International School of Florence.
Life
Who: Charles Alexander Loeser (January 11, 1864 – March 15, 1928)
Charles Alexander Loeser was an American art historian and art collector. He was born in New York into a family of German origin. After completing his Master of Arts degree in Philosophy at Harvard University (his fellow students included Bernard Berenson, William Randolph Hearst and George Santayana) in 1888 he decided to travel to Europe and visit his friend George Santayana. Santayana's place in the gay literary tradition derives perhaps less directly from his writings (though the subtle homoeroticism of “The Last Puritan” is a significant contribution) than from the impact of antigay bigotry on his professional life at Harvard. Although regarded as brilliant by his peers (including William James), Santayana's status as a bachelor met with the university administration's clear disapproval. Loeser settled into Florence in 1890 where he met and married famous German pianist Olga Lebert Kaufmann, and spent the rest of his life here collecting and studying Medieval and early Renaissance art and furniture. He purchased his Villa Torri Gattaia, nestled into the Florentine hills behind San Miniato al Monte, around 1908 and started on renovations. In Florence, Loeser cultivated his studies. He devoted himself to his studies and the collecting of works of art, and furniture that was flooding the market at the turn of the century. He was like many other English and Americans resident in the city at that time. At his death, Loeser’s remarkable collection totalled over 1,000 pieces comprised over two hundred and fifty Old Master prints and drawings, numerous period furnishings, paintings, sculptures and works of applied art. Most were works of Italian Medieval and Renaissance art, but there were also contemporary works, such a collection of Cézanne paintings. Loeser was one of the first to appreciate the artist along with Italian-American collector Egisto Fabbri. The whole collection was characterized by the austere sobriety with which these precious antiques and works of art furnished the various rooms of the villa. Charles Loeser died during a visit to New York in 1928. In his will that was drawn up two years earlier, he had ordained that on his death the collection of Old Master prints and drawings would be donated to the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University, that the President of the United States would be able to choose eight of his prized Cézannes "to adorn the White House", and that the selection of over thirty works of art and period furnishings indicated by him should be bequeathed to the City Council of his adoptive city. The Palazzo Vecchio took this collection which would later be known as the "Loeser Bequest”. The Bequest still adorns the rooms of the Quartiere del Mezzanino of Palazzo Vecchio, laid out in line with aesthetic canons similar to those that characterized the interiors of the aristocratic mansions of Renaissance Florence, and which the collectors of Loeser’s time tended to reproduce in their private residences. The collection was originally set up in the Mezzanino by curator, Alfredo Lensi. He had the same vision that had Loeser arranging the space in the Florentine style which kept chronology and style separate from the aesthetic value of the works together. This collection can still be seen set up similarly to how Loeser would have lived with the pieces in his Villa.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori ("The Evangelical Cemetery of Laurels") is located in Florence, Italy, between 'Due Strade' and Galluzzo. The small cemetery was opened on February 26, 1860 when the non-Catholic communities of Florence could no longer bury their dead in the English Cemetery in Piazzale Donatello.
Address: Via Senese, 184, 50124 Firenze, Italy (43.74775, 11.22999)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Place
The Cemetery is named after the Allori farm where it was located. Initially a Protestant cemetery, the site is now private. Since 1970 it has accepted the dead of other denominations, including Muslims. The cemetery became newsworthy in 2006 when the writer and journalist Oriana Fallaci was buried there alongside her family and a stone memorial to Alexandros Panagoulis, her companion.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori:
• Harold Acton (1904-1994), British writer.
• Robert Wiedeman Barrett Browning, known as Pen Browning, (1849–1912), English painter. His career was moderately successful, but he is better known as the son and heir of the celebrated English poets, Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.
• Leo Ditrichstein (1865-1928), American actor and playwriter. Educated in Austria, Ditrichstein was the author of a number of plays, five of which were made into motion pictures. Worked with Gareth Hughes, Welsh actor in theater and film who worked primarily in the United States, and who, according to historian William J. Mann, was a "flaming little queen".
• Alice Keppel (1868-1947), British mistress of Edward VII and mother of Violet Trefusis.
• John Pope-Hennessy (1913-1994), British art historian.
• Violet Page, aka Vernon Lee (1856-1935), British writer.
• Charles Alexander Loeser (1864–1928), American art historian and art collector.
• Osbert Sitwell (1892-1969), British writer.
• Frederick Stibbert (1838-1906), British art collector.
• Violet Trefusis (1894-1972), English and French writer.
• Reginald Turner (1869-1938), British writer. Turner numbered among his friends Max Beerbohm, Lord Alfred Douglas, H. G. Wells, Arnold Bennett, Somerset Maugham, D. H. Lawrence, Oscar Wilde, Osbert Sitwell and others of the London literary scene during the late XIX and early XX century. S. N. Behrman said of him, "He was one of those men who talk like angels and write like pedestrians". Harold Acton agreed, writing of Turner's conversation, "One forgot to eat while he spun his fantasies." Beerbohm said, "He would be eloquent even were he dumb," and Maugham wrote, "Reggie Turner was, on the whole, the most amusing man I have known." After Wilde's death, Turner, who was homosexual, felt few ties to England.
Burial tombstone by Adolf von Hildebrand at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori:
• RUDOLF BENNERT, Place of birth: FRANKFURT, Mother: FUSSLI M, Died: 08/09/1882, Age: 23, Plot: 2PPsSG VII 16s
• ERMINIA BUMILLER, Father: HERMAN, Mother: DANIELIS FEDERICA, Age: 82, Plot: 2PPsSG V 28r
• HERMAN BUMILLER, Died: 24/07/1898, Plot: 2PPsSG V 28s
• FEDERICA DANIELIS, Father: GIOVAN BATTISTA, Died: 13/03/1903, Age: 78, Plot: 2PPsSG V 28s
• KARL ARNOLD HILLEBRAND, Place of birth: GIESSEN, Died: 18/10/1884, Plot: 2PPsSB VII 78s
• HEINRICH EMIL HOMBERGER, Place of birth: MAINZ, Died: 01/08/1890, Plot: 2PPsSB VII 81s
• JESSY TAYLOR, Place of birth: LONDRA, Father: EDGARD, Died: 08/05/1905, Age: 78, Plot: 2PPsSB VII 79u
Life
Adolf von Hildebrand (October 6, 1847 – January 18, 1921)
Adolf von Hildebrand was a German sculptor. Hildebrand was born at Marburg, the son of Marburg economics professor Bruno Hildebrand. He studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Nuremberg, with Kaspar von Zumbusch at the Munich Academy and with Rudolf Siemering in Berlin. From 1873 he lived in Florence in San Francesco, a secularized XVI-century monastery. A particular friend of Hans von Marées, he designed the architectural setting for the painter's murals in the library of the German Marine Zoological Institute at Naples (1873). In 1877 he married Irene Schäuffelen, a separation from von Marées that was decipted by the painter in one of his works. Von Hildebrand spent a significant amount of time in Munich after 1889, executing a monumental fountain there, the Wittelsbacher Brunnen. He is known for five monumental urban fountains. Hildebrand worked in a Neo-classical tradition, and set out his artistic theories in his book “Das Problem der Form in der Bildenden Kunst” (The Problem of Form in Painting and Sculpture), published in 1893. He was ennobled by the King of Bavaria in 1904. He was the father of the painter Eva, Elizabeth, sculptor Irene Georgii-Hildebrand, Sylvie, Bertele, and Catholic theologian Dietrich von Hildebrand. He died in Munich in 1921.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Eva Le Gallienne was an English-born American stage actress, producer, director, translator, and author.
Born: January 11, 1899, London, United Kingdom
Died: June 3, 1991, Weston, Connecticut, United States
Books: The Mystic in the Theatre: Eleonora Duse, With a quiet heart
Parents: Julie Norregard, Richard Le Gallienne
Awards: Special Tony Award, more
Lived: LeGallienne Bird Sanctuary, 40 Hillside Rd, Weston, CT 06883, USA (41.21754, -73.39313)
Frillinghurst Old Manor, Chiddingfold, Haslemere, Surrey GU27 2EN
5 Bedford Gardens, W8
Southdown Hotel, 1-3 Howard Square, Eastbourne BN21 4BQ, UK
16 Clifton Hill, NW8
Algonquin Hotel, 59 W 44th St, New York, NY 10036
Association: Civic Repertory Theatre, The 14th Street Theatre, 107 West 14th Street
Buried: at her home in Weston, Connecticut (ashes)

Eva Le Gallienne was a theatrical actress, producer, and director during the first half of the 20th century. During the early days of her career she often was in the company of outspoken and bisexual actress Tallulah Bankhead, and actresses Estelle Winwood and Blyth Daly, with the four of them being dubbed "The Four Horsemen of the Algonquin", referring to the Algonquin Round Table. Among other lovers, history counts also Alla Nazimova and Eleonora "Eleo" Sears. In 1934, she met actress Marion Evensen, who became her partner of 37 years sharing her house in Connecticut. In the late 1930s, Le Gallienne became involved in a relationship with theater director Margaret Webster. She was living in Connecticut with Evensen and shared an apartment in New York City with Webster. The relationship with Webster ended in 1948. At the death of Evensen in 1971, Le Gallienne was devastated, and it did not help that also Webster died just one year later.
Together from 1934 to 1971: 37 years.
Eva Le Gallienne (January 11, 1899 – June 3, 1991)
Marion Gunnar Evenson (or Evensen) (September 29, 1891 – September, 1971)
Margaret Webster (March 15, 1905 - November 13, 1972)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Frillinghurst Old Manor, Chiddingfold (Haslemere, Surrey GU27 2EN) is a late XVII century cottage with XX century extensions. Timber frame, red brick infill; plain tile roof, front stack to left wing. 2 storeys: centre;queen post timber frame with mixed fenestration, 2 windows across the first floor; leaded casement ground floor right; plank door to left. XX century cross wings either end with casement windows. Grade II, 1983. Was rented by Richard Le Gallienne, Eva Le Gallienne (January 11, 1899 – June 3, 1991)’s father, and the family spend time there during her childhood, even after they subleased it to their friend, actor William Faversham. It was here that a young Margaret Webster, guest with her family of William Faversham, met for the first time Eva Le Gallienne, six years her senior, in 1908. It was while Webster was directing Hamlet in 1938 that she began her long romantic relationship with Le Gallienne.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Richard Le Gallienne (1866-1947) was an English author and poet. American actress Eva Le Gallienne (1899-1991) was his daughter, by his second marriage to the the Danish journalist Julie Norregard, who left him in 1903 and took their daughter Eva to live in Paris. In May, 1902 the family could no longer meet all the expenses of country living and they rented their family home, The Old Manor, to their actor friend William Faversham and his wife and they took their lodgings at 5 Bedford Gardens, W8. An agreeable, residential quarter, the area contained, in addition to Kensington Palace and Gardens, several large mansions with extensive grounds, giving the neighborhood the appearance of a rural district removed from the metropolis of London. In July Richard took an alcohol cure at a doctor's home in Wimbledon. Ashamed of his weakness, he told friends that he was suffering from a nervous collapse and asthma and that he was taking a cycling holiday through the countryside. Julie and Eva left Bedford Gardens and moved into the Southdown Hotel (1-3 Howard Square, Eastbourne BN21 4BQ, UK). They were joined by Richard in August. By September they were living at 16 Clifton Hill, NW8 in the London suburb of St. John's Wood.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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In 1919, the Algonquin Hotel (59 W 44th St, New York, NY 10036) hosted the Algonquin Round Table, a lunch-time gathering of wits. Members included drama critic Alexander Woollcott and writer Dorothy Parker, Talullah Bankhead, Estelle Winwood, Eva LaGallienne, and Blythe Daly. Overnight guests included Noel Coward, Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, Gertrude Stein, and Alice B. Toklas.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Broadway’s 1100-seat Civic Repertory Theatre (more popularly known as The 14th Street Theatre) at 107 West 14th Street was home to Eva Le Gallienne’s company whose actors included herself, J. Edward Bromberg, Paul Leyssac, Florida Friebus, and Leona Roberts. As head of the Civic Repertory Theatre, she rejected the admission of Bette Davis, whose attitude she described as "insincere" and "frivolous.” The Civic Rep disbanded at the height of the Depression in 1934, having mounted 34 productions.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

“I bought a tiny little house in Weston in 1926. The house was well over two hundred years old, and about four acres of rocky woodland went along with it. To this haven I fled every week end – rain, shine, or snow – and those few hours of peace helped me immeasurably to sustain my physical and spiritual energy.” Eva LeGallienne
Address: 40 Hillside Rd, Weston, CT 06883, USA (41.21754, -73.39313)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1928
A romantic and charming "Mini-Estate.” Multiple out buildings include main house, separate barn, cottage. Currently in the middle of 12acres of preserve (the LeGallienne Bird Sanctuary.)
Life
Who: Eva Le Gallienne (January 11, 1899 – June 3, 1991)
Eva Le Gallienne was an English-born stage actress, producer, director, translator, and author. A broadway star by age 21, Le Gallienne consciously ended her work on Broadway to devote herself to founding the Civic Repertory Theater, in which she was both director, producer, and lead actress. Noted for her boldness and idealism, she became a pioneering figure in the American Repertory Movement, which enabled today’s Off-Broadway. A versatile and eloquent actress herself (playing everything from “Peter Pan” to “Hamlet”), Le Gallienne also became a respected stage coach, director, producer and manager. Le Gallienne consciously devoted herself to the "Art of the Theatre" as opposed to the "Show Business of Broadway.” She ran the Civic Repertory Theatre Company for 10 years (1926–1936), backed by the financial support of one of her lovers, Alice DeLamar, a wealthy Colorado gold mine heiress, producing 37 plays during that time. Le Gallienne was awarded the National Medal of Arts in 1986. Le Gallienne never hid her lesbianism inside the acting community, but reportedly was never comfortable with her sexuality, struggling privately with it. She reportedly briefly considered arranging for a "front" marriage with actor Basil Rathbone. During the early days of her career she often was in the company of witty, libertine actresses Tallulah Bankhead, Estelle Winwood and Blyth Daly, with the four being dubbed "The Four Horsemen of the Algonquin,” referring to the Algonquin Round Table. In 1918, while in Hollywood, she began an affair with the great actress Alla Nazimova, who was at her height of fame, and who at that time wielded much power in the acting community. The affair ended reportedly due to Nazimova’s jealousy. In 1920, she became involved with poet, novelist and playwright Mercedes de Acosta about whom she was passionate for several years. She and de Acosta began their romance shortly after de Acosta’s marriage to Abram Poole which strained their relationship. Still, they vacationed and travelled together often, at times visiting the salon of famed writer and socialite Natalie Barney. By early 1927, Le Gallienne was involved with married actress Josephine Hutchinson. Hutchinson’s husband started divorce proceedings and named Le Gallienne in the divorce proceedings as "co-respondent.” The press began accusations that named Josephine Hutchinson as a "shadow actress,” which at the time meant lesbian. In the late 1930s Le Gallienne became involved in a relationship with theatre director Margaret Webster. She, Webster, and producer Cheryl Crawford co-founded The American Repertory Theater, which operated from 1946 to 1948. In the following years she lived with her companion Marion Evensen. On June 3, 1991, Le Gallienne died at her home in Weston, Connecticut from natural causes, aged 92. She was cremated and her ashes were scattered at her home in Weston.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Katharine Coman was an American social activist, historian and economist. She specialized in teaching about the development of the American West. Wellesley College named a professorship in her honor.
Born: November 23, 1857, United States of America
Died: January 11, 1915, Wellesley, Massachusetts, United States
Education: University of Michigan
Buried: Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Licking County, Ohio, USA, Plot: Section 2 - Lot 207
Mount Auburn Cemetery (cremated)

Katharine Lee Bates was an American songwriter. She is remembered as the author of the words to the anthem America the Beautiful. She popularized "Mrs. Santa Claus" through her poem Goody Santa Claus on a Sleigh Ride (1889). In 1887, while teaching at Wellesley, Bates met fellow teacher Katharine Coman. Bates lived in Wellesley with Coman, who was a history and political economy teacher and founder of the Wellesley College School Economics department. The pair lived together for twenty-five years until Coman's death in 1915. In 1922, Bates published Yellow Clover: A Book of Remembrance, a collection of poems written "to or about my Friend" Katharine Coman, some of which had been published in Coman's lifetime. Some describe the couple as intimate lesbian partners, citing as an example Bates' 1891 letter to Coman: "It was never very possible to leave Wellesley [for good], because so many love-anchors held me there, and it seemed least of all possible when I had just found the long-desired way to your dearest heart...Of course I want to come to you, very much as I want to come to Heaven." Others contest the use of the term lesbian to describe such a "Boston marriage".
Together from 1887 to 1915: 28 years.
Katharine Ellis Coman (November 23, 1857 - January 11, 1915)
Katharine Lee Bates (August 12, 1859 – March 28, 1929)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Private, women-focused school founded in 1870 and known for its humanities programs.
Address: 106 Central St, Wellesley, MA 02481, USA (42.29357, -71.30592)
Type: Education facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 781-283-1000
Place
Vida Dutton Scudder taught English literature from 1887 at Wellesley College, where she became an associate professor in 1892 and full professor in 1910. Wellesley College is a private women’s liberal-arts college in the town of Wellesley, Massachusetts, west of Boston. Founded in 1870, Wellesley is a member of the original Seven Sisters Colleges. Wellesley is the highest ranking women’s college in the U.S., and one of the top liberal arts colleges, ranking 4th by U.S. News & World Report. The school is also the highest endowed women’s college. For the 2014–15 year admissions cycle, Wellesley admitted 29% of its applicants. The college is known for allowing its students to cross-register at MIT, Babson, Brandeis, and Olin College. It is also a member of a number of exchange programs with other small colleges, including opportunities for students to study a year at Amherst, Bowdoin, Connecticut College, Dartmouth, Mt. Holyoke, Smith, Trinity, Vassar, Wesleyan, and Wheaton. Wellesley was founded by Pauline and Henry Fowle Durant, believers in educational opportunity for women. Wellesley was founded with the intention to prepare women for "great conflicts, for vast reforms in social life." Its charter was signed on Mar. 17, 1870, by Massachusetts Governor William Claflin. The original name of the college was the Wellesley Female Seminary; its renaming to Wellesley College was approved by the Massachusetts legislature on March 7, 1873. Wellesley first opened its doors to students on September 8, 1875. The original architecture of the college consisted of one very large building, College Hall, which was approximately 150 metres (490 ft) in length and five stories in height. The architect was Hammatt Billings. From its completion in 1875 until its destruction by fire in 1914, it was both an academic building and residential building. A group of residence halls, known as the Tower Court complex, are located on top of the hill where the old College Hall once stood.
Notable queer alumni and faculty at Wellesley:
• Katharine Anthony (1877-1965), biographer best known for “The Lambs” (1945), a controversial study of the British writers Charles and Mary Lamb. She taught at Wellesley College in 1907.
• Katharine Lee Bates (1859-1929), full professor of English literature. Bates lived in Wellesley with Katharine Coman at 70 Curve St, Wellesley, MA 02482, historic home built in 1907 by Bates, while she was a professor at Wellesley College.
• Katharine Coman (1857-1915), history and political economy teacher and founder of the Wellesley College School Economics department.
• Florence Converse (1871-1967)
• Mary “Molly” Dewson (1874–1962), graduated as a social worker in 1897. She was senior class president and her classmates believed she might one day be elected president of the United States.
• Marion Dickerman (1890-1983), suffragist, educator, vice-principal of the Todhunter School and an intimate of Eleanor Roosevelt.
• Grace Frick (1903-1979), literary scholar and Marguerite Yourcenar’s intimate companion.
• Esther Lape (1881-1981), a graduate of Wellesley College, taught English at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, the University of Arizona, and Barnard College in New York City. Her life-partner was the scholar and lawyer, Elizabeth Fisher Read, who was Eleanor Roosevelt's personal attorney and financial advisor.
• Jeannette Augustus Marks (1875-1964), English and Theater professor at Mount Holyoke until her retirement in 1941 and Mary Emma Woolley’s companion.
• Julia Vida Dutton Scudder (1861-1954).
• Charlotte Anita Whitney (1867–1955), American women's rights activist, political activist, suffragist, and early Communist Labor Party of America and Communist Party USA organizer in California.
• Mary Emma Woolley (1863–1947), educator, peace activist and women’s suffrage supporter. She was the first female student to attend Brown University and served as the 11th President of Mount Holyoke College from 1900-1937.
Life
Who: (Julia) Vida Dutton Scudder (December 15, 1861 – October 9, 1954)
Vida Dutton Scudder was an educator, writer, and welfare activist in the social gospel movement. In 1885 she and Clara French (1863-1888) were the first American women admitted to the graduate program at Oxford, where she was influenced by York Powell and John Ruskin. While in England she was also influenced by Leo Tolstoi and by George Bernard Shaw and Fabian Socialism. Scudder and French returned to Boston in 1886. French died in 1888 (from typhoid fever, buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Syracuse, NY), and from 1919 until her death, Scudder lived with Florence Converse (1871-1967.) Converse graduated from Wellesley College in 1893 and was a member of the editorial staff of the The Churchman from 1900 to 1908, when she joined the staff of the Atlantic Monthly. In Wellesley they resided at 45 Leighton Road. A 6000 square foot single family home with 5 bedrooms built in 1912, it was last sold in 1987 for $460,000. Scudder retired from Wellesley in 1927 and received the title of professor emeritus. She became the first dean of the Summer School of Christian Ethics in 1930 at Wellesley. In 1931 she lectured weekly at the New School for Social Research in New York. She published an autobiography, “On Journey,” in London in 1937, and a collection of essays, “The Privilege of Age,” in New York in 1939. Vida Dutton Scudder died at Wellesley, Massachusetts, on October 10, 1954. Florence Converse and Vida Dutton Scudder are buried side by side at Newton Cemetery (791 Walnut St, Newton Centre, MA 02459).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lilian May Miller was an American painter, woodblock printmaker and poet born in Tokyo, Japan. In the world of art she marked her place with imagery, while she attended presentations in traditional kimonos, and signed her paintings with a monogram.
Born: July 20, 1895, Tokyo, Japan
Died: January 11, 1943, San Francisco, California, United States
Education: Vassar College
Known for: Drawing, Painting, Watercolor painting, Printmaking, Woodblock printing, Poetry
Lived: USC Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, 46 N Los Robles Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101, USA (34.14675, -118.14101)
Buried: Woodlawn Memorial Park, Colma, San Mateo County, California, USA

Grace Nicholson's Pasadena residence, now the Pacific Asia Museum, was where Lilian May Miller felt most at home—outside Japan. Their friendship enabled Miller to meet and make use of many important art contacts on her American trip and afterwards.
Address: 46 N Los Robles Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101, USA (34.14675, -118.14101)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +1 626-449-2742
National Register of Historic Places: 77000300, 1977
Place
Built in 1926, Design by Marston, Van Pelt & Maybury
The museum was founded in 1971 by the Pacificulture Foundation, which purchased “The Grace Nicholson Treasure House of Oriental Art” from the City of Pasadena. Grace Nicholson donated the structure to the city for art and cultural purposes in 1943 and was a dealer in Native American and, later, Asian art and antiques. It houses some 15,000 rare and representative examples of art from throughout Asia and the Pacific Islands. In 2013, the museum became part of the University of Southern California. The building is temporarily closed beginning June 27, 2016 until mid-spring 2017 for a seismic retrofit and renovation. The building is designed in the style of a Chinese imperial palace and features a central courtyard with a garden, a small pool, and decorative carvings.
Life
Who: Grace Nicholson (December 31, 1877 – August 31, 1948) and Lilian May Miller (July 20, 1895 - January 11, 1943)
Grace Nicholson was an American art collector and art dealer, specializing in Native American and Chinese handicrafts. She was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, daughter of Franklin Nicholson and Rose Dennington Nicholson. Her father was an attorney, and her mother trained as an educator. Rose Nicholson died from complications following Grace's birth; when Grace was a teen, her father also died, and she was sent to live with her paternal grandparents. They both died in 1901, leaving her an inheritance. Nicholson attended Philadelphia High School for Girls, graduating in the class of 1896. She briefly worked as a stenographer after high school. In 1901, using her inheritance, Nicholson moved to California, and soon opened a small shop in Pasadena, selling Native American handicrafts such as baskets and weaving. In 1924, she designed a new building for her collections, which (reflective of changing fashions) had begun to focus on Asian art. The architectural firm of Marston, Van Pelt & Maybury worked with Nicholson to realize her vision. Her design, nicknamed the "Treasure House," borrowed elements from buildings she had seen in China. The building was opened as an art gallery and shop in 1925, although the interior garden courtyard was not completed until 1929. Her building was deeded to the City of Pasadena in 1943, but she continued to live in her private apartment on the second floor until her death from cancer in 1948. Nicholson was an active charter member of the Zonta Club of Pasadena, and hosted meetings at her home, including a 1929 Christmas party attended by Amelia Earhart. She was the art patron of Lilian May Miller. Lilian May Miller was an American painter, woodblock printmaker and poet born in Tokyo, Japan. In the world of art she marked her place with imagery, while she attended presentations in traditional kimonos, and signed her paintings with a monogram. Her father, Ransford Miller, was an American diplomat who had worked for the YMCA in Tokyo from 1890 to 1894. In 1894 Ransford Miller married Lilly Murray, who had arrived in Japan in 1888 and taught English. Lilian had a sister named Harriet, who her father called "Hal"; Lilian was called "Jack". She lived a life of contradictions. Miller wore kimonos when she showed her work - which reflected her east Asian upbringing - but also wore men's clothes. The kimono represented the Japanese traditional culture in which she was raised, but she didn't follow the strict protocols for developing wood block printing, this was something that made her popular with Americans. Her parents were from the United States, but she lived most of her life in Asia. She is assumed to have been a lesbian and once said that she didn't have the ability to make herself fall in love with a man. Her ashes were buried at Woodland Memorial Park (1000 El Camino Real, Colma, CA 94014). Grace Nicholson is buried with her parents at West Laurel Hill Cemetery (215 Belmont Avenue, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Sarah Aldridge was the pen name of Anyda Marchant, who was a founding partner for Naiad Press 1973 and A&M Books in 1995, and a writer of primarily lesbian popular fiction.
Born: January 27, 1911, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Died: January 11, 2006, Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, United States
Education: George Washington University

Sarah Aldridge was the pen name of Anyda Marchant, who was a founding partner for Naiad Press in 1973 and A&M Books in 1995, and a writer of primarily lesbian popular fiction. She met legal secretary Muriel Inez Crawford in 1948. The couple was together until Aldridge's death. Crawford died less than 5 months after Aldridge. One of the first women to pass the bar in Washington DC, she served the World Bank as an attorney in the Legal Department for 18 years until retiring in 1972. As Sarah Aldridge, she was the author of many literary works. Her first published work was a short story issued by The Ladder, the periodical released by the Daughters of Bilitis. The fourteen lesbian novels she wrote include All True Lovers, Tottie, A Flight of Angels, The Latecomer, and The Nesting Place. Aldridge died at her home in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware on January 11, 2006. She was 94. She was awarded the Golden Crown Literary Society Trailblazer Award posthumously in June 2007.
Together from 1948 to 2006: 58 years.
Sarah Aldridge aka Anyda Marchant (January 27, 1911 – January 11, 2006)
Muriel Inez Crawford (April 21, 1914 – June 7, 2006)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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