Jan. 12th, 2017

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Lived: 61-63 Petersham Rd, Richmond, Greater London TW10 6UT, UK (51.45518, -0.30333)
Buried: St Mary the Virgin, Mortlake High Street, Across the road from the river, Mortlake, London, SW14 8JA

Michael Field was a pseudonym used for the poetry and verse drama of Katherine Harris Bradley and her niece and ward Edith Emma Cooper. As Field, they wrote around 40 works together and a long journal Works and Days. Their intention was to keep the pen name secret, but it became public knowledge, not long after they had confided in their friend Robert Browning. Bradley published first under the pseudonym Arran Leigh, a nod to Elizabeth Barrett. Edith adopted the name Isla Leigh. From the late 1870s, when Edith was at University College, Bristol, they agreed to live together and were, over the next 40 years, lovers and co-authors. They had financial independence: Bradley's father, Charles Bradley, had been in the tobacco industry in Birmingham. They developed a large circle of literary friends; in particular, painters and life partners Charles de Sousy Ricketts and Charles Hazelwood Shannon, near whom they settled in Richmond, London. They also were passionately devoted to their pets, in particular a dog named Whym Chow, for whom they wrote a book of poems named after him. This continued a tradition of lesbian couples forming families that included beloved animals. They wrote each other: “My love and I took hands and swore / against the world to be / Poets and lovers evermore.” –Michael Field, Underneath the Bow (1893)
Together from 1878 to 1913: 35 years.
Edith Emma Cooper (January 12, 1862 - December 13, 1913)
Katherine Harris Bradley (October 27, 1846 - September 26, 1914)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Contemporary dining with carefully crafted dishes in chic riverside spot with alfresco balcony.
Address: 61-63 Petersham Rd, Richmond, Greater London TW10 6UT, UK (51.45518, -0.30333)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 20 8940 0902
Place
In 1899 the death of Edith Emma Cooper’s father enabled her and her aunt, Katherine Harris Bradley, to buy their own house as evidence of their "close marriage,” although Edith saw her father’s death as retribution for their lifestyle. The property, originally built as two Georgian houses in 1740, was described in a rental survey for George III, carried out in 1773 as a “messeuge (a dwelling), court and garden” and a “messuage with stables and coach house.” Lady Ann Bingham, whose sister Lady Lavinia married the first Earl of Spencer, rented the property in 1821, added the room which is currently the Bingham Bar, which links the properties. Katherine Bradley and Edith Cooper, who wrote under the pseudonym Michael Field, lived in the property from 1899-1914. They entertained many literary visitors including W.B. Yeats. The Bingham’s 15 bedrooms are named after their poetry and works. During the XX Century the property fell into disrepair and was bought by the current owners in 1984 undergoing extensive refurbishment from 2006-8. 53 Petersham Road, along with neighbouring associated buildings 55-61 are collectively known as The Paragon, and are all Grade II Listed Georgian-era buildings. No. 55 was at once home of Occultist Aleister Crowley. In 1898, while appearing at the Cambridge Footlights club, Herbert Pollitt (1871-1942), female impersonator under the name of Diane De Rougy, and art collector, met and had an affair with the then unknown Aleister Crowley. Crowley describes his lover: “Pollitt was rather plain than otherwise. His face was made tragic by the terrible hunger of the eyes and the bitter sadness of the mouth. He possessed one physical beauty - his hair. This was very plentiful and he wore it rather long. It was what is called a shock. But its colour was pale gold, like spring sunshine, and its texture was of the finest gossamer.” Crowley would later write that “I lived with Pollitt as his wife for some six months and he made a poet out of me.”
Life
Who: Katharine Harris Bradley (October 27, 1846 –September 26, 1914) and Edith Emma Cooper (January 12, 1862 –December 13, 1913)
Michael Field was a pseudonym used for the poetry and verse drama of Katharine Harris Bradley and her niece and ward Edith Emma Cooper. As Field they wrote around 40 works together, and a long journal “Works and Days.” Their intention was to keep the pen-name secret, but it became public knowledge, not long after they had confided in their friend Robert Browning. Bradley’s elder sister, Emma, married James Robert Cooper in 1860, and went to live in Kenilworth, where their daughter, Edith Emma Cooper was born on January 12, 1862. Emma Cooper became an invalid for life after the birth of her second daughter, Amy, and Katharine Bradley, being her sister, stepped in to become the legal guardian of her niece Edith Cooper. From the late 1870s, when Edith was at University College, Bristol, they agreed to live together and were, over the next 40 years, lovers and co-authors. They had financial independence: Bradley’s father Charles Bradley had been in the tobacco industry in Birmingham. They developed a large circle of literary friends and contacts; in particular painters and life partners Charles Ricketts (1866-1931) and Charles Shannon (1863-1937), near whom they settled in Richmond, London. Robert Browning was also a close friend of Edith and Katherine, and they knew and admired Oscar Wilde, whose death they bitterly mourned. They knew many of the aesthetic movement of the 1890s, including Walter Pater, Vernon Lee, J. A. Symonds and also Bernard Berenson. William Rothenstein was a friend. They wrote a number of passionate love poems to each other, and their name Michael Field was their way of declaring their inseparable oneness. Friends referred to them as the Fields, the Michaels or the Michael Fields. They had a range of pet names for each other. They also were passionately devoted to their pets, in particular a dog named Whym Chow, for whom they wrote a book of poems named after him. Edith died of cancer in 1913, as did Katherine less than a year later. They were buried together at St Mary the Virgin (Mortlake High Street, Across the road from the river, Mortlake, London, SW14 8JA). A now-lost marble tomb was erected in 1926. St Mary is a Roman Catholic church in North Worple Way, Mortlake, in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. The church building, in Gothic Revival style, was designed by Gilbert Blount, architect to the first Archbishop of Westminster, Nicholas Wiseman, and dates from 1852. In the same cemetery is buried Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), a British explorer, geographer, translator, writer, soldier, orientalist, cartographer, ethnologist, spy, linguist, poet, fencer, and diplomat. He was known for his travels and explorations in Asia, Africa and the Americas, as well as his extensive knowledge of languages and cultures. He wrote numerous books and scholarly articles on a wide range of subjects, including homosexuality. After his death in 1890, his wife Isabel destroyed much of his material, including Burton’s study on homosexuality that was planned to be published with the new translation of Sheikh Nefzawi’s “The Perfumed Garden.” Burton had a lifelong interest in the study of sexual practices. While working in the army of the East India Company, he participated in an undercover investigation of a brothel in Karachi, said to be frequented by British soldiers where the prostitutes were young boys. His report was so detailed that subsequent readers believed Burton had participated in some of the practices described in his writing. Burton lies buried with his wife in a tent-shaped mausoleum. The mausoleum is Grade II* listed.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Died: 1979
People also search for: Marguerite Yourcenar, more
Lived: 549 Prospect Ave, Hartford, CT 06105, USA (41.76378, -72.71623)
Petite Plaisance, 35 S Shore Rd, Northeast Harbor, ME 04662, USA (44.28888, -68.28585)
Studied: Wellesley College
Buried: Brookside Cemetery, Mount Desert, Hancock County, Maine, USA
Buried alongside: Marguerite Yourcenar

Marguerite Yourcenar (born Marguerite Antoinette Jeanne Marie Ghislaine Cleenewerck de Crayencour to Michel Cleenewerck de Crayencour, of French bourgeois descent, and a Belgian mother, Fernande de Cartier de Marchienne, of Belgian nobility) was a Belgian-born French novelist and essayist. In 1939 literary scholar and Kansas City native Grace Frick, invited the writer to the United States to escape the outbreak of World War II in Europe. Frick was a graduate of Wellesley College and did her postgraduate work at Yale. She taught at Stephens College, Columbus, at Barnard College. Yourcenar lectured in comparative literature in New York City and Sarah Lawrence College. Yourcenar was bisexual and she and Frick became lovers in 1937, and would remain so until Frick's death in 1979. After ten years spent in Hartford, they bought a house together in Northeast Harbor on Mount Desert Island, Maine and lived there for decades. They are both buried at Brookside Cemetery, Mount Desert, Maine.
Together from 1937 to 1979: 42 years.
Grace Frick (1903-1979)
Marguerite Yourcenar (June 8, 1903 – December 17, 1987)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Marguerite Yourcenar arrived in Hartford in 1939. WWII was breaking out in Europe, but Yourcenar had chosen life in America with Grace Frick, a Wellesley graduate she had met in Paris in 1934 and fallen in love with “head over heels.” Shortly after Yourcenar arrived in the United States, Frick got a job as academic dean of Hartford Junior College, now Hartford College for Women. They rented a house at 549 Prospect Ave.
Address: 549 Prospect Ave, Hartford, CT 06105, USA (41.76378, -72.71623)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: West End South Historic District (Roughly bounded by Farmington Ave., Whitney and S. Whitney Sts., West Blvd. and Prospect Ave.), 85000763, 1985
Place
Marguerite Yourcenar’s French biographer, Josyane Savigneau, calls Hartford “a rather uninteresting city about a hundred miles from New York.” Yourcenar herself called it “reactionary, chauvinist and Protestant, with a hint of worldliness.” In Savigneau’s book, there are photos of Frick and Yourcenar leaning out of a window of the Prospect Avenue house, “photographs of love, the sort of childish demonstrations of happiness one can’t resist when in the thrall of a passion.” During her decade in Hartford, Yourcenar fell in with one major representative of the avant-garde in town: A. Everett “Chick” Austin Jr., who had turned the Wadsworth Atheneum from a stodgy small-city museum into a cultural movement. Austin was commissioning a theatrical-dance work based on the four elements -- earth, air, fire, water -- and for “Water,” Yourcenar wrote a piece based on Hans Christian Andersen’s story “The Little Mermaid.” “Chick danced in every one,” says Eugene R. Gaddis, the Atheneum’s archivist and Austin’s biographer. Yourcenar blamed herself for suggesting in 1945 that Austin stage the Elizabethan play “Tis Pity She’s a Whore,” “a story of an incestuous young couple, a brother and sister, who brave all sorts of slander to their love.” Reactionary Hartford was not amused, and gave Austin the boot. She wrote the work for which she is best known in America, “Memoirs of Hadrian,” while she lived in Hartford in the 1940s. The novel is in the form of a series of letters from the Roman emperor, on the eve of his death, to his successor. She wrote numerous other novels and short stories, plays and essays, and translated Virginia Woolf, Henry James and African American spirituals into French. Gaddis interviewed Yourcenar at her book-filled home in Maine in 1982, three years after Frick’s death and two years after Yourcenar had become the first woman elected to the French Academy. “Chick Austin was air and fire,” she recalled. She made Gaddis an omelet with vegetables from her kitchen garden and then asked him, in a thick French accent, “Eugene, will you go to the refrigerator and get us a couple of Budweisers?” She died in 1989.
Life
Who: Marguerite Yourcenar (June 8, 1903 – December 17, 1987) and Grace Frick (1903-1979)
Marguerite Yourcenar and Grace Frick lived in Hartford, to be near Grace’s work, first at Hartford Junior College, then at Connecticut College. Soon Yourcenar, too, began teaching, commuting to Sarah Lawrence, just outside New York City, where she gave courses in French and Italian.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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After ten years spent in Hartford, Grace Frick and Marguerite Yourcenar bought a house together in Northeast Harbor on Mount Desert Island, Maine and lived there for decades.
Address: 35 S Shore Rd, Northeast Harbor, ME 04662, USA (44.28888, -68.28585)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone:+1 207-276-3940
Place
You can wander behind the modest house of the late novelist Marguerite Yourcenar, Petite Plaisance, and through the Japanese garden to the little headstone of her dog, inscribed, "A gentle heart in a small body." At the turn of the XX century, Bar Harbor, the onetime fishing village on the eastern coast of Mount Desert Island, was Maine’s premier resort—a glamorous enclave of regal cottages and lavish entertainments for the few and the wealthy. They ran it like a country club until the great fire of 1947 destroyed everything. As the upper crust migrated 10 miles south, to Northeast Harbor and Seal Harbor, what rose from the rubble was a noisy, lively resort on the move. Northeast Harbor is a village on Mount Desert Island, located in the town of Mount Desert in Hancock County, Maine. The village has a significant summer population, and has long been a quiet enclave of the rich and famous. Summer residents include the Rockefeller family, as well as the late Brooke Astor and Barbara Bel Geddes. The village was at a time so popular as a summer resort among Philadelphians that it was sometimes known as "Philadelphia on the rocks.” Northeast Harbor is the home of Morris Yacht Brokerage. The village is home to the Asticou Azalea Garden.
Life
Who: Marguerite Yourcenar (June 8, 1903 – December 17, 1987) and Grace Frick (1903-1979)
Marguerite Yourcenar was a Belgian-born French novelist and essayist. Winner of the Prix Femina and the Erasmus Prize, she was the first woman elected to the Académie française, in 1980, and the seventeenth person to occupy Seat 3. In 1939 Yourcenar’s intimate companion at the time, the literary scholar and Kansas City native Grace Frick, invited the writer to the United States to escape the outbreak of WWII in Europe. Yourcenar lectured in comparative literature in New York City and Sarah Lawrence College. Yourcenar was bisexual; she and Frick became lovers in 1937 and remained together until Frick’s death in 1979. They are buried side by side across the sound in Somesville at Brookside Cemetery (Mt Desert, ME 04660). Yourcenar’s house on Mount Desert Island, Petite Plaisance, is now a museum dedicated to her memory.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Henry Gauthier-Villars or Willy, his nom-de-plume, was a French fin-de-siecle writer and music critic who is today mostly known as the mentor and first husband of Colette.
Born: August 8, 1859, Villiers-sur-Orge, France
Died: January 12, 1931, Paris, France
Spouse: Colette (m. 1893–1910)
Parents: Jean-Albert Gauthier-Villars
Buried: Montparnasse

Henry Gauthier-Villars or Willy was a French fin-de-siecle writer and music critic who is today mostly known as the mentor and first husband of Colette. In 1889, he met Colette, 14 years younger than he was; they married on May 15, 1893. Colette soon learned that Willy had other affairs, and she met his mistress Charlotte Kinceler, who later became her friend. Willy and Colette had an affair unbeknownst to each other with the same woman, the American socialite Georgie Raoul-Duval, née Urquhart. Upon discovery, they made it a threesome and attended the Bayreuth festival together. In 1906, Colette left the unfaithful Gauthier-Villars, living for a time at the home of the American writer and salonist Natalie Clifford Barney. The two had a short affair, and remained friends until Colette's death. The marriage of Willy and Colette lasted until 1910, although in the years prior they were already separated. Colette went to work in the music halls of Paris, under the wing of Missy de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf, with whom she became romantically involved. She also was involved in a heterosexual relationship during this time, with the Italian writer Gabriele D’Annunzio. According to one writer, Colette "never gave Missy as much love" and took "advantage of her and more or less appropriating Rozven, a Brittany villa, from her after they split up." Another affair during this period was with the automobile-empire scion Auguste Heriot.
Together from 1893 to 1906: 13 years.
Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954)
Henry Gauthier-Villars aka Willy (August 8, 1859 - January 12, 1931)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Tree-lined graveyard with the resting places of writers & artists including Sartre & Beckett.
Address: 3 Boulevard Edgar Quinet, 75014 Paris, France (48.83791, 2.32762)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 44 10 86 50
Place
Montparnasse Cemetery is a cemetery in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris, part of the city’s 14th arrondissement. Created from three farms in 1824, the cemetery at Montparnasse was originally known as Le Cimetière du Sud (Southern Cemetery.)
Notable queer burials at Montparnasse:
• Jules-Amédée Barbey d’Aurevilly (1808-1889) was a French novelist and short story writer. He had a decisive influence on writers such as Auguste Villiers de l’Isle-Adam, Henry James and Marcel Proust. When accused of sodomitical practices, D’Aurevilly reply was: “My tastes incline me to it, my principles permit it, but the ugliness of my contemporaries repels me.” He was transferred in 1926 to St Sauveur, le vicomte's cemetery, in Normandy.
• Marie Dorval (1798–1849), actress. In January 1833, female writer George Sand met Marie Dorval after the former wrote the actress a letter of appreciation following one of her performances. The two women became involved in an intimate friendship, and were rumored to have become lesbian lovers.
• Henry “Willy” Gauthier-Villars (1859–1931), writer and first husband of Colette. Willy and Colette had an affair unbeknownst to each other with the same woman, the American socialite Georgie Raoul-Duval, née Urquhart. Upon discovery, they made it a threesome and attended the Bayreuth festival together.
• Joris-Karl Huysmans (1848–1907), author. Huysmans’ novel “À rebours” (Against the Grain or Against Nature or Wrong Way) (1884) became his most famous, or notorious. It featured the character of an aesthete, des Esseintes, and decisively broke from Naturalism. It was seen as an example of "decadent" literature. The description of des Esseintes’ "alluring liaison" with a "cherry-lipped youth" was believed to have influenced other writers of the decadent movement, including Oscar Wilde. It is now considered an important step in the formation of "gay literature.” “À rebours” gained notoriety as an exhibit in the trials of Oscar Wilde in 1895. The prosecutor referred to it as a "sodomitical" book.
• Josie Mansfield (1847-1931), an American woman who became famous when one of her two wealthy lovers murdered the other. In 1873, Mansfield left New York for Paris with Ella Wesner, a male impersonator in Vaudeville. Mansfield and Wesner went to Paris and presided over a salon at the Café Américan. Wesner returned to the United States alone in the spring of 1873.
• Charles, Vicomte de Noailles (1891-1981) and his wife Marie-Laure (1902-1970), heiress of the Bischoffsheim banking fortune, are buried in the Bischoffsheim vault.
• Man Ray (1890–1976), American-born Dada & Surrealist artist and photographer
• Susan Sontag (January 16, 1933– December 28, 2004), American author & philosopher. Sontag lived with “H,” the writer and model Harriet Sohmers Zwerling whom she first met at U. C. Berkeley from 1958 to 1959. Afterwards, Sontag was the partner of María Irene Fornés, a Cuban-American avant garde playwright and director. Upon splitting with Fornes, she was involved with an Italian aristocrat, Carlotta Del Pezzo, and the German academic Eva Kollisch. Sontag was romantically involved with the American artists Jasper Johns and Paul Thek. During the early 1970s, Sontag lived with Nicole Stéphane, a Rothschild banking heiress turned movie actress, and, later, the choreographer Lucinda Childs. She also had a relationship with the writer Joseph Brodsky. With Annie Leibovitz, Sontag maintained a relationship stretching from the later 1980s until her final years.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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John Singer Sargent was an American artist, considered the "leading portrait painter of his generation" for his evocations of Edwardian era luxury.
Born: January 12, 1856, Florence
Died: April 14, 1925, London, United Kingdom
Period: American Renaissance
Influenced by: James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Diego Velázquez, more
Parents: Mary Sargent, FitzWilliam Sargent
Lived: Morgan Hall, London Rd, Fairford, Gloucestershire GL7 4AU, UK (51.70796, -1.77278
31-33 Tite St, Chelsea, London SW3 4JA, UK (51.48507, -0.15977) [English Heritage Building ID: 424570 (Grade II, 1969)
12-14 The Avenue, Fulham Rd, London, UK (51.49334, -0.16938)
Russell House, B4632, Broadway, Worcestershire WR12 7BU, UK (52.03685, -1.86585) [English Heritage Building ID: 400987 (Grade II, 1959)]
Farnham House, Church St, Broadway, Worcestershire WR12, UK (52.03469, -1.86374) [English Heritage Building ID: 399309 (Grade II, 1959)]
73 Rue Notre Dame des Champs, 75006 Paris, France (48.84322, 2.33189)
41 Boulevard Berthier, 75017 Paris, France (48.88744, 2.29916)
Studied: École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts
Buried: Brookwood Cemetery, Brookwood, Woking Borough, Surrey, England, GPS (lat/lon): 51.29772, -0.62469

John Singer Sargent was an American artist, considered the "leading portrait painter of his generation" for his evocations of Edwardian era luxury. Sargent was extremely private regarding his personal life, although the painter Jacques-Émile Blanche said after his death that Sargent's sex life "was notorious in Paris, and in Venice, positively scandalous. He was a frenzied bugger." Some scholars have suggested that Sargent was homosexual. He had personal associations with Prince Edmond de Polignac and Count Robert de Montesquiou. His male nudes reveal complex and well-considered artistic sensibilities about the male physique and male sensuality; this can be particularly observed in his portrait of Thomas E. McKeller (an African American elevator operator he befriended), but also in Tommies Bathing, nude sketches for Hell and Judgement, and his portraits of young men. However, there were many friendships with women, as well, and a similar suppressed sensualism informs his female portrait and figure studies. Art historian Deborah Davis suggests that Sargent's interest in women he considered exotic, Rosina Ferrara, Amélie Gautreau and Judith Gautier, was prompted by infatuation that transcended aesthetic appreciation. Sargent scholars accept an affair with Louise Burkhardt, the model for Lady with the Rose.
John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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When John Singer Sargent was only 18 years old, he was accepted at the rigorous L’Ecole des Beaux Arts. In August 1875, Sargent moved out of the family’s home and into a fifth-floor studio apartment at 73 rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs with fellow art student James Carroll Beckwith.
Addresses:
73 Rue Notre Dame des Champs, 75006 Paris, France (48.84322, 2.33189)
41 Boulevard Berthier, 75017 Paris, France (48.88744, 2.29916)
Place
The young American artists had found a promising location. The studios at 73 rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs had also housed the famous French painter Jean-Paul Laurens, while 75 was the mansion-atelier of Adolphe William Bourguereau. By the 1860s, this small, winding road had already been nicknamed “the royal road of painting.” Sargent, Beckwith and their pals led a young bohemian life in the Left Bank. They worked hard but still had time for wild evenings, moving the easels aside for dancing and drinking right in the studio. Sargent was known for entertaining his guests on a rented piano. On Sunday nights, they would clean themselves up for a proper dinner party at Sargent’s family’s home with “educated and agreeable” conversation. In 1879, Sargent painted the portrait of his art teacher Carolus-Duran, and it absolutely launched his career. It was bold, theatrical, and presented a stunning likeness in both spirit and physicality. Sargent was only 23 years old and already one of the best portrait artists in France. In Diliberto’s novel, Sargent meets the future Madame X at a Montparnasse restaurant. In reality, they may have met when Gautreau attended an informal party at Sargent’s studio on rue de Notre-Dame-des-Champs in 1881. In the meantime, steady commissions enabled Sargent to buy a large, new home and studio on the Right Bank, closer to all of his wealthy patrons. In the winter of 1883-84, Sargent moved to 41 boulevard Berthier, on the shaded side of a wide street whose light made it a popular location for art studios. It wasn’t far from the new mansions near Parc Monceau, and in fact just a few blocks from Madame Gautreau who lived at 80 rue Jouffroy d’Abbans. The studio did have some history to it as it had previously been occupied by Alfred Stevens (Belgian painter in Paris, 1823–1906.) In The Greater Journey, David McCullough describes Sargent’s new Right Bank studio: “A workplace elegantly furnished with comfortably upholstered chairs, Persian rugs, and drapery befitting his new professional standing, and with an upright piano against one wall.” “Portrait of Madame X” was a disaster at the 1884 salon. “Quelle horreur!” said polite Paris society. One critic said the flesh “more resembles the flesh of a dead than a living body.” Sargent left for the summer in London while Gautreau disappeared to Brittany, far from the judgment of Paris. Sargent would keep his Paris studio on boulevard Berthier for two more years, where he proudly displayed Madame X. By March of 1886 he saw the folly of keeping his Berthier studio and gave it up to Giovannie Boldini.
Life
Who: John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925)
Before John Singer Sargent’s birth, his father, FitzWilliam, was an eye surgeon at the Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia 1844–1854. After John’s older sister died at the age of two, his mother, Mary (née Singer), suffered a breakdown, and the couple decided to go abroad to recover. They remained nomadic expatriates for the rest of their lives. Although based in Paris, Sargent’s parents moved regularly with the seasons to the sea and the mountain resorts in France, Germany, Italy, and Switzerland. While Mary was pregnant, they stopped in Florence, Tuscany, because of a cholera epidemic. Sargent was born there in 1856. A year later, his sister Mary was born. After her birth, FitzWilliam reluctantly resigned his post in Philadelphia and accepted his wife’s entreaties to remain abroad. They lived modestly on a small inheritance and savings, living a quiet life with their children. They generally avoided society and other Americans except for friends in the art world. Four more children were born abroad, of whom only two lived past childhood. An attempt of Sargent to study at the Academy of Florence failed as the school was re-organizing at the time, so after returning to Paris from Florence, Sargent began his art studies with Carolus-Duran. The young French portrait artist, who had a meteoric rise, was noted for his bold technique and modern teaching methods, and his influence would be pivotal to Sargent during the period from 1874 to 1878. In 1874, on the first attempt, Sargent passed the rigorous exam required to gain admission to the École des Beaux-Arts, the premier art school in France. He took drawing classes, which included anatomy and perspective, and gained a silver prize. He also spent much time in self-study, drawing in museums and painting in a studio he shared with James Carroll Beckwith. He became both a valuable friend and Sargent’s primary connection with the American artists abroad. Sargent also took some lessons from Léon Bonnat. His most controversial work, “Portrait of Madame X” (Madame Pierre Gautreau) (1884) is now considered one of his best works, and was the artist’s personal favorite; he stated in 1915, "I suppose it is the best thing I have done." when unveiled in Paris at the 1884 Salon, it aroused such a negative reaction that it likely prompted Sargent’s move to London.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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John Singer Sargent first took a lease at Tite Street in June 1885 and London would remain his home the rest of his life.
Addresses:
31-33 Tite St, Chelsea, London SW3 4JA, UK (51.48507, -0.15977) [English Heritage Building ID: 424570 (Grade II, 1969)
12-14 The Avenue, Fulham Rd, London, UK (51.49334, -0.16938)
Place
13 Tite Street, later changed to 33 Tite Street, SW3. John Singer Sargent would eventually expand to 31 Tite Street in 1900, combining both by cutting a hole in the wall and he would use 31 as his residence and keep 33 as his studio. John Singer Sargent entered into the lease of 14 Fulham Road, SW10 Studio towards the end of 1895, effectively moving from Morgan Hall where he and Abbey worked together. John Singer Sargent would keep this studio for the next twenty-one years, pretty much over the whole remaining span of his library decoration project. From 1895 on, according to Charteris, Sargent would be working here more than at Tite Street. It served as his hide-away of sorts as he had grown so popular he could rarely get any privacy at Tite Street.
Life
Who: John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925)
Prior to the Madame X scandal of 1884, John Singer Sargent had painted exotic beauties such as Rosina Ferrara of Capri, and the Spanish expatriate model Carmela Bertagna, but the earlier pictures had not been intended for broad public reception. Sargent also kept the Madame X painting prominently displayed in his London studio until he sold it to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1916, a few months after Gautreau’s death. Before arriving in England, Sargent began sending paintings for exhibition at the Royal Academy. These included the portraits of “Dr. Pozzi at Home” (1881), a flamboyant essay in red and his first full-length male portrait, and the more traditional “Mrs. Henry White” (1883.) The ensuing portrait commissions encouraged Sargent to complete his move to London in 1886. Notwithstanding the Madame X scandal, he had considered moving to London as early as 1882; he had been urged to do so repeatedly by his new friend, the novelist Henry James. In retrospect his transfer to London may be seen to have been inevitable. Back in London, Sargent was quickly busy again. His working methods were by then well-established, following many of the steps employed by other master portrait painters before him. After securing a commission through negotiations which he carried out, Sargent would visit the client’s home to see where the painting was to hang. He would often review a client’s wardrobe to pick suitable attire. Some portraits were done in the client’s home, but more often in his studio, which was well-stocked with furniture and background materials he chose for proper effect. He usually required eight to ten sittings from his clients, although he would try to capture the face in one sitting. He usually kept up pleasant conversation and sometimes he would take a break and play the piano for his sitter. Sargent seldom used pencil or oil sketches, and instead lay down oil paint directly. Finally, he would select an appropriate frame. Sargent had no assistants; he handled all the tasks, such as preparing his canvases, varnishing the painting, arranging for photography, shipping, and documentation. He commanded about $5,000 per portrait (about $130,000 in current dollars.) Some American clients traveled to London at their own expense to have Sargent paint their portrait.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Russell house would be the center of attention and animation of the Broadway colony of artists. This was actually the second home of the Broadway colony. They moved here in 1886 after having lived for a year at Farnham House, which was almost next door.
Addresses:
Russell House, B4632, Broadway, Worcestershire WR12 7BU, UK (52.03685, -1.86585) [English Heritage Building ID: 400987 (Grade II, 1959)]
Farnham House, Church St, Broadway, Worcestershire WR12, UK (52.03469, -1.86374) [English Heritage Building ID: 399309 (Grade II, 1959)]
Place
Russell House is said to be 1791, with early XIX century additions and late XIX century alterations. Sandstone ashlar with Welsh slate roof. Two storeys with attic. Main part of house of three bays, with storey band. On the ground floor are bowed sash windows of early XIX century type, with glazing bars, fluted pilasters, and cornices. On the first floor are boxed sashes with glazing bars. Attic dormers have segmental heads and sashes with glazing bars To the right is an added bay which has a blocked keyed elliptical archway on the ground floor and a sash with glazing bars above. Within the blocked archway is a door under an iron openwork porch with leaded canopy. Copings and chimneys on gables and between main house and added bay. To the right is a former barn, converted into a drawing room and studio in the late XIX century. Within the blocked elliptical archway is a timber bay window with, curved sides. To each side are four pairs of ventilation slits, with an oval opening above each. A photograph taken in the late 1870s shows the front door in the middle bay of the main part of the house, and the barn before conversion. The house was bought in 1885 by Frank Millet, an American artist who died when the Titanic sank in 1912. Farnham House and former barn is circa 1660, altered in the XIX century. Squared limestone with stone slate roof. Two storeys with attic, three bays. Two moulded drip courses. Windows rebated and chamfered with mullions, of four lights at the left and three lights at the right. The central window on the first floor is of two lights. The attic is lit by 3-light windows with hoods, set within gables which have a rusticated oval below each apex. The door, in the middle bay, has a moulded surround of the XIX century with Tudor arch and a hood with lozenge stops. This replaced a timber doorcase of the XVIII century shown in an old photograph. Coped gables with chimneys. The left-hand chimney has diagonal caps which have friezes carved with lozenges. Adjoining to the right is a former barn, now a restaurant, of one storey with attic. It has three windows with plain reveals, the two left-hand ones with keyed segmental heads. Above is a dormer. The right-hand return wall, facing north, has two timber canted bay windows with glazing bars. Between them is a doorway. The wide doorway, to the right, is now blocked and glazed. Dormer at left. The wall has triangular ventilation holes. At the right a lower part of the building has two timber canted bay windows and another dormer. Between the windows is a doorway with Tudor-arched head.
Life
Who: Francis Davis Millet (November 3, 1848 – April 15, 1912)
Russell House was quite a bit larger than Farnham House and both Edwin Austin Abbey and John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) partnered with the Millets for a seven year lease. For Francis Davis Millet, his wife, sister and kids, it became their family’s permanent residence. For Sargent and Abbey (both bachelors at the time) they deferred to Frank’s wife Lily Millet and his sister Lucia Millet as mistresses of the house. Lily became the informal hostess of the colony and to the Millets came a flock of other guests who would come and go, staying indifferent periods throughout the year either in this house or near at some other lodging. This was Sargent’s home away from home - his second family and he would make it back to Broadway as much as he could for four straight years. Though he had the Tite Street studio in London, he really preferred Broadway during this period. Still, the demands of his art had him traveling often. Millet had a studio in Rome in the early 1870s, and Venice in the mid-1870s, where he lived with Charles Warren Stoddard, a well-known American travel journalist who, evidence indicates, had an active sexual interest in men. Historian Jonathan Ned Katz presents letters from Millet to Stoddard that suggest they had a romantic and intimate affair while living a bohemian life together. A well-regarded American Academic Classicist, Millet was close friends with Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Mark Twain, both of whom were present at his 1879 marriage to Elizabeth ("Lily") Greely Merrill in Paris, France; Twain was his best man. He was also well acquainted with the impressionist artist John Singer Sargent, who often used Millet’s daughter Kate as a model, as well as the esteemed Huxley family. The couple would have three children: Kate, Laurence, and John. Since about 1910, Millet had moved with Archibald Butt, a Captain in the United States Army Quartermaster Corps, in his home in Washington, D.C. They died together during the sinking of the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Morgan Hall is a large detached house set back from road. Late XVI century (recorded as Bakers in 1590), refaced in XVIII century and enlarged to east.
Address: London Rd, Fairford, Gloucestershire GL7 4AU, UK (51.70796, -1.77278)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 129728 (Grade II, 1952)
Place
Rubble stone, faced in roughcast to north west, and in render on late XVIII century wing, with raised alternating quoins, hipped stone slate roof both ranges, large ashlar stacks. Long E-shape range of 2 storeys and attic, with single XVIII century wing on north east end of 2 storeys. West front has 2-light XVIII century casements in moulded stone architraves, to both floors along whole of west side, occasionally with timber lintel and no architrave. Stone doorcase in northernmost arm of E with pilasters, plain frieze, and moulded cornice, and recessed 6-panel door, 4 fielded, lower 2 flush, in 2 leaves, with sundial over. Southernmost arm appears to have been altered or is possibly later. East side of original range has similar casement fenestration, 4 windows, some 3-light, and 3 hipped dormers. XVIII century range on plinth has 4 large 12-pane sashes in moulded architraves matching earlier ones, 3 on ground floor with door in bay 2 from left formed by adding solid piece of wood to lower sash. Internal shutters remain and some panelling in this wing, panelling also intact in ground floor room in north west corner of original range. Interior otherwise inaccessible. Reputed to have been a Cromwellian stronghold during the Civil War.
Life
Who: John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925)
In the XIX century, Broadway became home to artists and writers, including Elgar, John Singer Sargent, J.M. Barrie, Vaughan Williams, William Morris, Mary Anderson and American artist and writer, Francis Davis Millet. Edwin Austin Abbey was an American muralist, illustrator, and painter. He worked with John Singer Sargent on the Boston Public Library. The move from Broadway to Morgan Hall for use as a studio (which was only 40 miles south of Broadway) was from the pressuring of Abbey’s newlywed wife ("Mary") Gertrude Mead. They (Abbey and Mary) had met at Broadway when they were staying with the Millet’s at Russel House in 1888, and again in 1889. The following year Edwin and Mary were married in America and when they returned to England, Mary bristled under the notion that they would once again stay with the Millet’s, it wasn’t a serious enough atmosphere. Mary’s idea was to find other accommodations, and Sargent went along since the two artists were working on the same project. Edwin was well liked by all those at Broadway, the Millet’s having been very close to Abbey long time before he ever met Mary. The new Mrs. Abbey, on the other hand, a dominating, ambitious, and frosty personality felt Broadway wasn’t a focused enough environment for two artists taking on such a serious undertaking as the murals at the Boston Public Library. This may have been a fair critique of the little Broadway colony during the summers and the gregarious Millet’s in general, but everyone seemed to understand, without it ever having been said, that Mary couldn’t countenance playing second fiddle to the mistress of the house. Although Broadway and the Millets carried on without Abbey and Sargent, the little wedge forced between them by Edwin’s wife seemed to shatter the fragile Broadway colony’s atmosphere. Life was taking a new turn for most. Those with children found their families growing up, it was time to get serious, and it never again quite equaled (as often happens in life) those years between 1885 and 1889. Though the Millets could understand, they never quite forgave Mary for taking their Edwin away. In 1890 when the Abbeys returned to England as newlyweds, they found a place in Gloucestershire which became their permanent residence. Sargent was still away in the Middle East doing research for his part of the murals and by the time he joined them, two art students from Paris, James Finn and Wilfrid de Glehn were there to assist.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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John Singer Sargent, who died on April 14, 1925, is interred in Brookwood Cemetery (Glades House, Cemetery Pales, Brookwood, Woking GU24 0BL).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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John William "Long John" Baldry was an English blues singer and a voice actor. He sang with many British musicians, with Rod Stewart and Elton John appearing in bands led by Baldry in the 1960s.
Died: July 21, 2005, Vancouver, Canada
Height: 2 m
Movies: Nilus the Sandman: The Boy Who Dreamed Christmas, Long John Baldry: Live in Concert
Lived: 18 Frinton Road, East Ham, London

Long John Baldry was an English and Canadian blues singer and a voice actor. He sang with many British musicians, with Rod Stewart and Elton John appearing in bands led by Baldry in the 1960s. It Ain't Easy was one of Baldry's biggest successes. The opener, Don't Try to Lay No Boogie Woogie on the King of Rock 'n' Roll was inspired by his arrest for busking. In 1978 Baldry moved to New York: dressed in leather, out on the town, he met the man he would spend the rest of his life with, Felix "Oz" Rexach, a charming, chatty, flamboyant Puerto Rican immigrant who frequented Studio 54. Baldry lived in Canada from the late 1970s until his death; there he continued to make records and do voiceover work. One of his best-known roles in voice acting was as Dr. Robotnik in Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog. Baldry had said he felt more comfortable "treading the boards" as a stage actor than in other performing venues. He first appeared in a stage play called Big Rock Candy Mountain. Baldry died on July 21, 2005, in Vancouver General Hospital, of a chest infection. His partner, Felix “Oz” Rexach, survived him.
Together from 1978 to 2005: 27 years.
Long John Baldry (January 12, 1941 – July 21, 2005)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Long John Baldry (January 12, 1941 –July 21, 2005) was an English blues singer and a voice actor. At the time of the registration of his birth his parents lived at 18 Frinton Road, East Ham, London. He obtained the nickname Long John as a baby, being remarkably long, and by his mid-teens he was six feet seven inches tall. In 1978 Baldry moved to New York: dressed in leather, out on the town, he met the man he would spend the rest of his life with, Felix "Oz" Rexach, a charming, chatty, flamboyant Puerto Rican immigrant who frequented Studio 54.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Lorraine Vivian Hansberry was an African-American playwright and writer. She was the first black woman to write a play performed on Broadway.
Born: May 19, 1930, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Died: January 12, 1965, New York City, New York, United States
Books: The collected last plays, more
Movies: A Raisin in the Sun
Lived: 5330 S Calumet Ave, Chicago
337 Bleecker Street
112 Waverly Place
Studied: University of Wisconsin-Madison
The New School
Buried: Bethel Cemetery, Croton-on-Hudson, Westchester County, New York, USA

Playwright Lorraine Hansberry lived at 5330 S Calumet Ave, Chicago, from 1930 to 1938. In 1938 her family attempted to move to a new house in the predominantly white Washington Park neighbourhood, but was evicted by the Illinois courts on the grounds that existing racial codes were being violated. Hansberry’s most famous play, “A Raisin in the Sun” (1959), is set on the South Side. The story describes a conflict between a mother who want to buy a house with $10.000 she has received from her dead husband’s life insurance policy and her son who wants to invest in a liquor store. In 1969 “A Raisin in the Sun” won the Drama Critics Circle Award, later becoming a film that starred Sideny Poitier.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lorraine Hansberry moved into an apartment in a row house at 337 Bleecker Street in 1953 with her then husband, Robert B. Nemiroff. She wrote “A Raisin in the Sun” (1959) there. Using proceeds from the play, Hansberry and Nemiroff moved to 112 Waverly Place in 1960. The two divorced amicably. Hansberry became involved with one of the tenants of 112 Waverly Place, Dorothy Secules, and they remained together until Hansberry's death in 1965. In 1955 193 Waverly Place was purchased by Dr. Rhoda Bubendey Metraux, the highly-regarded anthropologist and partner of Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901 - November 15, 1978).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In 1962 Lorraine Hansberry and Bob Nemiroff moved to a comfortable house modeled on Frank Lloyd Wright’s architecture in Croton-on-Hudson, a 60-minute train ride from downtown Manhattan. Hansberry would live there until her death in 1965. She is buried at Bethel Cemetery (Croton-On-Hudson, NY 10520).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Nobuko Yoshiya was a Japanese novelist active in Taishō and Showa period Japan. She was one of modern Japan's most commercially successful and prolific writers, specializing in serialized romance novels ...
Born: January 12, 1896, Niigata, Niigata Prefecture, Japan
Died: July 11, 1973, Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan
People also search for: Yūzō Yamamoto, Tatsuzō Ishikawa, Toyoko Yoshikawa, Tsuruo Matsumoto
Buried: Kamakura-gu (shrine), Kamakura, Kanagawa, Japan, Plot: Her grave is at the temple of Kōtoku-in in Kamakura, behind the famous Kamakura Daibutsu.

Nobuko Yoshiya was a Japanese novelist active in Taishō and Showa period of Japan. She was one of modern Japan's most commercially successful and prolific writers, specializing in serialized romance novels and adolescent girls’ fiction, as well as a pioneer in Japanese lesbian literature, including the Class S genre. Several of her stories have been made into films. On January 1923, Yoshiya met Monma Chiyo, a mathematics teacher at girls' school in Tokyo. They would go on to have a same-sex relationship for over 50 years. Unlike many Japanese public persona, she was not reticent about revealing details of her personal life through photographs, personal essays and magazine interviews. In 1957, Yoshiya adopted Monma as her daughter, the only legal way for lesbians to share property and make medical decisions for each other. They both traveled together to Manchuria, the Soviet Union, stayed for a year in Paris and then returned via the United States to Japan from 1927-1928. In the late 1930s, they also visited the Netherlands East Indies and French Indochina.
Together from 1923 to 1973: 50 years.
Nobuko Yoshiya (January 12, 1896 – July 11, 1973)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Patsy Kelly was an American stage, radio, film and television actress. She is known for her role as the brash, wisecracking sidekick to Thelma Todd in a series of short comedy films produced by Hal Roach in the 1930s.
Born: January 12, 1910, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: September 24, 1981, Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, California, United States
Resting place: Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens County, New York, USA, Plot: 4th Calvary Sect. 66 Row 40 Grave 7
Parents: John Kelly, Delia Kelly
Awards: Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical

Tallulah Bankhead was an American actress of the stage and screen, talk-show host, and bonne vivante. Bankhead was the daughter of US Congressman and Speaker of the House William Brockman Bankhead. According to her, “Daddy warned me about men and alcohol. But he never said a thing about women and cocaine.” She had numerous heterosexual affairs but considered herself “ambisextrous.” Rumors about Bankhead's sex life have lingered for years, and she was linked romantically with many notable female personalities of the day, including Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Eva Le Gallienne, Hattie McDaniel, and Alla Nazimova, as well as writer Mercedes de Acosta and singer Billie Holiday. Actress Patsy Kelly claimed she had a sexual relationship with Bankhead when she worked for her as a personal assistant. John Gruen's Menotti: A Biography notes an incident in which Jane Bowles chased Bankhead around Capricorn, Gian Carlo Menotti and Samuel Barber’s Mount Kisco estate, insisting that Bankhead needed to play the lesbian character Inès in Jean-Paul Sartre's No Exit (which Paul Bowles had recently translated), but Bankhead locked herself in the bathroom and kept insisting "That lesbian! I wouldn't know a thing about it."
Patsy Kelly (January 12, 1910 – September 24, 1981)
Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 – December 12, 1968)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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At Calvary Cemetery (4902 Laurel Hill Blvd, Woodside, NY 11377) is buried Patsy Kelly (1910-1981), American stage, radio, film and television actress. At a time when being openly gay was not socially acceptable, Kelly was open about her sexuality. On occasion she would frankly disclose, in public and with typical candor, to being a "dyke". During the 1930s, she disclosed to Motion Picture magazine that she had been living with actress Wilma Cox for several years and had no intention of getting married. She later claimed she had an affair with Tallulah Bankhead when she worked as Bankhead's personal assistant. Also Claude McKay (1890–1948) and Robert Harron (1893-1920) are buried here.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Buried: Antietam Church Cemetery, Waynesboro, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA

George Edward Kelly was an American playwright, screenwriter, director, and actor. He began his career in vaudeville as an actor and sketch writer. He became best known for his satiric comedies, including The Torch-Bearers (1922) and The Show-Off (1924). Born in Philadelphia, the second of ten children to John Henry Kelly, an Irish immigrant, he was the brother of American businessman and Olympic champion sculler John B. Kelly, Sr. and the uncle of actress Grace Kelly. Kelly maintained a 55-years relationship with his lover William Weagley up until his death. Weagley was often referred to as his valet; he was actually an employee in a nearby factory. That Kelly was gay was a closely guarded secret and went unacknowledged by his family to the point of not inviting Weagley to his funeral; he instead slipped in and sat quietly on a back seat, weeping quietly and completely ignored. He died a year later. Speaking about Kelly’s playwrights, Arthur Willis noted "Kelly appears to be anti-love, anti-romantic love, certainly, and distrustful of the tender emotions."
Together from 1919 to 1974: 55 years.
George Kelly (January 16, 1887 - June 18, 1974)
William Weagley (1891 - November 25, 1975)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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George Kelly and William Weagley met in 1919, when George maintained a suite at NYC’s Concord Hotel (formerly at 130 E. 40th St., cross Lexington Avenue). The story goes that William was working as a bellhop at the hotel, and the two became lovers within a short time after meeting. George educated William in the rules of etiquette so that the two could appear in high society as social equals. In the 1930s George Kelly lived at 226 West 47th Street.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Antietam Church Cemetery (117 S Church St, Waynesboro, PA 17268) is buried William Weagley (1891-1975). George Kelly maintained a 55-year relationship with his lover William E. Weagley, who was often referred to as Kelly’s valet. The Philadelphia Kellys forced Weagley to eat in the kitchen with the servants when George and William were visiting, thus reinforcing their acknowledgment that William was regarded as nothing more than George’s employee, a valet. While it’s true that William often cooked, typed, and performed secretarial services for George, William was much more than a traveling companion and valet. The couple were loyal, devoted partners who were deeply in love. When George and William hosted dinner parties at their home in Laguna Beach, California, the two men sat at opposite ends of the table as equal co-hosts and partners.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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