Jan. 14th, 2017

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Lady Evelyn Barbara "Eve" Balfour, OBE was a British farmer, educator, organic farming pioneer, and a founding figure in the organic movement.
Born: July 16, 1898, Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Died: January 14, 1990, Dunbar, United Kingdom
Education: University of Reading
Books: The Living Soil, more
Organizations founded: Soil Association, more
Lived: New Bells Farm, New Bells Ln, Haughley, Stowmarket IP14 3RW, UK (52.23719, 0.97931)
Buried: Whittingehame (near Dunbar), Whittingehame, East Lothian, Scotland

Lady Evelyn Barbara "Eve" Balfour was an English farmer, educator, organic farming pioneer, and a founding figure in the organic movement. She was one of the first women to study agriculture at an English university, graduating from the University of Reading. The daughter of the second Earl of Balfour, she began farming in 1920, in Haughley Green, Suffolk, England. In 1939, with her friend and neighbor Ryan Nelson, she launched the Haughley Experiment, the first long-term, side-by-side scientific comparison of organic and chemical-based farming. Balfour, who lived on a farm with her companion Beryl ‘Beb’ Hearnden from 1919 to about 1951, and then lived with agriculturalist Kathleen Carnley until this latter's death, ‘discovered the freedom of breeches’ in the First World War; Elizabeth Lutyens remembered ‘She had an Egyptian face of great strength and charm, with cropped hair and masculine manners, in spite of a feminine heart.’ Hearnden's pursuit of paid journalism work in London coincided with her departure from the struggling farming cooperative.
Together from 1919 to 1951: 32 years.
Lady Evelyn "Eve” Barbara Balfour (July 16, 1898 - January 14, 1990)
Beryl “Beb” Hearnden (1897 – January 22, 1978)
Kathleen Carnley (1889-1976)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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In 1919, at the age of 21, Lady Eve Balfour used her inheritance to buy New Bells Farm in Haughley Green, Suffolk. In 1939, she launched the Haughley Experiment, the first long-term, side-by-side scientific comparison of organic and chemical-based farming.
Address: New Bells Ln, Haughley, Stowmarket IP14 3RW, UK (52.23719, 0.97931)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 280574 (Grade II, 1955)
Place
New Bells has been formerly owned by Lady Eve Balfour, who originally founded the Soil Association. The Haughley Research Trust was set up to conduct a long term organic farming experiment at the property, and Lady Eve subsequently published her definitive book, “The Living Soil,” based on this research. Whilst the Trust no longer exists and the farm is no longer organic, the Soil Association continues to this day, promoting sustainable organic farming. The property is surrounded by its own land, which is located to the east of the Haughley to Bacton Road. Approached via a minor dead end lane, the Farmhouse has fully moated grounds offering a degree of privacy from the main yard and farm buildings. The property is situated some 1.5 miles from Haughley Village, near to both Stowmarket and Bury St Edmunds, about 4 miles and 14 miles away respectively. The farmhouse is believed to date back to around 1530 and is of timber frame construction with part herringbone brick and part lathe and plaster elevations under a tiled roof. The house stands in its own gardens and grounds, with numerous mature trees surrounding the property. The house enjoys views over open countryside and across to the traditional Suffolk Barn. The house has many interesting features, including a magnificent dragon beam located in the sitting room, supporting the jettied upper floor in the south-western corner of the house. The garden is completely surrounded by the attractive moat, which is believed to date originally from around 1150. It is mainly laid to lawn with flower borders adjacent to the house and numerous mature trees both in the garden and bordering the moat, including oak, ash, pine, copper maple and a large weeping ash.
Life
Who: Lady Evelyn Barbara "Eve" Balfour, OBE (July 16, 1898 – January 16, 1990)
Lady Eve Balfour was a British farmer, educator, organic farming pioneer, and a founding figure in the organic movement. She was one of the first women to study agriculture at an English university, graduating from the institution now known as the University of Reading. Balfour, one of the six children of Gerald, Earl of Balfour, and the niece of former prime minister Arthur Balfour, had decided she wanted to be a farmer by the age of 12. In 1943, leading London publishing house Faber & Faber published Balfour’s book, “The Living Soil.” Reprinted numerous times, it became a founding text of the emerging organic food and farming movement. The book synthesized existing arguments in favor of organics with a description of her plans for the Haughley Experiment. In 1946, Balfour co-founded and became the first president of the Soil Association, an international organization which promotes sustainable agriculture (and the main organic farming association in the UK today.) She continued to farm, write and lecture for the rest of her life. In 1958, she embarked on a year-long tour of Australia and New Zealand, during which she met Australian organic farming pioneers, including Henry Shoobridge, president of the Living Soil Association of Tasmania, the first organization to affiliate with the Soil Association. Lady Eve Balfour died in 1990 and her ashes were buried beside her sister Mary at Whittingehame, the home where they had first dreamed of a life together in farming.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Gerald Arpino was an American dancer and choreographer. He was co-founder of the Joffrey Ballet and succeeded Robert Joffrey as its artistic director in 1988.
Born: January 14, 1923, Staten Island, New York City, New York, United States
Died: October 29, 2008, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Education: School of American Ballet
Current group: Joffrey Ballet
Organization founded: Joffrey Ballet

Robert Joffrey (born Abdullah Jaffa Bey Khan) was an American dancer, teacher, producer, choreographer, and co-founder of the Joffrey Ballet with Gerald Arpino in 1956. He is known for his highly imaginative modern ballets. The company grew from a small touring group to become one of the most prominent dance troupes in US. Gerald Arpino studied ballet with Mary Ann Wells, while stationed with the Coast Guard in Seattle, Washington. Arpino first met Robert Joffrey at Wells' school. After the death of Robert Joffrey in 1988, Arpino became the Artistic Director of the Joffrey Ballet. Joffrey was inducted into the National Museum of Dance's Mr. & Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney Hall of Fame in 2000. Malcolm McDowell plays a character loosely based on Arpino in the Robert Altman film The Company.
Together from (before) 1956 to 1988: 32 years.
Gerald Arpino (January 14, 1923 - October 29, 2008)
Robert Joffrey (December 24, 1930 – March 25, 1988)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Herbert "Harry" Stack Sullivan was an American Neo-Freudian psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who held that the personality lives in, and has his or her being in, a complex of interpersonal relations.
Born: February 21, 1892, Norwich, New York, United States
Died: January 14, 1949, Paris, France
Education: Cornell University
Organization founded: William Alanson White Institute
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Arlington County, Virginia, USA, Plot: Section 11, Lot 753 SH

At Arlington National Cemetery (Arlington, VA 22211), is buried John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963). In the same cemetery is buried Harry Stack Sullivan (1892-1949). An American Neo-Freudian psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who held that the personality lives in, and has his or her being in, a complex of interpersonal relations. Having studied therapists Sigmund Freud, Adolf Meyer, and William Alanson White, he devoted years of clinical and research work to helping people with psychotic illness. Beginning in 1927, Sullivan had a 22-year relationship with James Inscoe Sullivan, known as "Jimmie", 20 years his junior. In 1927, he reviewed the controversial anonymously published “The Invert and his Social Adjustment” and in 1929 called it "a remarkable document by a homosexual man of refinement; intended primarily as a guide to the unfortunate sufferers of sexual inversion, and much less open to criticism than anything else of the kind so far published." In 1940, he and colleague Winfred Overholser, serving on the American Psychiatric Society's committee on Military Mobilization, formulated guidelines for the psychological screening of inductees to the United States military. He believed, writes one historian, "that sexuality played a minimal role in causing mental disorders and that adult homosexuals should be accepted and left alone." Despite his best efforts, others included homosexuality as a disqualification for military service.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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James Arthur "Jim" Williams was the only person in the state of Georgia ever to be tried four times for the same crime.
Born: December 11, 1930, Gordon, Georgia, United States
Died: January 14, 1990, Savannah, Georgia, United States
Buried: Ramah Baptist Church Cemetery, Gordon, Wilkinson County, Georgia, USA, Plot: Next to mother, Blanche Brooks Williams
Siblings: Dorothy Williams Kingery
Lived: Mercer House, 421-425 Bull St, Savannah, GA 31401, USA (32.07125, -81.0954)
541, 543 and 545 East Congress Street
Hampton Lillibridge House, 507 E Saint Julian Street, Savannah, GA 31401
Habersham's Pink House, 23 Abercorn St, Savannah, GA 31401
Armstrong House, 447 Bull St, Savannah, GA 31401

The Mercer House, now called the Mercer-Williams House Museum, is located at 429 Bull Street and stands at the southwest end of Monterey Square, in Savannah, Georgia.
Address: 421-425 Bull St, Savannah, GA 31401, USA (32.07125, -81.0954)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Place
Design by John S. Norris (1804-1876)
The house was the scene of the shooting death of Jim Williams' assistant, Danny Lewis Hansford, a story that is retold in the 1994 John Berendt book “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.” The house is currently owned by Dorothy Kingery, Williams' sister, and is open to the public for tours. Designed for General Hugh Weedon Mercer (great-grandfather of the songwriter Johnny Mercer) construction of the house began in 1860. Interrupted by the American Civil War, it was finally completed around 1868 by the new owner, John Wilder. For a period in the XX century, the building was used as the Savannah Shriners Alee Temple. It then lay vacant for a decade until in 1969 when Jim Williams, one of Savannah’s earliest and most dedicated private restorationists, bought the house and restored it. Before Hansford's death, the house had already been the scene of two deaths. In 1913 a previous owner tripped over the second floor banister, fractured his hip, and suffered a concussion, dying three days later. In 1969, a boy chasing pigeons on the roof fell over the edge and impaled himself on the iron fence below.
Life
Who: James Arthur "Jim" Williams (December 11, 1930 – January 14, 1990)
James Arthur Williams was the only person in the state of Georgia ever to be tried four times for the same crime. Following the May 2, 1981 shooting death of assistant Danny Lewis Hansford in his Savannah home, Mercer House, Williams was charged with murder and tried four times. He was found not guilty at the final trial. Born in Gordon, Georgia, Williams was a noted Savannah, Georgia antiques dealer and historic preservationist who played an active role in the preservation of Savannah's historic district. In 1955, at the age of 24, he bought and restored his first three houses located at 541, 543 and 545 East Congress Street. Over the next 35 years, he would restore more than 50 homes in Savannah as well as the lowcountry of Georgia and South Carolina. Notable Savannah houses he restored include: Odingsell House, Merault House, Hampton Lillibridge House (507 E Saint Julian Street, Savannah, GA 31401), Habersham's Pink House (23 Abercorn St, Savannah, GA 31401), Armstrong House (447 Bull St, Savannah, GA 31401) and Mercer House. At the time of the purchase, the Mercer House had been vacant for almost a decade since its former occupants, the Shriners organization, had used the building for their Alee Temple. Over the course of two years, Williams painstakingly restored the house. After the restoration, it became his personal residence and he ran his antiques restoration business out of the carriage house located behind the mansion. Williams died in 1990 and is buried at Ramah First Baptist Church (502 Ramah Dr, Palmetto, GA 30268), next to his mother, Blanche Brooks Williams. Danny Lewis "Billy Hanson" Hansford was Savannah's most popular male escort of the late 1970's and early '80's. Hansford, famed for his muscular build by both male and female clients, was often seen in his "trademark" white t-shirt and jeans. At the time of his death he was 21 years old. He is buried at Greenwich Cemetery (330 Greenwich Rd, Savannah, GA 31404).


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Jane Welsh Carlyle was the wife of essayist Thomas Carlyle. Their long marriage was close but tempestuous, complicated by other relationships on both sides, though these appear to have been platonic, as their own was believed to have been.
Born: January 14, 1801, Haddington, United Kingdom
Died: April 21, 1866, Haddington, United Kingdom
Spouse: Thomas Carlyle (m. 1826–1866)
Lived: Carlyle’s House, 24 Cheyne Row, Chelsea, London SW3 5HL, UK (51.48427, -0.16994)
Craigenputtock, Dumfries, Dumfries and Galloway DG2, UK (55.12019, -3.92846)
Buried: Ecclefechan Churchyard, Ecclefechan, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland

A revealing private homosexual document of the 19th century is the ardent correspondence of popular novelist Geraldine Jewsbury with Jane Welsh Carlyle, which lasted from 1841, shortly after they met, until Mrs. Carlyle's death in 1866. (A selection of these letters from 1841 to 1852 was published in 1892; Jewsbury destroyed all of Mrs. Carlyle's letters to her on her deathbed.) Apparently bisexual (she had similarly passionate correspondences with two men), Jewsbury speaks to Mrs. Carlyle in intense, and knowing, romantic terms--for example, on October 29, 1841, she declares, "I love you, my darling, more than I can express, more than I am conscious of myself. . . . I feel towards you much more like a lover than a female friend!" Jane married essayist Thomas Carlyle but the marriage was often unhappy. Thomas was devoted to Lady Harriet Mary Montagu, eldest daughter of George Montagu, 6th Earl of Sandwich, who was married to Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton. When Lady Harriet died, Lord Ashburton married Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, who was Jane’s friend and who subsequently, after her husband’s death in 1864, had an intimate relationship with the sculptor Harriet Hosmer.
They met in 1841 and remained friends until Carlyle’s death in 1866: 25 years.
Geraldine Endsor Jewsbury (August 22, 1812 – September 23, 1880)
Jane Baillie Welsh Carlyle (January 14, 1801 – April 21, 1866)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The XIX century four-storey home of Thomas Carlyle is now a Victorian time capsule of furniture and relics.
Address: 24 Cheyne Row, Chelsea, London SW3 5HL, UK (51.48427, -0.16994)
Type: Museum (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 203648 (Grade II, 1954)
Place
Carlyle’s House, in the district of Chelsea, in central London, was the home acquired by the historian and philosopher Thomas Carlyle and his wife Jane Welsh Carlyle, after having lived at Craigenputtock in Dumfriesshire, Scotland. Jane Welsh Carlyle was a prominent woman of letters, for nearly half a century. The building dates from 1708 and is at No. 24 Cheyne Row (No. 5 at Carlyle’s time); the house is now owned by the National Trust. The house is a typical Georgian terraced house, a modestly comfortable home where the Carlyles lived with one servant and Jane’s dog, Nero. The house was opened to the public in 1895, just fourteen years after Carlyle’s death. It is preserved very much as it was when the Carlyles lived there despite another resident moving in after them with her scores of cats and dogs. It is a good example of a middle class Victorian home due to the efforts of devotees tracking down much of the original furniture owned by the Carlyles. It contains some of the Carlyles’ books (many on permanent loan from the London Library, which was established by Carlyle), pictures and personal possessions, together with collections of portraits by artist such as James Abbott McNeill Whistler and Helen Allingham and memorabilia assembled by their admirers. The house is made up of four floors — a basement which houses the kitchen, the ground floor which was the Carlyles’ parlour, the first floor where the drawing room/library and Jane’s bedroom are found, the second floor which was Thomas’ bedroom and is now the Custodian’s residence, and the attic, which was converted into a study in an attempt to remove Carlyle from the constant noise of the street and neighbours. It has a small walled garden which is preserved much as it was when Thomas and Jane lived there — the fig tree still produces fruit today. Theatre producer Stanford Holme became curator of the house and moved there with his wife, the actress Thea Holme in 1959. She took up writing, beginning with a book about the lives of Thomas and Jane Carlyle at the house, “The Carlyles at Home” (1965.)
Life
Who: Jane Welsh Carlyle, née Jane Baillie Welsh (January 14, 1801 – April 21, 1866)
Jane Welsh Carlyle had a long lasting relationship (1840-1866) with fellow writer Geraldine Jewsbury (1812-1880.) The two women first met when Thomas invited Geraldine to Cheyne Row, where Thomas and Jane lived. Geraldine had written to Thomas prior to the invitation admiring his work and also expressing her religious doubt. Geraldine was going through a depressive time, but she also contacted Thomas in the hopes of entering the literary realm in England. When Geraldine and Jane met, their friendship turned out to be more of a romantic relationship. It is evident both women had feelings for each other, but there is no evidence of them being lesbian lovers. Jane always remained dutiful to her husband and neither had acted upon any romantic feelings. This caused a lot of jealousy between the two women as Jane always remained married to Thomas and Geraldine had lovers of her own. However, they both had passionate feelings towards one another and that passion is expressed in their many letters to one another. When Charlotte Saunders Cushman made England her home for several years, she became friends with Geraldine Jewsbury, who is said to have based a character on Cushman in her 1848 novel “The Half Sisters.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Craigenputtock is the craig/whinstone hill of the puttocks (small hawks.) It is a 800-acre (3.2 km2) upland farming estate in the civil parish of Dunscore in Dumfriesshire, within the District Council Region of Dumfries and Galloway.
Address: Dumfries, Dumfries and Galloway DG2, UK (55.12019, -3.92846)
Type: Private Property
Historic Scotland Building ID: 4250 (Grade B, 1971)
Place
Craigenputtock was the property for generations, since ca XVI century of the family Welsh, and eventually that of their heiress, Jane Baillie Welsh Carlyle, descended on the paternal side from Elizabeth, the youngest daughter of John Knox, which the Carlyles made their dwelling-house in 1828. It was once the residence of the well-known writer Thomas Carlyle, who wrote many famous works there. It comprises the principal residence – a two-storey, 4 bedroomed Georgian Country House, 2 cottages and a farmstead, 315 acres (127 ha) of moorland hill rising to 1,000 ft (300 m) above sea level, 350 acres (140 ha) of inbye ground of which 40 acres (16 ha) is arable/ploughable and 135 acres (55 ha) of woodland/forestry. The Carlyles remained at Craigenputtock for seven years (before moving to Carlyle’s House in Cheyne Row, London), where "Sartor Resartus" was written. The property was bequeathed by Thomas Carlyle to the Edinburgh University on his death in 1881. It is now home to the Carter-Campbell family, and managed by the C.C.C. (Carlyle Craigenputtock Circle.)
Life
Who: Jane Welsh Carlyle, née Jane Baillie Welsh (January 14, 1801 – April 21, 1866)
Jane Welsh Carlyle was the wife of essayist Thomas Carlyle and has been cited as the reason for his fame and fortune. She was most notable as a letter-writer. Jane had been introduced to Carlyle by her tutor Edward Irving, with whom she came to have a mutual romantic (although not sexually intimate) attraction. The couple married in 1826 and for the first seven years lived on the farm in Scotland; the marriage was often unhappy. Jane was also jealous of a friendship her husband had with Lady Harriet Mary Montagu, eldest daughter of George Montagu, 6th Earl of Sandwich, who was married to Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton. When Lady Harriet died, Lord Ashburton married Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, who was Jane’s friend and who, subsequently, after her husband’s death in 1864, had an intimate relationship with the sculptor Harriet Hosmer. Harriet Hosmer was also a lover of Matilda Hays, former companion of Charlotte Saunders Cushman and later partner of Adelaide Anne Procter, poet and philanthropist. Although Adelaide Procter had died 30 years before Hays, the Liverpool Echo obituary stated that she had been "the dear friend of Adelaide Procter, gone before." Jane was buried at Ecclefechan Churchyard (Ecclefechan, Lockerbie, Dumfries and Galloway DG11), alongside her husband.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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A.E. Housman was an English classical scholar and poet, best known to the public for his cycle of poems A Shropshire Lad. At St John's College, Oxford, Housman formed strong friendships with two roommates, Moses Jackson and A. W. Pollard. Jackson became the great love of Housman's life, though the latter's feelings were not reciprocated, as Jackson was heterosexual. After Oxford, Jackson got a job as a clerk in the Patent Office in London and arranged a job there for Housman as well. They shared a flat with Jackson's brother Adalbert until 1885 when Housman moved to lodgings of his own. Moses Jackson moved to India in 1887. He remained in India his entire career, returning to England only briefly to marry Rosa Chambers and for various trips home. In 1900, he asked Housman to stand as the godfather to his fourth son, Gerald Christopher Arden Jackson. When he retired, he moved to British Columbia with his family and settled in as a farmer. He died in 1923. Jackson’s last visit to England in 1921 was also the last time Housman saw him. Mo’s last letter was preserved by A.E., who retraced the shaky pencil with ink and kept it in a desk drawer, where his brother Laurence, found it after Housman’s death in 1936. In 1942, Laurence Housman deposited an essay entitled A.E. Housman's De Amicitia in the British Library, with the proviso that it was not to be published for 25 years. The essay discussed A.E.'s homosexuality and his love for Moses.
They met in 1877 and remained friends until Jackson’s death in 1923: 46 years.
Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 – April 30, 1936)
Moses John Jackson (1858 – January 14, 1923)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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At St John's College, Oxford, A.E. Housman formed strong friendships with two roommates, Moses Jackson and A.W. Pollard. Jackson became the great love of Housman's life, though the latter's feelings were not reciprocated, as Jackson was heterosexual. After Oxford, Jackson got a job as a clerk in the Patent Office in London and arranged a job there for Housman as well. They shared a flat at 82 Talbot Road, Westbourne Park, W2 from 1882 with Jackson's brother Adalbert until 1885 when Housman moved to lodgings of his own at nearby 39 Northumberland Place, W2 from 1885 to 1886. He had also lived at number 15 Northumberland Place, W2 from 1881 to 1882.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Ralph Nicholas Chubb was an English poet, printer, and artist. Heavily influenced by Whitman, Blake, and the Romantics, his work was the creation of a highly intricate personal mythology, one that was anti-materialist and sexually revolutionary.
Born: February 8, 1892, Harpenden, United Kingdom
Died: January 14, 1960, Stratfield Saye
Resting place: St Mary (Swan Street, Kingsclere, Berkshire, RG20 5PJ)
Books: An Eye for Ganymede: Forty Epigrams of Marcus Valerius Martialis
Education: Slade School of Fine Art
Selwyn College, Cambridge

Ralph Chubb (1892–1960) was an English poet, printer, and artist. Heavily influenced by Whitman, Blake, and the Romantics, his work was the creation of a highly intricate personal mythology, one that was anti-materialist and sexually revolutionary. Failing in health and facing continuing legal and financial difficulties, Ralph Chubb abandoned his controversial works in the mid-fifties, and began to collect and reprint his early poems and childhood memories. “Treasure Trove” and “The Golden City” (published posthumously) are devoid of the usual profusion of naked, lissome youths, but instead offer a glimpse into his youthful imagination, and some of his most charming poetry. In the final years of his life he donated his remaining volumes to the national libraries of Britain. He died peacefully at Fair Oak Cottage (Fair Oak Lane, Stratfield Saye, Hampshire RG7 2DL, English Heritage Building ID: 139103, 1984) and was buried next to his parents at St Mary (Swan Street, Kingsclere, Berkshire, RG20 5PJ). Chubb's own assessment of his work conforms to the general critical reaction: “I do not necessarily claim to be a great artist or writer; but I claim to be a true spirit – this is a subtler test. Seek me out; but you may not find me.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Robert T. Odeman was a gay German classical pianist, actor, writer, and composer. He was a Holocaust survivor.
Born: November 30, 1904, Hamburg, Germany
Died: January 14, 1985, Berlin, Germany

Robert T. Odeman was a German classical pianist, actor, writer, and composer. He was a Holocaust survivor. In 1922, at the age of 17, Odeman met his first love, architecture student Martin Ulrich Eppendorf, who went by the name Muli. The two shared a close relationship for 10 years until Muli's death. A year after Muli’s death, in 1933, Odeman became musical director of the New Theater in Hamburg. In 1935, Odeman opened a cabaret in Hamburg, which was shut down a year later by the Nazis, who claimed it was politically subversive. Odeman's boyfriend, a bookseller, was pressured by the Gestapo to denounce him in 1937 and he was arrested under Paragraph 175, which outlawed homosexual acts between men. Odeman was sentenced to 27 months in prison, which he spent first in Plötzensee and then in various Berlin prisons. In 1959, Odeman met the 25-year-old Günter Nöring, with whom he lived until his death. Since the two were unable to marry, Odeman adopted his younger partner.
Together from 1959 to 1985: 26 years.
Günter Odeman-Nöring (born 1934)
Martin Ulrich Eppendorf (died in 1932)
Martin Hoyer aka Robert T. Odeman (November 30, 1904 – January 14, 1985)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Buried: Diamond Head Memorial Park, Honolulu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, USA, Plot: Peace#7-BH-4

Charles Bell was an American Photorealist artist, known primarily for his large-scale still lives of Toys, Gumball machines, Pinball machines and marbles. Bell died in Manhattan, New York of AIDS-related lymphoma on April 1, 1995. His partner of 26 years, interior designer Willard Ching, had died of AIDS three years earlier, in 1992. The New York Times quoted Henry Geldzahler as saying, "[the pinball series is] the artist's greatest achievement -- visually, technically and technologically." According to a Guggeheim Foundation biography, Bell never received any formal training in his art. He claimed inspiration from Richard Diebenkorn and Wayne Thiebaud. He also worked in the San Francisco studio of Donald Timothy Flores, who painted mostly small-scale landscapes and still lives. He was given the Society of Western Artists Award in 1968. After moving to New York, Bell created his paintings by photographing a subject in still life and working from it. Bell's work, created in his New York loft studio on West Broadway, is noted not only for the glass-like surface, done largely in oil, but also for their significant scale. In the mid 70’s he collaborated on a painting with Dali, who had great interest in the Photorealist. After Bell's death, Louis K. Meisel became the owner of all intellectual property rights to the body of art created by Bell.
Together from 1966 to 1992: 26 years.
Charles Bell (1935 - April 1, 1995)
Willard K.H. Ching (1942 – January 14, 1992)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Charles Bell (1935-1995) was an American Photorealist artist, known primarily for his large-scale still lives of Toys, Gumball machines, Pinball machines and marbles. Bell died in Manhattan, New York of AIDS-related lymphoma on April 1, 1995. His partner of 26 years, interior designer Willard Ching (1942-1992), had died of AIDS three years earlier. Ching was born in Honolulu and was founder of Will Ching Planning & Design. He was former national director of the Institute of Business Designers and twice president of the National Council for Interior Design Qualification. He was also vice president of Contract Interior Design Standards governing board; and was an honorary member of the International Society of Interior Designers. Projects on which he worked included the New York City police headquartes, Westinghouse Nuclear Center in Pennsylvania and Lum Yip Kee offices in Honolulu. Both Bell and Ching are buried at Diamond Head Memorial Park, Honolulu, Plot: Flowers Urn Gar. A-4 (Bell) and Plot: Peace#7-BH-4 (Ching) 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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