Jan. 23rd, 2017

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Anne Whitney was an American sculptor and poet.
Born: September 2, 1821, Watertown, Massachusetts, United States
Died: January 23, 1915, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Lived: John Hunt House, Water Street, Watertown
Whitney Farm, 476 North Rd, Shelburne, NH 03581
92 Mount Vernon Street, Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (42.35779, -71.06874)
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA, Plot: Lot 709, Thistle Path
Buried alongside: Abby Adeline Manning
Books: Poems, by Anne Whitney.
Known for: Sculpture, Poetry

Anne Whitney was an American sculptor and poet. A well-known supporter of both the abolitionist and suffragist movements, Whitney herself was to publicly feel the brunt of the sexism of the day when, in 1875, the commission for a statue of Charles Sumner that won a competition was denied her when it was discovered that a woman created the winning model. She also sculpted members of her family and the painter Abby Adeline Manning, with whom Whitney is said to have had a "Boston marriage." Manning's work has since fallen into obscurity. She and Anne Whitney perhaps met around 1862 when Anne was studying with the renowned William Rimmer. Between 1867 and 1876, she and Anne visited Munich, Paris and Rome. In 1878, Adeline and Anne were living and working in their new studio at 92 Mt. Vernon in Boston. In 1888, Anne purchased 225 acres in Shelburne, New Hampshire, and her and Adeline spent their summers on the farm. Some have written of Adeline that she was gentle as a moonbeam, yet firm as a rock and was Anne's other self and second conscience. They buried her and Anne's ashes next to each other under the same headstone in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Together from 1862 to 1906: 44 years.
Abby Adeline Manning (June 1836 - May 21, 1906)
Anne Whitney (September 2, 1821 – January 23, 1915)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The Town of Watertown is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. It is part of the Greater Boston area. The population was 31,915 at the 2010 census.
Address: Watertown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA (42.37092, -71.18283)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Watertown Arsenal Historic District (Arsenal St.), 99000498, 1999
Place
Watertown is one of fourteen Massachusetts municipalities that have applied for, and been granted, city forms of government but wish to retain "The town of” in their official names. Watertown is made up of six neighborhoods: Bemis, Brigham (Brigham Historic District), Coolidge Square, East Watertown, Watertown Square and the West End. Archeological evidence suggests that Watertown was inhabited for thousands of years before the arrival of settlers from England. Two tribes of Massachusett people, the Pequossette and the Nonantum, had settlements on the banks of the river later called the Charles. The Pequossette built a fishing weir to trap herring at the site of the current Watertown Dam. The annual fish migration, as both alewife and blueback herring swim upstream from their adult home in the sea to spawn in the fresh water where they were hatched, still occurs every spring. Watertown, first known as Saltonstall Plantation, was one of the earliest of the Massachusetts Bay settlements. It was begun early in 1630 by a group of settlers led by Sir Richard Saltonstall and the Rev. George Phillips and officially incorporated that same year. The alternate spelling "Waterton" is seen in some early documents. The first buildings were upon land now included within the limits of Cambridge known as Gerry’s Landing. For its first quarter century Watertown ranked next to Boston in population and area. Since then its limits have been greatly reduced. Thrice portions have been added to Cambridge, and it has contributed territory to form the new towns of Weston (1712), Waltham (1738), Lincoln (1754) and Belmont (1859.) In 1632 the residents of Watertown protested against being compelled to pay a tax for the erection of a stockade fort at Cambridge; this was the first protest in America against taxation without representation and led to the establishment of representative government in the colony. As early as the close of the XVII century Watertown was the chief horse and cattle market in New England and was known for its fertile gardens and fine estates. Here about 1632 was erected the first grist mill in the colony, and in 1662 one of the first woolen mills in America was built here. Boston town meetings were held here during the siege of Boston, when many Boston families made their homes in the neighborhood. For several months early in the American Revolution the Committees of Safety and Correspondence made Watertown their headquarters and it was from here that General Joseph Warren set out for Bunker Hill. From 1832 to 1834 Theodore Parker conducted a private school here and his name is still preserved in the Parker School, though the building no longer operates as a public school. The Edmund Fowle House is a historic house and local history museum at 28 Marshall Street in Watertown, Massachusetts. Built in 1722, it is the second oldest surviving house in Watertown (after the Browne House, built c. 1698.) Watertown was the seat of Massachusetts government during the British occupation of Boston in the American Revolution. The committees of the 2nd and 3rd Provincial Congress met in this house from Apr. 22 to 19 July, 1775, and the Executive Committee met here from 19 July, 1775, to September 18, 1776. The house was built by Edmund Fowle (1747-1821) and originally located on Mount Auburn St., then called Mill St. In 1776 the Treaty of Watertown, the first treaty signed between the newly formed United States of America and a foreign power, the St. John’s and Mi’kmaq First Nations of Nova Scotia, was signed in this house. Sturgis and Brigham Architects (Charles Brigham and John Hubbard Sturgis) purchased the house in 1871, moved it to its present Marshall St. address and converted it into a two family residence. The Historical Society of Watertown purchased the house in 1922. The Historical Society was awarded $500,000 in 2004 and another $200,000 in 2006 by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the restoration of the Edmund Fowle House. The grand re-opening of the house took place in May, 2008. The Abraham Browne House (built circa 1694-1701) is a colonial house located at 562 Main Street. It is now a nonprofit museum operated by Historic New England and open to the public two afternoons per year. The house was originally a modest one-over-one dwelling, probably with a minor dependency to one side. It has grown by a series of enlargements but they occurred behind the original block, thus preserving the profile of the one-over-one elevation. (The exception, a XIX century addition, was removed before 1919.) The Browne House is one of fewer than a half-dozen houses in New England to retain this profile. By 1919 the house was nearly ruined when it was acquired by William Sumner Appleton, who in 1923 donated it to the nonprofit organization now known as Historic New England. It was then painstakingly restored in the first fully documented restoration in America. The Abraham Browne house was featured on PBS’s “This Old House” television program while they were in Watertown for a restoration project during their 20th anniversary season. The Watertown Arsenal operated continuously as a military munitions and research facility from 1816 until 1995, when the Army sold the property, by then known as the Army Materials Technology Laboratory, to the town of Watertown. The Arsenal is notable for being the site of a 1911 strike prompted by the management methods of operations research pioneer Frederick Winslow Taylor. Taylor’s method, which he dubbed "Scientific Management," broke tasks down into smaller components. Workers no longer completed whole items; instead, they were timed using stopwatches as they did small tasks repetitively, as Taylor attempted to find the balance of tasks that resulted in the maximum output from workers. The strike and its causes were controversial enough that they resulted in Congressional hearings in 1911; Congress passed a law in 1915 banning the method in government owned arsenals. Taylor’s methods spread widely, influencing such industrialists as Henry Ford, and the idea is one of the underlying inspirations of the factory (assembly) line industrial method. The Watertown Arsenal was the site of a major superfund clean-up in the 1990s, and has now become a center for shopping, dining and the arts, with the opening of several restaurants and a new theatre. The site includes the Arsenal Center for the Arts, a regional arts center that opened in 2005. The Arsenal is now owned by athenahealth. Arsenal Street features two shopping malls across the street from one another, with the Watertown Mall on one side, and The Arsenal Project of Watertown (formerly the Arsenal Mall) on the other. The Perkins School for the Blind, founded in 1829, has been located in Watertown since 1912. The Stanley Brothers built the first of their steam-powered cars, which came to be known as Stanley Steamers, in Watertown in 1897. In 1988, Watertown Square became the new location for the Armenian Library and Museum of America, said to host the largest collection of Armenian artifacts in North America. The Birthplace of Harriet Hosmer, Riverside Street, is currently the location of the Riverside Condominiums. Dr. Hiram Hosmer was born in 1798 in Walpole, NH. Helped his father on the farm and learned the trade of cabinet maker. He received his degree from Harvard in 1824. He married Sarah Watson Grant of Walpole, NH in 1827. Of his four children only the youngest, Harriet Hosmer survived. The John Hunt House is Anne Whitney’s birthplace. The house was built by James Barton in 1715. It was sold to John Hunt in 1745. Joseph Warren boarded (in the southwestern corner on the first floor) here during the session of the Provincial Congress in 1775. He left afterward to ride to Bunker Hill, 17 June, 1775. It was later owned by Nathaniel Whitney, Jr. and in it was born Anne Whitney, September 2, 1821. It was bought from Nathaniel Whitney, Jr. by Luke Robinson, who lived here the rest of his life. The house was demolished 8 May, 1935. It was later sold to Mr. F.E. Howard who moved it to Water Street and had tenants "of a lower class.”
Life
Who: Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895), Harriet Hosmer (1830-1908) and Anne Whitney (1821-1915)
Leverett Saltonstall travelled with Charles William Dabney, Jr., his Harvard classmate, after graduation and generally had a difficult time settling down; it was said that his mother forced him, against his will, to marry. He is buried at Harmony Grove Cemetery (30 Grove St, Salem, MA 01970). Both Harriet Hosmer, a neoclassical sculptor, considered the most distinguished female sculptor in America during the XIX century, and Anne Whitney, a sculptor and poet, where from Watertown. Nathaniel Hawthorne described in his novel “The Marble Faun,” the group of American women artists living in Rome, causing Henry James to dismiss them as "The White Marmorean Flock.” They were: Harriet Hosmer, Anne Whitney, Emma Stebbins, Edmonia Lewis, Louisa Lander, Margaret Foley, Florence Freeman, and Vinnie Ream. While living in Rome, Hosmer associated with a colony of artists and writers that included Nathaniel Hawthorne, Bertel Thorvaldsen, William Makepeace Thackeray, and the two female Georges, Eliot and Sand. When in Florence, she was frequently the guest of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning at Casa Guidi.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Beacon Hill is a historic neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the population of Boston’s Beacon Hill neighborhood is 9,023.
Address: Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (42.35779, -71.06874)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Beacon Hill Historic District (Bounded by Beacon St., the Charles River Embankment, and Pinckney, Revere, and Hancock Sts.), 66000130, 1966
Place
The window on the top 92 Mount Vernon Street marked the studio for two decades of sculptor Anne Whitney, who was part of a group of American women sculptors gathering around actress Charlotte Cushman in Rome in the mid-XIX century. In 1878, Addy Manning and Anne were living and working in their new studio in Boston. In 1888, Anne purchased 225 acres in Shelbourne (476 North Rd, Shelburne, NH 03581), and Adeline and her spent theirs summer on the farm. Although the home of Annie Adams Fields and her husband, publisher James T. Fields, at 148 Charles Street, does not survive, it was the site of their important literary salon. Prescott Townsend was a significant figure in local GLBT civil rights history. Toward the end of his life, his two remaining properties on the Hill were on its North Slope, traditionally the side where servants of patrician South Slope residents lived. He accommodated a motley collection of tenants, mostly young gay men, in an eight-unit building at 75 Phillips Street; Prescott himself inhabited an old brick townhouse at the end of Lindall Place, a cul-de-sac that terminated just behind the Philips Street apartments. A subterranean corridor lined with cubicles connected the basements of the two buildings. The tunnel was said to have housed runaway slaves in transit on the Underground Railway prior to the Civil War. The Drawing-Room at 148 Charles Street with Miss Jewett and Mrs. Fields, from a photograph lent by Mr. M. A. DeW. Howe, in Sarah Orne Jewett, by Francis Otto Matthiessen, 1929
Life
Who: Anne Whitney (September 2, 1821 – January 23, 1915), Annie Adams Fields (June 6, 1834 – January 5, 1915) and Prescott Townsend (June 24, 1894 – May 23, 1973)
Anne Whitney had a “Boston marriage” with her longtime partner Adeline “Addy” Manning (1836-1906.) During the late Victorian era, such marriages between women, generally professional and upper class, were both common and accepted by society at large. After the death of James T. Fields in 1881, his wife Annie Fields continued to support the work of many women writers, including Sarah Orne Jewett (1849-1909), who spent winters with her, poet Louise Imogen Guiney (1861-1920), and Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-96.) Fields was also active in charitable works. She spent many hours at the Charity House on Chardon Street and cofounded the Cooperative Society of Visitors, a case review agency that made recommendations to the central administration of Boston’s relief organizations for aid disbursement. The Society was absorbed into the Associated Charities of Boston. Fields’s book “How to Help the Poor” (1884) served as an unofficial guide to the programs and policies of Associated Charities. Prescott Townsend was an American cultural leader and gay rights activist, from the 1930s through the early 1970s. He was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, the fourth child (third son) of Kate Wendell and Edward Britton Townsend; his mother was both a descendant of Myles Standish and other Mayflower passengers, and the great-granddaughter of the American founding father Roger Sherman. He attended the Volkman School, graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year. He spent the summer of 1914 in logging camps in Montana and Idaho, and traveled to North Africa and the Soviet Union. He returned to Boston's Beacon Hill neighborhood, where he began a relationship with theater producer Elliot Paul, with whom he founded the experimental Barn Theatre in 1922. Paul introduced Townsend to numerous avant-garde creatives, including openly-gay writer André Gide. Townsend operated speakeasies, restaurants, and theaters, cultivating a bohemian neighborhood on Beacon Hill's Joy Street. He pioneered the popularity of A-frame houses, building several in Provincetown. He was later a founder of the Provincetown Playhouse, where the works of Eugene O'Neill were first performed. In the 1930s, Townsend repeatedly addressed the Massachusetts legislature as an acknowledged homosexual man advocating for the repeal of sodomy legislation, urging the lawmakers "to legalize love." He was indulged due to his Boston Brahmin status, but ignored. While working at the Fall River shipyard during WWII, Townsend was arrested on Jan. 29, 1943 for participating in an "unnatural and lascivious act". The Mid-Town Journal headline reported, "Beacon Hill 'Twilight' Man Member of Queer Love Cult Seduced Young Man". He didn't deny it, and was sentenced to eighteen months in the Massachusetts House of Corrections on Deer Island. No one in his influential family applied any pressure to shorten his jail time. A month later he was officially stricken from both the New York and Boston Social Registers. Townsend had, for years, been suffering from failing health brought on by Parkinson's Disease, and on May 23, 1973 his body was found in the Beacon Hill apartment of John Murray who had been caring for him during the final years of his life. The police reported that "when we came in to take charge of the body, Mr. Townsend was found in a kneeling prayer position at his bedside." Of his entire family, only one sister, a nephew and a great-nephew attended his memorial service at the Arlington Street Church.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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A small, dynamic figure, with flashing brown eyes and, in later life, white hair worn short, Anne Whitney (September 2, 1821 – January 23, 1915) was a thorough Bostonian by breeding and inclination. Wholly free of sentimentality in the age of its abundance, she was known for her satiric wit. She supported movements for abolition and woman's rights, the education of the Afro-American people and the blind, and forest conservation. From an early age she had vacationed in the White Mountains in New Hampshire, and in 1882 she purchased a rams at Shelburne (476 North Rd, Shelburne, NH 03581), where for thirty years she spent her summers, taking long walks, managing the farm, and reading poetry aloud on the veranda of the house overlooking Mounts Washington, Madison, and Adams. Here, as in Boston and abroad, her constant companion was Abby Adeline Manning of Brooklyn, an amateur painter who from 1880 had devoted her life to her older, more talented friend. Mrs Hugh S. Hince is the great-grandniece of Anne Whitney’s mother and the present owner of Whitney Farm.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston.
Address: 580 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37479, -71.14449)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +1 617-547-7105
National Register of Historic Places: 75000254, 1975. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, Mount Auburn Cemetery marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery,” derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. It is Watertown’s largest contiguous open space and extends into Cambridge to the east, adjacent to the Cambridge City Cemetery and Sand Banks Cemetery.
Notable queer burials are at Mount Auburn Cemetery:
• Roger Brown (1925–1997), professor at Harvard University from 1952 until 1957 and from 1962 until 1994, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1957 until 1962. During his time at the University of Michigan, he met Albert Gilman (died 1989), later a Shakespeare scholar and a professor of English at Boston University. Gilman and Brown were partners for over 40 years until Gilman's death from lung cancer in 1989. Brown's sexual orientation and his relationship with Gilman were known to a few of his closest friends, and he served on the editorial board of The Journal of Homosexuality from 1985, but he did not come out publicly until 1989. Brown chronicled his personal life with Gilman and after Gilman's death in his memoir. Brown died in 1997, and is buried next to Gilman.
• Katharine Ellis Coman (1857-1915), author on economic subjects who lived with Katharine Lee Bates (Author of "America the Beautiful"), and died at her home, was cremated at Mount Auburn Cemetery but was buried with her parents at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
• Abby Adeline Manning (1836-1906), painter, and her partner, Anne Whitney (1821-1915), poet and sculptor, together.
• Amy Lowell (1874–1925), poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
• Annie Adams Fields (1834–1915), author and hostess; wife of James Thomas Fields, later companion to Sarah Orne Jewett.
• Charlotte Cushman (July 23, 1816 – February 18, 1876), actress, her last partner was lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins, who sculpted Angels of the Water on Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, New York City.
• Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924) was a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. She founded the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.
• Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908), sculptor. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton (died 1864). Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie. Hosmer was good friend with Charlotte Cushman and Matilda Hays, Cushman’s partner, left Charlotte for her.
• Alice James (1848-1892) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American diarist. The only daughter of Henry James, Sr. and sister of psychologist and philosopher William James and novelist Henry James, she is known mainly for the posthumously published diary that she kept in her final years. Her companion was Katherine Peabody Loring and from their relationship it was conied the term “Boston Marriage”.
• Henry James (1843-1916) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of XIX century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
• Stewart Mitchell (November 25, 1892–November 3, 1957) was an American poet, editor, and professor of English literature. Along with Gilbert Seldes, Mitchell’s editorship of The Dial magazine signaled a pivotal shift in content from political articles to aesthetics in art and literature. In 1929 he became the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Richard Cowan (1909-October 24, 1939)’s diary, which he started while he was a student at Cornell, chronicles the life of a young gay man in Boston in the 1930s. Cowan committed suicide at the age of thirty. His forty-seven-year old mentor and long-term lover, Stewart Mitchell, was devastated. Mitchell resigned as president of the Massachusetts Historical Society on account of a “personal misfortune,” and wrote a friend, “There is no running away from a broken heart.” According to the Boston Herald Nov. 9, 1957: “Mitchell directed that the urn containing his mortal remains be buried, “but not in winter,” in the lot “where my dear friends Georgine Holmes Thomas and Richard David Cowan now repose”.”
• Francis Williams Sargent (1848 - 1920) and Jane Welles Hunnewell Sargent (1851 - 1936), Margarett Williams Sargent’s parents. Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) was born into the privileged world of old Boston money; she was a distant relative of John Singer Sargent.
• Henry Davis Sleeper (1878-1934), a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator, who had a long lasting friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, an economist, an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, the founder and director of the American Ambulance Field Service during WWI, and a United States Representative from Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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B. Michael Hunter was an educator, cultural activist and journal editor of Sojourner: Black Gay Voices in the age of AIDS. "It's through the community that we met. I first met him at a meeting of the Lesbian & Gay People of Color Steering Committee. I noticed Bert, one of the handsomest men I had ever seen, who was really quite and cautious - the opposite of me. He was a writer and refreshingly not a graduate of an Ivy League school, like my ex-lover. I was happy to learn that he did not grow up with money and, like me, received financial aid to get through mostly all-white schools. I felt safe with him from the beginning, and not ashamed of unpacking whatever personal baggage I may have brought with me. I wondered about Bert being Black, having experienced too many Black people telling me that I wasn't oppressed enough." --Johnny “My previous experience with men who attended Ivy League school also left me a little cold - they seem to never be satisfied with things. John was very different - he is one of the few men I trust." Bert. Hunter died of AIDS in 2001. John Albert Santos Manzon married his new partner, Michael Leo Branca, in 2012. They are looking to adopt.
Together from 1990 to 2001: 11 years.
Bertram Michael Hunter (April 15, 1958 - January 23, 2001)



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino, also known as Luisa Casati, was an Italian heiress, muse, and patroness of the arts in early 20th-century Europe known for her eccentricities.
Born: January 23, 1881, Milan
Died: June 1, 1957, Knightsbridge, London, United Kingdom
Lived: 32 Beaufort Gardens, SW3
Villa San Michele, Viale Axel Munthe, 34, 80071 Anacapri NA, Italy (40.5574, 14.225)
Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, Dorsoduro, 701-704, 30123 Venice, Italy (45.43082, 12.33153)
Buried: Brompton Cemetery, West Brompton, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, Greater London, England
Other name: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino

Luisa, Marquise Casati Stampa di Soncino was an eccentric Italian heiress, muse, and patroness of the arts in early 20th century Europe. As the concept of dandy was expanded to include women, the Marchesa Casati fitted the utmost female example by saying: "I want to be a living work of art". From 1919-1920 she lived at Villa San Michele in Capri, the tenant of the unwilling Axel Munthe. British author Compton Mackenzie in his diaries described her time on the Italian island, tolerant home to a wide collection of artists, gay men, and lesbians in exile. Her numerous portraits were painted and sculpted by artists as various as Giovanni Boldini, Paolo Troubetzkoy, Romaine Brooks (with whom she had an affair), Kees van Dongen, and Man Ray. By 1930, Casati had amassed a personal debt of $25 million. Unable to satisfy her creditors, her personal possessions were auctioned off. Rumor has it that among the bidders was Coco Chanel. She died in poverty on June 1, 1957, aged 76, and is buried under a small urn at Brompton Cemetery, London, England.
Luisa Adele Rosa Maria Von Amman (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
Beatrice Romaine Goddard aka Romaine Brooks (May 1, 1874 – Dec. 7, 1970)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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From 1919 to 1920 Luisa Casati lived at Villa San Michele in Capri, the tenant of the unwilling Axel Munthe.
Address: Viale Axel Munthe, 34, 80071 Anacapri NA, Italy (40.5574, 14.225)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +39 081 837 1401
Place
Built around the turn of the XX century
The Villa San Michele was built on the Isle of Capri, Italy, by the Swedish physician and author Axel Munthe. The villa’s gardens have panoramic views of the town of Capri and its harbour, the Sorrentine Peninsula, and Mount Vesuvius. The villa sits on a ledge at the top of the Phoenician Steps, between Anacapri and Capri, at a height of 327 meters above sea level. San Michele’s gardens are adorned with many relics and works of art dating from ancient Egypt and other periods of classical antiquity. They now form part of the Grandi Giardini Italiani. The story of the villa is recorded by Axel Munthe in his book “The Story of San Michele,” first published in 1929 and reprinted many times since then. Between 1919 and 1920, Munthe was an unwilling landlord to the outrageous socialite and muse Luisa Casati, who took possession of Villa San Michele.
Life
Who: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
Luisa Casati’s time on the Italian island, tolerant home to a wide collection of artists, gay men, and lesbians in exile, was described by British author Compton Mackenzie in his diaries. Her numerous portraits were painted and sculpted by artists as various as Giovanni Boldini, Paolo Troubetzkoy, Romaine Brooks (with whom she had an affair), Kees van Dongen, and Man Ray; many of them she paid for, as a wish to "commission her own immortality.” She was muse to Italian Futurists such as F. T. Marinetti, Fortunato Depero, and Umberto Boccioni. Augustus John’s portrait of her is one of the most popular paintings at the Art Gallery of Ontario; Jack Kerouac wrote poems about it and Robert Fulford was impressed by it as a schoolboy.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In 1910, Luisa Casati took up residence at the Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, on Grand Canal in Venice (now the home of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection.)
Address: Dorsoduro, 701-704, 30123 Venice, Italy (45.43082, 12.33153)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Wednesday through Monday 10.00-18.00
Phone: +39 041 240 5411
Place
Built in the XVIII century, Design by Lorenzo Boschetti (active 1709-1772)
The building was unfinished, and has an unusually low elevation on the Grand Canal. The museum’s website describes it thus: “Palazzo Venier dei Leoni’s long low façade, made of Istrian stone and set off against the trees in the garden behind that soften its lines, forms a welcome "caesura" in the stately march of Grand Canal palaces from the Accademia to the Salute.” The palace was also Peggy Guggenheim’s home for thirty years. In 1951, the palace, its garden, now called the Nasher Sculpture Garden, and her art collection were opened to the public from April to October for viewing. Her collection at the palace remained open during the summers until her death in Camposampiero, northern Italy, in 1979; she had donated the palace and the 300-piece collection to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in 1976. The foundation, then under the direction of Peter Lawson-Johnston, took control of the palace and the collection in 1979 and re-opened the collection there in April 1980 as the Peggy Guggenheim Collection. After the Foundation took control of the building, it took steps to expand gallery space; by 1985, "all of the rooms on the main floor had been converted into galleries ... the white Istrian stone facade and the unique canal terrace had been restored" and a protruding arcade wing, called the barchessa, had been rebuilt by architect Giorgio Bellavitis. Since 1985, the museum has been open year-round. In 1993, apartments adjacent to the museum were converted to a garden annex, a shop and more galleries. In 1995, the Nasher Sculpture Garden was completed, additional exhibition rooms were added, and a café was opened. A few years later, in 1999 and in 2000, the two neighboring properties were acquired. In 2003, a new entrance and booking office opened to cope with the increasing number of visitors, which reached 350,000 in 2007. Since 1993, the museum has doubled in size, from 2,000 to 4,000 square meters. Since 1985, the United States has selected the foundation to operate the U.S. Pavilion of the Venice Biennale, an exhibition held every other summer. In 1986, the foundation purchased the Palladian-style pavilion, built in 1930.
Life
Who: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
Luisa Casati was an Italian heiress, muse, and patroness of the arts in early XX century Europe known for her eccentricities. As the concept of dandy was expanded to include women, the Marchesa Casati fitted the utmost female example by saying: "I want to be a living work of art.” In 1900, she married Camillo, Marchese Casati Stampa di Soncino (1877-1946.) The couple’s only child, Cristina Casati Stampa di Soncino, was born the following year. The Casatis maintained separate residences for the duration of their marriage. They were legally separated in 1914. They remained married until Marchese Casati’s death in 1946. She captivated artists and literary figures such as Robert de Montesquiou, Romain de Tirtoff (Erté), Jean Cocteau, and Cecil Beaton. She had a long term affair with the author Gabriele d’Annunzio, who is said to have based on her the character of Isabella Inghirami in “Forse che si forse che no” (Maybe yes, maybe no) (1910.) Her soirées at Palazzo Venier dei Leoni would become legendary. Casati collected a menagerie of exotic animals, and patronized fashion designers such as Fortuny and Poiret.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Consecrated by the Bishop of London in June 1840, Brompton Cemetery is one of Britain’s oldest and most distinguished garden cemeteries.
Address: Fulham Rd, London SW10 9UG, UK (51.48529, -0.19114)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-16.00, Sunday 9.00-20.00
Phone: +44 20 7352 1201
English Heritage Building ID: 203792 (Grade II, 1969)
Place
Brompton Cemetery is located near Earl’s Court in west London (postal districts SW5 and SW10), in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. It is managed by The Royal Parks, and is one of the Magnificent Seven cemeteries. Established by Act of Parliament, it opened in 1840 and was originally known as the West of London and Westminster Cemetery. Some 35,000 monuments, from simple headstones to substantial mausolea, mark the resting place of more than 205,000 burials. The site includes large plots for family mausolea, and common graves where coffins are piled deep into the earth, as well as a small columbarium. Brompton was closed to burials between 1952 and 1996, but is once again a working cemetery, with plots for interments and a “Garden of Remembrance” for the deposit of cremated remains. The cemetery has a reputation for being a popular cruising ground for gay men.
Notable queer burials at Brompton Cemetery:
• Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino, infamous Italian quaintrelle, muse, eccentric and patron of the arts. The quote "Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale her infinite variety," from Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, was inscribed on her tombstone.
• Geraldine Jewsbury (1812-1880), writer.
• Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928), leading suffragette.
• Ernest Thesiger (1879-1961), character actor, “The Old Dark House” and “Bride of Frankenstein.”
Life
Who: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
By 1930, Luisa Casati had amassed a personal debt of $25 million. Unable to pay her creditors, her personal possessions were auctioned off. Designer Coco Chanel was reportedly one of the bidders. Luisa Casati fled to London where she lived in comparative poverty in a one-room flat. She was rumoured to be seen rummaging in bins searching for feathers to decorate her hair. On June 1, 1957, Marchesa Casati died of a stroke at her last residence at 32 Beaufort Gardens, SW3 aged 76. Following a requiem mass at Brompton Oratory, the Marchesa was interred in Brompton Cemetery. She was buried wearing her black and leopard skin finery and a pair of false eyelashes. She was also interred with one of her beloved stuffed pekinese dogs. Her tombstone is a small grave marker in the shape of an urn draped in cloth with a swag of flowers to the front. The inscription on the tombstone misspells her "Louisa" rather than "Luisa.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lived: Tan Llan, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2ST, UK (52.75838, -3.90129) [Cadw Building ID: 16146 (Grade II, 1995)]
Tyn-y-Celyn, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2TA, UK (52.75788, -3.90737) [Cadw Building ID: 5239 (Grade II, 1991)]
Hengwrt, Llanelltyd
26 Hereford Square, SW7
Rhagatt Hall, Rhagatt, Corwen, Denbighshire, LL21 9HY, UK (52.98415, -3.34396)
Buried: Saint Illtud Church Cemetery, Llanelltyd, Gwynedd, Wales
Buried alongside: Frances Power Cobbe

Frances Power Cobbe was an Irish writer, social reformer, anti-vivisection activist, and leading women's suffrage campaigner. She formed a marriage with sculptor Mary Lloyd, whom she met in Rome in 1861 and lived with from 1864 until Lloyd's death. Cobbe referred to Lloyd alternately as "husband," "wife," and "dear friend." Cobbe founded the Society for the Protection of Animals Liable to Vivisection in 1875, the world's first organization campaigning against animal experiments, and in 1898 the BUAV. Cobbe was a member of the executive council of the London National Society for Women's Suffrage and writer of editorial columns for London newspapers on suffrage, property rights for women, and opposition to vivisection. Lloyd studied and worked with French artist Rosa Bonheur. In 1853, she worked in the studio of Welsh sculptor John Gibson in Rome, along with sculptor Harriet Hosmer. In 1858, Lloyd inherited a share in the Welsh landed estate of Hengwrt. This allowed Lloyd to refer to herself as a landed proprietor when signing petitions supporting women's suffrage, and gave her some local political rights, such as the ability to appoint a vicar. They are buried together in the churchyard at Llanelltyd, Wales.
Together from 1861 to 1896: 35 years.
Frances Power Cobbe (December 4, 1822 – April 5, 1904)
Mary Charlotte Lloyd (January 23, 1819 – 1896)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Rhagatt Hall is located in a landscaped park on the north side of the B5437, 1km. approx. west of Carrog.
Address: Rhagatt, Corwen, Denbighshire, LL21 9HY, UK (52.98415, -3.34396)
Type: Private Property
Cadw Building ID: 15562 (Grade II, 1995)
Place
The existence of an estate at Rhagatt can be documented from the late XIV century. The house was described as “old” in 1803, and the rear wing of the present house may incorporate parts of a down-hill sited building of possible XVII century date. However the main block is largely of 1819-20, when an earlier building was extended and remodelled for Edward Lloyd, whose family had acquired the estate in 1804. The external detail of the rear wing is also largely early XIX century or later. The interior of the house was again restored and substantially remodelled ca. 1970. Rhagatt Hall has roughly coursed and squared stone to entrance and garden fronts, rougher rubble to rear west elevation; slate roofs. 2 storeyed. Entrance front faces east and is a 3 window range with advanced pedimented central bay. Entrance with recessed doorway renewed ca. 1970 (formerly with columns in antis.) Flanking 12-pane sash windows, with 9-pane sashes to first floor and above the entrance. Right hand windows appear to be inserted, and the scars of earlier openings are visible alongside them. Similar scars to left of entrance may indicate the blockings of windows which were themselves later insertions. A length of wall perpendicular to the building line divides the main part of the house from the service wing, which has 2 x12-pane sash windows to first floor, inserted openings below. Garden front has twin full height bows, the boldly overhanging eaves of the hipped roof carried straight across them. Each has a floor length 12-pane sash window to ground floor, and a 6-pane sash above. Long rear west elevation has 2 long casement windows to lower right, with 6-pane sash windows above; a stair window (reduced in length) and a blocked doorway (apparently cut by the present stairs) in the angle with a projecting full-height bow. Paired long casement windows (inserted) in the bow, and further inserted openings in the 2-window range beyond. Cross wing to left may be of early origin, but was remodelled ca. 1970. Rhagatt is of historical interest as a small country house, the seat of an old-established estate. The early XIX century re-working of older buildings on the site is a distinctive exercise in simple Neo-Classical villa-architecture.
Life
Who: Mary Charlotte Lloyd (January 23, 1819 – 1896)
Rhagatt Hall is the family home of Mary Lloyd, daughter of Edward Lloyd, who later became the life companion of Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904.)



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904), feminist writer, lived with Mary Lloyd at 26 Hereford Square, SW7 from 1862 to 1884.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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In 1858 Mary Lloyd inherited a share in the Welsh landed estate of Hengwrt. This allowed Lloyd to refer to herself as a landed proprietor when signing petitions supporting women’s suffrage, and also gave her some local political rights, such as the ability to appoint a vicar.
Addresses:
Tan Llan, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2ST, UK (52.75838, -3.90129) [Cadw Building ID: 16146 (Grade II, 1995)]
Tyn-y-Celyn, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2TA, UK (52.75788, -3.90737) [Cadw Building ID: 5239 (Grade II, 1991)]
Place
Llanelltyd is a small village and community in Gwynedd, to the north of Dolgellau. The Community population taken at the 2011 Census was 514. It is home to the XII century Cymer Abbey, a grade I listed building. St Illtyd’s church, one of the oldest parish churches in Wales, is a grade II listed building. A late Medieval church retaining much of its historic character and with the special interest of its XVIII century vernacular porch and fenestration. Hengwrt, Llanelltyd (near Dolgellau) was the home of Robert Vaughan (1592-1667.) He was the eminent Welsh antiquary and collector of manuscripts (later known as the Hengwrt-Peniarth Library.) A later Georgian Mansion was built on the site 1750-54. Mary Lloyd had a one-third share in the Welsh estate of Hengwrt by way of her sister Frances and her husband, Robert Williams Vaughan. They died childless; Vaughan willed a life interest in Hengwrt to his wife’s three unmarried sisters, Mary, Jane, and Harriet. This was rebuilt and remodelled in the XIX century. The house was destroyed by fire in 1962, but the three outbuildings, much remodeled, remain, and the site still has a clear view of the church of St Illtyd’s, where Cobbe and Lloyd are buried. Mary Lloyd and Frances Power Cobbe lived at Tan Llan, a house on the edge of Llanelltyd. Tan Llan is a mid-XVIII century house, said formerly to have been dated 1728. Long a dower house of the Nannau estate, it was altered and extended in the late XIX century. Located across the river from the idyllic little market town of Dolgellau, Llanelltyd was then “a scattering of some twenty cottages.” Lloyd was, in effect, its resident squire; the church living was in the gift of Hengwrt, which also owned much of the farmland. Tan Llan is situated at the eastern extremity of Llanelltyd village some 50m south east of the main road; sited against the gentle slope of the hill and accessed via a metalled drive leading east from the church lane. A L-shaped two-and-a-half-storey primary house with one-and-a-half-storey service range adjoining to the north east. Rubble construction with overlapping stone coping to gable parapets with moulded kneelers; tall end chimneys with moulded capping andweather-coursing. 3-window symmetrical main south east front with Victorian fenestration. Central entrance with part-glazed door behind large XX century conservatory; flanking storied, canted baywindows with plain sashes. Similar, smaller sash windows to thefirst-floor centre and the second floor, the latter contained within gabled rubble dormers; deep verges and plain bargeboards. XIX century single-storey extensions to the rear with modern windows and amodern upper door with bridge access to the banked garden behind. The connecting service range is set back and has 3 gabled dormersas before with large 6-pane Victorian sashes. Below, further 6-pane windows of differing size and an off-centre entrance to left with French doors; plain off-centre stack to right. Modern extension to the north east. Inside, a fine full-height original oak dog-leg stair with moulded rail and turned balusters, with similar gallery at the top; decorative tread-ends. The lower flight has lost its balusters. Four XVIII century 6-panel doors (raised and fielded) with simply moulded architraves to first floor; 4 similar doors of painted pine to the attic floor. Ground-floor living room left has fireplace made up of sections of small-field XVIII century oak panelling (raised and fielded as before.) A large earlier XVIII century vernacular house with Victorian alterations, retaining some good XVIII century internal detail. Group value with the coach house and stable block at Tan Llan. The census of 1891 found Cobbe and Lloyd living at Tyn-y-Celyn, Llanelltyd, with three servants. Dated 1773 Tyn-y-Celyn is formerly the home of Henry Griffiths, timber merchant. Early XIX century alterations and later XIX century cross-range. Tyn-y-Celyn is below the A 496 to west of the junction with the A 470; set back from the by-road that runs through the village; rubble boundary wall with ball finials to gated entry at left. Rubble revetment wall to hillside at rear. Symmetrical 3-window, 2 storey and attic front; rubble construction with slate roof, gable parapets and tall end chimneys with plain capping and weather-coursing. Distinctive central gable in the form of a pediment with 6-pane oculus, characteristic of the area; stone spout to right. Massive stone lintels to 16-pane sash windows ; continuous cills to first floor forming band beneath windows; the front formerly had a verandah. Inscribed slate date plaque to centre over modern 12-pane glazed door. The right gable has one attic casement and a small-pane window over a modern rubble porch. 1 window cross-range beyond with 4-pane casement windows and 12-pane and 9-pane sashes. Set in the slope at the left end is a lower XIX century cross-wing set at an angle to the original house; similar construction including boulder plinth to the rear. The range diminishes in height towards the rear, the left-hand windows therefore being stepped-up. Mostly 4-pane sashes to the first floor. The main entrance has been moved from the front to the right-hand side. The main ground-floor rooms retain Georgian detail including 6-panel doors and panelled shutters; the drawing room has architraves with bosses and the dining room has plainarched recesses. Original dog-leg stairs with swept-up hand rail, shaped tread-ends and turned balusters. Twin purlin pegged trusses. Listed as a late XVIII century regional house retaining much of its internal and external character.
Life
Who: Mary Charlotte Lloyd (January 23, 1819 – 1896)
Mary Lloyd was a Welsh sculptor who lived for decades with feminist Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904.) She was the 8th of 17 children born to Edward Lloyd of Rhagatt and his wife, Frances Maddocks. She may have lived for a time with a maiden aunt, Margaret Lloyd of Berth. Born about 1780, Margaret Lloyd was a friend of the Ladies of Llangollen (Llangollen is ten miles to the east of Rhagatt Hall, on the great road from London to Holyhead and Dublin.) Mary inherited several books inscribed “M. Lloyd. The gift of Lady Eleanor Butler and Miss Ponsonby” and also some letters written to her aunt Margaret by the poet Felicia Hemans, who until 1831 lived less than ten miles from Berth. Mary Lloyd studied and worked with French artist Rosa Bonheur. In 1853 she was working in the studio of Welsh sculptor John Gibson in Rome, along with American sculptor Harriet Hosmer. When Cobbe and Lloyd met in the winter of 1861-62, both were mature single women (Cobbe was 39, Lloyd was 43) who had some private income, lived alone, and were fond of animals. Mary Lloyd died in 1896. Responding to letters of condolence, Cobbe wrote that she had died “bravely resting on my arm & telling me we should not long be separated.” She was buried as they had planned in the Saint Illtud's churchyard, in a double plot that left room for Cobbe to rest beside her under the single headstone.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Nell Carter was an American singer and actress. She won a Tony Award for her performance in the Broadway musical Ain't Misbehavin', as well as an Emmy Award for her reprisal of the role on television.
Born: September 13, 1948, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
Died: January 23, 2003, Beverly Hills, California, United States
Buried: Hillside Memorial Park, Culver City, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Acacia Gardens, Wall KK, Crypt 7040
Children: Tracy Carter, Daniel Carter, Joshua Carter
Spouse: Roger Larocque (m. 1992–1993), George Krynicki (m. 1982–1992)

Nell Carter (1948–2003) was an American singer and actress. She won a Tony Award for her performance in the Broadway musical “Ain't Misbehavin',” as well as an Emmy Award for her reprisal of the role on television. From 1981 to 1987, Carter starred in the NBC sitcom “Gimme a Break!.” She received two Emmy and two Golden Globe nominations for her work on the series. Carter died at the age of 54 on January 23, 2003, from heart disease complicated by diabetes in her Beverly Hills home. She was survived by her domestic partner, Ann Kaser. She is buried at Hillside Memorial Park & Mortuary (6001 W Centinela Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90045).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Paul Leroy Robeson was an American bass singer and actor who became involved with the Civil Rights Movement.
Born: April 9, 1898, Princeton, New Jersey, United States
Died: January 23, 1976, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Somerville High School
Columbia University
Rutgers University
Columbia Law School
Lived: The Chestnuts, Branch Hill, NW3
Buried: Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum, Hartsdale, Westchester County, New York, USA, Plot: Hillcrest A, Grave 1511
Albums: Paul Robeson. Ol' Man River - His 56 Finest 1925-1945, more

English Heritage Blue Plaque: 17 East Heath Road, “Katherine Mansfield (1888–1923) writer, and her husband John Middleton Murry (1889–1957) critic lived here”.
Addresses:
1 Ellerdale Cl, London NW3 6BE, UK (51.55445, -0.17962)
17 E Heath Rd, London NW3 1AL, UK (51.56079, -0.17506)
Branch Hill, London NW3, UK (51.56067, -0.18363)
Place
Hampstead Heath (locally known as "the Heath") is a large, ancient London park, covering 320 hectares (790 acres.) Hampstead Heath, a grassy public space sitting astride a sandy ridge, is one of the highest points in London, running from Hampstead to Highgate, which rests on a band of London Clay. The Heath is rambling and hilly, embracing ponds, recent and ancient woodlands, a lido, playgrounds, and a training track, and it adjoins the stately home of Kenwood House and its grounds. The south-east part of the Heath is Parliament Hill, from which the view over London is protected by law. Running along its eastern perimeter are a chain of ponds – including three open-air public swimming pools – which were originally reservoirs for drinking water from the River Fleet. The Heath is a Site of Metropolitan Importance for Nature Conservation, and part of Kenwood is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. Lakeside concerts are held there in summer. The Heath is managed by the City of London Corporation, and lies mostly within the London Borough of Camden with the adjoining Hampstead Heath Extension and Golders Hill Park in the London Borough of Barnet. The Heath first entered the history books in 986 when Ethelred the Unready granted one of his servants five hides of land at "Hemstede.” This same land is later recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as held by the monastery of St. Peter’s at Westminster Abbey, and by then is known as the "Manor of Hampstead.” Westminster held the land until 1133 when control of part of the manor was released to one Richard de Balta; then during Henry II’s reign the whole of the manor became privately owned by Alexander de Barentyn, the King’s butler. Manorial rights to the land remained in private hands until the 1940s when they lapsed under Sir Spencer Pocklington Maryon Wilson, though the estate itself was passed on to Shane Gough, 5th Viscount Gough. Over time, plots of land in the manor were sold off for building, particularly in the early XIX century, though the Heath remained mainly common land. The main part of the Heath was acquired for the people by the Metropolitan Board of Works. Parliament Hill was purchased for the public for £300,000 and added to the park in 1888. Golders Hill was added in 1898 and Kenwood House and grounds were added in 1928. From 1808 to 1814 Hampstead Heath hosted a station in the shutter telegraph chain which connected the Admiralty in London to its naval ships in the port of Great Yarmouth. The City of London Corporation has managed the Heath since 1989. Before that it was managed by the GLC and before that by the London County Council (LCC.) In 2009, the City of London proposed to upgrade a footpath across the Heath into a service-road. The proposal met with protests from local residents and celebrities, and did not proceed.
Notable queer residents at Hampstead Heath:
• In 1936 Beverly Nichols (September 9, 1898-September 15, 1983) purchased a house at One Ellerdale Close, NW3. Ellerdale Road is one of Hampstead’s premier turnings, ideally located off the top of Fitzjohns Avenue. A book about Beverly Nichols’ city garden near Hampstead Heath in London, “Green Grows the City,” published in 1939, was very successful. That book introduced Arthur R. Gaskin, who was Nichols’s manservant from 1924 until Gaskin’s death in 1966. Gaskin was a popular character, who also appeared in the succeeding gardening books.
• Lord Alfred Douglas, or “Bosie,” Oscar Wilde’s one time lover and ruin, moved at 26 Church Row, NW3 with his wife (he was by now officially heterosexual) in 1907 until 1910, shortly after winning a libel suit against “The Daily News,” which had run an obituary calling him a degenerate, only to find he was still alive. Though not a great writer, the peer was highly rated by the young John Betjeman, who told C.S. Lewis, his tutor at Oxford, that Douglas was a better poet than Shakespeare.
• Katherine Mansfield (1888–1923) and John Middleton Murry (1889–1957) lived at 17 E Heath Road, NW3. A prominent critic, Murry is best remembered for his association with Katherine Mansfield, whom he married in 1918 as her second husband, for his friendship with D. H. Lawrence, T. S. Eliot, and for his friendship (and brief affair) with Frieda Lawrence. Following Mansfield’s death, Murry edited her work. Mansfield had several romantic relationships with both men and women. She became pregnant in 1909 but her lover’s parents did not approve of the relationship and they broke up. She hastily married a George Bowden, a singing teacher, but left him the same evening, before the marriage could be consummated. Mansfield later miscarried. Mansfield began a relationship with Ida Baker which continued for many years, even after Mansfield met her second husband, John Middleton Murray, in 1911. “Baker, whom Mansfield often called, with a mixture of affection and disdain, her “wife”, moved in with her shortly afterwards.” Mansfield was diagnosed with tuberculosis in 1917, leading to her death in 1923.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: The Chestnuts, Branch Hill, NW3 Paul Robeson (1898–1976), “Singer and Actor lived here 1929–1930"
• John Schlesinger (1926-2003) was an English film and stage director, and actor. He won an Academy Award for Best Director for “Midnight Cowboy,” and was nominated for two other films (“Darling” and “Sunday Bloody Sunday”). Schlesinger was born at 53 Hollycroft Avenue, NW3 into a middle class Jewish family, the son of Winifred Henrietta (née Regensburg) and Bernard Edward Schlesinger, a physician. He recalled a normal, middle-class childhood in Hampstead (he grew up at 15 Templewood Avenue, NW3), though he was not happy at the boarding-schools to which he was sent.
• Josephine Hutchinson (1903-1998), American actress who appeared in “North By North West” (1959) lived at Swiss Cottage, 4 Finchley Road, NW3.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum is located in the hamlet of Hartsdale, town of Greenburgh, Westchester County, New York, about 25 miles (40 km) north of Midtown Manhattan. It was founded in 1902, and is non-sectarian. Ferncliff has three community mausoleums, a crematory, a small chapel, and a main office located in the rear of the main building.
Address: 280 Secor Rd, Hartsdale, NY 10530, USA (41.02737, -73.83234)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 914-693-4700
Place
Ferncliff Cemetery has three community mausoleums that offer what The New York Times has described as "lavish burial spaces". As of 2001, a standard crypt space in the mausoleums was priced at $15,000. The highest-priced spaces were private burial rooms with bronze gates, crystal chandeliers, and stained-glass windows, priced at $280,000. The Ferncliff Mausoleum, aka "The Cathedral of Memories", is the cemetery's oldest mausoleum, constructed in 1928. It has classic architecture, but the corridors are dark without glass panes to admit natural light. Judy Garland, Ed Sullivan, and Joan Crawford are three of the most famous interments in the main mausoleum. The Shrine of Memories is Ferncliff's second mausoleum and was constructed in 1956. "Shrine of Memories" is a more contemporary structure than "Ferncliff Mausoleum." It has many panes of glass to admit natural light, and there is a large frieze of Christopher Columbus in the main hall of the building. Basil Rathbone is one of the most famous interments in "Shrine of Memories." Rosewood is Ferncliff's most recently completed community mausoleum, having been constructed in 1999. Aaliyah and her father Michael Haughton have a private room in Rosewood. Cab Calloway is interred with his wife Zulme "Nuffie". The cemetery is also known for its in-ground burials in sections located in front of the mausoleums. Ferncliff is one of the very few cemeteries that does not permit upright headstones in its outdoor plots. All outdoor grave markers are flush with the ground. This feature facilitates maintenance of the cemetery grounds. However, there are several upright headstones that were placed before this policy was instituted. Malcolm X is one of the most famous ground burials, in plot Pinewood B.
Notable queer burials at Ferncliff Cemetery:
• James Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – December 1, 1987), novelist, essayist
• Joan Crawford (c. 1905–1977), actress
• Alice Delamar (1895-1983), heiress and socialite, cremated here but buried in Palm Beach
• Judy Garland (1922–1969), singer, actress
• Moss Hart (1904–1961), playwright and director
• Alberta Hunter (1895-1984), blues singer
• Elsa Maxwell (1883–1963), columnist, society figure
• Ona Munson (1910–1955), actress
• Basil Rathbone (1892–1967), actor. In 1924 he was involved in a brief relationship with Eva Le Gallienne.
• Paul Robeson (1898–1976), actor, singer, and civil rights activist.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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George Randolph Scott was an American film actor whose career spanned from 1928 to 1962. As a leading man for all but the first three years of his cinematic career, Scott appeared in a variety of genres, ...
Born: January 23, 1898, Orange County, Virginia, United States
Died: March 2, 1987, Beverly Hills, California, United States
Education: Georgia Institute of Technology
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Buried: Elmwood Cemetery, Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, USA, Plot: R-38
Height: 1.9 m
Children: Sandra Scott, Christopher Scott
Spouse: Patricia Stillman (m. 1944–1987), Marion duPont Scott (m. 1936–1939)

Cary Grant (born Archibald Alexander Leach) was an English stage and Hollywood film actor who became an American citizen in 1942. Randolph Scott was an American film actor whose career spanned from 1928 to 1962. They met in 1932 when they were cast together in Hot Saturday. They lived together for many years in Los Angeles. Their home was featured in an issue of Architectural Digest that showed legendary Hollywood stars at home. After that, the house was dabbed “Bachelor Hall” (recently sold in 2006 for more or less 4 million dollars.) They both married but remained close ever afterward. Toward the end of their lives, Scott and Grant were often seen together, on one occasion holding hands late at night in the Polo Lounge, alone except for the waiters. Scott died little more than 3 months after Grant.
They met in 1932 and remained friends until Grant’s death in 1986: 54 years.
Cary Grant (January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986)
Randolph Scott (January 23, 1898 – March 2, 1987)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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At Elmwood Cemetery (700 W 6th St; Charlotte, North Carolina 28202) is buried Randolph Scott (January 23, 1898 – March 2, 1987), American film actor. He was good friends with Fred Astaire and Cary Grant. He met Grant on the set of “Hot Saturday” (1932), where they shared only one scene together, and shortly afterwards they began rooming together in a beach house in Malibu that became known as "Bachelor Hall". According to author Robert Nott, "They lived together on and off for about ten years, because they were friends and wanted to save on living expenses (they were both considered to be notorious tightwads)." In 1944, Scott and Grant stopped living together but remained close friends throughout their lives. 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Samuel Osborne Barber II was an American composer of orchestral, opera, choral, and piano music. He is one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th century: music critic Donal Henahan stated that ...
Born: March 9, 1910, West Chester, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: January 23, 1981, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Curtis Institute of Music
Lived: Capricorn, Capricorn, Haines Road, west of Croton Lake Road, Mt Kisco, NY 10549, USA (41.23958, -73.73527)
107 S Church St, West Chester, PA 19382, USA (39.95792, -75.60441)
Buried: Oaklands Cemetery, West Chester, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA
Nationality: American
Awards: Pulitzer Prize for Music, more
Parents: Samuel Le Roy Barber, Marguerite McLeod Beatty

Samuel Barber was a composer of orchestral, opera, choral, and piano music. He is one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th century: music critic Donal Henahan stated, "Probably no other American composer has ever enjoyed such early, such persistent and such long-lasting acclaim." He was twice awarded the Pulitzer Prize for music, for his opera Vanessa and his Concerto for Piano and Orchestra. At 14, he entered the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, where he studied piano with Isabelle Vengerova, composition with Rosario Scalero, and voice with Emilio de Gorgoza. He began composing seriously in his late teenage years. Around the same time, he met fellow Curtis schoolmate Gian Carlo Menotti, who became his partner in life as well as in their shared profession. Menotti supplied the libretto (text) for Barber's opera, Vanessa. Menotti also contributed the libretto for Barber's chamber opera A Hand of Bridge. Barber's Antony and Cleopatra was commissioned to open the new Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center in 1966. In recent years, a revised version for which Menotti provided collaborative assistance has enjoyed some success.
Together from 1929 to 1981: 52 years.
Gian Carlo Menotti (July 7, 1911 – February 1, 2007)
Samuel Osmond Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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In 1943, Samuel Barber and Gian Carlo Menotti purchased a house in Mount Kisco, New York.
Address: Capricorn, Haines Road, west of Croton Lake Road, Mt Kisco, NY 10549, USA (41.23958, -73.73527)
Type: Private Property
Place
Mount Kisco is a village and a town in Westchester County, New York. The Town of Mount Kisco is coterminous with the village. The population was 10,877 at the 2010 census. The Village of Mount Kisco was incorporated in 1875 and was partly in the towns of Bedford and New Castle. In 1978, the village chose to become a town in its own right and joined several villages in the state that have made same choice. According to the town’s official web site, Kisco is derived from an Indian word –either kiskamenahook meaning “settlement near a brook” or cisqua meaning “a muddy place.” Mount comes from the 623-foot hill northwest of town. The Mount Kisco Municipal Complex was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997. Merestead, St. Mark’s Cemetery, and the United Methodist Church and Parsonage are also listed.
Life
Who: Samuel Osborne Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981)
For three years, 1939–42, Samuel Barber taught at the Curtis Institute, but in 1942 he joined the U.S. Army Air Forces, becoming its resident composer. In 1943, a gift from Bok enabled Barber and Menotti to buy a house in Mt. Kisco, New York, which they named Capricorn. They were regularly visited by a wide variety of artists and intellectuals, and their domestic happiness brought greater productivity for both composers. At the peak of his powers, Barber unveiled “Medea,” his ballet score for the Martha Graham Dance Company, in 1946; “Knoxville, Summer of 1915,” a song with orchestra, in 1947; and his lone piano sonata in 1949. (All are still in the world repertory; in 1953 Barber reworked his ballet score for orchestra and soprano, as “Medea’s Meditation and Dance of Vengeance,” Op. 23a.) His opera “Vanessa” (1958) received its premiere at the Metropolitan Opera, won a Pulitzer Prize, and became the first American opera performed at Austria’s Salzburg Festival. He wrote three works for the opening of Lincoln Center, including the opera “Antony and Cleopatra,” his second commission for the Met. When the premiere of “Antony and Cleopatra” was hammered by the critics, Barber withdrew to a villa in Italy, where he battled depression. He and his lifelong partner, Menotti, separated and Capricorn, their home, was sold. Barber continued to compose in New York City but drank too much. Cared for by Menotti, he died of cancer and was buried in Oaklands Cemetery in the town of his birth, West Chester, Pennsylvania.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Samuel Barber was born in West Chester, Pennsylvania, the son of Marguerite McLeod (née Beatty) and Samuel Le Roy Barber.
Address: 107 S Church St, West Chester, PA 19382, USA (39.95792, -75.60441)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: West Chester State College Quadrangle Historic District (Bounded by S. High and S. Church Sts., College and Rosedale Aves.), 81000539, 1981
Place
West Chester is a borough and the county seat of Chester County, Pennsylvania. The population was 18,461 at the 2010 census. West Chester University of Pennsylvania is located in the borough. Valley Forge, the Brandywine Battlefield, Marsh Creek State Park, and other historical attractions are nearby, as are Longwood Gardens, the Brandywine River Museum, and Christian C. Sanderson Museum. The area was originally known as Turk’s Head — after the inn of the same name located in what is now the center of the borough. West Chester has been the seat of government in Chester County since 1786, and the borough incorporated in 1799. In the heart of town is its courthouse, a classical revival building designed in the 1840s by Thomas U. Walter, one of the architects for the Capitol in Washington, D.C. In the XVIII century West Chester was a center of clockmaking. In the late XIX century the Hoopes, Bro. and Darlington company became a major wheelworks, first for wagons and later automobiles. In the early XX century, an important industry was the Sharples cream separator company. In the late XX century, Commodore International, one of the pioneers of home computers, giving its headquarters as West Chester, was located approximately a mile northeast of the borough.
Life
Who: Samuel Osborne Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981)
Samuel Barber was a composer of orchestral, opera, choral, and piano music. He is one of the most celebrated composers of the XX century: music critic Donal Henahan stated that "Probably no other American composer has ever enjoyed such early, such persistent and such long-lasting acclaim." Growing up with music in the house (his aunt was Metropolitan Opera star Louise Homer and his uncle, Sidney Homer, was a composer who had a lifelong impact on Barber’s style), Barber decided early on to become a composer, and wrote an operetta at age 10. Four years later he was admitted into the newly established Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. In 1928, while at conservatory, Barber met fellow composer and future life partner Gian Carlo Menotti. Well-trained and a favorite of the school’s founder, Mary Louise Curtis Bok, Barber began his professional career auspiciously with the publication of the delightful “School for Scandal Overture,” in 1931. He completed his well-regarded setting of Matthew Arnold’s “Dover Beach,” for soprano and string quartet, in the same year. He travelled in Europe, particularly Italy, and won a Rome Prize, which sent him to the American Academy for 1935–37. While there, he wrote his string quartet, arranging the second movement for string orchestra (the famous “Adagio for Strings.”) He also completed his “First Symphony.” Samuel Barber died of cancer in 1981 in New York City at the age of 70. He was buried in Oaklands Cemetery (120 W Market St # 1, West Chester, PA 19382). Samuel Barber’s will provided for a burial plot next to his own, reserved for Gian Carlo Menotti, Barber’s partner for most of his adult life. Further, the will said that if Menotti chose not to be buried in Oaklands Cemetery (he is buried near his last home in Scotland), a stone should be placed on the empty plot and inscribed with the words "To The Memory Of Two Friends."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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