Jan. 24th, 2017

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Constance Fenimore Woolson was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe.
Born: March 5, 1840, Claremont, New Hampshire, United States
Died: January 24, 1894, Venice
Lived: 15 Beaumont Street, Oxford
Buried: Campo Cestio, Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy, Plot: 153 Zona Vecchia
Anne's Tablet, Mackinac Island, MI 49757 (memorial)

Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840-1894) was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe. The relationship between Woolson and Henry James has prompted much speculation by biographers, especially Lyndall Gordon in her 1998 book, “A Private Life of Henry James.” In 1893 Woolson rented an elegant apartment on the Grand Canal of Venice. Suffering from influenza and depression, she either jumped or fell to her death from a fourth story window in the apartment in January 1894, surviving for about an hour after the fall. The event stunned Henry James. After travelling to Italy for Woolson’s funeral, James found himself returning to and eventually moving into the house that she had once occupied at 15 Beaumont Street, Oxford.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Anne's Tablet is an Art Nouveau sculptural installation located within Mackinac Island State Park adjacent to Fort Mackinac on Mackinac Island. Consisting of stone benches and a bronze plaque, the overlook was built in 1916 as a memorial to local author Constance Fenimore Woolson.
Address: Anne's Tablet Trail, Mackinac Island, MI 49757, USA (45.85216, -84.61486)
Type: Public Park
Life
Who: Constance Fenimore Woolson (March 5, 1840 – January 24, 1894)
Constance Fenimore Woolson, a member of a prominent Cleveland family of means, as a girl summered on Mackinac Island in a now-vanished building located directly below the overlook. The experience inspired her to become a professional writer, and in 1875 she published her first volume of short stories, “Castle Nowhere: Lake-Country Sketches,” based on her experiences on Mackinac Island and in surrounding shorelines of the Great Lakes. The work was followed by Woolson's first novel, “Anne.” Also set on Mackinac Island, the work was published in 1880. Woolson's success at conveying the dilemmas faced by young Victorian-era women in a regionalist setting inspired further works from the increasingly successful author set in new homes in St. Augustine, Florida and in Venice. Unfortunately, the popular writer's personal attachment to Henry James was not fully reciprocated, and the depressed author fell from a Venetian window in 1894. As Woolson was buried in Italy, there was no location in the United States where her American-born readers could pay their respects. The Anne's Tablet installation was constructed as a gift from Samuel Mather, a successful iron ore mineowner and nephew of the writer. The sculptor was New York City's William Ordway Partridge. The Grand Hotel is a historic hotel and coastal resort on Mackinac Island. Constructed in the late XIX century, the facility advertises itself as having the world's largest porch. The Grand Hotel is well known for a number of notable visitors, including five U.S. presidents, Russian presidents Vladimir Putin and Dmitri Medvedev, inventor Thomas Edison, and author Mark Twain. Grand Hotel is a member of Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The Cimitero Acattolico ("Non-Catholic Cemetery") of Rome, often referred to as the Cimitero dei protestanti ("Protestant Cemetery") or Cimitero degli Inglesi ("Englishmen's Cemetery"), is a public cemetery in the rione of Testaccio in Rome.
Address: Via Caio Cestio, 6, 00153 Roma, Italy (41.8763, 12.4795)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 06 574 1900
Place
The Protestant Cemetery is near Porta San Paolo and adjacent to the Pyramid of Cestius, a small-scale Egyptian-style pyramid built in 30 BC as a tomb and later incorporated into the section of the Aurelian Walls that borders the cemetery. It was formerly called Cimitero Anticattolico, the anti-Catholic cemetery. It has Mediterranean cypress, pomegranate and other trees, and a grassy meadow. It is the final resting place of non-Catholics including but not exclusive to Protestants or British people. The earliest known burial is that of a University of Oxford student named Langton in 1738. The English poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley are buried there.
Notable queer burials at Campo Cestio:
• Hendrik Christian Andersen (April 15, 1872 – December 19, 1940), sculptor, friend of Henry James. A bust of the young Count Alberto Bevilacqua, a muse of sculptor Hendrik Christian Andersen, remains in the home of Henry James, Lamb House, in Rye, England. Henry James to Henrik Andersen, three years later, upon the death of Andersen’s brother: “The sense that I can’t help you, see you, talk to you, touch you, hold you close & long, or do anything to make you rest on my, & feel my deep participation – this torments me, dearest boy, makes my ache for you, & for myself; makes me gnash my teeth & groan at the bitterness of things. . . . This is the one thought that relieves me about you a little – & I wish you might fix your eyes on it for the idea, just, of the possibility. I am in town for a few weeks, but return to Rye Apr. 1, & sooner or later to have you there & do for you, to put my arm round you & make you lean on me as on a brother & a lover, & keep you on & on, slowly comforted or at least relieved of the bitterness of pain – this I try to imagine as thinkable, attainable, not wholly out of the question.”
• Dario Bellezza (1944–1996), Italian poet, author and playwright
• Enrico Coleman (1846–1911), artist and orchid-lover, friend of Giovanni “Nino” Costa (who was special friend with Elihu Vedder)
• Gregory Corso (1930–2001), American beat generation poet
• The tomb of Maria Bollvillez (Zona V.7.18) was the first of de Fauveau’s commissions from the Russian aristocracy. Félicie de Fauveau (1801–1886) was a XIX-century French sculptor who was a precursor of the pre-Raphaelite style. Her multiple sculptural works showcase a variety of techniques and mediums including marble, stone, glass and bronze. Her family connections to the restored Bourbon court of Charles X led to commissions that helped launch her early career in Paris. But in 1830 when Charles X was forced to abdicate, de Fauveau paid for her opposition to the new order by being imprisoned for three months and then, in 1833, went into exile in Florence. She made a striking figure on arrival there: as Ary Scheffer’s portrait shows, she had adopted an androgynous appearance, with cropped hair and male clothing. One visitor reported that she had vowed to keep her hair short until the Bourbon monarchy was restored in France (it never was). Her admirers included Italian opera singer Angelica Catalani and Elizabeth and Robert Browning, who had also made their home in Florence. De Fauveau’s works were coveted by the city’s Russian ex-pats including Anatole Demidoff; the artist received multiple commissions from the industrialist and enjoyed the friendship of his wife Caroline Bonaparte. The Tsar Nicolas I purchased various works from the artist and his daughter Maria Nikolaieva was given a dagger, now at the Louvre, whose handle is engraved with scenes from Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” Guy Cogeval (Musée d’Orsay) uses the word lesbienne (lesbian) in his introduction to the catalogue for the exhibition “The Amazon of sculpture”, whereas Christophe Vital mentions on the adjacent page that Félicie de Fauveau was sans doute (without doubt) in love with the young (male) page who died in the Vendée (Charles de Bonnechose, for whom Félicie designed a monument on her prison wall). Michelle Facos also explicitly suggests that Félicie de Fauveau might have been a lesbian in her “Introduction to Nineteenth-Century Art” ( 2011). Usually her relationship to the Countess de la Rochejaquelein is then referred to.
• Denham Fouts (1914-1948), referenced in literary works by Christopher Isherwood, Truman Capote, and Gore Vidal. He was also a friend of George Platt Lynes, who photographed him. Isherwood described him as a mythic figure, "the most expensive male prostitute in the world." Fouts died in 1948, at the Pensione Foggetti, in Rome, at the age of 35.
• Wilhelm von Humboldt (1794–1803), son of the German diplomat and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt and nephew of Alexander von Humboldt
• Hans von Marées (1837–1887), German painter
• Dora Ohlfsen (1878-1948) was born as Dorothea Ohlfsen-Bagge in Ballarat, Victoria. Her father was Norwegian, Christian Herm Ohlfsen-Bagge, probably born in Schleswig (northern Germany now), and her mother, Kate Harison, Australian. She claimed that her great-grandfather was the Sydney convict printer, Robert Howe. Dora was educated at Sydney Girls High School and studied piano privately with Max Volgrich and Henri Kowalski. She traveled to Germany in 1883 to continue her piano studies under Moritz Moszkowski in Berlin; however, when she contracted neuritis, she began teaching music in Germany and later in Russia, after completing piano studies at Theodor Kullak’s Neue Akademie der Tonkunst. She lived in St Petersburg with a Madame Kerbitz and took up painting; she sold one of her work to the Czarina. Her extentive knowledge of languages gained her employement with the American ambassador and allowed her to write on music, theatre, drama and art for Russian and American newspaper. After traveling through various Baltic countries, she settled in Rome to study sculpture at the French Academy and with French engraver, Pierre Dautel. She produced many medallions using academic portraits, included Lord Chelmsford, Sir James Fairfax and General Peppino Garibaldi, and Symbolyst compositions. Church commissions came from Cardinal O’Connell of Boston and Josef Alteneisel, Prince-Bishop of Brixen in the Tyrol. The medallion in bas-relief of the Prince Bishop of Brizen, Tyrol, is among her finest productions. It has been praised in the French and Italian papers as "the wonderful achievement of a beautiful young Australian, who has only studied art for a comparatively short time" (June 10 1908). During WWI she became a Red Cross nurse in Italy. The Fascist government were patrons of her work and she produced a large relief portrait medallion of Mussolini and a war memorial, “Sacrificio,” at Formia, in 1924-26. Ohlfsen was commissioned by Mussolini to design this memorial because her art studies had been solely in Italy and she had nursed Italian soldiers during the war. This is the only work of its kind in Italy to be made by a woman or a foreigner. William Moore in the Brisbane Courier of 8 March 1930 referred to her as the artist who modelled a bust of Nellie Stewart; she also sculpted the head of W.A. Holman in plaster. In 1948, she and her companion, the Russian Baroness Hélène de Kuegelgen (1879-1948), were found gassed in her studio in Rome at Via di S. Nicola da Tolentino, 00187 Roma, close to the Spanish Steps. They had been living at that address, in an area traditionally associated with artists’ studios, for nearly half a century. Police said the deaths were accidental. Hélène de Kuegelgen was the daughter of Pavel Kuegelgen and Alexandra, nee Zhudlovsky. They had moved to Italy in 1902 from St. Petersburg, a city they both loved but which they accurately saw as being on the brink of revolution. Hélène (Elena) was from a well-connected family of Balten Germans, with one uncle a physician to the Tsar and another editor of the Petersburger German newspaper. Her family also boasted several prominent artists, two of them court painters. Dora and Hélène are buried together. A relief bust of the god Dionysius, one hand raised in a gesture of blessing, watches over one of the most distinctive graves in the Cemetery (Zone 1.15.28). Ohlfsen's work is represented in the collections of the British Museum and the Petit Palais in Paris, and in Australian collections including Museum Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales.
• John Addington Symonds (1840–1893), English poet and critic
• Pavel Fedorovich Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian surrealist painter, long-time partner of Charles Henri Ford. Campo Cestio is the original burial place, he was then moved to Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris.
• Una Vincenzo, Lady Troubridge (1887-1983), died in Rome in 1963; she had left written instructions that her coffin be placed in the vault in Highgate Cemetery where Hall and Batten had been buried, but the instructions were discovered too late. She is buried in the English Cemetery in Rome, and on her coffin is inscribed "Una Vincenzo Troubridge, the friend of Radclyffe Hall".
• Elihu Vedder (1836–1923), American painter, sculptor, graphic artist
• Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840–1894) was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe. In 1893 Woolson rented an elegant apartment on the Grand Canal of Venice. Suffering from influenza and depression, she either jumped or fell to her death from a fourth story window in the apartment in January 1894, surviving for about an hour after the fall She is also memorialized by Anne's Tablet on Mackinac Island, Michigan.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Donald Vining, was a gay diarist.
Born: June 20, 1917, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: January 24, 1998, New York City, New York, United States
Education: West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Yale School of Drama
Buried: Forest Grove Cemetery, Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine, USA
Books: A Gay Diary, more

Donald Vining was a gay diarist. Vining published essays on gay relationships - his own with his partner Richmond Morell Purinton lasted more than 43 years - which appeared in varied American periodicals. Many of Vining's original diaries (1932-1958) are now at Yale University. Donald Vining was a pacifist who admitted his homosexuality to his draft board because his mother needed his support, and he could not afford to be placed in a camp for conscientious objectors. In his review, John D'Emilio said, "A Gay Diary is, unquestionably, the richest historical document of gay male life in the United States that I have ever encountered.... It chronicles a whole life in which homosexuality is but one part and an ever changing part at that.... It illuminates a critical period in gay male American history.” D'Emilio discusses the earlier years of the diary at some length in his Sexual Politics, Sexual Communities: The Making of a Homosexual Minority. The strength of Vining's diary lies precisely in his detailed chronicle of the daily life of non-professional gay men in Manhattan over a period of more than 40 years.
Together from 1946 to 1989: 43 years.
Donald Vining (June 20, 1917 – January 24, 1998)
Richmond M. Purinton (November 9, 1905 - November 16, 1989)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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At Augusta, the capital of the U.S. state of Maine, Donald Vining (1917-1998) is buried together with his long-time companion, Richmond Purinton (1905-1989), at Forest Grove Cemetery (Winthrop St, Augusta, ME 04330). Donald Vining was a gay diarist, he published essays on gay relationships, his own with Purinton lasted more than 43 years.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Edith Wharton was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930.
Born: January 24, 1862, New York City, New York, United States
Died: August 11, 1937, Saint-Brice-sous-Forêt, France
Lived: Land’s End, Ledge Road, Newport RI, USA (41.45463, -71.30905)
Château Sainte-Claire, Hyères, Var Département, France (43.12054, 6.12863)
Le Pavillon Colombe, 33 Rue Edith Wharton, Saint-Brice-sous-Forêt, Val-d’Oise department, Île-de-France, France (48.99942, 2.356)
53 Rue de Varenne, 75007 Paris, France (48.85445, 2.32166)
The Mount, 2 Plunkett St, Lenox, MA 01240, USA (42.33102, -73.28201)
882-884 Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
Buried: Cimetière des Gonards, Versailles, Departement des Yvelines, Île-de-France, France
Spouse: Edward Robbins Wharton (m. 1885–1913)
Movies: The Age of Innocence, The Glimpses of the Moon, more

William Morton Fullerton was an American print journalist, author and foreign correspondent for The Times. A bisexual man-about-town, he juggled romances with Edith Wharton, Lord Ronald Gower and the Ranee of Sarawak. Wharton also had lesbian affairs, including one with writer Janet Flanner, and was friends with Teddy Roosevelt’s bisexual sister, poet Corinne Roosevelt Robinson. Fullerton and Wharton’s affair lasted from 1906 to 1909. They were introduced by mutual friend Henry James (brother of Alice James.) She undoubtedly considered him the love of her life, describing him as her "ideal intellectual partner". However they were never 'officially' together, as Wharton was already married and Fullerton's highly promiscuous personality prevented him from ever committing to a serious relationship. After the affair ended, Wharton, who was fiercely guarded when it came to her private life, requested that Fullerton destroy every letter she had ever sent him in order to avoid any scandal. The affair itself, although suspected, was not confirmed until the 1980s. Fullerton had ignored Wharton's request and had kept all of her letters, which were eventually published as a book, The letters of Edith Wharton, in 1988. Wharton wrote also several design books, including her first published work, The Decoration of Houses of 1897, co-authored by Ogden Codman, Jr.
Together from 1906 to 1909: 3 years.
Edith Wharton (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937)
William Morton Fullerton (September 18, 1865 – August 26, 1952)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The Mount is a country house in Lenox, Massachusetts, the home of noted author Edith Wharton, who designed the house and its grounds and considered it her "first real home."
Address: 2 Plunkett St, Lenox, MA 01240, USA (42.33102, -73.28201)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 413-551-5111
National Register of Historic Places: 71000900, 1971. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built in 1902, Design by Edith Wharton (1862-1937)
The Mount survives today as an example of Wharton’s design principles. Edith Wharton wrote several of her novels there, including “The House of Mirth” (1905), the first of many chronicles of life in old New York. At The Mount, she entertained the cream of American literary society, including her close friend, novelist Henry James, who described the estate as "a delicate French chateau mirrored in a Massachusetts pond.” Although she spent many months traveling in Europe nearly every year with her friend, Egerton Winthrop (John Winthrop’s descendant), The Mount was her primary residence until 1911. When living there and while traveling abroad, Wharton was usually driven to appointments by her longtime chauffeur and friend Charles Cook, a native of nearby South Lee, Massachusetts. Edith Wharton and her husband, Edward, lived in The Mount from 1902 to 1911. After the Whartons left, the house was a private residence, a girls’ dormitory for the Foxhollow School, and site of the theatre company Shakespeare & Company. It was then bought by Edith Wharton Restoration, which has restored much of the property to its original condition. Today, The Mount is a cultural center and historic house museum, welcoming close to 40,000 visitors each year. The house is open daily from May through October for house and garden tours. Speciality Ghost and Backstairs tours are also offered. In the summer, The Mount hosts performances, music, lectures, and outdoor sculpture exhibits. Additional special events are hosted throughout the year.
Life
Who: Edith Wharton, nèe Edith Newbold Jones (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937)
Edith Wharton was engaged to Henry Stevens in 1882 after a two-year courtship. The month the two were to marry, the engagement abruptly ended. In 1885, at age 23, she married Edward (Teddy) Robbins Wharton, who was 12 years her senior. From a well-established Boston family, he was a sportsman and a gentleman of the same social class and shared her love of travel. From the late 1880s until 1902, he suffered acute depression, and the couple ceased their extensive travel. At that time his depression manifested as a more serious disorder, after which they lived almost exclusively at their estate The Mount. In 1908 her husband’s mental state was determined to be incurable. In the same year, she began an affair with Morton Fullerton, a journalist for The Times, in whom she found an intellectual partner. She divorced Edward Wharton in 1913 after 28 years of marriage. Fullerton was bisexual and had affairs with Wharton, Lord Ronald Gower and the Ranee of Sarawak. Wharton had also lesbian affairs, including one with writer Janet Flanner, and was friend with bisexual poet Corinne Roosevelt Robinson, sister of Teddy Roosevelt.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Rumor has it that Edith Wharton purchased the remote property at the southern end of Ledge Road because she wanted to live as far as possible from her mother without leaving Newport.
Address: Ledge Road, Newport RI, USA (41.45463, -71.30905)
Type: Private Property
Place
In 1897 Edith Wharton purchased Land’s End from Robert Livingston Beeckman, a former U.S. Open Tennis Championship runner-up who would go on to become Governor of Rhode Island. At that time Wharton described the main house as "incurably ugly." Wharton agreed to pay $80,000 for the property, and spend thousands more to alter the home’s facade, decorate the interior, and landscape the grounds. Ultimately, Wharton would allow that she and Ogden Codman, Jr., a revivalist architect who supervised the renovations, had finally helped the home achieve "acertain dignity." The newly constructed gardens were especially impressive having been laid-out in classical design by Beatrix Ferrand, the landscape architect responsible for the gardens at Dumbarton Oaks. Wharton’s original French doors and carefully crafted moldings still grace the dining and living room areas. It is a "comfortable, functional" family home.
Life
Who: Edith Wharton, nèe Edith Newbold Jones (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937)
Edith Wharton was a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930. Wharton combined her insider’s view of America’s privileged classes with a brilliant, natural wit to write humorous, incisive novels and short stories of social and psychological insight. She was well acquainted with many of her era’s other literary and public figures, including Theodore Roosevelt. In addition to novels, Wharton wrote at least 85 short stories. She was also a garden designer, interior designer, and a taste-maker of her time. She wrote several design books, including her first published work, “The Decoration of Houses” (1897), co-authored by Ogden Codman, Jr. (1863-1951.) Another is the generously illustrated “Italian Villas and Their Gardens” of 1904. Ogden Codman, Jr. was a noted architect and interior decorator in the Beaux-Arts styles. Wharton became one of his first Newport clients for her home there, Land’s End. In her autobiography, “A Backward Glance,” Wharton wrote: “We asked him to alter and decorate the house—a somewhat new departure, since the architects of that day looked down on house-decoration as a branch of dress-making, and left the field up to the upholsterers, who crammed every room with curtains, lambrequins, jardinières of artificial plants, wobbly velvet-covered tables littered with silver gew-gaws, and festoons of lace on mantelpieces and dressing tables.” On June 1, 1937 Wharton was at the French country home of Ogden Codman, where they were at work on a revised edition of “The Decoration of Houses,” when she suffered a heart attack and collapsed. She later died of a stroke on August 11, 1937.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Immediately after the death of her father, Alice Delamar rented a house on Park Avenue 270.
Address: Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
Type: Private Property
Place
Park Avenue is a wide New York City boulevard which carries north and southbound traffic in the borough of Manhattan, and is also a wide one-way pair in the Bronx. For most of the road’s length in Manhattan, it runs parallel to Madison Avenue to the west and Lexington Avenue to the east. Park Avenue’s entire length was formerly called Fourth Avenue; the title still applies below 14th Street. Meanwhile, the section between 14th and 17th Street is called Union Square East, and between 17th and 32nd Streets, the name Park Avenue South is used. In the Bronx, Park Avenue runs in several segments between the Major Deegan Expressway and Fordham Road.
Notable queer residents at Park Avenue:
- No. 270: real estate titan Dr. Charles V. Paterno formed the Vanderbilt Av. Realty Corp. and commissioned the architectural firm of Warren & Wetmore to design a massive U-shaped neo-Renaissance building. Paterno envisioned two distinct sections—the mansion-like apartments that took the address 270 Park Avenue, and the apartment hotel that used the name Hotel Marguery. The residents would share a 70 by 275 foot garden with a private drive. As the restrained brick and stone structure rose, Manhattan millionaires rushed to take apartments. Construction was completed, as predicted, in the fall of 1917, at a cost of around $8 million, exclusive of the land. Twelve stories tall, there were 20 acres of floor space divided into 108 apartments. Deemed the “largest apartment building in the world,” a Dec. 1917 advertisement counted “1,536 living rooms; 1,476 closets; 100 kitchens; 100 sculleries.” Potential residents could choose apartments of 6 to 10 rooms with three or four baths, at an annual rent of $4000 to $6500. Larger apartments, from 12 to 19 rooms with four to six baths, would cost $7000 to $15000. The highest rent would be equivalent to about $23,000 per month in 2015. The moneyed residents could enjoy the convenience of the downstairs restaurant, run by the Ritz-Carlton restaurant. Rudolph Guglielmi had a spacious apartment in the building in Nov. 1925 when he applied for United States citizenship. Better known to American audiences by his screen name, Rudolph Valentino, the movie star had to dodge a battery of questions. His failure to do military service during the war was brought up—he explained it was due to “a slight defect in the vision of his left eye.” The Italian Government had listed him “as a slacker.” The New York Times reported that “it was discovered to be an error which was later corrected.” Then there was the question about why Valentine’s wife, Winifred, was living on 96th Street and not in the Park Avenue apartment. “Mrs. Valentino said that the only issue between her husband and herself was that he wished her to give up all business and settle down into home life, and this she would not do.” The 1920s saw the comings and goings of other internationally-known names. In 1926 Queen Marie of Romania stayed briefly in the apartment of Ira Norris; and a year later Charles Lindbergh’s family, including his mother, stayed at No. 270 Park Avenue following his triumphant June 1927 return from Europe. Acclaimed stage actress Gertrude Lawrence (rumoured to be the lover of Daphne du Marier) took an apartment in 1929. No. 270 Park Avenue occupied the entire block between Madison Avenue and 47th and 48th Street. The 12-storey complex containing 108 suites in two separate sections, which were connected by the architects by two triumphal arches over the Vander Bild Avenue. Alice DeLamar rented the largest apartment. The apartment building stood near the Delamar Mansion, which had to be sold. An American magazine, the St. Louis Star “told” the adventures of Prince Carol of Romania (future Carol II of Romania, son of Marie of Romania) overcome by love for the fair miss De la Mar, offering his heart and his titles, but without achieving the desired result. Miss De la Mar told in a few words: “I did not want to marry the prince because I didn’t love him. I own $10 million and if I want to marry then I do not wish to give up my freedom to marry without love." The prince wrote: "The American press blew the rumor that I came to America to find a rich woman. The Daily News even picked a few candidates ahead of me: Miss Millicent Rogers, Miss Abby Rockefeller and Miss Alice Lamar." King Carol II ruled from 1930 to 1940. Carol is more known for his amorous adventures than for his way of ruling: in it, he does not seem to have excelled. In 1920 Alice Delamar moved into a beautiful house on Sunset Boulevard in Palm Beach. The inherited house of Pembroke was sold a few years later. The auction took place on August 16, 1924 in the Great Reception Hall of Pembroke. On June 24, 1947 plans were filed by architects Harrison & Abramovitz for the more than $21 million Time Life Building. The Hotel Marguery, once the largest apartment building in the world, and its astonishingly colorful history, was soon bulldozed. In 1971, Alice wrote that the complex has long been demolished. Today the site is occupied by the JP Morgan Chase Tower, constructed in 1960 and designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
- No. 410: Monroe Wheeler and Glenway Wescott’s latest apartment was in a very grand building at 410 Park Avenue, and they gave a large party for their friend. Maugham enjoyed the gathering, but when their upstairs neighbour Marlene Dietrich appeared, he felt upstaged and left. By the late 40s, Monroe Wheeler was a high profile New Yorker. His full-page portrait appeared in the Nov. 1948 issue of Vogue. At his parties at 410 Park Avenue were such celebrities as Cecil Beaton, Francis Bacon, Ben Shahn, Gore Vidal, and Christopher Isherwood. Among the regulars were Paul Cadmus, Marianne Moore, Katherine Anne Porter, Pavel Tchelitchew and Charles Henri Ford, Diana and Reed Vreeland, Joseph Campbell, the Kirsteins, E.E. Cummings, Brooke Astor, Philip Johnson, and others. Wheeler’s most amusing annual guests were Osbert and Edith Sitwell, the brother and sister poet famous for their double wit and set-up dry humor. In 1958 Monroe Wheeler learned that the grand old building at 410 Park Avenue would be demolished and replaced by a office tower. He found a small apartment at 215 E. 79 St. in a tall pale-blond brick building called the Thornely. They lived there for two years.
- No. 465, The Ritz Tower: Built in 1925 as the city’s most elegant apartment hotel, The Ritz Tower today remains one of Manhattan’s most luxurious and sought-after residential cooperatives noted for its spacious and elegant apartments, each one unique. Greta Garbo lived here for a time in the 40s. Most happy about this move was probably Mercedes de Acosta, who had an apartment at 471 Park Avenue, from where she could see Garbo's north facing rooms. Mercedes told the story that during the wartime, when people were not allowed to show light at night “we gave each other signs with candles. Why we were not arrested for this offence is still today a riddle to me.” In 1951 Garbo moved from the Ritz into a suite with four rooms located on the seventeenth floor of The Hampshire House at 150 Central Park South.
- No. 530: In 1950, Alice DeLamar’s address is still a house in New York at 530 Park Avenue. This 19-story, white-brick apartment building at 530 Park Avenue on the southwest corner at 61st Street next to the Regency Hotel was erected in 1940 and designed by George F. Pelham Jr., who also designed 41, 50, 785, 1130 and 1150 Park Avenue and 1056 Fifth Avenue. It was bought in 2007 for about $211 million by Blackrock Realty Advisors which then sold it to Aby Rosen, the owner of the Seagrams Building and Lever House on Park Avenue who converted the rental building to a condominium with 116 apartments in 2013. Handel Architects LLP was architect and William T. Georgis was interior designer for the conversion.
- No. 564: The second clubhouse of the Colony Club, was commissioned in 1913 and constructed from 1914 to 1916. It was designed by Delano & Aldrich in the Neo-Georgian style, with interiors designed by Elsie de Wolfe. See Colony Club.
- No. 570: On April 24, 1947, Willa Cather died of a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 73 in her home at 570 Park Avenue in Manhattan.
- No. 695, 10065: Hunter College is an American public university and one of the constituent organizations of the City University of New York, located in the Lenox Hill neighborhood of Manhattan's Upper East Side. The college grants undergraduate and graduate degrees in over one-hundred fields of study across five schools. Hunter College also administers Hunter College High School and Hunter College Elementary School. Founded in 1870, originally as a women's college, Hunter is one of the oldest public colleges in the United States. The college assumed the location of its main campus on Park Avenue in 1873. Hunter began admitting men into its freshman class in 1964. In 1943 Eleanor Roosevelt dedicated the former home of herself and Franklin Delano Roosevelt to the college, which reopened in 2010 as the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Audre Lorde (1934-1992); Pauli Murray (1910–1985).
- No. 882-884: Ogden Codman, Jr. collaborated with Edith Wharton on the redesign of her townhouse at 882-884 Park Avenue, now demolished.
- No. 993: From the 1940s to the mid 1970s Marlene Dietrich kept, and often resided in apartment 12E, a four room apartment in this building. She relocated to New York to be close to her daughter Maria Riva and her grandchildren. 993 Park Avenue went co-op in the late fifties and Dietrich bought an apartment in the building. The full service, thirteen storey Italianite block had been built in the teens by Bing & Bing. Dietrich decorated her modest apartment (a two bed / two bath unit of 1600 square feet), in a mixture of styles: Louis XIV furniture was offset against glizy mirrored walls befitting a movie star. When she wasn’t travelling the world with her spectacular one-woman show, Dietrich divided her time between her New York home and a Paris rental on the Avenue Montaigne. Visting Dietrich in Paris in the late 70s, her friend Leo Lerman noted "the podge of the [Parisian] flat, which I find touching and that Gray [Foy] says is so unlike her New York controlled elegance. I like both and find both very much the way she is." After a stage fall in Australia in 1975 Dietrich went into semi-retirement in Paris, becoming increasingly reclusive. Her grandson, J. Michael Riva lived at the Park Avenue apartment during the early 80s with his then-fiance, Jamie Lee Curtis, when the latter was filming "Trading Places" (1983.) Dietrich died in 1992. Her heirs sold the apartment in 1998 for $615.000. 993 Park Ave #12E reappeared on the market in 2010. The refurbished unit was listed by Sotheby’s Real Estate for $ 2.250.000.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Château Sainte-Claire is a villa in the hills above Hyères, in the Var Département of France, which was the residence of Olivier Voutier and later of the American novelist Edith Wharton. Its garden is classified as one of the Notable Gardens of France.
Address: Hyères, Var Département, France (43.12054, 6.12863)
Type: Public Park (open to public)
Place
Built in 1820
In 1927, the property was purchased by the American novelist Edith Wharton, who used it as her summer residence. She called it "Sainte-Claire du Château" and created the garden in its present form, filling it with cacti and sub-tropical plants. The Château Sainte-Claire is located in the hills just above the old town of Hyères. Its park contains the ruins of part of the old walls of the city, dating to the end of the XII century. The walls were destroyed by the order of Cardinal Richelieu during the reign of Louis XIII of France. In the XVII century, the site was occupied by a convent belonging to the order of the Institute of Poor Women, created in Assisi in 1212, of which Sainte-Claire was the first Mother Superior. Following the French Revolution, the convent was closed and then demolished, and the land was sold. In 1820, the land was sold to the French naval officer and archeologist Olivier Voutier, best known as the man who brought the “Venus de Milo” from Greece to France. Voutier constructed the present villa, which he called La Villa Sainte Claire, and restored the ramparts of the old city between the villa and the ruins of an old tower. The villa was purchased by the city of Hyères in 1955, and the park became a public garden. Since 1990 it has been the office of the National Park of Port-Cros and the Botanical Preserve of Porquerolles (the island park off the coast of Hyères.)
Life
Who: Edith Wharton, nèe Edith Newbold Jones (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937)
The maritime officer and archaeologist Olivier Voutier built the peculiar neo-Romanesque villa. His gravesite can be seen at the top of the gardens close to the medieval tower. A few years later, Edith Wharton moved into the house and turned it into her own literary and botanical shelter. In a letter to Bernard Berenson in 1919 she extolled the region’s endless charms: “I read your letter stretched out on a bank of amaranth and moly, with the blue sea sending little silver splashes up to my toes, and roses and narcissus and mimosa outdoing Coty’s best from the centre all around to the sea. In front of us lay two or three Odyssean isles, and the boat with a Lotean sail which is always in the right place was on duty as usual — and this is the way all my days are spent! Seven hours of blue-and-gold and thyme and rosemary and hyacinth and roses every day that the Lord makes; and in the evenings, dozing over a good book! ….”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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A long, low, XVIII century house called "Pavillon Colombe,” named after the two Venetian actresses for whom it had been built. This is where Edith Wharton spent her summers.
Address: 33 Rue Edith Wharton, Saint-Brice-sous-Forêt, Val-d’Oise department, Île-de-France, France (48.99942, 2.356)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1769, Design by François Joseph Bélanger (1744–1818)
Le Pavillon Colombe was the house on rue de Montmorency (now rue Edith Wharton) in St. Brice-sous-Forêt, Seine-et-Oise (now Val d’Oise), France, that Edith Wharton acquired in 1918. The house was probably built for Jean André de Vassal de Saint-Hubert, who offered it to his mistress, Marie Catherine Ruggieri (1751–1830), an actress known as Mademoiselle Colombe. For this reason, Edith Wharton named the house Le Pavillon Colombe. In 1918–1919, the house was renovated by Charles Moreux and Henri Gonse and landscaped by Lawrence Johnston. Edith Wharton lived in Saint-Brice-sous-Forêt from 1919 until her death in 1937. The road she lived on has since been named after her.
Life
Who: Edith Wharton, nèe Edith Newbold Jones (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937)
After her Paris years before and during the war, Edith Wharton’s French residences were seasonal. Just after the war, she took over, and did up, two French houses and gardens. One is in Hyères, east of Toulon, a house called Château Sainte-Claire, on a hillside above the little town, in the grounds of a ruined XVII century convent, with a staggering view down to the Mediterranean, where she spent the winters. The other is on the outskirts of Paris, in a small town called Saint-Brice-sous-Fôret, on the edge of the Montmorency Forest. On June 1, 1937 Wharton was at the French country home of Ogden Codman Jr., where they were at work on a revised edition of “The Decoration of Houses,” when she suffered a heart attack and collapsed. Edith Wharton later died of a stroke on August 11, 1937 at Le Pavillon Colombe, her XVIII century house on Rue de Montmorency in Saint-Brice-sous-Forêt. She died at 5:30 p.m., but her death was not known in Paris. At her bedside was her friend, Mrs. Royall Tyler. Wharton was buried in the American Protestant section of the Cimetière des Gonards in Versailles, "with all the honors owed a war hero and a chevalier of the Legion of Honor... a group of some one hundred friends sang a verse of the hymn "O Paradise"”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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“My years of Paris life were spent entirely in the rue de Varenne – rich years, crowded and happy years.” Edith Wharton
Address: 53 Rue de Varenne, 75007 Paris, France (48.85445, 2.32166)
Type: Private Property
Place
When her marriage deteriorated, Edith Wharton decided to move permanently to France, living at 53 Rue de Varenne, Paris, in an apartment that belonged to George Washington Vanderbilt II. Wharton was preparing to vacation for the summer when WWI broke out. Though many fled Paris, she moved back to her Paris apartment on the Rue de Varenne and for four years was a tireless and ardent supporter of the French war effort. One of the first causes she undertook in August 1914 was the opening of a workroom for unemployed women; here they were fed and paid one franc a day. What began with thirty women soon doubled to sixty, and their sewing business began to thrive. When the Germans invaded Belgium in the fall of 1914 and Paris was flooded with Belgian refugees, she helped to set up the American Hostels for Refugees, which managed to get them shelter, meals, clothes and eventually an employment agency to help them find work. She collected more than $100,000 on their behalf. In early 1915 she organized the Children of Flanders Rescue Committee, which gave shelter to nearly 900 Belgian refugees who had fled when their homes were bombed by the Germans. Aided by her influential connections in the French government, she and her long-time friend Walter Berry (then president of the American Chamber of Commerce in Paris), were among the few foreigners in France allowed to travel to the front lines during WWI. She and Berry made five journeys between February and August 1915, which Wharton described in a series of articles that were first published in Scribner’s Magazine and later as “Fighting France: From Dunkerque to Belfort,” which became an American bestseller. Travelling by car, Wharton and Berry drove through the war zone, viewing one decimated French village after another. She visited the trenches, and was within earshot of artillery fire. She wrote, "We woke to a noise of guns closer and more incessant... and when we went out into the streets it seemed as if, overnight, a new army had sprung out of the ground.”
Life
Who: Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (July 29, 1859 – 1927)
Walter Berry was an American lawyer, diplomat, Francophile, and friend of several great writers. Berry was born in Paris, a descendant of the Van Rensselaer family of New York. After attending St. Mark’s School and Harvard, he took a law degree at Columbia University, practicing law in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Paris, where he pursued a career in international law and diplomacy. After serving as a judge at the International Tribunal of Egypt from 1908 to 1911, he settled in Paris for the remainder of his life and became a strong advocate of France, tirelessly promoting its cause in the United States when WWI broke out in 1914; he served as President of the American Chamber of Commerce in Paris from 1916 to 1923. After the war he vigorously opposed both Germany and the Soviet Union. A close friend of Henry James and Edith Wharton, who called him "the love of my life," he met Marcel Proust in the summer of 1916, beginning "a friendship that was to be one of the most rewarding of Proust’s final years." He was a cousin of Harry Crosby, leaving him in his will "my entire library except such items as my good friend Edith Wharton may care to choose." Edith Wharton is buried next to her long-time friend, Walter Berry, at Cimetière des Gonards, Versailles, Departement des Yvelines, Île-de-France, France.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
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Félicie de Fauveau was a nineteenth-century French sculptor who was a precursor of the pre-Raphaelite style. Her multiple sculptural works showcase a variety of techniques and mediums including marble, stone, glass and bronze. Wikipedia
Born: January 24, 1801, Livorno
Died: December 12, 1886, Florence
Lived: 18 Rue de la Rochefoucauld, 75009 Paris, France

Born in Tuscany in 1801, Félicie de Fauveau (1801-1886) moved to France at the peak of the Restoration, after having spent her childhood in Florence. In Paris, she studied painting and sculpture and cultivated an interest in archeology and ancient symbolism, establishing a studio in Paris from 1826 to 1830, at 18 Rue de la Rochefoucauld, 75009 Paris, which was frequented by artists such as Paul Delaroche and Ary Scheffer. After her participation at the Paris Salon in 1827, De Fauveau received ample acclaim. Stendhal called her the “new Canova.” One of the statues she presented at the event, “Queen Christine of Sweden Refusing to Spare the Life of Her Equerry Monaldeschi,” was awarded the gold medal, which the artist received from King Charles X, who looked to De Fauveau to promote the ideals of the Restoration. Her award-winning statue would also inspire Alexandre Dumas’s play “Christine.” In Paris, she subsequently received multiple commissions including bronze doors destined for the Louvre, a project that failed to reach fulfilment. A dedicated Legitimist, who supported the return of the Bourbon king to France after the fall of Napoleon, de Fauveau was supported by Marie Caroline, Duchess of Berry. Both women organized failed resistance efforts in the Vandee region. De Fauveau hoped the crown would be captured by Marie Caroline’s under-aged son, the Count of Chambord. After two squelched uprisings in the early 1830s and six months in prison, De Fauveau joined her mother in Florence in 1834, where she vowed to remain in voluntary exile until the Count of Chambord was crowned king of France, a hope that never materialized.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Frederick II was King of Prussia from 1740 until 1786, the longest reign of any Hohenzollern king. His most significant accomplishments during his reign included his military victories, his reorganization ...
Born: January 24, 1712, Kingdom of Prussia
Died: August 17, 1786, Potsdam, Germany
Lived: Sanssouci Palace, Maulbeerallee, 14469 Potsdam, Germany (52.4042, 13.03849)
Buried: Sanssouci Palace, Potsdam, Potsdamer Stadtkreis, Brandenburg, Germany, Plot: buried in the lawn of the south patio of Sans Souci
Spouse: Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel-Bevern (m. 1733–1786)
Parents: Sophia Dorothea of Hanover, Frederick William I of Prussia

Count Francesco Algarotti was a man of vast knowledge and an expert in art and music who charmed his way into the lives of many of the leading figures of his time. His chief work on art is the Saggi sopra le belle arti (Essays on the Fine Arts). Among his other books are Poems, Travels in Russia, Essay on Painting, and Correspondence. At the age of twenty, Algarotti left his native Italy for the bright lights of Paris. He soon became friendly with Voltaire, who referred to him as his “cher cygne de Padoue” (dear swan of Padua). Voltaire wrote in a letter on December 15, 1740, that seeing “tender Algarotti strongly hugging handsome Lugeac, his young friend, I seem to see Socrates reinvigorated on Alcibiades’ back” (referring to Charles-Antoine de Guerin, Marquis de Lugeac (1720-1785)). At twenty-two, in London, the bisexual Algarotti became entangled in a love triangle with the bisexual Lord John Hervey, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762). Hervey and Montagu competed for Algarotti’s love and attention for many years. Frederick the Great fell in love with the charming young Algarotti and named him a count of Prussia and Court Chamberlin. Augustus III of Poland honored Algarotti with the title of councilor. In 1754, after seven years in Berlin and Dresden, Algarotti returned to Italy, where he died in 1764. Frederick erected a monument to his memory on the Campo Santo at Pisa.
Count Francesco Algarotti (December 11, 1712 – May 3, 1764)
Frederick II the Great, King in Prussia (January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Sanssouci is the former summer palace of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, in Potsdam, near Berlin. It is often counted among the German rivals of Versailles.
Address: Maulbeerallee, 14469 Potsdam, Germany (52.4042, 13.03849)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Tuesday through Sunday 10.00-18.00
Phone: +49 331 9694200
Place
Built between 1745 and 1747, Design by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff (1699-1753)
While Sanssouci is in the more intimate Rococo style and is far smaller than its French Baroque counterpart, Versailles, it too is notable for the numerous temples and follies in the park. The palace was built to fulfill King Frederick’s need for a private residence where he could relax away from the pomp and ceremony of the Berlin court. The palace’s name emphasises this; it is a French phrase (sans souci), which translates as "without concerns,” meaning "without worries" or "carefree,” symbolising that the palace was a place for relaxation rather than a seat of power. Sanssouci is little more than a large, single-story villa—more like the Château de Marly than Versailles. Containing just ten principal rooms, it was built on the brow of a terraced hill at the centre of the park. The influence of King Frederick’s personal taste in the design and decoration of the palace was so great that its style is characterised as "Frederician Rococo,” and his feelings for the palace were so strong that he conceived it as "a place that would die with him.” Because of a disagreement about the site of the palace in the park, Knobelsdorff was fired in 1746. Jan Bouman, a Dutch architect, finished the project. During the XIX century, the palace became a residence of Frederick William IV. He employed the architect Ludwig Persius to restore and enlarge the palace, while Ferdinand von Arnim was charged with improving the grounds and thus the view from the palace. The town of Potsdam, with its palaces, was a favourite place of residence for the German imperial family until the fall of the Hohenzollern dynasty in 1918. After WWII, the palace became a tourist attraction in East Germany. Following German reunification in 1990, Frederick’s body was returned to the palace and buried in a new tomb overlooking the gardens he had created. Sanssouci and its extensive gardens became a World Heritage Site in 1990 under the protection of UNESCO; in 1995, the Foundation for Prussian Palaces and Gardens in Berlin-Brandenburg was established to care for Sanssouci and the other former imperial palaces in and around Berlin. These palaces are now visited by more than two million people a year from all over the world.
Life
Who: Frederick II (24 January 1712 – 17 August 1786), King of Prussia, aka Frederick the Great
Voltaire, long guest in the royal palace of Sans-Souci in Potsdam, left unequivocal evidence on Frederick the Great’s homosexuality, arriving, in a letter of 1 December 1740, to define him “the respectable, unique and lovable bitch.” On 15 June 1743 he wrote, addressing Frederick II as "Caesar":
I love Caesar in the embrace
Of his mistress that gives up to him;
I laugh and I’m not offended
to see him, young and handsome,
above and below Nicomede.
I admire him more than Cato,
Since he is tender and magnanimous.
And in the same letter Voltaire wrote: "Your Majesty is with me a civettina (a coquette), very seductive.” Always him, talking about the Court of Potsdam with a female correspondent on 17 November 1750 specifies: "I know, my dear child, all that is said about Potsdam around Europe. Especially women are wild (...) but this does not concern me (...) I well see, my dear child, that this country is not for you. I see that people spend ten months a year in Potsdam. This is not a Court, is a retreat from which the ladies are banned. And yet we are not in a monastery. Considering everything, wait for me in Paris." The meaning of the allusions by Voltaire is made clear by another witness, Giacomo Casanova (1725-1798), who wrote in his memoirs that he saw in Potsdam Frederick II drive the first battalion of his soldiers, all with a gold watch donated from him for having the courage to subdue him... like Caesar had made with Nicomedes. The thing, he assured, was no one mystery. Frederick the Great died on August 17, 1786 in the armchair of his study in Sanssouci. He wished to be buried in a tomb next to his "Weinberghäuschen" and next to his favourite dogs. His nephew and successor Frederick William II did not obey these instructions and ordered him to be buried in the Potsdam garrison church (destroyed in 1945) next to his father, the soldier-king Frederick William I. Almost 160 years later, in the turmoil of WWII, German soldiers took the coffins to safety in an attempt to save them from possible destruction. In March 1943 they were taken into an underground bunker in Potsdam-Eiche and then in March 1945 to the salt mine at Bernterode in Eichsfeld (Thüringen). From there they were carried off after the war by soldiers of the U.S. Army to Marburg (Hesse). The coffins stayed in the Marburg Elisabeth Church until their transfer to Burg Hohenzollern at Hechingen (Baden-Württemberg) in August 1952. After the reunification of Germany the final wish of Frederick the Great was fulfilled. On August 17, 1991, the 205th anniversary of his death, the sarcophagus with the mortal remains of the King was laid out in the forecourt of Sanssouci palace, escorted by an honour guard of the Bundeswehr. The burial took place that night in the tomb Frederick had planned for the purpose since 1744 on the highest terrace of vineyards. His soldier-king father found his final resting place in the Kaiser-Friedrich-Mausoleum at the Church of Peace in Sanssouci Park.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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George Dewey Cukor was an American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
Born: July 7, 1899, Lower East Side, New York City, New York, United States
Died: January 24, 1983, Los Angeles, California, United States
Lived: 9166 Cordell Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90069, USA (34.09418, -118.39137)
Buried: Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale), Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Garden of Honor (Private Garden), GPS (lat/lon): 34.12273, -118.23605
Awards: Academy Award for Best Director, more
Books: What Price Hollywood?

Florence Yoch and Lucile Council were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California. Their landscape design works include The George Cukor gardens in the Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles - over several decades
Address: 9166 Cordell Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90069, USA (34.09418, -118.39137)
Type: Private Property
Place
Design by Roland E. Coate (1890-1958)
The legendary director George Cukor’s residence in the Hollywood Hills provided a luxurious backdrop to the director’s vibrant social life. At the height of his career, Cukor’s home served as an vital social center in Hollywood’s gay community. He hired former film actor William "Billy" Haines as his interior designer, who filled the home with elegant decor and dozens of photographs of Cukor’s Hollywood friends.
Life
Who: Florence Yoch (1890–1972) and Lucile Council (1898–1964)
Florence Yoch was a landscape architect in California who was active from 1915 through the 1950s. Her career included commissions for private residential clients, parks, public spaces, and film sets for Hollywood movies. Florence Yoch’s college education began in 1910 at the University of California, Berkeley and then at Cornell’s College of Agriculture. She would go on to earn her degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1915. Upon graduation, Yoch immediately went to work designing gardens in Pasadena and Orange County. In 1921, she hired as apprentices Katherine Bashford (who would leave to found her own solo practice in 1923) and Lucile Council, who had studied at both the Cambridge School of Domestic and Landscape Architecture and at Oxford. In 1925, Florence and Lucile formed a partnership, Yoch & Council, setting up shop in the garden studio at Council’s home in South Pasadena. From there they would enjoy a thriving business creating landscaping for a large roster of clients that ranged from wealthy clientele in Pasadena and Santa Barbara to Hollywood players. Other than George Cukor gardens, their landscape design works include: The estate of Howard Huntington, a Henry E. Huntington heir, in Pasadena; The equestrian estate of Will Keith Kellogg in the Pomona Valley, the present day campus of Cal Poly Pomona; Il Brolino estate with topiary garden in Montecito; The Getty House gardens in Windsor Square, Los Angeles; Rancho Los Alamitos in Long Beach, California; The Jack L. Warner estate in Beverly Hills - present day David Geffen estate; Film sets for the exterior of “Tara” in Gone with the Wind; The David O. Selznick estate in Beverly Hills. The works of Florence Yoch & Lucile Council are documented in the book "Landscaping the American dream: the gardens and film sets of Florence Yoch, 1890-1972.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries is a corporation that owns and operates a chain of cemeteries and mortuaries in Los Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties in Southern California.
Addresses:
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cathedral City), 69855 Ramon Rd, Cathedral City, CA 92234, USA (33.81563, -116.4419)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Covina Hills), 21300 Via Verde Drive, Covina, CA 91724, USA (34.06783, -117.84183)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cypress), 4471 Lincoln Ave, Cypress, CA 90630, USA (33.8337, -118.0552)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Glendale), 1712 S Glendale Ave, Glendale, CA 91205, USA (34.12524, -118.24371)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Hollywood Hills), 6300 Forest Lawn Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.14688, -118.32208)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Long Beach), 1500 E San Antonio Dr, Long Beach, CA 90807, USA (33.84384, -118.17116)
Place
The company was founded by a group of San Francisco businessmen in 1906. Dr. Hubert Eaton assumed management control in 1917 and is credited with being Forest Lawn’s "founder" because of his origination of the "memorial-park" plan. The first location was in Tropico which later became part of Glendale, California. Its facilities are officially known as memorial parks. The parks are best known for the large number of celebrity burials, especially in the Glendale and Hollywood Hills locations. Eaton opened the first mortuary (funeral home) on dedicated cemetery grounds after a long battle with established funeral directors who saw the "combination" operation as a threat. He remained as general manager until his death in 1966 when he was succeeded by his nephew, Frederick Llewellyn.
Notable queer burials at Forest Lawn Memorial Parks:
• Lucile Council (1898-1964), Section G, Lot 5 Space 9, Glendale. Florence Yoch (1890–1972) and Lucile Council were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California.
• George Cukor (1899-1983), Garden of Honor (Private Garden), Glendale. American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
• Brad Davis (1949-1991), Court of Remembrance/Columbarium of Valor, G64054, Hollywood Hills. American actor, known for starring in the 1978 film Midnight Express and 1982 film Querelle. Davis married Susan Bluestein, an Emmy Award-winning casting director. They had one child, Alex, a transgender man born as Alexandra. Davis acknowledged having had sex with men and being bisexual in an interview with Boze Hadleigh.
• Helen Ferguson (1901-1977), Ascension, L-7296, space 1, Glendale. For nearly thirty years, former actress and publicist Helen Ferguson had an intimate relationship with Barbara Stanwyck. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, Loretta Young and Robert Taylor, among others.
• Edmund Goulding (1891–1959), Wee Kirk Churchyard, L-260, Space 4, Glendale. He was a British film writer and director. As an actor early in his career he was one of the Ghosts in the 1922 British made Paramount silent “Three Live Ghosts” alongside Norman Kerry and Cyril Chadwick. Also in the early 1920s he wrote several screenplays for star Mae Murray for films directed by her then husband Robert Z. Leonard. Goulding is best remembered for directing cultured dramas such as “Love” (1927), “Grand Hotel” (1932) with Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, “Dark Victory” (1939) with Bette Davis, and “The Razor's Edge” (1946) with Gene Tierney and Tyrone Power. He also directed the classic film noir “Nightmare Alley” (1947) with Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell, and the action drama “The Dawn Patrol.” He was also a successful songwriter, composer, and producer.
• Howard Greenfield (1936-1986) and Tory Damon (1939-1986), Hollywood Hills. Plot: Courts of Remembrance, wall crypt #3515. Damon’s epitaph reads: Love Will Keep Us Together..., Greenfield’s continues: ... Forever.
• Francis Grierson aka Jesse Shepard (1849-1927), Glendale, Great Mausoleum, Coleus Mezzanine Columbarium. Composer and pianist.
• Edward Everett Horton (1886-1970), Whispering Pines section, Map #03, Lot 994, Ground Interment Space 3, at the top of the hill. American character actor, he had a long career in film, theater, radio, television, and voice work for animated cartoons.
• Charles Laughton (1899–1962), Court of Remembrance, C-310 (wall crypt), Hollywood Hills. English stage and film character actor, director, producer and screenwriter.
• W. Dorr Legg (1904-1994), Eternal Love, Map E09, Lot 1561, Space 3, Hollywood Hills. W. Dorr Legg was a landscape architect and one of the founders of the U.S. gay rights movement, then called the homophile movement.
• David Lewis (1903-1987) and James Whale (1889-1957), Columbarium, Glendale. When David Lewis died in 1987, his executor and Whale biographer, James Curtis, had his ashes interred in a niche across from Whale’s.
• Liberace (1919-1987), Courts of Remembrance section, Map #A39, Distinguished Memorial – Sarcophagus 4, Hollywood Hills. American pianist, singer, and actor. A child prodigy and the son of working-class immigrants, Liberace enjoyed a career spanning four decades of concerts, recordings, television, motion pictures, and endorsements.
• Paul Monette (1945-1995) and Roger Horwitz (1941-1986), Hollywood Hills. Horwitz’s headstone reads: “My little friend, we sail together, if we sail at all.”
• Marion Morgan (1881-1971), The Great Mausoleum, Dahlia Terrace, Florentine Columbarium, Niche 8446, Glendale. Choreographer, longtime companion of motion picture director Dorothy Arzner.
• George Nader (1921-2002), Mark Miller, with friend Rock Hudson (1925-1985), Cenotaph, Cathedral City. Nader inherited the interest from Rock Hudson’s estate after Hudson’s death from AIDS complications in 1985. Nader lived in Hudson’s LA home until his own death. This is a memorial, George Nader’s ashes were actually scattered at sea.
• Alla Nazimova (1879-1945), actress,Whispering Pines, lot 1689, Glendale.
• Orry-Kelly (1897-1964), prominent Australian-American Hollywood costume designer. 3 times Oscar Winner. His partner was Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was acknowledged also by Kelly's mother. When Orry-Kelly died, his pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and Jack Warner read his eulogy.
• Charles Pierce (1926–1999), Columbarium of Providence, niche 64953, Hollywood Hills. He was one of the XX century's foremost female impersonators, particularly noted for his impersonation of Bette Davis. He performed at many clubs in New York, including The Village Gate, Ted Hook's OnStage, The Ballroom, and Freddy's Supper Club. His numerous San Francisco venues included the Gilded Cage, Cabaret/After Dark, Gold Street, Bimbo's 365 Club, Olympus, The Plush Room, the Venetian Room at the Fairmont Hotel, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, and the War Memorial Opera House. He died in North Hollywood, California, aged 72, and was cremated. His memorial service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park was carefully planned and scripted by Pierce before his death.
• George Quaintance (1902-1957), Eventide Section - Lot 2116 - Space 1, Glendale. American artist famous for his "idealized, strongly homoerotic" depictions of men in physique magazines. In 1938, he returned home with his companion Victor Garcia, described as Quaintance's "model, life partner, and business associate". In the early 1950s, Quaintance and Garcia moved to Rancho Siesta, which became the home of Studio Quaintance, a business venture based around Quaintance's artworks.
• Robert J. Sandoval (1950–2006), Glendale. Sandoval was a judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Sandoval and his long-time partner, Bill Martin, adopted a son in 1992, making them one of the first gay male couples in Los Angeles County to adopt a child. The couple named their son Harrison Martin-Sandoval, combining their last names to symbolize their familial unity. Sandoval died in 2006. He is survived by his partner of 24 years, Bill Martin, and his son, Harrison Martin-Sandoval. After his death, his alma mater McGeorge School of Law honored his contributions by placing him on the Wall of Honor.
• Emery Shaver (1903-1964) and Tom Lyle (1896-1976), Sanctuary, Glendale. Tom Lyle was the founder of Maybelline.
• Ethel Waters (1896-1977), Ascension Garden, Glendale. African-American blues, jazz and gospel vocalist and actress. In 1962. Ethel Waters had a lesbian relationship with dancer Ethel Williams that led to them being nicknamed “The Two Ethels.”
• Paul Winfield (1941–2004) was an American television, film and stage actor. He was known for his portrayal of a Louisiana sharecropper who struggles to support his family during the Great Depression in the landmark film “Sounder,” which earned him an Academy Award nomination. He portrayed Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 1978 television miniseries “King,” for which he was nominated for an Emmy Award. Winfield was also known to science fiction fans for his roles in “The Terminator,” “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” and “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” Winfield was gay, but remained discreet about it in the public eye. His partner of 30 years, architect Charles Gillan, Jr., died on March 5, 2002, of bone cancer. Winfield died of a heart attack in 2004 at age 62, at Queen of Angels – Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles. Winfield and Gillan are interred together.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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James Bernard was a British film composer. While still a student at Wellington College, Bernard met Benjamin Britten when the composer visited the school. The two stayed in touch during Bernard's service in the RAF from 1943 to 1946. In 1950, Britten approached him to copy out the vocal score of his new opera Billy Budd for his publishers Boosey & Hawkes. While doing this he stayed with Benjamin Britten at Aldeburgh. He went to the opening night with Benjamin Britten's housekeeper and the librettist, E.M. Forster. Around the time Bernard graduated from the RCM, he met the writer and critic Paul Dehn with whom he started a relationship. Dehn died in 1976. Working on She (1965, in which McGregor played one of the members of the tribe), Bernard first met the man who later became his second life partner, actor Ken McGregor, with whom he lived in Jamaica until McGregor's death there in 1994. Bernard then moved back to London and lived there for the remainder of his life. McFarland published David Huckvale’s critical biography of the composer, James Bernard - Composer to Count Dracula in 2006.
Together from 1965 to 1994: 29 years.
James Bernard (September 20, 1925 – July 12, 2001)
Ken McGregor (died in 1994)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Paul Edward Paget was the son of Henry Luke Paget, Bishop of Chester and Elmer Katie Hoare. He became business partner of John Seely, whom he met at Cambridge and with whom he restored many damaged church buildings after World War II.
Born: January 24, 1901
Died: 1985, Frogshall, United Kingdom
Lived: Mottistone Manor, Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Templewood, Frogshall, Northrepps, Norfolk
Buried: St Michael, Starling Rise, Sidestrand, Norfolk, NR27 0NJ

Mottistone Manor is a National Trust property in the village of Mottistone on the Isle of Wight. It has popular gardens and is a listed building. It was first mentioned in documents related to the Domesday Book.
Address: Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1983 741020
Place
The oldest parts of the manor, the south-east wing, date from the XV or early XVI century. The north-west wing was added or remodelled by Thomas Cheke in 1567, and additions to the south-east wing were made in the early XVII century. The whole house was remodelled in the 1920s by the architects Seely and Paget, Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963) of the firm being a great-grandson of Charles Seely (1803–1887), who had bought the house and estate in 1861. Though not open to the public, the manor has hosted gatherings for the Seely family. The great-great granddaughter of General J. E. B. Seely, 1st Baron Mottistone, the theatre and opera director Sophie Hunter, held her wedding reception here with Benedict Cumberbatch on February 14, 2015.
Life
Who: Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963)
'The Shack' is a small caravan in the grounds of Mottistone Manor in which the Hon. John Seeley and Paul Paget spent weekends. Seeley later inherited the title Lord Mottistone. The pair were founders of an architectural practice that flourished from the 1920s to the 1960s as Seeley & Paget. The firm is best known for their church architecture and the business partners were also life partners. Entertaining lavishly at Mottistone Manor the pair retreated at night to The Shack where they slept in bunks at either end of their tiny space - while guests relaxed in the more comfortable rooms of the Manor. This sleeping arrangement enabled them to avoid accusations of a sexual relationship when necessary. The interior of the The Shack was designed by the architects in chrome and plywood in the Modern movement style - while the outside is more rustic. Though small inside, there were luxuries such as heated chromed steel pipes formed into a ladder up to the bunk beds so they went to bed with warm feet. The Manor is in private ownership but the National Trust now admits visitors to The Shack as part of visits to the Mottistone estate and gardens. John Seely and Paul Paget also designed Eltham Palace, which hosted “The Queens of Eltham Palace” event for LGBT History Month 2012.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Templewood house was built 1938 as shooting box and base for other country activities for Samuel Hoare, Lord Templewood by Paul Edward Paget of the architectural firm Seely and Paget. The house incorporates fragments from the old Bank of England by John Soane, and from Nuthall Temple which stood in Nottinghamshire and was one of only four houses built in the United Kingdom generally said to have been inspired by Palladio's Villa Capra in Vicenza. Nuthall Temple was demolished in 1929. The two sphinxes which flank the terrace in front of the portico were salvaged from Nuthall Temple. The four columns which support the portico were salvaged from Soane’s Old Bank of England. The listed building is in excellent condition and is set in parkland and approached down a long chestnut tree-lined avenue.
Address: Northrepps, Norfolk NR27 0LJ, UK (52.89486, 1.34922)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 224676 (Grade II, 1988)
Place
Built in 1938, Design by John Seely and Paul Paget for the latter's uncle Sir Samuel Hoare, Viscount Templewood.
Painted brick, now pink but originally a warm yellow; lead roofs. Rectangular in plan, with rectangular ranges across west and east faces. Single storey west façade of 7 bays. Rendered plinth. Sash windows with glazing bars. Central 3-bay portico with 4 Ionic columns from the Taylor/Soane Bank of England supported on a rendered plinth; pediment over with Templewood's coat of arms in high relief; central double-leaved door with semicircular head, lower panels blank and upper 2 panels of each glazed. Each window of the flanking wings has apron and a continuous band to sill and head. Plain parapet. Statues on extreme corners in glass-fibre by Edwin Russell c1965. The entrance is reached by a shallow flight of stone steps flanked by 2 XVIII century stone sphinxes all from Nuthall Temple, Nottinghamshire by Thomas Wright (demolished 1929). To the left of the facade a screen wall with 6 blind rusticated arches. 7-bay south front has a double perron with stone and timber balustrade from Nuthall leading to a 3-bay loggia with 4 Bank of England columns; one bay to each side with sash windows and all 5 bays with a plain cornice and wrought iron roof balustrade by Bakewell of Derby also from Nuthall. 2 flanking wings project each with a sash with louvred shutters in the gable-end; bands and plain parapet as west front. Clerestorey above centre 5 bays with 3 oculi with radiating glazing bars and a stone festoon over the central opening. Semicircular terrace to the west front with similar balustrade from Nuthall. Central door with fanlight having 2 vertical glazing bars; sash to either side. 2 flanking bays project slightly having sashes with shutters. Plain cornice and wrought iron balustrade above centre 3 bays. Clerestorey with central oculus. Service entrance to north. Interior. Large central saloon with coved ceiling painted in 1964 with the life of Paul Paget by Brian Thomas. Modest apartments round the perimeter of the saloon.
Life
Who: Paul Edward Paget (January 24, 1901 – August 13, 1985)
Paul Paget was the son of Henry Luke Paget, Bishop of Chester and Elmer Katie Hoare (daughter of Sir Samuel Hoare). He became business partner of John Seely (later Lord Mottistone), whom he met at Cambridge and with whom he restored many damaged church buildings after WWII. From 1926 he had been a successful designer of opulent houses, including the former Eltham Palace, and claimed that he looked after 14 city churches. In his partnership with Seely he concentrated more on their clients than on design work. He succeeded Seely as surveyor to St Paul’s Cathedral in 1963 and designed or restored many churches. He was master of the Art Workers Guild in 1971. In August 1971 Paget married Verily Anderson in London, England. He was invested as a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects (FRIBA) and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (FSA). He was also a Commander, Royal Victorian Order (CVO). Paul retired to Templewood in Frogshall, Northrepps, Norfolk, a building he had designed for his uncle Samuel Hoare, Viscount Templewood. He is buried at St Michael (Starling Rise, Sidestrand, Norfolk, NR27 0NJ)



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Married: May 12, 2014

J.P. Bowie was born and raised in Aberdeen, Scotland. He left home at age eighteen for the bright lights of London. For the next twelve years, he sang, danced and acted his way around the theatres of London and the provinces, appearing in shows with many famous British singers, actors and comedians. While working aboard a cruise ship JP met Phil, a singer/guitarist who entertained in the ship’s nightclub. Phil is originally from Washington DC and worked the east coast cabaret circuit extensively. After their life on the ocean wave ended, they joined one another in California, moved to Las Vegas, then back to California where they now live in San Diego. They married on May 12, 2014: “We've been 'living in sin' for 21years so it's time don't you think?” JP is a prolific writer of gay romance novels and the two are enjoying their new life in sunny California, reuniting with old friends and making new ones. “If the future is as good as the past we’ll be just fine.”
Together since 1993: 22 years.
James “J.P.” (born October 5)
Phil (born January 24)
Married: May 12, 2014



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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