Jan. 25th, 2017

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Charlotte Elizabeth Whitton OC CBE was a Canadian feminist and mayor of Ottawa. She was the first woman mayor of a major city in Canada, serving from 1951 to 1956 and again from 1960 to 1964.
Born: March 8, 1896, Renfrew, Canada
Died: January 25, 1975, Ottawa, Canada
Education: Queen's University
Buried: Thompson Hill Cemetery, Thompson Hill, Renfrew County, Ontario, Canada
Buried alongside: Margaret Grier
Party: Progressive Conservative Party of Canada
Previous offices: Mayor of Ottawa (1960–1964), Mayor of Ottawa (1951–1956)

Charlotte Whitton was a Canadian feminist and mayor of Ottawa. She was the first female mayor of a major city in Canada, serving from 1951 to 1956 and again from 1960 to 1964. Whitton never married, but lived from 1915 to 1947 with her partner, Margaret Grier, whom she had met at Queen's University. Grier died in 1947 at the age of 55 years. Grier's tombstone reads: “Beloved Daughter of Robert and Rose Grier and Dear Friend to Charlotte Whitton.” Her relationship with Grier was not widespread public knowledge until 1999, 24 years after Whitton's death, when the National Archives of Canada publicly released the last of her personal papers, including many intimate personal letters between Whitton and Grier. The release of these papers sparked much debate in the Canadian media about whether Whitton and Grier's relationship could be characterized as lesbian, or merely as an emotionally intimate friendship between two unmarried women.
Together from 1915 to 1947: 32 years.
Charlotte Elizabeth Whitton, OC, CBE (March 8, 1896 – January 25, 1975)
Rose Margaret Grier (1892-1947)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Horton is a township in eastern Ontario, Canada, at the confluence of the Bonnechere River and the Ottawa River in Renfrew County. The Town of Renfrew was originally part of Horton Township. Communities: Castleford, Castleford Station, Cotieville, Fergusons Beach, Goshen, Lochwinnoch, Mayhew, Thompson Hill
Address: Thompson Hill, ON K0J, Canada (45.45674, -76.66531)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 807-344-7979
Life
Who: Charlotte Whitton (March 8, 1896 – January 25, 1975) and Margaret Grier (1892-1947)
Born in a family of rather modest means, Whitton grew to become the first female mayor of the City of Ottawa, a tireless defender of the less fortunate and a relentless crusader for professional standards of juvenile immigrants and neglected children. She was the driving force behind the Canadian Council on Child Welfare and was in high demand, across North America, as a lecturer on social programs. Charlotte Whitton was a study in the modern woman. Never married, Whitton lived for 32 years with her companion, Margaret Grier, whom she had met at Queen’s University. Grier died in 1947 at the age of 55 years. Her relationship with Grier was not widespread public knowledge until 1999, 24 years after Whitton's death, when the National Archives of Canada publicly released the last of her personal papers, including many intimate personal letters between Whitton and Grier. Charlotte Whitton died on January 25, 1975 and was laid to rest in the Thompson Hill Cemetery in Renfrew, near Margaret. Grier's tombstone reads: “Beloved Daughter of Robert and Rose Grier and Dear Friend to Charlotte Whitton.”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton PRA, known as Sir Frederic Leighton between 1878 and 1896, was an English painter and sculptor. His works depicted historical, biblical, and classical subject matter.
Born: December 3, 1830, Scarborough, North Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Died: January 25, 1896, London, United Kingdom
Education: University College School
Accademia di Belle Arti di Firenze
Lived: 13 Brunswick Terrace, Brunswick Centre, Brunswick Pavilion, Westborough, Scarborough YO11 1UE, UK
12 Holland Park Road, W14
2 Orme Square, W2
22 Argyle Street, WC1H
Buried: St. Paul's Cathedral, New Change, London, London, EC4M 9AD
Awards: Legion of Honour, Prix de Rome, Royal Gold Medal
Periods: Aestheticism, Neoclassicism, Academic art

Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton (1830-1896) was born in Scarborough at 13 Brunswick Terrace, to a family in the import and export business, and there is now a commemorative blue plaque up at the Brunswick Centre (Brunswick Pavilion, Westborough, Scarborough YO11 1UE, UK) marking where the Leighton family home used to be.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Dr Frederic Septimus Leighton (1799-1892), Frederic Leighton’s father, was born in St Petersburg, where his father, Dr James Boniface Leighton, a Yorkshireman, was court physician to czars Alexander I and Nicholas I of Russia. Fred's mother was Frances L'Anson. Fred was trained in medicine at Edinburgh. Soon after his marriage to Augusta Susan they traveled to Russia, and in 1830 returned to England and settled in Scarborough where Frederic Leighton was born. Toward the end of 1833 they re-located, to 22 Argyle Street, WC1H. In 1834 Fred was admitted to the Royal College of Physicians, and that year Augusta Susan sat for her portrait by Edward Foster.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: Leighton House, 12 Holland Park Road, Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton (1830–1896), "Painter lived and died here"
Address: Holland Walk, Kensington, London W8, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Holland Park is a district and a public park in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, in west London. Holland Park has a reputation as an affluent and fashionable area, known for attractive large Victorian townhouses, and high-class shopping and restaurants. There are many popular shopping destinations located around Holland Park such as High Street Kensington, Notting Hill, Holland Park Avenue, Portobello Market, Westbourne Grove, Clarendon Cross and Ledbury Road. Though there are no official boundaries, they are roughly Kensington High Street to the south, Holland Road to the west, Holland Park Avenue to the north and Kensington Church Street to the east. Holland Park Avenue is at the boundaries of the four census wards of Norland, Holland, Pembridge and Campden. The district was rural until the XIX century. Most of it was formerly the grounds of a Jacobean mansion called Holland House. In the later decades of that century the owners of the house sold off the more outlying parts of its grounds for residential development, and the district which evolved took its name from the house. It also included some small areas around the fringes which had never been part of the grounds of Holland House, notably the Phillimore Estate (there are at least four roads with the word Phillimore in their name) and the Campden Hill Square area. In the late XIX century a number of notable artists (including Frederic Leighton, P.R.A. and Val Prinsep) and art collectors lived in the area. The group were collectively known as "The Holland Park Circle.” Holland Park was for the most part very comfortably upper middle class when originally developed and in recent decades has gone further upmarket. Of the XIX century residential developments of the area, one of the most architecturally interesting is The Royal Crescent designed in 1839. Clearly inspired by its older namesake in Bath, it differs from the Bath crescent in that it is not a true crescent at all but two quadrant terraces each terminated by a circular bow in the Regency style which rises as a tower, a feature which would not have been found in the earlier classically inspired architecture of the XVIII century which the design of the crescent seeks to emulate. The design of the Royal Crescent by the planner Robert Cantwell in two halves was dictated by the location of the newly fashionable underground sewers rather than any consideration for architectural aesthetics. The stucco fronted crescent is painted white, in the style of the many Nash terraces which can be elsewhere in London’s smarter residential areas. Today many of these four storey houses have been converted to apartments, a few remain as private houses. The Royal crescent is listed Grade II. Aubrey House is situated to the North-East of the park. Holland Park is now one of the most expensive residential districts in London or anywhere in the world, with large houses occasionally listed for sale at over £10 million. A number of countries maintain their embassies here.
Notable queer residents at Holland Park:
• Between 1924 and 1929 Radclyffe Hall (August 12, 1880 –October 7, 1943) lived with her partner Una Troutbridge (1887-1963) at 37 Holland Street, W8. By putting pen to paper to write “The Well of Loneliness” (1928) in support of her passionate belief that sexual inverts deserved the same rights as everyone else, this established novelist risked losing everything – her literary reputation, economic security, friends, even her beautiful Kensington home. Radclyffe Hall lived with Lady Troubridge in London and, during the 1930s, in the tiny town of Rye, East Sussex, noted for its many writers, including her contemporary the novelist E.F. Benson. Hall died at age 63 of colon cancer, and is interred at Highgate Cemetery in North London. In 1930, Hall received the Gold Medal of the Eichelbergher Humane Award. She was a member of the PEN club, the Council of the Society for Psychical Research and a fellow of the Zoological Society. Radclyffe Hall was listed at number sixteen in the top 500 lesbian and gay heroes in The Pink Paper. English Heritage Blue Plaque: 37 Holland Street, Radclyffe Hall (1880–1943), "Novelist and Poet lived here 1924–1929" The Hall–Carpenter Archives, EC2M founded in 1982, are the largest source for the study of gay activism in Britain, following the publication of the Wolfenden Report in 1958. The archives are named after the authors Marguerite Radclyffe Hall and Edward Carpenter. They are housed at the London School of Economics, at Bishopsgate Library (230 Bishopsgate, London, EC2M 4QH), and in the British Library (Sound Archive) (oral history tapes).
• Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton (1830–1896), painter and sculptor, lived at 12 Holland Park Road, W14. Leighton remained a bachelor and rumours of his having an illegitimate child with one of his models in addition to the supposition that Leighton may have been homosexual continue to be debated today. He certainly enjoyed an intense and romantically tinged relationship with the poet Henry William Greville whom he met in Florence in 1856. Leighton was knighted at Windsor in 1878, and was created a baronet, of Holland Park Road in the Parish of St Mary Abbots, Kensington, in the County of Middlesex, eight years later, just before her death from heart failure in 1896. He is the only British artist to have been awarded this honour and is buried in St Paul's Cathedral (New Change, London, London, EC4M 9AD). The Leighton House Museum in the Holland Park district of Kensington and Chelsea in London, former home of Frederic, Lord Leighton, has been open to the public since 1929. Built for Leighton by the architect and designer George Aitchison, it is a Grade II listed building. It is noted for its elaborate Orientalist and aesthetic interiors. It is open to the public daily except Tuesdays, and is a companion museum to 18 Stafford Terrace, another Victorian artist’s home in Kensington. Leighton’s first house in London was 2 Orme Square, W2 and he created much of his early work there. After his election to the Academy in 1864 he commissioned George Aitchison to build Leighton House.
• Legendary lead singer of the rock group Queen, the late Freddie Mercury (1946-1991) wrote the classic bestseller “Bohemian Rhapsody” whilst living at 100 Holland Road, W14 in the 1970s. The front cover from a record album is from a photo session of Queen taken at Freddie’s flat in Holland Road.
• Holland Villas Road in the 1950s was full of married couples with young children. Some of the houses were divided into flats, like 6 Holland Villas Road, W14. Eric Sykes (1923-2012) and Frankie Howerd (1917-1992) lived in separate flats in the ground floor from 1948 to 1958. This being the scenes of social gatherings of comedians of the time, including Peter Cook, Spike Milligan, Ben Warriss, Peter Sellers, and even Dame Margaret Rutherford. Eric Sykes, Spike Milligan, Barry Took and Frankie Howerd shared offices above a grocers shop at 130 Uxbridge Road, W12. Sykes occasionally lodged there too. In addition to the office, social hang-out was at 9 Orme Court, W2.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Isabella Beecher Hooker was a leader, lecturer and activist in the American Suffragist movement.
Born: February 22, 1822, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States
Died: January 25, 1907, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Education: Hartford Female Seminary
Lived: 2950 Gilbert Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45206, USA
Buried: Cedar Hill Cemetery, Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA, Plot: Section 4, Lot 20
Spouse: John Hooker (m. 1841)
Parents: Lyman Beecher
Siblings: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry Ward Beecher

The Harriet Beecher Stowe House is a historic home in Ohio which was once the residence of influential antislavery author Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin. The 5,000 square foot house was completed in 1833 and was constructed specifically to house the president of the Lane Seminary. The house was provided by the seminary to the Beechers. Harriet and most of her brothers and sisters (11 Beecher children lived to adulthood) lived with their father in this house.
Address: 2950 Gilbert Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45206, USA (39.13314, -84.48733)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +1 513-751-0651
National Register of Historic Places: 70000497, 1970
Life
Who: Henry Ward Beecher (June 24, 1813 – March 8, 1887)
Rev. Lyman Beecher accepted a job at Lane Theological Seminary in the Walnut Hills area of Cincinnati, founded in 1830. Rev. Beecher was a Congregationalist minister. He had dreamed of moving west to promote his brand of Christianity as early as 1830, when he wrote to his daughter Catharine: "I have thought seriously of going over to Cincinnati, the London of the West, to spend the remnant of my days in that great conflict, and in consecrating all my children to God in that region who are willing to go. If we gain the West, all is safe; if we lose it, all is lost." In September 1832, 21-year old Harriet Beecher (not yet Mrs. Stowe) moved with her family from Litchfield, Connecticut to Ohio. The company included her father, her stepmother, her aunt Esther, her siblings Catharine and George, and half-siblings Isabella, Thomas, and James. The extended family previously had not been living together but the various parts of the family from Boston and Hartford met in New York to being their trip together. Along the way, they traveled through other eastern cities to raise money for the seminary. The journey was long and difficult. Isabella later recalled, "After a week in Philadelphia, we chartered a big, old-fashioned stage, with four great horses, for Wheeling, Virginia, and spent a week or more on the way, crossing the Alleghenies, before ever a railroad was thought of, and enjoyed every minute of the way." They amused themselves by singing hymns while the journey that normally took 48 hours stretched to eight days. Cincinnati was then an area active in the abolitionist movement. It was also one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation at the time, with its population leaping from 10,000 people in 1820 to 25,000 in 1830. By 1850, thanks to an influx of German and Irish immigrants, it became the sixth-largest city in the United States. Catharine, Harriet's older sister by eleven years, established the Western Female Institute in town. It was in Cincinnati that Harriet Beecher began her writing career. She published her book “The Mayflower: Sketches of Scenes and Character Among the Descendants of the Pilgrims” in 1834. It was also while living in Cincinnati that Stowe traveled to Maysville, Kentucky in 1833 and witnessed a slave auction. The distress she felt was one of several experiences that inspired her book “Uncle Tom's Cabin” years later. Harriet lived here for various periods of time from 1833 until her marriage to professor Calvin Ellis Stowe in 1836. Her first two children, twins Eliza and Harriet, were born in the house in 1836. Harriet's brother, Henry Ward Beecher, also resided in the Cincinnati Beecher House. Rev. Henry Ward Beecher was an early leader in the women's suffrage movement and popular Protestant minister.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Cedar Hill Cemetery in Hartford, Connecticut is located at 453 Fairfield Avenue. It was designed by landscape architect Jacob Weidenmann (1829–1893) who also designed Hartford's Bushnell Park. Its first sections were completed in 1866 and the first burial took place on July 17, 1866. Cedar Hill was designed as an American rural cemetery in the tradition of Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Address: 453 Fairfield Ave, Hartford, CT 06114, USA (41.72684, -72.6916)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 860-956-3311
National Register of Historic Places: 97000333, 1997
Place
The cemetery straddles three towns. It includes the Cedar Hill Cemetery Gateway and Chapel, also known as Northam Memorial Chapel and Gallup Memorial Gateway, which is separately listed on the NRHP. Cedar Hill Cemetery encompasses 270 acres (1.1 km2) and includes several historic buildings, including the Northam Memorial Chapel (built 1882), which was designed by Hartford architect George Keller, and the Superintendent's Cottage (built 1875), which continues to be occupied by Cedar Hill's Superintendent to this day. Open from dawn til dusk 365 days a year, Cedar Hill Cemetery welcomes visitors to walk the grounds and partake in the expansive art, history and natural resources this park-like space has to offer. Cedar Hill has many unique monuments. One of the most recognizable is the 18-foot (5.5 m) tall pink-granite pyramid, and life-sized angel statue, erected in memory of Mark Howard and his wife, Angelina Lee Howard. Mark Howard was president of the National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford and Connecticut's first internal revenue collector. Another example of an unusual grave is that of Cynthia Talcott, age two, which features her likeness in stone. John Pierpont Morgan's family monument was designed by architect George W. Keller. Made of red Scottish granite, the monument was designed to portray Morgan's vision of the Ark of the Covenant. The Porter-Valentine mausoleum features a stained-glass window created by Louis Comfort Tiffany.
Notable queer burials at Cedar Hill Cemetery:
• Ethel Collins Dunham (1883-1969) and her life-partner, Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), devoted their lives to the care of children. Dunham focused on premature babies and newborns, becoming chief of child development at the Children's Bureau in 1935. She established national standards for the hospital care of newborn children, and expanded the scope of health care for growing youngsters by monitoring their progress in regular home visits by Children's Bureau staff. Martha invented the cure for Rickets. She tried to go to Harvard, but because women were not admitted to the medical school, went to Johns Hopkins. Eliot went on to become chief of the Division of Child and Maternal Health. She was the only woman to sign the founding document of the World Health Organization, and an influential force in children's health programs worldwide. We do not know where Martha is buried, probably with her family in Massachusetts.
• Katharine Hepburn (1907–2003). Hepburn requested that there be no memorial service.
• Isabella Beecher Hooker (1822-1907), suffragist. Daughter of Lyman Beecher, and half-sister of Henry Ward Beecher and Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), she organized the New England Woman's Suffrage Association in 1868 and the Connecticut Woman's Suffrage Association in 1869. She authored the work "Mother's Letters to a Daughter on Woman's Suffrage." Her sister Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) is buried in the historic cemetery at Phillips Academy (180 Main St, Andover, MA 01810).
• Anne Tracy Morgan (1873-1952), daughter of J. P Morgan. Known for her generosity during WWI and WWII. She lived most of her life in France and was awarded many honors.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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James Pope Hennessy CVO was a British biographer and travel writer.
Born: November 20, 1916, London, United Kingdom
Died: 1974, London, United Kingdom
Education: Downside School
Lived: 9 Ladbroke Grove, W11
Buried: Kensal Green Cemetery, Kensal Green, London Borough of Brent, Greater London, England
Parents: Una Pope-Hennessy
Grandparent: Arthur Birch
People also search for: Una Pope-Hennessy, more

James Pope Hennessy CVO (1916–1974), British biographer and travel writer, was brother to John Pope Hennessy, British art historian and museum director. Both brother were homosexual. James was brutally murdered on January 25, 1974 in his London flat at 9 Ladbroke Grove, W11 the event pushing John to leave England for Italy.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Kensal Green Cemetery is a cemetery in Kensal Green, London, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.
Address: Harrow Rd, London W10 4RA, UK (51.52998, -0.22806)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +44 20 8969 0152
English Heritage Building ID: 1403609 (Grade II, 2012)
Place
The Cemetery of All Souls at Kensal Green was the earliest of the large privately-run cemeteries established on the fringes of London to relieve pressure on overcrowded urban churchyards. Its founder George Frederick Carden intended it as an English counterpart to the great Père-Lachaise cemetery in Paris, which he had visited in 1821. In 1830, with the financial backing of the banker Sir John Dean Paul, Carden established the General Cemetery Company, and two years later an Act of Parliament was obtained to develop a 55-acre site at Kensal Green, then among open fields to the west of the metropolis. An architectural competition was held, but the winning entry – a Gothic scheme by HE Kendall – fell foul of Sir John’s classicising tastes, and the surveyor John Griffith of Finsbury was eventually employed both to lay out the grounds and to design the Greek Revival chapels, entrance arch and catacombs, built between 1834 and 1837. A sequence of royal burials, beginning in 1843 with that of Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, ensured the cemetery’s popularity. It is still administered by the General Cemetery Company, assisted since 1989 by the Friends of Kensal Green. The Reformers’ Memorial was erected in 1885. It was erected at the instigation of Joseph Corfield “to the memory of men and women who have generously given their time and means to improve the conditions and enlarge the happiness of all classes of society.” Lists of names of reformers and radicals on north and east sides (together with further names added in 1907 by Emma Corfield.)
Notable queer burials at Kensal Green:
• A simple Portland stone headstone with curved and slightly moulded profile to the top is the burial place for James Miranda Stuart Barry (ca. 1789–1865.) The leaded inscription reads: “Dr James Barry / Inspector General of Hospitals / Died July 25, 1865 / Aged 70 years.” Commemorates James Barry, a.k.a. Margaret Bulkley, a leading military doctor and the first woman to qualify in medicine in this country, who lived all her professional life in disguise as a man.
• Ossie Clarke (1942-1996), Fashion Designer. Born in Liverpool, he showed an early interest in clothes design. In 1958, he enrolled at the Regional College of Art in Manchester, where he met painter David Hockney and the textile designer Celia Birtwell. He attented the Royal College of Art from 1962-1965, and secured a first-class degree. He first featured in Vogue, August 1965, and quickly made his mark in the fashion industry. His fashion show at Chelsea Town Hall was attended by The Beatles and The Rolling Stones.
• The name of Frances Power Cobbe (1822–1904), an Irish writer, social reformer, anti-vivisection activist, and leading women’s suffrage campaigner, is included in the Reformers’ Memorial.
• Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Bt. (1853-1917)’s body was laid in a vault at Kensal Green Cemetery on Nov. 29, 1917, where it remained until the end of WWI. On 22 May, 1920, the burial was moved in a grave cut in the granite on the top of the mountain which Rhodes had called The View of the World, beside the grave of his friend, Cecil Rhodes.
• Isabella Kelly Hedgeland, née Fordyce (1759-1857), Scottish novelist and poet. Her son William was befriended as a boy by the writer Matthew Lewis, by many considered his protector and possible lover.
• In 2013 a memorial plaque to Freddie Mercury (1946-1991) was placed in Kensal Green Cemetery, where the singer was cremated back in 1991.
• Adelaide Anne Procter (1825–1864) was an English poet and philanthropist. Critic Gill Gregory suggests that Procter may have been a lesbian and in love with Matilda Hays, a fellow member of the Society for the Promotion of the Employment of Women; other critics have called Procter's relationship with Hays "emotionally intense." Procter's first volume of poetry, “Legends and Lyrics” (1858) was dedicated to Hays and that same year Procter wrote a poem titled "To M.M.H." in which Procter "expresses love for Hays.” Hays was a novelist and translator of George Sand and a controversial figure ... [who] dressed in men's clothes and had lived with the actress Charlotte Cushman and sculptor Harriet Hosmer. Hays oversaw the tending of Procter's grave after her death and mourned her passing throughout her later years. Hays died in Liverpool and is buried at Toxteth Park Cemetery.
• Terence Rattigan (1911-1977) died in Hamilton, Bermuda, from bone cancer in 1977, aged 66. His cremated remains were deposited in the family vault at Kensal Green Cemetery.
• Dorothy “Dolly” Wilde (1895-1941), buried with her mother, Sophia Teixeira de Mattos. An Anglo-Irish socialite, made famous by her family connections, her uncle was Oscar Wilde, and her reputation as a witty conversationalist. Her charm and humour made her a popular guest at salons in Paris between the wars, standing out even in a social circle known for its flamboyant talkers.
Life
Who: James Miranda Stuart Barry (ca. 1789–1865)
Dr. James Barry was an army medical officer, and – as a lifelong transvestite – the first woman to qualify in medicine in the United Kingdom. She was born Margaret Bulkley, the daughter of Ann Bulkley of Cork, whose brother was the artist James Barry RA. The date of her birth has been variously placed between 1789 and 1799. A family crisis in 1803 had left the Bulkleys destitute, but an inheritance from her uncle, and the support of a family friend General Francisco Miranda, the Venezuelan revolutionary, allowed Margaret to travel to London to continue her education. In 1809, under the sponsorship of the eleventh earl of Buchan, she enrolled at Edinburgh University as a literary and medical student under the name of James Barry, and from this point until her death she passed as male. She received her MD in 1812 and the following year, after a brief spell as a pupil at St Thomas’s Hospital in London, enlisted in the medical ranks of the British Army. She served in Cape Town, Mauritius, Jamaica, St Helena, the Windward and Leeward Islands, Malta and Corfu, ending her career in Canada as Inspector General of Hospitals. She carried out a caesarean section in Cape Town in 1826, in which both mother and child survived – a feat not performed in Britain until 1833. She may herself have had a child in 1819, possibly by Lord Charles Somerset (1767-1831), the governor of the Cape. She was noted throughout her career for her kindness and concern for the oppressed, but also for her ferocious temper; at Sebastopol in 1855 she met Florence Nightingale, who described her as “the most hardened creature I ever met throughout the army.” Barry retired due to ill health in 1859, and died in London on July 25, 1865, the year that Elizabeth Garrett Anderson received her medical licence. Her long deception enabled her to become one of the most successful and respected military doctors of her time, insisting on rigorous hygiene and adequate living conditions for those in her care long before such demands became commonplace. Her strange appearance, flamboyant dress and flirtatious behaviour frequently gave rise to rumours about her gender and sexuality, but her secret was not finally revealed until after her death. Barry lived at 14 Margaret Street, W1W, towards the end of his life and eventually died here on July 25, 1865.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Josephine Lyons Scott Pinckney was a novelist and poet in the literary revival of the American South after World War I. Her first best-selling novel was the social comedy, Three O'clock Dinner.
Born: January 25, 1895, South Carolina, United States
Died: October 4, 1957
Education: College of Charleston
Lived: 36 Chalmers Street, Charleston
21 King St, Charleston, SC 29401
Buried: Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, Charleston County, South Carolina, USA
Books: Three o'clock dinner, Splendid in Ashes: A Novel, My Son and Foe

38 Chalmers Street, once owned by the family of Charleston artist Elizabeth O’Neill Verner, became the home of Laura Bragg (1881–1978). “Miss Bragg”, as she was known to generations of Charlestonians whom she mentored, used her influence, acumen and intelligence to further not just her “girls” and “boys” (as she called them, many of whom were gay) but her adopted city as well. She was director of the Charleston Museum (once housed at the College of Charleston), the first woman in the country to head a publicly supported museum, and helped found the Charleston County Public Library. In her salon, gay and straight people mixed; she was criticized for also including people of “color”: several Chinese men who were enrolled in the Citadel in the 1930s. Miss Bragg has been linked romantically with several women but whether hers were romantic friendships or more intimate is open to debate. One of Bragg’s best friends was Josephine Pinckney (1885-1957.) who lived next door, at 36 Chalmers Street. Charleston novelist Pinckney was a free woman of color, she was not gay, but befriended many people who were, most notably the gay artist Prentiss Taylor. It was Pinckney who invited Taylor to Charleston; he produced images for two of her dust jackets. A sophisticated woman with cosmopolitan tastes, she glancingly referred to gay or “fey” characters in her novels, including her best known work, “Three o’Clock Dinner,” one of the best Charleston novels. She also befriended Harry Hervey; Hervey used Josephine Pinckney’s mother as a character in his novel “The Damned Don’t Cry,” and two of Pinckney’s works seem to mirror a plot used by Hervey in his Charleston novel, “Red Ending.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Magnolia Cemetery is a historic cemetery in Charleston, South Carolina. It was dedicated in 1850; Charles Fraser delivered the dedication address. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a Historic District in 1978. Notable queer burials at Magnolia Cemetery:
• Ned Jennings (1898-1929) was born in Washington, D.C., but moved to Charleston with his parents within a few weeks. His father would become postmaster of the city and an early developer of Folly Beach. Jennings attended Porter Military Academy and soon became one of the “boys” that Laura Bragg, director of the Charleston Museum, would mentor over the years. He went to Paris in 1927 and studied privately with the artists Mela Meuter and Walter Renee Fuerst, eventually returning to the city.
• Helen Gardner McCormack (1903-1974) was head of the Gibbes Art Gallery for years and years, and she was beloved aroung town. She was the second big lover of the other museum director, Laura Bragg, who was running the Gibbes’s rival, the Charleston Museum.
• Isabelle Bowen-Heyward (1870-1926) entered a romantic friendship with Laura Bragg that would last until her death. By February 1915 Bragg moved into Belle’s home at 7 Gibbes Street, where the rooms were filled with the Bowen and Heyward family silver and “people are always laughing,” or so she wrote her father. These letters home were filled with news off her new romantic partner: “Belle has made me one of the family and I am more comfortably situated than I have ever before been.” This emotional partnership with Belle provided Bragg with an entrée into a social circle well-connected to the powerful political and economic leaders of the community.
• Josephine Pinckney (1895-1957) was a novelist and poet in the literary revival of the American South after WWI. Her first best-selling novel was the social comedy, “Three O'clock Dinner” (1945). Josephine Pinckney was born in Charleston to Thomas Pinkney and Camilla Scott. She received the Southern Authors Award in 1946. As a poet, novelist, and essayist, Pinckney was an active participant in the Charleston Renaissance. In 1920, she co-founded the Poetry Society of South Carolina. She was involved in institutions such as the Charleston Museum and Dock Street Theatre and was an early proponent of the historic preservation of Charleston. She was an active member of the Society for the Preservation of Spirituals, which transcribed and annotated African American songs. Both organizations met for the first time at Pinckney's home at 21 King St. in Charleston.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lord Frederick William Charles Nicholas Wentworth Hervey was a British aristocrat and political activist.
Born: November 26, 1961
Died: January 26, 1998, Chelsea, London, United Kingdom
Education: Eton College
Yale University
Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester
Buried: St Mary, Honey Hill, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, IP33 1RT
Parents: Victor Hervey, 6th Marquess of Bristol, Lady Juliet Tadgell
Siblings: Lady Victoria Hervey
Grandparents: Herbert Hervey, 5th Marquess of Bristol, more

National Trust-owned property with an ornate, domed rotunda and extensive art and silver collection.
Address: House Stewards Flat Rotunda, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk IP29 5QE, UK (52.2218, 0.65787)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 9.00-17.30 (managed by the National Trust)
Phone: +44 1284 735270
Place
Built between 1795 and 1829, Design by Antonio Asprucci (1723-1808)
You can trace Ickworth’s origins back to the Domesday book when it was merely one of hundreds of assets belonging to the Abbey of Bury St Edmunds. Its association with the Hervey family began three centuries later in 1432. Ickworth House is a country house near Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. It is a neoclassical building set in parkland. The house is in the care of the National Trust. Thomas Hervey acquired the land by marriage. Through success and scandal, Ickworth was the family’s home for the next 500 years. Thomas’ descendants set about transforming the ancient deer-park into an aristocratic paradise. The modest medieval hall became a turreted Tudor mansion. In 1701 the 1st Earl demolished the mansion and developed plans for an even grander abode. He also renovated the church, where all Ickworth’s owners have been laid to rest. Residents of the tiny hamlet of Ickworth were rehoused in neighbouring Horringer, and their former dwellings demolished to make way for pasture. The next generation of Herveys made even more of an impact on the landscape. The building was the creation of Frederick Hervey, 4th Earl of Bristol and Bishop of Derry who commissioned a classical villa in the Suffolk countryside. The Earl died in 1803, leaving the completion of house to his successor. In 1956, the house, park, and a large endowment were given to the National Trust in lieu of death duties. As part of the handover agreement, a 99-year lease on the 60-room East Wing was given to the Marquess of Bristol. However, in 1998 the 7th Marquess of Bristol sold the remaining lease on the East Wing to the National Trust. He was succeeded by his half-brother Frederick William Augustus Hervey, 8th Marquess of Bristol (born October 19, 1979.) The National Trust refused to sell the remaining lease term back to the 8th Marquess, thereby contravening the Letter of Wishes which states that the head of the family should always be offered whatever accommodation he chooses at Ickworth. The family’s once private East Wing is now run as The Ickworth Hotel and apartments on a lease from the National Trust. The apartments are in Dower House which is in the grounds. The West Wing at Ickworth House went uncompleted until 2006, when a joint partnership between the National Trust and Sodexo Prestige led to its renovation and opening as a centre for conferences and events. The first wedding in the property’s history took place in 2006.
Life
Who: John Hervey, 2nd Baron Hervey (October 13, 1696 – August 5, 1743)
John Hervey, 2nd Baron Hervey, courtier and political writer and memoirist, was the eldest son of John Hervey, 1st Earl of Bristol, by his second wife, Elizabeth. He was known as Lord Hervey from 1723, upon the death of his elder half-brother, Carr, the only son of his father’s first wife, Isabella, but Lord Carr Hervey never became Earl of Bristol, as he predeceased his father. John Hervey was a frequent visitor at the court of the Prince and Princess of Wales at Richmond, and in 1720 he married Mary “Molly” Lepell, daughter of Nicholas Lepell, who was one of the Princess’s ladies-in-waiting, and a great court beauty. Molly Lepel (1697 – 1768) was praised by finest writers such as Voltaire and Pope. "Bright Venus you never saw bedded So perfect a beau and a belle As when Hervey the handsome was wedded To the beautiful Molly Lepel" - Lord Chesterfield and William Pulteney, Earl of Bath. Her portrait can be found in a bedroom of the Rotunda. Hervey was bisexual. He was married to Mary Lepell, but he had an affair with Anne Vane, and possibly with Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762) and Princess Caroline. He lived with Stephen Fox-Strangways, 1st Earl of Ilchester (1704-1776) during the decade after he followed him to Italy in 1728. He wrote passionate love letters to Francesco Algarotti (1712-1764), whom he first met in 1736. He may have had a sexual affair with Prince Frederick before their friendship dissolved. He was also attracted to Henry Fox before his affair with his brother Stephen Fox. John Hervey, 2nd Baron Hervey, is buried at St Mary (Hill Road, main road through the village, Westley, Suffolk, IP33 3TL). Frederick Hervey, 7th Marquess of Bristol (1954-1999) was a British aristocrat and businessman, notable for both his wealth, which he used to fund his vices, includeding drug addiction, and his flamboyant homosexuality and dissipated lifestyle. The life of the 7th Marquess was as remarkable as his earlier forebears and equalled them in terms of his well-publicised private life and indulgence, surprising many with a brief marriage in the 1980s. Rumoured in the press to have blown a £21 million fortune, (and even more made as a business man), on vice and high living, the 7th Marquess sold much of his remaining family possessions and moved out of the East Wing at Ickworth in 1996. He was the last of the Hervey family to live at Ickworth and was succeeded by his half-brother Frederick as 8th Marquess of Bristol. In spite of a lifetime of homosexual relations, John married Francesca Fisher, then 20, just shy of his 30th birthday; it is not known whether they consummated their relationship. The marriage lasted for four years; they had no children. The 7th Marquess was described by his friend Jamie Spencer-Churchill, Marquess of Blandford, as a "complicated, reserved character, hiding behind a flamboyant personality.” Lord Bristol was alleged to have been a harsh father to his eldest son, according to friends of the latter. "He treated his son and heir with indifference and contempt," said Anthony Haden-Guest. The Marquess of Blandford summed up the relationship: "Victor created the monster that John became." Lord Nicholas Hervey (1961-1998) was the only child born to the 6th Marquess of Bristol by his second wife (m. 1960) Lady Juliet Wentworth-FitzWilliam. Lord Nicholas’s mother was the only child of the wealthy 8th Earl Fitzwilliam; she was 13 years old when her father died in a small aircraft crash that also killed his intended second wife Kathleen Cavendish, Marchioness of Hartington, sister of John F. Kennedy, in 1948. Lord Nicholas was a descendent of William the Conqueror on both his mother’s and father’s side. When Nicholas was 11 years old, his mother divorced his father and married his 60-year-old friend, Somerset de Chair (d. 1996), with whom she had a daughter, Helena de Chair, five years later. In 1996, she married a third time and is now known as Lady Juliet Tadgell. Lord Nicholas Hervey was found dead in his Chelsea flat at the age of 36, having hanged himself. He never married and had no issue. His half-brother, the 7th Marquess of Bristol, died less than a year later. Frederick William Augustus Hervey, 8th Marquess of Bristol (born October 19, 1979) is a British peer. He succeeded his elder half-brother the 7th Marquess (1954–1999) in January 1999 as Marquess of Bristol. He is also the 12th Earl of Bristol, Earl Jermyn of Horningsheath in the County of Suffolk, 13th Baron Hervey of Ickworth in the County of Suffolk, and Hereditary High Steward of the Liberty of St Edmund, which encompasses the whole former county of West Suffolk. In 1998 the 7th Marquess sold his right to occupy the East Wing of Ickworth House, the family seat since the XV century. After his death in 1999 the 8th Marquess vigorously criticised the National Trust for not reselling what would have been the remaining term of that leasehold to him, arguing that the 7th Marquess could only sell his own life interest, not that of his descendants. This was disputed by the National Trust who have since converted the East Wing into a hotel. However, in 2009 Sir Simon Jenkins, the National Trust’s new chairman, stated, "I think it is in our interest for the Marquesses of Bristol to be living there."



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Philip Cortelyou Johnson was an influential American architect. He is especially known for his postmodern work from the 1980s and beyond, as well as his collaborations with John Burgee.
Born: July 8, 1906, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
Died: January 25, 2005, New Canaan, Connecticut, United States
Education: Hackley School
Harvard University
Lived: Glass House, 842 Ponus Ridge Rd, New Canaan, CT 06840, USA (41.14648, -73.49683)
Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Guest House, 242 East 52nd Street
Books: Deconstructivist architecture, Johnson/Burgee, Writings, more
Awards: Pritzker Architecture Prize, AIA Gold Medal, Twenty-five Year Award

Philip Johnson was an influential American architect. In 1930, he founded the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. In 1978 he was awarded an American Institute of Architects Gold Medal and in 1979 the first Pritzker Architecture Prize. David Whitney was the life partner of Johnson for 45 years. "He was 18 years old or something. He was a student up at Rhode Island School of Design. We met because of Johns’ flag painting. He said, 'Why did you buy that flag?' It was his first question to me in the world. He just came up to me after a lecture [at Brown University]. So then we got started." “After Johnson had been living with Whitney for more than fifteen years, Barbara Walters interrogated Johnson during a dinner party at the home of Kitty Carlisle Hart. ‘Why don't you ever bring your boyfriend to these events?’ Walters demanded. ‘I said, "By God, you're right, Barbara." Got up from the table and went home,’ Johnson recalled. ‘She was a very great help. I was so mean and selfish: “I'll be home late tonight," that kind
of thing.’” --Charles Kaiser. Johnson died in his sleep at 95. Whitney survived him only by 6 months.
Together from 1960 to 2005: 45 years.
David Whitney (1939 – June 12, 2005)
Philip Cortelyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Philip Johnson died in his sleep while at his Glass House retreat in 2005. He was survived by his partner of 45 years, David Whitney, who died later that year at age 66.
Address: 842 Ponus Ridge Rd, New Canaan, CT 06840, USA (41.14648, -73.49683)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +1 203-594-9884
National Register of Historic Places: 97000341, 1997. Also National Historic Landmarks
Place
Built in 1949, Design by Philip Johnson (1906-2005)
The Glass House or Johnson house, is a historic house museum at 798-856 Ponus Ridge Road in New Canaan, Connecticut. The Glass House is Philip Johnson’s own residence, and "universally viewed as having been derived from" the Farnsworth House design, according to Alice T. Friedman. Johnson curated an exhibit of Mies van der Rohe work at the Museum of Modern Art in 1947, featuring a model of the glass Farnsworth House. It was an important and influential project for Johnson and for modern architecture. The building is an essay in minimal structure, geometry, proportion, and the effects of transparency and reflection. The estate includes other buildings designed by Johnson that span his career. It is open to the public for guided tours, which begin at a visitors center at 199 Elm Street in New Canaan. The house is an example of early use of industrial materials such as glass and steel in home design. Johnson lived at the weekend retreat for 58 years, and since 1960 with his longtime companion, David Whitney, an art critic and curator who helped design the landscaping and largely collected the art displayed there. The house is mostly hidden from the street. It is behind a stone wall at the edge of a crest in Johnson’s estate overlooking a pond. Visitors walk over grass and gravel strips as they approach the building. The building is 56 feet (17 m) long, 32 feet (9.8 m) wide and 10½ feet (3.2 m) high. The kitchen, dining and sleeping areas were all in one glass-enclosed room, which Johnson initially lived in, together with the brick guest house (later the glass-walled building was only used for entertaining.) The exterior sides of the Glass House are charcoal-painted steel and glass. The brick floor is 10 inches above the ground. The interior is open with the space divided by low walnut cabinets; a brick cylinder contains the bathroom and is the only object to reach floor to ceiling.
Life
Who: Philip Cortelyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005) and David Whitney (1939 – June 12, 2005)
Philip Johnson was an influential architect. He is especially known for his postmodern work from the 1980s and beyond, as well as his collaborations with John Burgee. In 1930, he founded the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. In 1978 he was awarded an American Institute of Architects Gold Medal and in 1979 the first Pritzker Architecture Prize. He was a student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Johnson was gay, and has been called "the best-known openly gay architect in America." He came out publicly in 1993. In 1961, he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate member and became a full Academician in 1963. David Whitney was an art curator, collector, gallerist and critic. He led a very private life and was not well known outside the art world, even though he participated naked in the 1965 Claes Oldenburg happening Washes. He was the life partner of architect Philip Johnson for 45 years until their deaths five months apart. He was also a close friend of Andy Warhol.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller (Mrs. John D, III) Guest House, at 242 East 52nd Street, was built in 1950 by Murphy-Brinkworth Construction Company, design by Philip Johnson. Intended for use as a social gathering place and modern art gallery. The second floor was meant to be a bedroom and has rarely been photographed. The house was donated to the Museum of Modern Art in 1955 after which it had several owners. Another Johnson client, Robert Leonhardt, bought it in 1964 for $100,000 and was owner when Johnson rented the house from 1971 to 1979. In the early 2000's the house was sold at auction for $11M. It was given Landmark status by the Preservation Commission in December 2000.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Adeline Virginia Woolf, known professionally as Virginia Woolf, was an English writer and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century.
Born: January 25, 1882, Kensington, London, United Kingdom
Died: March 28, 1941, River Ouse, Sussex
Education: King's College London
Lived: Monk’s House, Rodmell, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 3HF, UK (50.83881, 0.01652)
17 The Green, Richmond, Greater London TW9, UK (51.46285, -0.30691)
Hogarth House, 34 Paradise Rd, Richmond, Greater London TW9 1SE, UK
38 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AE, UK (51.52383, -0.12409)
Burley House, 15 Cambridge Park, Twickenham
Asham House, Beddingham, A26, Lewes, East Sussex BN8, UK (50.84041, 0.06302)
The Round House, Pipe Passage, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1YQ, UK (50.87282, 0.0066)
Hotel Café Royal, 68 Regent Street, W1B
9 St Aubyns, Hove
Talland House, Albert Rd, St. Ives, St Ives, Cornwall TR26, UK (50.20921, -5.47883)
37 Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB, UK
29 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
22 Hyde Park Gate, Kensington, London SW7 5DH, UK
46 Gordon Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H 0PD, UK (51.52445, -0.13018)
52 Tavistock Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H, UK (51.5247, -0.12791)
Buried: Monk's House Grounds, Rodmell, Lewes District, East Sussex, England, Plot: Ashes Buried Beneath an Elm Tree in the Garden.
Movies: Mrs. Dalloway, Orlando, To the Lighthouse, Golven, Simple Gifts, A Room of One's Own
Siblings: Vanessa Bell, Thoby Stephen, Adrian Stephen, more

Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English writer, and one of the foremost modernists of the 20th century. During the interwar period, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a central figure in the influential Bloomsbury Group of intellectuals. Her most famous works include the novels Mrs. Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927) and Orlando (1928), and the book-length essay A Room of One's Own (1929), with its famous dictum, "A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.“ Virginia Stephen married writer Leonard Woolf on August 10, 1912. Despite his low material status (Woolf referring to Leonard during their engagement as a "penniless Jew") the couple shared a close bond. Indeed, in 1937, Woolf wrote in her diary: "Love-making—after 25 years can't bear to be separate ... you see it is enormous pleasure being wanted: a wife. And our marriage so complete." In 1922, she met Vita Sackville-West. After a tentative start, they began a sexual relationship, which, according to Sackville-West, was only twice consummated. In 1928, Woolf presented Sackville-West with Orlando, a fantastical biography in which the eponymous hero's life spans three centuries and both sexes. After their affair ended, the two women remained friends until Woolf's death in 1941. Virginia committed suicide by drowning at the age of 59. Leonard died in 1969 from a stroke and was cremated with his ashes being buried beneath an elm tree in his beloved garden at Monk's House, with his wife's ashes, in Rodmell, Sussex.
Together from 1912 to 1941: 29 years.
Leonard Sidney Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969)
Adeline Virginia Woolf (nee Stephen; January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Virginia Woolf was born Adeline Virginia Stephen at 22 Hyde Park Gate in Kensington, London. Her parents were Sir Leslie Stephen (1832–1904) and Julia Prinsep Duckworth Stephen (née Jackson, 1846–1895.)
Address: Hyde Park Gate, Kensington, London SW7 5DH, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Hyde Park Gate is a street in central London, which applies to two parallel roads in Kensington on the southern boundary of Kensington Gardens. It is probably most famous for having the former residence and death place of Sir Winston Churchill. It is in a picturesque part of London and a very expensive place to live.
Notable queer residents at Hyde Park Gate:
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 9 Hyde Park Gate, SW7 Robert Baden-Powell (1857-1941), “Chief Scout of the World lived here.”
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 22 Hyde Park Gate, SW7 Sir Leslie Stephen (1832-1904), “Scholar and writer lived here.”
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)
Leslie Stephen was a notable historian, author, critic and mountaineer. He was a founding editor of the Dictionary of National Biography, a work that would influence Virginia Woolf’s later experimental biographies. Julia Stephen was born in British India to Dr. John and Maria Pattle Jackson. She was the niece of the photographer Julia Margaret Cameron and first cousin of the temperance leader Lady Henry Somerset. Julia moved to England with her mother, where she served as a model for Pre-Raphaelite painters such as Edward Burne-Jones. Julia named her daughter after the Pattle family: Adeline after Lady Henry’s sister, who married George Russell, 10th Duke of Bedford; and Virginia, the name of yet another sister (who died young) but also of their mother, Julia’s aunt. Woolf was educated by her parents in their literate and well-connected household. Her parents had each been married previously and been widowed, and, consequently, the household contained the children of three marriages. Julia had three children by her first husband, Herbert Duckworth: George, Stella, and Gerald Duckworth. Leslie had first married Harriet Marian (Minny) Thackeray (1840–1875), the daughter of William Thackeray, and they had one daughter: Laura Makepeace Stephen, who was declared mentally disabled and lived with the family until she was institutionalised in 1891. Leslie and Julia had four children together: Vanessa Stephen (later known as Vanessa Bell) (1879), Thoby Stephen (1880), Virginia (1882), and Adrian Stephen (1883.) Sir Leslie Stephen’s eminence as an editor, critic, and biographer, and his connection to William Thackeray, meant that his children were raised in an environment filled with the influences of Victorian literary society. Henry James, George Henry Lewes, and Virginia’s honorary godfather, James Russell Lowell, were among the visitors to the house. Julia Stephen was equally well connected. She came from a family of beauties who left their mark on Victorian society as models for Pre-Raphaelite artists and early photographers, including her aunt Julia Margaret Cameron who was also a visitor to the Stephen household. Supplementing these influences was the immense library at the Stephens’ house, from which Virginia and Vanessa were taught the classics and English literature. Unlike the girls, their brothers Adrian and Julian (Thoby) were formally educated and sent to Cambridge, a difference that Virginia would resent. The sisters did, however, benefit indirectly from their brothers’ Cambridge contacts, as the boys brought their new intellectual friends home to the Stephens’ drawing room. After the death of their parents and Virginia’s second nervous breakdown, Vanessa and Adrian sold 22 Hyde Park Gate and bought a house at 46 Gordon Square in Bloomsbury.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

According to Virginia Woolf’s memoirs, her most vivid childhood memories were not of London but of St Ives, Cornwall, where the family spent every summer until 1895.
Address: Albert Rd, St. Ives, St Ives, Cornwall TR26, UK (50.20921, -5.47883)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1736 755050
English Heritage Building ID: 68918 (Grade II, 1972)
Place
The Stephens’ summer home, Talland House, looked out over Porthminster Bay, and is still standing, though somewhat altered. Memories of these family holidays and impressions of the landscape, especially the Godrevy Lighthouse, informed the fiction Woolf wrote in later years, most notably “To the Lighthouse”: “It still makes me feel warm; as if everything were ripe; humming; sunny… The gardens gave off a murmur of bees… The buzz, the croon, the smell… it was rapture.” Virginia Woolf cherished early memories of St Ives, where she spent summers until she was 13 - the year her mother died. Today, the family’s colonial-style Victorian villa retreat is available as holiday apartments. Buildings have grown up around it, but there are still views across the bay to the lighthouse on Godrevy Island, the inspiration for “To the Lighthouse” with its themes of transience and loss. Woolf set the novel in Skye, transplanting the flora and scenery of the balmy south-west. Overlooking Porthminster Beach, with its terrific café, Talland House is away from the busy centre of this town of fishermen’s cottages, cobbled streets, galleries and craft shops.
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)
The sudden death of her mother in 1895, when Virginia was 13, and that of her half-sister Stella two years later, led to the first of Virginia’s several nervous breakdowns. She was, however, able to take courses of study (some at degree level) in Ancient Greek, Latin, German and history at the Ladies’ Department of King’s College London between 1897 and 1901. This brought her into contact with some of the early reformers of women’s higher education such as the principal of the Ladies’ Department, Lilian Faithfull (one of the so-called Steamboat ladies) and Clara Pater (sister of the more famous Walter, George Warr.) Her sister Vanessa also studied Latin, Italian, art and architecture at King’s Ladies’ Department. In 2013 Woolf was honoured by her alma mater with the opening of a building named after her on Kingsway. The death of her father in 1904 provoked her most alarming collapse and she was briefly institutionalised. She spent time recovering at her friend, Violet Dickinson, and at her aunt’s house in Cambridge. Modern scholars (including her nephew and biographer, Quentin Bell) have suggested her breakdowns and subsequent recurring depressive periods were also influenced by the sexual abuse to which she and her sister Vanessa were subjected by their half-brothers George and Gerald Duckworth (which Woolf recalls in her autobiographical essays “A Sketch of the Past” and “22 Hyde Park Gate.”)



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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From 1897 to 1900 Virginia Woolf, then known as Virginia Stephens, stayed with her family at 9 St Aubyns, Hove.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 46 Gordon Square, John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946), "Economist lived here 1916–1946"
Addresses:
46 Gordon Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H 0PD, UK (51.52445, -0.13018)
51 Gordon Square, London WC1H, UK (51.52419, -0.12987)
52 Tavistock Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H, UK (51.5247, -0.12791)
Place
Gordon Square is in Bloomsbury, in the London Borough of Camden, London (postal district WC1) part of the Bedford Estate. Gordon Square was developed by master builder Thomas Cubitt in the 1820s, as one of a pair with Tavistock Square, which is a block away and has the same dimensions. As with most London squares the central garden was originally for the private use of the residents of the surrounding houses, but it now belongs to the University of London and is open to the public. The square is named after the second wife of the 6th Duke of Bedford, Lady Georgiana Gordon, daughter of Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon. The university owns many of the buildings in the square and in early 2005 it submitted an application for a refurbishment of the square, including the reinstatement of railings similar to the originals. The work was completed in 2007. The west side of the square is dominated by the listed church of Christ the King and next to it the home of Dr Williams’s Library.
Notable queer resident at Gordon & Tavistock Square:
• James Strachey (September 26, 1887 - April 25, 1967), Lytton’s brother, lived at n. 41 Gordon Square, WC1H from 1919-56, with his wife, Alix, sometimes joined by Ralph Partridge.
• The economist John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946) lived at no. 46 Gordon Square, WC1H marked by a blue plaque. Before Keynes moved in, the same house was occupied by a young Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) and her siblings (including the noted painter and interior designer Vanessa Bell (1879-1961)) from 1905 to 1907 and frequented by other members of the Bloomsbury Group.
• Vanessa Bell moved into no. 50 Gordon Square, WC1H in 1920, moving to no. 37 Gordon Square, WC1H from 1922-29, with Clive Bell moving into no. 50.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 51 Gordon Square, Bloomsbury, WC1H Lytton Strachey (1880-1932), “Critic and biographer lived here.” Strachey moved here shortly after writing “Eminent Victorians” (1918), his controversial critique of Victorian values which set new parameters in the art of biography. In Gordon Square Strachey produced its follow-up, “Queen Victoria” (1921), another debunker of Victorian myths.
• From 1924 to 1939 Virginia Woolf lived at no. 52 Tavistock Square, WC1H south side of square: bombed in October, 1940 and replaced by the Tavistock Hotel in 1951.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 33 Fitzroy Square, Roger Fry (1866–1934), “In this house Roger Fry 1866–1934 Artist and Art Critic ran the Omega Workshops 1913–1919"
Address: Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Fitzroy Square is one of the Georgian squares in London and is the only one found in the central London area known as Fitzrovia. The square, nearby Fitzroy Street, and the Fitzroy Tavern in Charlotte Street have the family name of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton, into whose ownership the land passed through his marriage. His descendant Charles FitzRoy, 1st Baron Southampton developed the area during the late XVIII and early XIX century. Fitzroy Square was a speculative development intended to provide London residences for aristocratic families, and was built in four stages. Leases for the eastern and southern sides, designed by Robert Adam, were granted in 1792; building began in 1794 and was completed in 1798 by Adam’s brothers James and William. These buildings are fronted in Portland stone brought by sea from Dorset. The Napoleonic Wars and a slump in the London property market brought a temporary stop to construction of the square after the south and east sides were completed. According to the records of the Squares Frontagers’ Committee, 1815 residents looked out on “vacant ground, the resort of the idle and profligate.” Another contemporary account describes the incomplete square: “The houses are faced with stone, and have a greater proportion of architectural excellence and embellishment than most others in the metropolis. They were designed by the Adams, but the progress of the late war prevented the completion of the design. It is much to be regretted, that it remains in its present unfinished state.” The northern and western sides were subsequently constructed in 1827-1829 and 1832-1835 respectively, and are stucco-fronted. The south side suffered bomb damage during WWII and was rebuilt with traditional facades to remain in keeping with the rest of the square.
Notable queer residents at Fitzroy Square:
• No. 8, W1T was the home of the painter James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903.)
• No. 19, W1T was the base for the “International School” run by Louise Michel in the 1890s. Later, from 1909 to 1911, was the home of Bloomsbury Group artist Duncan Grant (1885-1978.)
• No. 21, W1T was Roger Fry (December 14, 1866 –September 9, 1934)’s studio
• No. 22, W1T was Duncan Grant’s studio.
• No. 26, W1T Duncan Grant and John Maynard Keynes shared a flat.
• Engligh Heritage Blue Plaque: 29 Fitzroy Square, W1T Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (1882–1941), "Novelist and Critic lived here 1907–1911" Also George Bernard Shaw lived here from 1887 until his marriage in 1898.
• No. 33, W1T housed Roger Fry (1866-1934)’s Omega Workshop, creating avant-garde furniture from 1913 to 1919.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Throughout her life, Virginia Woolf was plagued by periodic mood swings and associated illnesses. She spent three short periods in 1910, 1912 and 1913 at Burley House, 15 Cambridge Park, Twickenham, described as "a private nursing home for women with nervous disorder.” Though this instability often affected her social life, her literary productivity continued with few breaks throughout her life.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Brunswick Square is a public garden in Bloomsbury, in the London Borough of Camden.
Address: 38 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AE, UK (51.52383, -0.12409)
Type: Private Property
Place
Brunswick Square is overlooked by the School of Pharmacy and the Foundling Museum to the north and the Brunswick Centre to the west. South of it lies International Hall (a hall of residence of the University of London), and on its west side are the two separate but related children's charities, Coram Family and Coram's Fields. What is now Brunswick Square was originally fields that were part of the grounds of the Foundling Hospital. It was planned to be leased for housebuilding, along with Mecklenburgh Square, to raise funds for the hospital in 1790. Brunswick Square, named after Caroline of Brunswick, was finished first, being built by James Burton in 1795–1802; none of the houses remain. Leafy squares characterise the Bloomsbury district of London. Mecklenburgh Square is a matching square to the east. Russell Square is the nearest tube station to the south-west. In Jane Austen's book “Emma,” the characters of Mr. and Mrs. John Knightley make their residence in Brunswick Square.
Notable queer residents at Brunswick Square:
• The writer E.M. Forster (January 1, 1879 –June 7, 1970) used no. 26, WC1N as his London base from 1930 to 1939.
• Virginia Woolf, from 1911 to 1912, lived at no. 38, WC1N north side of the square (demolished in about 1936 and replaced by the School of Pharmacy of the University of London.)



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Virginia Woolf spent holidays and weekends during 1912–19 at Asham House, just off the road between Lewes and Newhaven. The house was then surrounded by the cement works that opened in 1932 and became derelict. It was demolished on July 12, 1994, to allow expansion of Beddingham landfill site.
Address: A26, Lewes, East Sussex BN8, UK (50.84041, 0.06302)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 292742 (Grade II, 1952)
Place
Beddingham is a village in the Lewes district of East Sussex. The area was settled in pre-Roman times with many tumuli in the surrounding hills originating in the Iron Age. The Roman villa at Beddingham was excavated by David Rudling between 1987 and 1992. Construction began in the late first century AD, and the villa was occupied until the mid fourth-century. There was a wooden roundhouse built originally (around 50 AD) before Roman construction began towards the end of the century. When the Saxons came, one of the buildings on the site was hollowed out, presumably to be used as a Sunken Feature Building (Grubenhaus). It is interesting that the fill of the cut contains a mix of Late Roman and Early Saxon pottery, suggesting some degree of continuity of settlement. Beddingham was a Saxon royal minster. It was probably seized by Offa of Mercia following his annexation of Sussex early in the 770s. One of his coins was found there. Once back in Saxon possession, the land was bequeathed by King Alfred to his nephew Aethelm, and the manor was later held by Earl Godwin. The manor of Preston in Beddingham (or 'Preston Becklewin') was originally held by the Abbey of Bec and passed to King's College, Cambridge, at its foundation. The original church was wooden. The Normans used local flint from the South Downs to construct the present building. The XIII century farmhouse at Itford Farm (Grade II* listed) is being converted into a youth hostel (YHA) and outdoor activity centre to be known as YHA South Downs, and is due to open in Spring 2013.
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) and Leonard Sidney Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969)
Asham - or Asheham, as it was originally spelt, and as Virginia spells it in her diaries - was the house Leonard and Virginia Woolf occupied for holidays and weekends from 1912, just before their marriage, to 1919, when they had to surrender the lease to the owner. It stood just off the road between Lewes and Newhaven, in East Sussex, near the village of Beddingham. Asham House was where she and Leonard spent the night of their wedding and where they entertained the leading intellectuals and artists of the time. Above all it was associated with her creative self. During her years there she completed her first novel “The Voyage Out,” and did much of the work on “Night and Day.” Asham was where she renewed herself as a writer.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In October 1914, Leonard and Virginia Woolf moved to Richmond, where they occupied rooms in a house on the east side of The Green: number 17. Leonard describes some amusing incidents which he experienced here in the volume of his autobiography called “Beginning again.” (1964).
Address: 17 The Green, Richmond, Greater London TW9, UK (51.46285, -0.30691)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 205665 (Grade II, 1950)
Place
Richmond Green is a recreation area located near the centre of Richmond, a town of about 20,000 inhabitants situated in south west London. Owned by the Crown Estate, it is leased to the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. The Green is essentially square in shape and its open grassland, framed with broadleaf trees, extends to roughly twelve acres. It is overlooked by a mixture of period townhouses, historic buildings and municipal and commercial establishments including the Richmond Lending Library and Richmond Theatre. For over 400 years, Richmond Green has been edged by houses and commercial premises – built to provide accommodation for people serving or visiting Richmond Palace. In 1625 Charles I brought his court here to escape the plague in London and by the early XVIII century these had become the homes of "minor nobility, diplomats, and court hangers-on". The construction of the railway in the mid-XIX century cut the Green off from Old Deer Park, and led to the building of Victorian villas for the more prosperous commuters to London. The A316 road, built in the early XX century, worsened this separation.
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)
Virginia and Leonard Woolf lived in Richmond, a suburb just 15 minutes from central London by train, from 1915 to 1924. They occupied two houses during their years there. The first was rooms in number 17 on the east side of The Green, which is still considered “one of the most beautiful urban greens surviving anywhere in England.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: Hogarth House, 34 Paradise Road, “In this house Leonard (1880–1969) and Virginia Woolf (1882–1941) lived 1915–1924 and founded the Hogarth Press 1917"
Address: Paradise Rd, Richmond, Greater London TW9 1SE, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 205596 (Grade II, 1968)
Place
St Mary Magdalene, Richmond, in the Anglican Diocese of Southwark, is a Grade II listed parish church on Paradise Road, Richmond, London. The church was built in the early XVI century but has been greatly altered so that apart from the tower, the visible parts of the church date from the XVIII, XIX and early XX centuries. The initial chapel was built in around 1220. The church was entirely rebuilt during the reign of Henry VII, who rebuilt the royal palace of Sheen and, in 1501, renamed Sheen as Richmond. The two bottom sections of the tower that survive from this period were re-faced in flint in 1904.
Notable queer residents at Paradise Road:
• Charles de Sousy Ricketts (1866–1931) and Charles Haslewood Shannon (1863–1937) lived at Chalon House, 8 Spring Terrace, Paradise Road, from 1898 to 1904, near their friends Katharine Harris Bradley and Edith Emma Cooper, aka Michael Field. After Ricketts died, Charles Shannon moved from Regent’s Park to 21 Kew Gardens Road. Shannon died here on March 18, 1937, and his ashes were buried at St Botolph (Town Road, Quarrington, Sleaford, Lincolnshire, NG34 8RS).
• Leonard Woolf (1880–1969) and Virginia Woolf (1882–1941) lived at Hogarth House, 34 Paradise Rd, from 1915 to 1924.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The smock mill is a timber-framed construction with weatherboarded, steeply sloping external walls. It was built on a brick base. A pivoting wooden top with sails moved independently of the main structure so that the sails could be positioned towards the wind. This was controlled by a tail fan.
Address: The Round House, Pipe Passage, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1YQ, UK (50.87282, 0.0066)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 293330 (Grade II, 1985)
Place
The Round House is the brick and flint base of a windmill built by public subscription in 1802. After the working parts of the mill were moved to another site, it was converted into a private house, extended in the 1870s and 1920s. There are links with the Bloomsbury Group writer Virginia Woolf and with John Every, owner of the Phoenix Ironworks in Lewes. Ground floor open with display of historical material. In 1919, Virginia Woolf purchased the Round House in Pipe Passage, Lewes for £300. In 2009 was for sale again, but the price was £800,000.
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) and Leonard Sidney Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969)
The Round House, which is said to look much as it did when Woolf bought it, has been sold in 2009 by the same estate agents that originally sold it to her as a weekend and holiday home. Charles Wycherley, who runs the family estate agengy in Lewes, auctioned the house June 9, 2009. Woolf bought the house from his great-grandfather, Alfred. The owner of the cottage, which was built in 1802 and was once the town windmill, was retired teacher Annie Crowther, who moved to a home nearby. The same year Woolf purchased the Round House, she discovered Monk’s House in nearby Rodmell, which both she and Leonard favored because of its orchard and garden. She then bought Monk’s House and sold the Round House. The Round House was also owned by John Every, ironmaster of Lewes Phoenix works.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Monk’s House is an XVIII century weatherboarded cottage in the village of Rodmell, three miles south-east of Lewes, East Sussex.
Address: Rodmell, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 3HF, UK (50.83881, 0.01652)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1273 474760
English Heritage Building ID: 416677 (Grade II, 1979) (managed by the National Trust)
Place
The writer Virginia Woolf and her husband, the political activist, journalist and editor Leonard Woolf, bought the house in 1919, and received there many important visitors connected to the Bloomsbury Group, including T. S. Eliot, E. M. Forster, Roger Fry and Lytton Strachey. Virginia’s sister, the artist Vanessa Bell, lived at nearby Charleston Farmhouse in Firle from 1916, and though contrasting in style, both houses became important outposts of the Bloomsbury Group. The National Trust now operates the building as a writer’s house museum. During the Woolfs’ early years at Rodmell, Monk’s House was of modest dimensions with three-quarters of an acre of garden including an orchard and a number of outbuildings. Conditions were primitive and over the years the Woolfs made many alterations and additions, including: improvements to the kitchen; the installation of a hot water range and bathroom with water closet; and a two-storey extension in 1929. In 1928 they bought an adjoining field to preserve the beautiful views from the garden towards Mount Caburn. The Woolfs spent more and more time in Rodmell, eventually living there full-time from 1940 when their flat in Mecklenburgh Square, Bloomsbury, London, was damaged during an air raid. The solitude of village life allowed Virginia respite from the tumult of London, and it was in the small wooden lodge at the bottom of the garden that many of her novels took shape. “Jacob’s Room,” published in 1922, “Mrs Dalloway” (1925), “To The Lighthouse” (1927), “Orlando” (1928), “The Waves” (1931), “The Years” (1937) and “Between The Acts” (1941), as well as other works, were also written there. Her final novel, “Between the Acts,” published posthumously in July 1941, is steeped in references to Rodmell and the traditions and values of its villagers. Virginia documented her life at the house in photographs. Preserved in the Monk’s House Albums, these include portraits and group pictures of many who visited the house. In Mar. 1941, Virginia committed suicide by drowning herself in the nearby River Ouse. Leonard continued to live at Monk’s House until his death in 1969, and played an active role in village life. Both he and Virginia had been members of the Socialist Party, and he became a manager of the village school in Rodmell in the 1930s. He was also treasurer and president of the Rodmell and District Horticultural Society. Upon Leonard’s death the house was bequeathed to his close friend, the artist Trekkie Parsons, née Ritchie, who sold it to the University of Sussex in 1972. It was eventually turned over to the National Trust in 1980, and is open to the public. The ground floor, including sitting room, dining room, kitchen and Virginia’s bedroom, is on display and Virginia’s writing lodge can be found at the bottom of the garden with views across to Mount Caburn.
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) and Leonard Sidney Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969)
Virginia Woolf was a writer and one of the foremost modernists of the XX century. After the death of their father and Virginia’s second nervous breakdown, Vanessa and Adrian bought a house at 46 Gordon Square in Bloomsbury. Woolf came to know Lytton Strachey, Clive Bell, Rupert Brooke, Saxon Sydney-Turner, Duncan Grant, Leonard Woolf, John Maynard Keynes, David Garnett, and Roger Fry, who together formed the nucleus of the intellectual circle of writers and artists known as the Bloomsbury Group. Several members of the group attained notoriety in 1910 with the Dreadnought hoax, which Virginia participated in disguised as a male Abyssinian royal. Her complete 1940 talk on the hoax was discovered and is published in the memoirs collected in the expanded edition of “The Platform of Time” (2008.) In 1907 Vanessa married Clive Bell, and the couple’s interest in avant garde art would have an important influence on Woolf’s development as an author. Virginia Stephen married the writer Leonard Woolf on August 10, 1912. Despite his low material status (Woolf referring to Leonard during their engagement as a "penniless Jew") the couple shared a close bond. Indeed, in 1937, Woolf wrote in her diary: "Love-making—after 25 years can’t bear to be separate ... you see it is enormous pleasure being wanted: a wife. And our marriage so complete." The two also collaborated professionally, in 1917 founding the Hogarth Press, which subsequently published Virginia’s novels along with works by T. S. Eliot, Laurens van der Post, and others. The Press also commissioned works by contemporary artists, including Dora Carrington and Vanessa Bell. The ethos of the Bloomsbury group encouraged a liberal approach to sexuality, and in 1922 she met the writer and gardener Vita Sackville-West, wife of Harold Nicolson. After a tentative start, they began a sexual relationship, which, according to Sackville-West in a letter to her husband dated August 17, 1926, was only twice consummated. However, Virginia’s intimacy with Vita seems to have continued into the early 1930s. In 1928, Woolf presented Sackville-West with “Orlando,” a fantastical biography in which the eponymous hero’s life spans three centuries and both sexes. Nigel Nicolson, Vita Sackville-West’s son, wrote, "The effect of Vita on Virginia is all contained in “Orlando,” the longest and most charming love letter in literature, in which she explores Vita, weaves her in and out of the centuries, tosses her from one sex to the other, plays with her, dresses her in furs, lace and emeralds, teases her, flirts with her, drops a veil of mist around her." After their affair ended, the two women remained friends until Woolf’s death in 1941. After completing the manuscript of her last (posthumously published) novel, “Between the Acts,” Woolf fell into a depression similar to that which she had earlier experienced. The onset of WWII, the destruction of her London home during the Blitz, and the cool reception given to her biography of her late friend Roger Fry all worsened her condition until she was unable to work. On March 28, 1941, Woolf drowned herself by filling her overcoat pockets with stones and walking into the River Ouse near her home. Woolf’s body was not found until Apr. 18, 1941. Her husband buried her cremated remains under an elm in the garden of Monk’s House, their home in Rodmell, Sussex.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Close to the end of the war, H.D. met the wealthy novelist Bryher (Annie Winifred Ellerman.) They lived together until 1946, and although both took numerous other partners, Bryher remained her lover for the rest of H.D.’s life.
Address: Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Mecklenburgh Square is located in the King’s Cross area of central London. The Square and its garden were part of the Foundling Estate, a residential development of 1792–1825 on fields surrounding and owned by the Foundling Hospital. The Square was named in honour of King George III’s Queen, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. It was begun in 1804, but was not completed until 1825. It is notable for the number of historic terraced houses that face directly onto the square and the Mecklenburgh Square Garden. Access to the garden is only permitted to resident keyholders, except on two days a year when it is open to all visitors for Open Garden Squares Weekend. The garden was laid out and planted between 1809 and 1810 as the centrepiece of the newly developed Mecklenburgh Square. The 2 acres (8,100 m2) garden is made up of formal lawns, gravel paths, mature plane trees and other ornamental trees. It contains a children’s playground,and a tennis court. The east side of the garden is planted with plants native to New Zealand. To the west is Coram’s Fields, a playground for children, and to the east is Gray’s Inn Road, a major thoroughfare for the area. Goodenough College is a postgraduate residence and educational trust on the north and south sides of the square, and operates an academic-oriented hotel on the east side. Russell Square tube station is located to the south-west of the square, and the major railway terminus of King’s Cross-St Pancras is a short walk north.
Notable queer residents at Mecklenburgh Square:
• No. 44, WC1N H.D. (Hilda Doolittle September 10, 1886– September 27, 1961), American poet, lived here from 1917 to 1918.
• No. 37, WC1N Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) from 1939 to 1940. The house was bombed in a German air raid in 1940 and replaced in 1957 by William Goodenough House at Goodenough College.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Hotel Café Royal is a five-star hotel at 68 Regent Street, W1B. Before its conversion in 2008-2012 it was a restaurant and meeting place. By the 1890s the Café Royal had become the place to see and be seen at. Its patrons have included Oscar Wilde, Aleister Crowley, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, Winston Churchill, Noël Coward, Brigitte Bardot, Max Beerbohm, George Bernard Shaw, Jacob Epstein, Mick Jagger, Elizabeth Taylor, Muhammad Ali and Diana, Princess of Wales. The café was the scene of a famous meeting on March 24, 1895, when Frank Harris advised Oscar Wilde to drop his charge of criminal libel against the Marquess of Queensberry, father of Alfred Douglas. Queensberry was acquitted, and Wilde was subsequently tried, convicted and imprisoned.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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William Somerset Maugham CH, better known as W. Somerset Maugham, was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest-paid author during the 1930s.
Born: January 25, 1874, Paris, France
Died: December 16, 1965, Nice, France
Education: Heidelberg University
King's College London
St Thomas's Hospital Medical School
Lived: Villa La Mauresque, 52 boulevard du Général-de-Gaulle, 06230 Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, France (43.67962, 7.32727)
Shaw House, 6 Chesterfield St, Mayfair, London W1J 5JQ, UK (51.50729, -0.14827)
2 Wyndham Place, W1H
43 Bryanston Square, W1H
11 Vincent Square, SW1P
3 rue Victor Considerant, Montparnasse
2 Calle Guzman el Bueno 84, Madrid
27 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, SW3
The Langham, London, 1C Portland Pl, Regent St, W1B
17 Great James Street, Bloomsbury
Buried: Canterbury Cathedral, 11 The Precincts, Canterbury, Kent CT1 2EH
Short stories: Mr. Know-All, The Ant and the Grasshopper, more
Plays: The Constant Wife, The Letter, Sheppey, For Services Rendered, The Sacred Flame, The Bread-Winner, The Tenth Man

William Somerset Maugham was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. In 1914, W. Somerset Maugham met Gerald Haxton, a young American who would be his companion until his death in 1944. Maugham married Syrie Wellcome, the former wife of Henry Wellcome. The marriage was unhappy, and Syrie divorced him in 1929, finding his relationship and travels with Haxton too difficult to live with. Maugham regarded Haxton as indispensable to his success as a writer. Maugham was painfully shy, and Haxton the extrovert gathered human material, which the author converted to fiction. Maugham placed a dedication in his 1949 compilation, A Writer’s Notebook: “In Loving Memory of My Friend Frederick Gerald Haxton, 1892 -1944.” After Haxton died in 1944, Maugham began a relationship with Alan Searle. Older men had already kept Searle, a young man from the London slum area of Bermondsey. He proved a devoted if not a stimulating companion. One of Maugham's friends, describing the difference between Haxton and Searle, said, "Gerald was vintage, Alan was vin ordinaire.”
Together from 1914 to 1944: 30 years.
Frederick Gerald Haxton (1892 – November 7, 1944)
W. Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Godfrey Winn was a British journalist known as a columnist, and also a writer and actor. Born in Birmingham, England, he went to King Edward's School, Birmingham. His career as a theatre actor began as a boy actor at the Haymarket Theatre and appeared in many plays and films. He went on to write a number of novels and biographical works, and became a star columnist for the Daily Mirror and the Sunday Express newspapers, and in 1939 was the first British war correspondent to cross the Maginot Line. His book PQ17 was an account of his experiences on Convoy PQ 17 during the Second World War. After the war he wrote numerous books and magazine articles, and appeared on radio and television as well as in films. He was an accomplished bridge player and became an ornament at the bridge table at Blenheim House. It was at one of these events when he was spotted and then bedded by J.R. Ackerley. It was also at a bridge evening in 1928 at the London home of Ned Lathom that he met W. Somerset Maugham who immediately invited him to spend a month at Villa Mauresque. They were lovers for a time and remained friends until Somerset Maugham's death. The character George Potter who appeared in a chapter in Somerset Maugham's Strictly Personal (1941), is a portrait of Godfrey Winn, but not a very flattering one. The chapter was deleted from the Heinemann edition in Britain for fear of a libel action. By 1938 he was claiming that he was the most highly paid journalist in Fleet Street (where he was known as Winifred God).
They met in 1928 and remained friends until Somerset Maugham’s death in 1965: 37 years.
Godfrey Herbert Winn (October 15, 1906 – June 19, 1971)
W. Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Great James Street, Bloomsbury, is in the south-east of Bloomsbury, running north from Theobald’s Road to the east end of Chapel Street. It was developed from about 1721. It was named after James Burgess, co-developer of the estate. In the 1820s no. 17 was the home and practice of solicitor Robert Maugham, later first Secretary of the Law Society, and grandfather of the author W. Somerset Maugham. 15 Great James Street, WC1N was the home of Theodore Watts-Dunton, poet and solicitor, from 1872 to 1873. 3 Great James Street, WC1N was the home of poet Algernon Charles Swinburne in the 1870s. Many original buildings still remained and were listed, though some were considerably rebuilt.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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W. Somerset Maugham lived at 11 Vincent Square, SW1P while studying medicine at St. Thomas’s Hospital. This was his first flat in London. Maugham kept his own lodgings, took pleasure in furnishing them, filled many notebooks with literary ideas, and continued writing nightly while at the same time studying for his medical degree. In 1897, he published his first novel, “Liza of Lambeth,” a tale of working-class adultery and its consequences. It drew its details from Maugham's experiences as a medical student doing midwifery work in Lambeth, a South London slum.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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W. Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 - December 16, 1965), who had qualified as a medic, dropped medicine after “Liza of Lambeth”'s first print run sold out in a matter of weeks. He embarked on his 65-year career as a man of letters. He later said, "I took to it as a duck takes to water." The writer's life allowed Maugham to travel and to live in places such as Spain from 1897 to 1898, staying at 2 Calle Guzman el Bueno 84, Madrid, and Capri for the next decade, but his next ten works never came close to rivalling the success of Liza. This changed in 1907 with the success of his play “Lady Frederick.” By the next year, he had four plays running simultaneously in London, and Punch published a cartoon of Shakespeare biting his fingernails nervously as he looked at the billboards. 



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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From 1901 to 1905 W. Somerset Maugham lived at 3 rue Victor Considerant, Montparnasse.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 4 Cheyne Walk, Mary Ann Cross (née Evans) aka George Eliot (1819–1880), "Novelist died here"
Address: Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW3 5TS, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Cheyne Walk is a historic street, in Chelsea, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Cheyne Walk forms part of the A3212 and A3220 trunk roads; it extends eastwards from the southern end of Finborough Road past the Battersea and Albert Bridges, after which the A3212 becomes the Chelsea Embankment. It marks the boundary of the, now withdrawn, extended London Congestion Charge Zone. East of the Walk is the Chelsea Physic Garden with its cedars. To the West is a collection of residential houseboats which have been in situ since the 1930s. Cheyne Walk takes its name from William Lord Cheyne who owned the manor of Chelsea until 1712. Most of the houses were built in the early XVIII century. Before the construction in the XIX century of the busy Embankment, which now runs in front of it, the houses fronted the River Thames. The most prominent building is Carlyle Mansions.
Notable queer residents of Cheyne Walk:
• At the time of his death, Richard Addinsell (January 13, 1904 –November 14, 1977), composer, was living at 1 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, SW3.
• George Eliot (1819-1880) spent the last three weeks of her life at 4 Cheney Walk, SW3. Michael Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, acquired it in 2015.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 16 Cheyne Walk, SW3 Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–1882) and Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837–1909), "Lived here." Dante Gabriel Rossetti was banned from keeping peacocks due to the noise.
• Henry James (1843-1916) spent his last years at 21 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, SW3.
• W. Somerset Maugham stayed at 27 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, SW3 in 1904, the same address of Bram Stoker.
• Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier of Brighton (1907-1989) and Jill Esmond lived at 74 Cheney Walk, SW3 in the 1930s.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 96 Cheyne Walk, SW10 James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834–1903) "Painter and ercher lived here." Also Diana Mitford, Lady Mosley (1910-2003) lived at no. 96 with her first husband Bryan Guinness in 1932.
• Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) and Peter Pears (1910-1986) lived at Ursula Nettleship’s house, 104a Cheney Walk, SW10 8 weeks at £1 a week each. Light and heath, £2, telephone £9. Total £27.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 6 Chesterfield Street, William Somerset Maugham (1874–1965), "Novelist and playwright lived here 1911–1919"
Address: 6 Chesterfield St, Mayfair, London W1J 5JQ, UK (51.50729, -0.14827)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Place
This serviced building was once the home of author W. Somerset Maugham. The flats have been refurbished and decorated in traditional English style, they are spacious with high ceilings. There is a resident manager, video entry system and all of the apartments have the same high standard of comfort and style. Living rooms have a comfortable sofa, oak furniture, cable TV, video, CD player, direct dial phone and answering machine. Large windows look out to street or garden views and the fully fitted kitchens have a refrigerator/freezer, oven, hob, microwave, dishwasher and washer/dryer. The bedrooms have either a queen bed or twin beds and excellent storage.
Life
Who: William Somerset Maugham CH (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965)
W. Somerset Maugham’s first drama “Man of Honour” (1903) brought him to the attention of London’s intelligentsia but with little rewards. This changed in 1907 with the success of his play “Lady Frederick” and by the next year, he had four plays running simultaneously in London. He moved to 23 Mount Street, Mayfair, W1K in 1908 where he shared a flat with Walter Payne. His success was repeated in New York and he celebrated by moving in 1911 into a luxurious house at 6 Chesterfield Street, Mayfair, W1J always with his old friend and financial advisor, Walter Payne. He lived there until 1919.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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In 1919, the 6 Chesterfield Street property became too cramped for the needs of W. Somerset Maugham, his wife Syrie and their daughter Liza and they moved to a handsome 4 storeyed mansion at 2 Wyndham Place, W1H. Here Syrie was able to indulge in her decorative talents, furnishing the house for high-level entertaining. Maugham continued to travel to avoid this unhappy marriage but when at home the couple tried to keep up appearances, riding in Hyde Park, inviting friends for breakfasts, lunches and lavish evening receptions. Here the glitterati from the world of art, literature and theatre from England and America would gather. In 1923, at the instigation of Maugham, the family moved to a larger house at 43 Bryanston Square, W1H. Here Syrie could entertain on an even more lavish scale and show case her furniture restoration business.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Surrounded by gardens and terraces, this villa has received numerous writers and celebrities.
Address: 52 boulevard du Général-de-Gaulle, 06230 Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, France (43.67962, 7.32727)
Type: Private Property
Place
Restored in 1927, Design by Barry Dierks (1899-1960)
The villa La Mauresque is located in cap Ferrat (Alpes-Maritimes) and was remodeled to serve as the main residence of the British novelist William Somerset Maugham. Around 1900, the former missionary and chaplain to Leopold II, King of the Belgians, Félix Charmettant (1844-1921), purchased a parcel of land (4 hectares (9.9 acres)) on the newly subdivided peninsula of cap Ferrat. Here he had a villa constructed in the Moorish style by an unknown architect. In 1927, the author William Somerset Maugham purchased the property and commissioned the young American architect Barry Dierks to eliminate the villa’s original neo-oriental elements, to classicize the façades and patio, and to modernize the layout by creating a staircase. Villa La Mauresque became Maugham’s main residence until his death in 1965. Becoming a near-obligatory stop for the literary and Riviera society, La Mauresque, from the point of Maugham’s acquisition, received most of the celebrities who visited the Riviera: Winston Churchill, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Lord Beaverbrook and the Aga Khan mingled with such literary figures as T. S. Eliot, H. G. Wells, Rudyard Kipling, Ian Fleming, Noël Coward and even Virginia Woolf. Maugham and his partner Gerald Haxton – who was followed by other partners after Haxton’s death in 1944 – received as well numerous artists and men from the gay community. Maugham’s last partner, Allan Searle, inherited the Maugham’s estate and the villa. In 1967, the villa was purchased by the American, Lynn Wyatt, a prominent figure in international society. The façades and the interior layout were modified – while retaining the classic style – at this time by the French architect Marcel Guilgot. La Mauresque is arranged around a central patio, on a rectangular plan. Two superimposed galleries, including one that is arcaded and the other on the ground floor, which is glazed, surround this patio. The entry façade is marked by a columnated porte-cochere. A tower marks the southeast corner of the building. The somber façades, which lack any ornamentation, are of plaster painted white. The roof is tiled, save for the terrace, which is cement. The interior, on the ground floor, which was modified during the renovation of 1967, included a larger semi-circular foyer (formerly the dining room), living room, kitchen, and service rooms and staff quarters. The tower housed the library. On the first floor, which is served by an elevator, are seven bedrooms and four bathrooms as well as service rooms, laundry and linen room. A staircase leads to the terrace. The villa La Mauresque is a private residence located at “Le Sémaphore.” It has been classified with the Inventaire général du patrimoine culturel since Nov. 2008. The villa’s gardens were the subject of a separate classification, which occurred at the same time as that of the house.
Life
Who: William Somerset Maugham CH (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965)
W. Somerset Maugham was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when WWI broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross’s so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers,” a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos, E. E. Cummings, and Ernest Hemingway. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan born in 1892, who became his companion and lover until Haxton’s death in 1944. Although homosexual, Maugham entered into a relationship with Syrie Wellcome, the wife of Henry Wellcome, an American-born English pharmaceutical magnate. They had a daughter named Mary Elizabeth Maugham, (1915–1998.) Henry Wellcome sued his wife for divorce, naming Maugham as co-respondent. In 1916, Maugham travelled to the Pacific to research his novel “The Moon and Sixpence,” based on the life of Paul Gauguin. This was the first of his journeys through the late-Imperial world of the 1920s and 1930s which inspired his novels. He became known as a writer who portrayed the last days of colonialism in India, Southeast Asia, China and the Pacific, although the books on which this reputation rests represent only a fraction of his output. On this and all subsequent journeys, he was accompanied by Haxton, whom he regarded as indispensable to his success as a writer. Maugham was painfully shy, and Haxton the extrovert gathered human material which the author converted to fiction. In May 1917, following the decree absolute, Syrie Wellcome and Maugham were married. Syrie Maugham became a noted interior decorator who in the 1920s popularized "the all-white room." Their daughter was familiarly called Liza and her surname was changed to Maugham. The marriage was unhappy, and Syrie divorced him in 1929, finding his relationship and travels with Haxton too difficult to live with. Maugham spent most of WWII in the United States, first in Hollywood (he worked on many scripts, and was one of the first authors to make significant money from film adaptations) and later in the South. While in the US, he was asked by the British government to make patriotic speeches to induce the US to aid Britain, if not necessarily become an allied combatant. After his companion Gerald Haxton died in 1944, Maugham moved back to England. In 1946 he returned to his villa in France, where he lived, interrupted by frequent and long travels, until his death. Maugham began a relationship with Allan Searle, whom he had first met in 1928. A young man from the London slum area of Bermondsey, Searle had already been kept by older men. He proved a devoted if not stimulating companion. One of Maugham’s friends, describing the difference between Haxton and Searle, said simply: "Gerald was vintage, Alan was vin ordinaire."



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Regent Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London. It is named after George, the Prince Regent (later George IV) and was built under the direction of the architect John Nash. The street runs from Waterloo Place in St James's at the southern end, through Piccadilly Circus and Oxford Circus, to All Soul's Church. From there Langham Place and Portland Place continue the route to Regent's Park.
Address: Regent Street, London W1B, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
• The Langham, London (1C Portland Pl, Regent St, W1B) is one of the largest and best known traditional style grand hotels in London. It is in the district of Marylebone on Langham Place and faces up Portland Place towards Regent's Park. It is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World marketing consortium. Since the XIX century the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon III, Oscar Wilde, Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as “A Scandal in Bohemia” and “The Sign of Four” partly at the Langham. The Langham continued throughout the XX century to be a favoured spot with members of the royal family, such as Diana, Princess of Wales, and many high-profile politicians including Winston Churchill and Charles de Gaulle. Other guests included Noël Coward, Wallis Simpson, Don Bradman, Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, W. Somerset Maugham and Ayumi Hamasaki. Guy Burgess, one of the “Cambridge Five”, a spying ring who fed official secrets to the Soviets during the Cold War, stayed at the Langham while working for the BBC. Horace Walpole lived in 1743 at 5 Portland Place, W1B. Edward FitzGerald (March 31, 1809- June 14, 1883), English writer and translator, lived at 39 Portland Place, W1B in his childhood. He married Lucy, the daughter of the Quaker poet Bernard Barton in Chichester on 4 November, 1856, following a death bed promise to Bernard made in 1849 to look after her. The newly married pair went to Brighton, and then settled for a time at 31 Great Portland Street, W1W. A few days of married life were enough to disillusionise FitzGerald. The marriage was evidently unhappy, for the couple separated after only a few months, despite having known each other for many years, including collaborating on a book about her father's works in 1849.
• Aleister Crowley was evicted by his landlords as they had heared that he planned to exhibt "erotic" paintings at 2 All Souls Place, W1B. While Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson was at Charterhouse, his family moved from Hanwell to a house behind All Souls Church in Langham Place (1 All Souls Place, W1B).
• English Heritage Blue Plaque, 110 Hallam Street, W1W Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828-1882), “Poet & painter born here.”
• From 1848 to 1850 Edward FitzGerald lived at 39 Bolsover Street, W1W.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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W. Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 –December 16, 1965), British playwright, novelist and short story writer, was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. He is buried inside the Canterbury Cathedral (11 The Precincts, Canterbury, Kent CT1 2EH). He came to live at a vicarge that stood at Maugham Court (Saddleston Road, Whitstable, Kent, CT5 4RR) when his parents died in France. Maugham was sent to the UK to be cared for by his uncle, Henry MacDonald Maugham, the Vicar of Whitstable. The boy attended The King's School, Canterbury.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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