Jan. 28th, 2017

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Bryher was the pen name of the English novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman, of the Ellerman ship-owning family.
Born: September 2, 1894, Margate, United Kingdom
Died: January 28, 1983, Vevey, Switzerland
Lived: 1 South Audley Street, W1K
Norfolk House, Harold Road (at the NW corner of Albion and Harold), Margate
44 Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB, UK
2 Herbert Mansions, 35-36 Sloane Street, SW1X
49 Lowndes Square, SW1X
Villa Kenwin, 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)
Riant Chateau, Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)
Buried: Vevey (Saint Martin's) Cemetery, Vevey, District de la Riviera-Pays-d’Enhaut, Vaud, Switzerland
Parents: Sir John Ellerman, 1st Baronet
Movies: Borderline
Spouse: Kenneth Macpherson (m. 1927–1947), Robert McAlmon (m. 1921–1927)

Hilda Doolittle was an American poet, novelist and memoirist known for her association with the early 20th century avant-garde Imagist group of poets such as Ezra Pound and Richard Aldington. Close to the end of the war, H.D. met the wealthy English novelist Bryher (Annie Winifred Ellerman). They lived together until 1946, and although both took numerous other partners, Bryher remained her lover for the rest of H.D.'s life. From 1920, her relationship with Bryher became closer and the pair travelled in Egypt, Greece and the United States before eventually settling in Switzerland. Bryher entered a marriage of convenience in 1921 with Robert McAlmon. They divorced in 1927. Bryher married H.D.'s new male lover, bisexual Kenneth Macpherson. Critic Barbara Guest termed it as a “menagerie of three.” H.D. was unapologetic about her sexuality, and thus became an icon for both the gay rights and feminist movements when her poems, plays, letters and essays were rediscovered during the 1970s and 1980s.
Together from 1918 to 1961: 43 years.
Annie Winifred Ellerman aka Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Hilda Doolittle aka H.D. (September 10, 1886 – September 27, 1961)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Bryher was the pen name of the novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. In 1921, she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. The same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D. 's lover (H.D. was Bryher’s lover as well). In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin (Kenneth + Winifred). They formally adopted H.D.'s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson's child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, even if she continued to provide for him. Bryher and H.D. no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until H.D.’s death in 1961. Bryher, H.D., and Macpherson formed the film magazine Close Up, and the POOL Group. Only one POOL film, Borderline (1930), starring H.D. and Paul Roberson, survives in its entirety.
Together from 1927 to 1947: 20 years.
Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Bryher was born Annie Winifred Glover on September 2, 1894, at Norfolk House, Harold Road (at the NW corner of Albion and Harold), Margate, to Hannah Glover and John Ellerman (unmarried). 



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Close to the end of the war, H.D. met the wealthy novelist Bryher (Annie Winifred Ellerman.) They lived together until 1946, and although both took numerous other partners, Bryher remained her lover for the rest of H.D.’s life.
Address: Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Mecklenburgh Square is located in the King’s Cross area of central London. The Square and its garden were part of the Foundling Estate, a residential development of 1792–1825 on fields surrounding and owned by the Foundling Hospital. The Square was named in honour of King George III’s Queen, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. It was begun in 1804, but was not completed until 1825. It is notable for the number of historic terraced houses that face directly onto the square and the Mecklenburgh Square Garden. Access to the garden is only permitted to resident keyholders, except on two days a year when it is open to all visitors for Open Garden Squares Weekend. The garden was laid out and planted between 1809 and 1810 as the centrepiece of the newly developed Mecklenburgh Square. The 2 acres (8,100 m2) garden is made up of formal lawns, gravel paths, mature plane trees and other ornamental trees. It contains a children’s playground,and a tennis court. The east side of the garden is planted with plants native to New Zealand. To the west is Coram’s Fields, a playground for children, and to the east is Gray’s Inn Road, a major thoroughfare for the area. Goodenough College is a postgraduate residence and educational trust on the north and south sides of the square, and operates an academic-oriented hotel on the east side. Russell Square tube station is located to the south-west of the square, and the major railway terminus of King’s Cross-St Pancras is a short walk north.
Notable queer residents at Mecklenburgh Square:
• No. 44, WC1N H.D. (Hilda Doolittle September 10, 1886– September 27, 1961), American poet, lived here from 1917 to 1918.
• No. 37, WC1N Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) from 1939 to 1940. The house was bombed in a German air raid in 1940 and replaced in 1957 by William Goodenough House at Goodenough College.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In 1919 Bryher moved out of 1 South Audley Street, W1K where she had lived since 1909. The home was a “great Victorian mansion at 1 South Audley Street, her house overflowed with mosaics, tapestries, carvings, furniture, and a medley of objects, some of them works of art and others without value.” Around this time Bryher began traveling to Greece with H.D. and Havelock Ellis. She also assumed responsibility for care of Perdita Aldington, H.D.’s daughter.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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English born writer and philanthropist, her father shipowner and financier John Ellerman was reputed to be the richest Englishman upon his death in 1933, Annie Winifred Ellerman used the pseudonym Bryher, after her favourite island in Scilly. She spent much of the 1920's at 2 Herbert Mansions, 35-36 Sloane Street, SW1X and in France. She spent the war years, from 1934 to 1946, in a cramped flat at 49 Lowndes Square, SW1X with H.D.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Since 1921, H.D. had been a close friend of Bryher. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle.
Address: Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1913, Design by Michel Polak (1885-1948)
The Riant Chateau was built for Belgian businessman Lucien Kaisin. This complex was built for a cosmopolitan clientele and was considered very advanced for its time. It had the most modern elevators and central heating of its time, and was furnished with luxurious fittings. In its heyday, it was the meeting place for avant-garde of the cinema; it was frequently visited by such notables as Eisenstein, Room and Pabst and housed the headquarters of the publishers of the magazine Pool. The redevelopment program has ensured that the spirit of the building has been retained, while all essential services have been replaced and modern technology added. The interior of the building reflects the extravagance and luxury of the Belle Époque, with high ceilings, elaborate cornices, inlaid mirrors, stained glass, heavy oak doors, and antique oak parquet floors. Bordering the Riant Chateau is Rose Park, a beautiful park which extends to the Anglican church. At present an underground parking space is being built beneath Rose Park which is being re-landscaped and replanted with more trees for added privacy. On the other side of the garden lies the Anglican church, and beyond that the terminus of the Mont Pelerin funicular. Rose Park was a favorite haunt of the Austrian Empress Sissi, whose statue serves as a reminder to today’s visitors.
Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971), Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983) and Hilda "H.D." Doolittle (September 10, 1886 – September 27, 1961)
It was in 1927, from their base in Territet, that Kenneth Macpherson, Bryher and HD launched themselves as the Pool Group. Pool would veer away from the West’s commercial model of film production, and produce material which would promote cinematography as an “art form.” Their model would be based on the work coming out of Germany, particularly G W Pabst, and coming out of Russia, particularly Sergei Eisenstein. Their subject matter would be human behaviour, and its many facets, and their task would be representing this behaviour on screen, influenced by the work of Freud. Also at Territet, Macpherson founded the influential film journal, Close Up, dedicated to "independent cinema and cinema from around the world.” The first issue of Close Up, describing itself on the front cover as an "international magazine devoted to film art,” appeared in July 1927. Macpherson was editor, with Bryher as assistant editor, and Doolittle making regular contributions. Macpherson, who was particularly influenced by the Russian film-maker Sergei Eisenstein and whom he first met in 1929, "dictated the tone and direction of the publication, contributing articles that defined the role of the director and defended the integrity of cinema and its right to be considered as art.” Close Up published many of the first translations of Eisenstein’s ideas. Macpherson continued as the main editor until the magazine’s demise in 1933. Bryher is buried at Cimetière Saint-Martin (Boulevard Saint-Martin, 1800 Vevey).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Villa Kenwin, La Tour-de-Peilz (2)
In September, 1931, Kenneth Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build on plans drawn up several years earlier by Alexander Ferenczy.
Address: 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)
Type: Private Property
Place
The home, which overlooked Lake Geneva, came to be known as Kenwin, derived from the names of its commissioners, Kenneth and Winifred, and would double as a film studio and home, not only for themselves, but also for an assortment of dogs, cats, and monkeys. Bryher gave her address, at the time, as Villa Kenwin, Chemin de Vallon, 1814 Burier-La-Tour, Vaud, Switzerland. During the war years, Bryher would use Kenwin as a staging post for the evacuation of refugees from Nazi Germany. Abandoned after the death of Bryher who will live there until 1983, it was bought in 1987 by the architect Giovanni Pezzoli who undertook a complete renovation. It is registered as a Swiss cultural object of national importance. In 1996, a documentary film entitled "Kenwin" and telling the story of the villa Kenwin was directed by Véronique Goël on the basis of archive footage.
Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Bryher was the pen name of the English novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. Her father was the shipowner and financier John Ellerman, who at the time of his death in 1933, was the richest Englishman who had ever lived. He lived with her mother Hannah Glover, but did not marry her until 1908. During the 1920s, Bryher was an unconventional figure in Paris. Among her circle of friends were Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Beach and Berenice Abbott. Her wealth enabled her to give financial support to struggling writers, including Joyce and Edith Sitwell. She also helped with finance for Sylvia Beach’s bookshop Shakespeare and Company and certain publishing ventures, and started a film company Pool Group. She also helped provide funds to purchase a flat in Paris for the destitute Dada artist and writer Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. In 1918 she met and became involved in a lesbian relationship with poet Hilda Doolittle “H.D.” The relationship was an open one, with both taking other partners. In 1921 she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. That same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D.’s lover. In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin. They formally adopted H.D.’s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson’s child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, she and Doolittle no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until Doolittle’s death in 1961.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Colette was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. Her best known work, the novella Gigi, was the basis for the film and Lerner and Loewe stage production of the same name.
Born: January 28, 1873, Saint-Sauveur-en-Puisaye, France
Died: August 3, 1954, Paris, France
Lived: Villa Belle Plage, Rue du Capitaine Guy Dath, 80550 Le Crotoy, France (50.21867, 1.61906)
Rozven, 35350 Saint-Coulomb, France (48.69028, -1.92284)
9 Rue De Beaujolais
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 4, #6, GPS (lat/lon): 48.86073, 2.39115
Full name: Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette
Children: Colette de Jouvenel

Mathilde de Morny, called "Missy", was the daughter of the Duke of Morny, half-brother of Napoleon III, and his wife Princess Sophie Troubetzkoy, who was perhaps the natural daughter of Tsar Nicolas I. She was the great-granddaughter of Talleyrand and Empress Josephine. An extravagant conduct made her a celebrity of the Belle Époque and despite her marriage in 1881 to Jacques Godart, Marquis of Belbeuf - whom she divorced in 1903 - she openly displayed her sexual preference for women. At that time, a woman in love with another woman, was no surprise and was quite well accepted. But Missy was wearing a business suit, short hair and she was a cigar chain smoker. She was called Max, Uncle Max or even the Marquis by her friends. Missy underwent an hysterectomy and removed her breast. She was viril, strong and rich and served as Pygmalion to many women in Paris including her love-friend Colette for which she bought villas, produced comedies and made folies. In 1907, the two performed together in a pantomime entitled Rêve d'Égypte at the Moulin Rouge. Their onstage kiss nearly caused a riot, which the police were called in to suppress. As a result of this scandal, further performances were banned and Colette and de Morny were no longer able to openly live together, though their relationship continued a total of five years. Missy committed suicide on June 29, 1944, by putting the head in the oven and died at three o'clock in the afternoon.
Together from 1906 to 1912: 6 years.
Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954)
Mathilde “Missy” de Morny (May 26, 1863 – June 29, 1944)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Henry Gauthier-Villars or Willy was a French fin-de-siecle writer and music critic who is today mostly known as the mentor and first husband of Colette. In 1889, he met Colette, 14 years younger than he was; they married on May 15, 1893. Colette soon learned that Willy had other affairs, and she met his mistress Charlotte Kinceler, who later became her friend. Willy and Colette had an affair unbeknownst to each other with the same woman, the American socialite Georgie Raoul-Duval, née Urquhart. Upon discovery, they made it a threesome and attended the Bayreuth festival together. In 1906, Colette left the unfaithful Gauthier-Villars, living for a time at the home of the American writer and salonist Natalie Clifford Barney. The two had a short affair, and remained friends until Colette's death. The marriage of Willy and Colette lasted until 1910, although in the years prior they were already separated. Colette went to work in the music halls of Paris, under the wing of Missy de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf, with whom she became romantically involved. She also was involved in a heterosexual relationship during this time, with the Italian writer Gabriele D’Annunzio. According to one writer, Colette "never gave Missy as much love" and took "advantage of her and more or less appropriating Rozven, a Brittany villa, from her after they split up." Another affair during this period was with the automobile-empire scion Auguste Heriot.
Together from 1893 to 1906: 13 years.
Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954)
Henry Gauthier-Villars aka Willy (August 8, 1859 - January 12, 1931)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Villa Belle Plage was the residence of Colette from 1907 to 1910
Address: Rue du Capitaine Guy Dath, 80550 Le Crotoy, France (50.21867, 1.61906)
Type: Private Property
Place
Villa Belle Plage in rue du Capitaine-Guy-Dath, home to Colette and Missy de Morny, does not longer exist, but Le port and town of Crotoy is still a place of interest. Le Crotoy is a commune in the Somme department in Picardie in northern France. Le Crotoy has had lengthy visits from some famous figures of French history: Joan of Arc (who was imprisoned there), Jules Verne (who wrote “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea” here), the perfumer Guerlain who has created in regard of the special shades of blue, purple, violet which cover the bay at down his well-known perfume, "L’Heure Bleue .” Several painters as Toulouse-Lautrec, Paul Signac, and Pierre Risch had also been charmed by Le Crotoy.
Life
Who: Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954), aka Colette
Thanks to her personality and fortune, Mathilde de Morny (1863-1944) became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette. From summer 1906 onwards she and Colette stayed together in the “Belle Plage” villa in Le Crotoy, where Collete wrote “Les Vrilles de la vigne” and “La Vagabonde” which would be adapted for the screen by Musidora. On Jan. 3, 1907 Mathilde and Colette put on a pantomime entitled “Rêve d’Égypte” (Dream of Egypt) at the Moulin Rouge, in which Mathilde caused a scandal by playing an Egyptologist during a simulated lesbian love scene - a kiss between them almost caused a riot and the production was stopped by the prefect of police Louis Lépine. From then on they could no longer live together openly, though the relationship lasted until 1912. Mathilde also inspired the character “La Chevalière” in Colette’s novel “Le Pur et l’Impur,” described as "in dark masculine attire, belying any notion of gaiety or bravado... High born, she slummed it like a prince."



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The property was offered for sale in the early XX century, when it was in possession of the Baroness of Crest.
Address: 35350 Saint-Coulomb, France (48.69028, -1.92284)
Type: Private Property
Place
In May 1910, Colette and Missy de Morny escaped Crotoy for Brittany, to find a holiday home in a less rainy setting. On June 21, 1910 they bought the manor of Rozven at Saint-Coulomb in Brittany (its owner, baron du Crest, refused the sale because Mathilde was dressed as a man and so Colette signed the deed instead.) Rozven was a magnificent property that can be admired even today from the beach of Touesse in Saint-Coulomb, near Saint-Malo. Colette spent her holidays here until 1924, although a newcomer soon replaced Missy in the heart of the writer: Henry de Jouvenel, the second editor of the daily Le Matin, with whom Colette began collaborating. Missy in the end, let Colette enjoyment and possession of Rozven.
Life
Who: Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954), aka Colette
In 1906, Colette separated from Willy. Colette moved in rue de Villejust. She was often found at 2 rue Georges-Ville, home of the Marquise de Belboeuf, called Missy (daughter of Count and Duke of Morny), noble, rich, generous and homosexual. They met in 1905 at the Cercle des arts et de la mode and spent the summers from 1906 to 1910 in Crotoy where Missy rented the villa "Belle Plage.” They bought Rozven on the same day the first chamber of the “tribunal de grande instance” for the Seine departement pronounced Colette’s divorce from Henry Gauthier-Villars. When Mathilde and Colette separated a year later, Colette kept the house.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954), more widely known simply as Colette, French novelist, author of the novella “Gigi” which was later adapted into a stage and then a film musical. She won the 1948 Nobel Prize for Literature. Colette was also a stafe actress and mime artiste. From 1938 to 1954 she lived at 9 Rue De Beaujolais.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.
Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on May 21, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”
Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942), buried together.
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) was a French actress.
• Oscar Wilde’s tomb in Père Lachaise was designed by sculptor Sir Jacob Epstein, at the request of Robert Ross (1869-1918), who also asked for a small compartment to be made for his own ashes. Ross's ashes were transferred to the tomb in 1950.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. They are buried together.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. The modernist angel depicted as a relief on the tomb was originally complete with male genitals. They were broken off as obscene and kept as a paperweight by a succession of Père Lachaise Cemetery keepers. Their current whereabouts are unknown. In the summer of 2000, intermedia artist Leon Johnson performed a 40 minute ceremony entitled Re-membering Wilde in which a commissioned silver prosthesis was installed to replace the vandalised genitals.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Howard Austen was the long-time companion of American writer Gore Vidal for 53 years until Austen's death.
Born: January 28, 1929, New York City, New York, United States
Died: September 22, 2003, Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: New York University
Buried: Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, District Of Columbia, USA, Plot: Section E-16
Buried alongside: Gore Vidal

Gore Vidal was an American writer known for his essays, novels, screenplays, and Broadway plays. In 1950, he met his long-term partner Howard Austen. Vidal once reported that the secret to his lengthy relationship with Austen was that they did not have sex with each other: "It's easy to sustain a relationship when sex plays no part and impossible, I have observed, when it does." Austen died in Nov. 2003 and was buried in a plot for himself and Vidal at Rock Creek Cemetery. Vidal was buried there in 2012. On one side of Gore and Howard is the grave of Henry Adams, the American journalist, novelist, academic and historian who featured in Vidal's books. On the other side is the great love of Gore Vidal's life, indeed the person who he said was the only person he had ever loved, Jimmy Trimble, who died at Iwo Jima, March 1, 1945.
Together from 1950 to 2003: 53 years.
Gore Vidal (October 3, 1925 – July 31, 2012)
Howard Austen (January 28, 1929 – September 22, 2003)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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End of 2003, Howard Austen died; later, in Feb. 2005, he was re-buried at Rock Creek Cemetery, in Washington, D.C., in a joint grave meant for both Gore Vidal and Austen.
Address: 201 Allison St NW, Washington, DC 20011, USA (38.94744, -77.01203)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 (202) 726-2080
National Register of Historic Places: 77001498, 2010
Place
Rock Creek Cemetery is an 86-acre (350,000 m2) cemetery with a natural rolling landscape located at Rock Creek Church Road, NW, and Webster Street, NW, off Hawaii Avenue, NE in Washington, D.C.’s Petworth neighborhood. It is across the street from the historic Soldiers’ Home and the Soldiers’ Home Cemetery. It also is home to the InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington. It was first established in 1719 as a churchyard within the glebe of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish. The Vestry later decided to expand the burial ground as a public cemetery to serve the city of Washington and this was established through an Act of Congress in 1840. The expanded Cemetery was landscaped in the rural garden style, to function as both a cemetery and a public park. It is a ministry of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish with sections for St. John’s Russian Orthodox Church and St. Nicholas Orthodox Church. Rock Creek Cemetery’s park-like setting has many notable mausoleums, sculptures, and tombstones. The best known is Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Stanford White’s Adams Memorial, a contemplative, androgynous bronze sculpture seated before a block of granite. It marks the graves of Marian Hooper “Clover" Adams and her husband, Henry Adams, and sometimes mistakenly, the sculpture is referred to as Grief. Saint-Gaudens entitled it The Mystery of the Hereafter and The Peace of God that Passeth Understanding. Other notable memorials include the Frederick Keep Monument, the Heurich Mausoleum, the Hitt Monument, the Hardon Monument, the Kauffman Monument, known as The Seven Ages of Memory, the Sherwood Mausoleum Door, and the Thompson-Harding Monument.
Notable queer burials at Rock Creek Cemetery:
• Henry Brooks Adams (1838-1918)
• Howard Auster (1929–2003)
• Frances Benjamin "Fannie" Johnston (1864-1952), pioneering photojournalist and documentary photographer. She was cremated and her ashes scattered over the family plot.
• James Trimble, III (1925-1945)
• Gore Vidal (1925–2012)
Life
Who: Eugene Louis Vidal (October 3, 1925 – July 31, 2012) aka Gore Vidal and Howard Auster (1929 – September 22, 2003) aka Howard Austen
Gore Vidal and Howard Austen are buried side by side at Rock Creek Cemetery. Near them there is also Henry Adams, the American journalist, novelist, academic and historian who featured in Vidal’s books, and the great love of Gore Vidal’s life, Jimmy Trimble. Gore Vidal’s second novel, “The City and the Pillar” (1948) caused a moralistic furor over his dispassionate presentation of a young protagonist coming to terms with his homosexuality and a male homosexual relationship. The novel was dedicated to "J.T."; decades later, Vidal confirmed that the initials were those of James Trimble III, killed in the Battle of Iwo Jima on March 1, 1945; and that Jimmie Trimble was the only person Gore Vidal ever loved.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lived: 76440 Forges-les-Eaux, France
Buried: Cimetière Monumental, Rue du Mesnil Gremichon, 76000 Rouen, France

In July 1952, parallel to his theater activity in his native Normandy, Jacques Hébertot became the owner of the spa town of Forges-les-Eaux, at the time battered by four years of German occupation. He intended to create a regional artistic center and to found a kind of international academy: "We will go from the Opera to the mystical drama. We will play Claudel as well as Meyerbeer, Beethoven and Strauss. Classical and modern...". Activities multiplied and Jacques Hébertot led a project dear to his heart: he bought the facade of the abandoned Carmelite convent of Gisors, disassembling stone by stone and then building it up again near the casino, along the road that leads to Dieppe. It's still there. Hébertot sold it in 1959 for lack of means, abandoning his expensive and ambitious project.
Address: 76440 Forges-les-Eaux, France (49.61331, 1.54588)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Forges-les-Eaux is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France. On 1 January 2016, the former commune of Le Fossé was merged into Forges-les-Eaux. A farming and spa town, with considerable light industry, situated by the banks of the rivers Andelle and Epte, in the Pays de Bray, some 34 miles (55 km) southeast of Dieppe, at the junction of the D921, the D1314 and the D929 roads. Known as "De Forgis" in 1186, the first part of the name, Forges, is derived from the fact that it was an important centre for the mining and manufacturing of iron in Roman times. The second part of its name comes from the therapeutic use of the thermal waters from the XVI century onwards. A seigneur from Forges took part in the Battle of Hastings and another took part in the First Crusade. During the Hundred Years War, a certain Philippe de Forges was killed in 1356 at the Battle of Poitiers. Years later, but in the same conflict, the English besieged the castle and took the town, in 1418. Blanche d'Evreux, widow of Philippe VI of France, came here to take the waters in the fourteenth century, but it was the Chevalier de Varenne who really began the vogue in 1573. The spa became famous after the stay from 21 June to 13 July 1632 of Louis XIII, Anne of Austria and Cardinal Richelieu. Because of the royal visit, the parks, gardens and many water sources were developed, including three lakes that still exist today. Subsequently, many famous figures from French history have taken the waters. A large pottery factory was active from 1797 to the end of the XIX century. The casino was first built in the XIX century but destroyed by fire in 1896. It was rebuilt and reopened in 1902. 1906 saw the first (in France) annual butter conventions. The railway station was opened in the XIX century and runs a TER service to Gisors and Dieppe.
Life
Who: André Daviel (January 28, 1886 – June 19, 1970) aka Jacques Hébertot
Jacques Hébertot was a French theater director, a poet, journalist and editor. The Hébertot theater in Paris bears his name since 1940. The family of André Daviel has among its ancestors the doctor Jacques Daviel, known to have been a friend of Denis Diderot, the surgeon of Louis XV and for practicing the operation of cataract and Alfred Daviel, a lawyer, Minister of Justice in 1851, then senator of the Empire and first honorary president of the Court of Appeal of Rouen, specialist in Norman customary law. The young André Daviel was born in this noble family at rue Socrate in Rouen. He studied at the Catholic college Join-Lambert in Rouen and in various Parisian colleges. Resolutely anti-conformist, he run as soon as he could to Paris and soon mixed with the young artistic circles and poets of the time. His artistic and literary ambitions worried his father who feared for the good name of the family. That is why, in 1903, at the age of 17, André Daviel became Jacques Hébertot: Jacques, in reference to the name of his ancestor doctor, Hébertot because he appreciated the name of this small village in Auge, close to the family property located in the hamlet of Beaumoucel, some distance from Beuzeville. He collects his first success with “Ballade pour le rachat de la maison” by Pierre Corneille which was awarded by the Revue Picarde et Normande. During this period, he wrote several plays, was the editor of “La Revue Mauve”, founded the magazine “L'Âme Normande”, published the poetry collection “Poèmes de mon pays”, even founded the “Théâtre d'art régional normand.” From 1909, at the age of 19, he was a member of the " Société des auteurs". After his military service in 1911, he was hired as a drama critic of the journal “Gil Blas.” In 1912, he gave lectures in Scandinavia as part of the French Alliance. From this time he tied to the artistic movement avant-garde, and he attended the "dîners de Passy" where he found his childhood friends, Apollinaire and Max Jacob, Milosz, Satie, Stravinsky, and Fernand Léger. While a journalist for “Gil Blas,” he was mobilized in August 1914. He was assigned to the 81e régiment d'artillerie lourde - 5e groupe, as a sergeant. For his courage under fire he was decorated with the Croix de Guerre. Throughout his time on the front, he wrote his notebooks of war, various notes, articles for the newspaper “Le Matin,” political considerations, description of the horrors of war and poems. In 1919 he was responsible for a literary and theatrical tour organized in Scandinavia on behalf of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. With Nils de Dardel he met the patron Rolf de Maré and his partner, dancer Jean Börlin. This meeting is the occasion for the birth of the idea which was to lead to the founding of the Scandinavian Ballets, later the Swedish Ballet. Rolf de Maré, very appreciative of the Ballets Russes and eager to start a new company, foresaw that Jacques Hébertot was the man for the job. He proposed to him to try a solo presentation of Jean Börlin in Paris. Jacques Hébertot rented the Comédie des Champs-Élysées for three nights, 25-27 March 1920, and hired an orchestra of 45 musicians under the direction of Désiré-Émile Inghelbrecht. Without stage decoration, Jean Börlin danced several compositions, including “Danse celeste”, inspired by Siam, “Sculpture nègre”, inspired by the Cusbism. It was a great success and Börlin was acclaimed. Rolf de Maré, convinced, decided to entrust Jacques Hébertot to find in Paris a vast room to represent the Swedish Ballets. After trying to sign with the Opéra de Paris and the Théâtre Sarah Bernhardt, on August 1, 1920, Jacques Hébertot signed the lease for the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées (Grand théâtre et Comédie). The grand theater was the Parisian base of the Swedish Ballets, Rolf de Maré dedicating themselves to their world tours, while Jacques Hébertot continued to animate the two Parisian theaters, now under his responsibility. The Théâtre des Champs-Élysées was to become an important artistic center, especially in the theatrical and musical fields, bringing in four years of high quality personalities: directors (Georges and Ludmilla Pitoëff, Jouvet, Gaston Baty) authors (Jean Cocteau, Paul Claudel, Blaise Cendrars, Francis Picabia, Anton Chekhov, Jules Romains, Pirandello), composers (Francis Poulenc, Darius Milhaud, Georges Auric, Germaine Tailleferre, Erik Satie). In the field of painting, galerie Montaigne hosted the first exhibition of Modigliani and the first Dada demonstrations. Meanwhile, Hébertot created the magazines “Théâtre et Comœdia illustré,” “Paris-Journal,” “La Danse,” “Monsieur”, with the collaboration of Louis Aragon, Georges Charensol and Rene Clair. Following financial problems, Hébertot left the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in 1925. He joined in 1938 his friends Georges and Ludmilla Pitoëff at the Théâtre des Mathurins. His friend Paulette Pax offered him, in 1938, to come and support the direction of the Théâtre de l'Œuvre. He resumed the lease of the theater in 1942, saying: "I will take the result of the efforts of my predecessors. I give the assurance that the Théâtre de l'Œuvre will remain an exceptional scene. I confirm that the Théâtre de l'Œuvre is a research theater and experiences, in a way, the theater of tomorrow". After producing many shows, creating a play of Pierre Brasseur, he assigned the lease of the Théâtre de l'Œuvre in 1944 to Raymond Rouleau. In 1940 Hébertot took over the management of the Théâtre des Arts, an old theater in Batignolles, built in 1838, 78 bis boulevard des Batignolles in the seventeenth arrondissement of Paris, and renamed it Théâtre Hébertot. There he attracted the greatest authors and comedians. In the spring 1957 he had the idea of a national weekly magazine: “Artaban” (peacock, "Because we are proud!"), dedicated to the arts in general. Despite concerns from friends Albert Camus and Maurice Clavel, he launched into an expensive adventure that was to fail in 1958. He died on June 19, 1970. He is buried in the monumental cemetery of Rouen in the vault of the Pinel Family, his mother side.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Born: April 13, 1553, Vicenza
Died: January 28, 1595, Vicenza
Buried: Santa Maria in Araceli, Vicenza
Buried Alongside: Giulia Cisotta

The church of Santa Maria in Araceli is a late-Baroque style church built in the late XVII century in Vicenza according to designs attributed to Guarino Guarini.
Address: Piazza Araceli, 21, 36100 Vicenza VI, Italy (45.55262, 11.54934)
Type: Religious Building (open to public)
Phone: +39 393 482 9000
Place
Documents first take note of a church at the site, dating from 1241. They refer to a church of Santa Maria in the area that stood near a convent. This convent, which in 1277 belonged to the Clarisse Nuns, was called Santa Maria ad Cellam, (referring to the nun's rooms). The suffix was then modified to alla cella, then Arcella and finally to Araceli. Construction of the present church was begun during 1672-1680, a period during which the famous architect Guarino Guarini resided in Vicenza under the patronage of the Theatines. In 1965, designs for the church were found in the Vatican Library. Construction seems to have been guided by Carlo Borella. It was about 60 years after the start of construction, on November 17, 1743, that the church was consecrated. In 1810, during the Napoleonic occupation, the convent was expropriated, and the church became a parish church. The church was replaced by a new parish church, Cristo Re, in 1960. This church ceased being used until restoration in finished in 1990. The main baroque altar (1696), was carved in marble by Tommaso Bezzi . It contains an altarpiece representing the Tiburtine Sybil who portends the coming Virgin and Child to the Roman Emperor Augustus attributed to Pietro Liberi . The altar on the right has a XIII-century painted crucifix, originally from church of San Vito.
Life
Who: Maddalena Campiglia (April 13, 1553 - January 28, 1595)
Maddalena Campiglia was an Italian poetess. She is remembered for having been praised by Torquato Tasso for the composition of the pastoral fable “Flori”, inspired to “Aminta.” Maddalena Campiglia was born in Vicenza from the relationship between Polissena Verlato and Carlo Campiglia. Both nobles and widowers, parents of two sons, the two regularized their union only in 1565. In the course of her studies, the young Campiglia showed special interest in literature, philosophy and music. Critical to its formation also turned the attendance of the cultural society of the XVI century which met in the province of Vicenza at the house owned by her cousin Elena, married the Marquis Guido Sforza Gonzaga. There she met Curzio Gonzaga - Marquis of Palazzolo, poet and diplomat, a friend of writers and artists - custodian of the trust of the poet to the point to be designated in her will as editor of her writings. Presumably, here, she met Dionisio da Colzè, her husband from 1576 to 1580, when she separated and began to live alone. Theirs was - for imposition of Campiglia - a white wedding. According to the writer, virginity was to be experienced not as a constraint but as an effective means of obtaining the women independence from the male gender. As the embodiment par excellence of this principle, she shows the Virgin Mary who was devoted to spontaneous chastity and for the greatness of this choice had been chosen by God. The most recognized work of Campiglia was “Flori,” a boscareccia tale inspired by “Aminta” of Torquato Tasso that earned her the congratulations of the poet himself. Flori is a virgin nymph dedicated to the cult of Diana, who, heartbroken by the death of her beloved girlfriend Amaranta, is destined to fall in love with the first man she meets. Albeit in love with the pastor whom she meets, the nymph accepts only a chaste marriage. The woman loved by Flori, Calisa, whose name is hidden behind that of Isabella Pallavicini Lupi, marquise of Soragna, protector of Maddalena and to whom “Flori” is dedicated, as well as several other sonnets. Maddalena Campiglia died in Vicenza following a long illness that deprived her of sight. In recent years, the poet approached the monastic environments and expressed the unusual will, which was respected, to be buried in the same tomb of the abbess Giulia Cisotta, at the church of Santa Maria in Araceli in Vicenza.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Reynaldo Hahn was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer. Best known as a composer of songs, he wrote in the French classical tradition of the mélodie.
Born: August 9, 1874, Caracas, Venezuela
Died: January 28, 1947, Paris, France
Education: Conservatoire de Paris
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 85
Parents: Carlos Hahn, Elena María de Echenagucia
Albums: Néère, La Belle Époque: The Songs of Reynaldo Hahn, more
Operas: Ciboulette, Le marchand de Venise, Mozart

Valentin Louis Georges Eugène Marcel Proust was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel À la recherche du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time; earlier translated as Remembrance of Things Past). Proust was one of the first European novelists to feature homosexuality openly and at length in À la recherche du temps perdu. Lucien Daudet and Reynaldo Hahn were noted to be his lovers. Reynaldo Hahn was a Venezuelan, naturalized French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer. In 1894, Hahn met the then-unknown Proust. Their love affair was Proust's first, and Proust later stated, "Everything I have ever done has always been thanks to Reynaldo." Although by 1896 they were no longer lovers, they remained lifelong friends and supporters until Proust's death in 1922. Lucien Daudet was a French writer, the son of Alphonse Daudet. Although a prolific novelist and painter, he was never able to trump his father's greater reputation and is now primarily remembered for his ties to fellow novelist Marcel Proust.
Together from 1894 to 1922: 28 years.
Lucien Daudet (June 11, 1878 – 1946)
Marcel Proust (July 10, 1871 – November 18, 1922)
Reynaldo Hahn (August 9, 1875 – January 28, 1947)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.
Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on May 21, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”
Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942), buried together.
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) was a French actress.
• Oscar Wilde’s tomb in Père Lachaise was designed by sculptor Sir Jacob Epstein, at the request of Robert Ross (1869-1918), who also asked for a small compartment to be made for his own ashes. Ross's ashes were transferred to the tomb in 1950.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. They are buried together.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. The modernist angel depicted as a relief on the tomb was originally complete with male genitals. They were broken off as obscene and kept as a paperweight by a succession of Père Lachaise Cemetery keepers. Their current whereabouts are unknown. In the summer of 2000, intermedia artist Leon Johnson performed a 40 minute ceremony entitled Re-membering Wilde in which a commissioned silver prosthesis was installed to replace the vandalised genitals.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Married: January 28, 2014

Ryan Field is the author of over 100 published works of LGBT fiction, the bestselling Virgin Billionaire series, a pg rated hetero romance that was featured on The Home Shopping Network titled, Loving Daylight, and a few more works of full-length fiction with a pen name. He has worked in publishing for twenty years as a writer, editor, and associate editor. His work has been in Lambda Award winning anthologies and he's self-published a few novels with Ryan Field Press. He met Tony in 1992 and being together since then. They share homes in New Hope, Pennsylvania, and Miami Beach, Florida, and have two poodles they consider part of their family. Ryan and Tony like to entertain friends in front of the home fire in their Pennsylvania home, while outside the snow blankets the grounds.
Together since 1992: 23 years.
Ryan Field (born 1970)
Tony (born 1970)
Anniversary: December 6, 1992
Married: January 28, 2014
We do not have many photos taken together because the opportunity never comes up. Since we never thought gay marriage would become a reality on our lifetimes back in 1992, we decided early on to take the night we met as our anniversary like other gay couples we know. And as we wait to see if Pennsylvania will legalize same sex marriage like other states in the US, we will continue to keep that date in December as our official anniversary forever. The marriage certificate is important to us for equal rights and for legal reasons. We have earned it like all other gay couples. But after being together for twenty-one years we have also learned you don't always need a piece of paper to stay together for better or for worse. It is what you feel deep in your heart during the good times and the bad times that matters most. For your 21st anniversary, we went to a local restaurant. Did not think anything unusual. Nice dinner, quiet. No big deal. After the check comes, I see three friends come in. I figure they stopped in for a drink on the way home from a party. Next thing I know a cake with "Marry Me" comes out and then two gold wedding bands. Turns out Tony and the three friends planned the whole thing and I had absolutely no idea at all. And, he planned a wedding in Vermont in Jan. 2014. -Ryan Field



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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