Feb. 2nd, 2017

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Adelaide Anne Procter was an English poet and philanthropist. She worked prominently on behalf of unemployed women and the homeless, and was actively involved with feminist groups and journals. Procter never married.
Born: October 30, 1825, Bedford Square, London, United Kingdom
Died: February 2, 1864, London, United Kingdom
Buried: Kensal Green Cemetery, Kensal Green, London Borough of Brent, Greater London, England
Parents: Bryan Procter

Kensal Green Cemetery is a cemetery in Kensal Green, London, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.
Address: Harrow Rd, London W10 4RA, UK (51.52998, -0.22806)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +44 20 8969 0152
English Heritage Building ID: 1403609 (Grade II, 2012)
Place
The Cemetery of All Souls at Kensal Green was the earliest of the large privately-run cemeteries established on the fringes of London to relieve pressure on overcrowded urban churchyards. Its founder George Frederick Carden intended it as an English counterpart to the great Père-Lachaise cemetery in Paris, which he had visited in 1821. In 1830, with the financial backing of the banker Sir John Dean Paul, Carden established the General Cemetery Company, and two years later an Act of Parliament was obtained to develop a 55-acre site at Kensal Green, then among open fields to the west of the metropolis. An architectural competition was held, but the winning entry – a Gothic scheme by HE Kendall – fell foul of Sir John’s classicising tastes, and the surveyor John Griffith of Finsbury was eventually employed both to lay out the grounds and to design the Greek Revival chapels, entrance arch and catacombs, built between 1834 and 1837. A sequence of royal burials, beginning in 1843 with that of Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, ensured the cemetery’s popularity. It is still administered by the General Cemetery Company, assisted since 1989 by the Friends of Kensal Green. The Reformers’ Memorial was erected in 1885. It was erected at the instigation of Joseph Corfield “to the memory of men and women who have generously given their time and means to improve the conditions and enlarge the happiness of all classes of society.” Lists of names of reformers and radicals on north and east sides (together with further names added in 1907 by Emma Corfield.)
Notable queer burials at Kensal Green:
• A simple Portland stone headstone with curved and slightly moulded profile to the top is the burial place for James Miranda Stuart Barry (ca. 1789–1865.) The leaded inscription reads: “Dr James Barry / Inspector General of Hospitals / Died July 25, 1865 / Aged 70 years.” Commemorates James Barry, a.k.a. Margaret Bulkley, a leading military doctor and the first woman to qualify in medicine in this country, who lived all her professional life in disguise as a man.
• Ossie Clarke (1942-1996), Fashion Designer. Born in Liverpool, he showed an early interest in clothes design. In 1958, he enrolled at the Regional College of Art in Manchester, where he met painter David Hockney and the textile designer Celia Birtwell. He attented the Royal College of Art from 1962-1965, and secured a first-class degree. He first featured in Vogue, August 1965, and quickly made his mark in the fashion industry. His fashion show at Chelsea Town Hall was attended by The Beatles and The Rolling Stones.
• The name of Frances Power Cobbe (1822–1904), an Irish writer, social reformer, anti-vivisection activist, and leading women’s suffrage campaigner, is included in the Reformers’ Memorial.
• Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Bt. (1853-1917)’s body was laid in a vault at Kensal Green Cemetery on Nov. 29, 1917, where it remained until the end of WWI. On 22 May, 1920, the burial was moved in a grave cut in the granite on the top of the mountain which Rhodes had called The View of the World, beside the grave of his friend, Cecil Rhodes.
• Isabella Kelly Hedgeland, née Fordyce (1759-1857), Scottish novelist and poet. Her son William was befriended as a boy by the writer Matthew Lewis, by many considered his protector and possible lover.
• In 2013 a memorial plaque to Freddie Mercury (1946-1991) was placed in Kensal Green Cemetery, where the singer was cremated back in 1991.
• Adelaide Anne Procter (1825–1864) was an English poet and philanthropist. Critic Gill Gregory suggests that Procter may have been a lesbian and in love with Matilda Hays, a fellow member of the Society for the Promotion of the Employment of Women; other critics have called Procter's relationship with Hays "emotionally intense." Procter's first volume of poetry, “Legends and Lyrics” (1858) was dedicated to Hays and that same year Procter wrote a poem titled "To M.M.H." in which Procter "expresses love for Hays.” Hays was a novelist and translator of George Sand and a controversial figure ... [who] dressed in men's clothes and had lived with the actress Charlotte Cushman and sculptor Harriet Hosmer. Hays oversaw the tending of Procter's grave after her death and mourned her passing throughout her later years. Hays died in Liverpool and is buried at Toxteth Park Cemetery.
• Terence Rattigan (1911-1977) died in Hamilton, Bermuda, from bone cancer in 1977, aged 66. His cremated remains were deposited in the family vault at Kensal Green Cemetery.
• Dorothy “Dolly” Wilde (1895-1941), buried with her mother, Sophia Teixeira de Mattos. An Anglo-Irish socialite, made famous by her family connections, her uncle was Oscar Wilde, and her reputation as a witty conversationalist. Her charm and humour made her a popular guest at salons in Paris between the wars, standing out even in a social circle known for its flamboyant talkers.
Life
Who: James Miranda Stuart Barry (ca. 1789–1865)
Dr. James Barry was an army medical officer, and – as a lifelong transvestite – the first woman to qualify in medicine in the United Kingdom. She was born Margaret Bulkley, the daughter of Ann Bulkley of Cork, whose brother was the artist James Barry RA. The date of her birth has been variously placed between 1789 and 1799. A family crisis in 1803 had left the Bulkleys destitute, but an inheritance from her uncle, and the support of a family friend General Francisco Miranda, the Venezuelan revolutionary, allowed Margaret to travel to London to continue her education. In 1809, under the sponsorship of the eleventh earl of Buchan, she enrolled at Edinburgh University as a literary and medical student under the name of James Barry, and from this point until her death she passed as male. She received her MD in 1812 and the following year, after a brief spell as a pupil at St Thomas’s Hospital in London, enlisted in the medical ranks of the British Army. She served in Cape Town, Mauritius, Jamaica, St Helena, the Windward and Leeward Islands, Malta and Corfu, ending her career in Canada as Inspector General of Hospitals. She carried out a caesarean section in Cape Town in 1826, in which both mother and child survived – a feat not performed in Britain until 1833. She may herself have had a child in 1819, possibly by Lord Charles Somerset (1767-1831), the governor of the Cape. She was noted throughout her career for her kindness and concern for the oppressed, but also for her ferocious temper; at Sebastopol in 1855 she met Florence Nightingale, who described her as “the most hardened creature I ever met throughout the army.” Barry retired due to ill health in 1859, and died in London on July 25, 1865, the year that Elizabeth Garrett Anderson received her medical licence. Her long deception enabled her to become one of the most successful and respected military doctors of her time, insisting on rigorous hygiene and adequate living conditions for those in her care long before such demands became commonplace. Her strange appearance, flamboyant dress and flirtatious behaviour frequently gave rise to rumours about her gender and sexuality, but her secret was not finally revealed until after her death. Barry lived at 14 Margaret Street, W1W, towards the end of his life and eventually died here on July 25, 1865.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Henry Havelock Ellis, known as Havelock Ellis, was an English physician, writer, progressive intellectual and social reformer who studied human sexuality.
Born: February 2, 1859, Croydon, United Kingdom
Died: July 8, 1939, Hintlesham, United Kingdom
Education: St Thomas's Hospital Medical School
Lived: 14 Dover Mansions, Canterbury Crescent, Brixton, London SW9 7QF, UK
Buried: Golders Green Crematorium
Spouse: Edith Ellis (m. 1891)

Havelock Ellis was a British physician, co-author of the first medical textbook in English on homosexuality in 1897. In 1887, he met Edith Lees at a meeting of the Fellowship of the New Life. Other members included Edward Carpenter, Edith Nesbit, Frank Podmore, Isabella Ford, Henry Hyde Champion, Hubert Bland, Edward Pease and Henry Stephens Salt. Another member, Ramsay MacDonald, said the group was influenced by the ideas of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson. In 1890 Ellis' first book, The New Spirit, was published. Lees later wrote: "When I first read The New Spirit, I knew I loved the man who wrote it." Their marriage was highly unconventional. They maintained separate incomes and, for large parts of the year, separate homes. It seems that they did not have a sexual relationship (apparently Ellis was impotent and a virgin until 60.) Ellis wrote that "on my side I felt that in this respect we were relatively unsuited to each other, that (sexual) relations were incomplete and unsatisfactory". Lees’s first relationship with a woman was with whom Ellis called "Claire" in his autobiography, My Life. In 1898 Lees published her first novel, Seaweed: A Cornish Idyll. During this period Edith began a relationship with Lily, an artist from Ireland who lived in St. Ives. “In Lily she found the ideal embodiment of all her cravings." Ellis claimed that he did not mind Edith's passionate relationship with Lily because Claire had absorbed all his capacity for jealously. Edith was devastated when Lily died from Bright's Disease in June, 1903.
Together from 1887 to 1916: 29 years.
Edith Lees (1861 – September 1916)
Henry Havelock Ellis (February 2. 1859 – July 8, 1939)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 14 Dover Mansions, Canterbury Crescent, Henry Havelock Ellis (1859–1939), “Pioneer in the scientific study of sex lived here"
Address: Brixton, London SW9 7QF, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Brixton is a district of London, located in the borough of Lambeth in south London. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. The area remained undeveloped until the beginning of the XIX century, the main settlements being near Stockwell, Brixton Hill and Coldharbour Lane. The opening of Vauxhall Bridge in 1816 improved access to Central London and led to a process of suburban development. The largest single development, and one of the last in suburban character, was Angell Town, laid out in the 1850s on the east side of Brixton Road, and so named after a family that owned land in Lambeth from the late XVII century until well into the XX. One of a few surviving windmills in London, built in 1816, is just off Brixton Hill and surrounded by houses built during Brixton’s Victorian expansion. When the London sewerage system was constructed during the mid-XIX century, its designer Sir Joseph Bazalgette incorporated flows from the River Effra, which used to flow through Brixton, into his “high-level interceptor sewer,” also known as the Effra sewer. Brixton was transformed into a middle class suburb between the 1860s and 1890s. Railways linked Brixton with the centre of London when the Chatham Main Line was built through the area by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway in the 1860s. In 1880, Electric Avenue was so named after it became the first street in London to be lit by electricity. In this time, large expensive houses were constructed along the main roads in Brixton, which were converted into flats and boarding houses at the start of the XX century as the middle classes were replaced by an influx of the working classes. By 1925, Brixton attracted thousands of new people. It housed the largest shopping centre in South London at the time, as well as a thriving market, cinemas, pubs and a theatre. In the 1920s, Brixton was the shopping capital of South London with three large department stores and some of the earliest branches of what are now Britain’s major national retailers. Today, Brixton Road is the main shopping area, fusing into Brixton Market. A prominent building on Brixton High Street (at 472–488 Brixton Road) is Morleys, an independent department store established in the 1920s. On the western boundary of Brixton with Clapham stands the Sunlight Laundry, an Art Deco factory building. Designed by architect F.E. Simpkins and erected in 1937, this is one of the few art deco buildings that is still owned by the firm that commissioned it and is still used for its original purpose. The Brixton area was bombed during WWII, contributing to a severe housing crisis, which in turn led to urban decay. This was followed by slum clearances and the building of council housing. In the 1940s and 1950s, many immigrants, particularly from the West Indies, settled in Brixton. More recent immigrants include a large Portuguese community (Little Portugal) and other European citizens. Brixton also has an increasingly ageing population, which affects housing strategies in the area. The Brixton Gay Community of the 1970s formed around the UK’s first gay centre and a series of nearby squatted houses. Between 50 and 60 men lived in these squats for anything from a week to ten years. In oral testimonies many of them describe how their experience shaped their politics, their ideas about sexual identity and community, and their creative lives. The South London Gay Liberation Front, the journal Gay Left and the Brixton Faeries are each linked to the squatting community, which in the mid-1980s was absorbed into the Brixton Co-op. The houses – and the communal garden that connects them – are still reserved for gay and lesbian tenants: a tangible legacy of the earlier community.
Notable queer residents at Brixton:
• David Bowie (January 8, 1947 –January 10, 2016) was born at 40 Stansfield Road.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), pioneer sexologist lived at 14 Dover Mansions, Canterbury Crescent.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.
Address: 60 Hoop Ln, London NW11 7NH, UK (51.57687, -0.19413)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +44 20 8455 2374
English Heritage Building ID: 199262 (Grade II, 1993)
Place
The land for the crematorium was purchased in 1900, costing £6,000, and the crematorium was opened in 1902 by Sir Henry Thompson. The crematorium, the Philipson Family mausoleum, designed by Edwin Lutyens, the wall, along with memorials and gates, the Martin Smith Mausoleum, and Into The Silent Land statue are all Grade II listed buildings. The gardens are included in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. Golders Green Crematorium, as it is usually called, is in Hoop Lane, off Finchley Road, Golders Green, London NW11, ten minutes’ walk from Golders Green tube station. It is directly opposite the Golders Green Jewish Cemetery (Golders Green is an area with a large Jewish population.) The crematorium is secular, accepts all faiths and non-believers; clients may arrange their own type of service or remembrance event and choose whatever music they wish. A map of the Gardens of Remembrance and some information on persons cremated here is available from the office. The staff are very helpful in finding a specific location. The columbaria are now locked, although they can still be visited (if accompanied.) There is also a tea room.
Notable queer burials at Golders Green Crematorium:
• Richard Addinsell (1904-1977), was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film “Dangerous Moonlight” (also known under the later title “Suicide Squadron”). Addinsell retired from public life in the 1960s, gradually becoming estranged from his close friends. He was, for many years, the companion of the fashion designer Victor Stiebel, who died in 1976.
• Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932), Scholar and advocate of a league of nations. He was the third of the five children of Lowes Cato Dickinson (1819-1908) and his wife, Margaret Ellen (d. 1882), daughter of William Smith Williams.
• Edith Ellis (1861-1916), psychologist. She was noted for her novels and memoirs.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), psychologist. He and his wife, Edith Ellis, were psychologists and writers. He wrote the controversial "Studies in the Psychology of Sex," which was banned as obscene.
• Anna Freud (1895-1982) and Dorothy Burlingham (1891-1979), next to each other and to others in the Freud family, including Sigmund Freud.
• Kenneth Halliwell (1926-1967), British actor and writer. He was the mentor, partner, and the eventual murderer of playwright Joe Orton. Their ashes were mingled and scattered in the same garden.
• Leslie Poles Hartley (1895–1972), known as L. P. Hartley, was a British novelist and short story writer. Until his death in 1972, Hartley lived alone but for a household of servants, in London, Salisbury and at a home on the Avon, near Bath. Between the wars, Venice was a favoured and frequent destination.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), actor, writer and lyricist. His ashes are buried beneath a lilac tree which has a plaque enscribed "Ivor Novello 6th March 1951 ‘Till you are home once more’.” He has also a memorial inside the St. Paul's Cathedral (New Change, London, London, EC4M 9AD)
• Norman O'Neill (1875-1934), British composer and conductor. His studies were facilitated by Eric Stenbock, with whom it is said he had a relationship. He married Adine Berthe Maria Ruckert (1875-1947) on 2 July 1899 in Paris, France. Adine was a celebrated pianist and music teacher in her own right. When he died in 1934 he was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, London, as was Adine on her death in 1947. There is a plaque there in memory to both of them.
• Joe Orton (1933-1967), playwright. Orton and his lover, Kenneth Halliwell, moved at 25 Noel Road, Islington, in 1959, at a time when the area was far from fashionable. Eight years later, Halliwell killed himself after murdering Orton.
Cremated here but ashes taken elsewhere:
• Sir Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), 1st Earl of Bewdley, K.G., P.C. was the leading Conservative politician between the two world wars and was Prime Minister for three terms (1923-4, 1924-29 and 1935-37). Ashes removed to Worcester Cathedral.
• Roger Fry (1866-1934), English artist and critic, a member of the Bloomsbury group. He had an affair with Vanessa Bell, and when she left him, he was heartbroken. Only in 1924 he found happiness with Helen Anrep, a former wife of the Russian-born mosaicist, Boris Anrep. His ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel, Cambridge, in a casket decorated by Vanessa Bell.
• In his later years Lord Ronald Gower had been a crusader for cremation, and after his death on March 9, 1916 his body was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were interred at Rusthall, Kent, on March 14, 1916.
• John Inman (1935-2007), actor, star of “Are You Being Served?,” location of ashes unknown.
• Joan Werner Laurie (1920–1964) was an English book and magazine editor. She met journalist and broadcaster Nancy Spain in 1950 and they became life partners. Joan and Nancy lived openly together with their sons, and later the couple provided a home to Windmill Theatre owner and rally driver Sheila van Damm. She was learning to fly when she died, with Nancy Spain and four others, when the Piper Apache aeroplane crashed near Aintree racecourse on the way to the 1964 Grand National. She was cremated with Spain at Golders Green Crematorium, London. The relationship between Werner Laurie and Spain is described in Rose Collis' biography of Nancy Spain, published in 1997.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Hilton Edwards was an English-born Irish actor, lighting designer and theatrical producer. He was the son of Thomas George Cecil Edwards and Emily Edwards. Edwards was born in London.
Born: February 2, 1903, London, United Kingdom
Died: November 18, 1982, Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Lived: 1 Bathurst Mansions, 460 Holloway Road, N7
4 Harcourt Terrace, Dublin
Buried: Saint Fintan's Cemetery, Sutton, County Dublin, Ireland
Partner: Micheál Mac Liammóir
Books: Elephant in flight
Parents: Emily Edwards, Thomas George Cecil Edwards

Hilton Edwards was an English-born Irish actor and theatrical producer. Micheál MacLiammóir was an English-born Irish actor, dramatist, impresario, writer, poet and painter. As Alfred Willmore, he was one of the leading child actors on the English stage, in the company of Noël Coward. While acting in Ireland with a touring company of his brother-in-law Anew MacMaster, MacLiammóir met Edwards. Deciding to remain in Dublin, where they lived at Harcourt Terrace, MacLiammóir and Edwards threw themselves into their venture, cofounding the Gate Theatre in Dublin in 1928, which remains Dublin’s most progressive theatre. MacLiammóir is the subject of the 1990 play The Importance of Being Micheál (also published as a book) by John Keyes. Edwards and MacLiammóir were the subject of a biography, titled The Boys by Christopher Fitz-Simon.
Together from 1927 to 1978: 51 years.
Hilton Edwards (February 2, 1903 – November 18, 1982)
Alfred Willmore aka Micheál MacLiammóir (October 25, 1899 – March 6, 1978)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Hilton Edwards (1903-1982), actor and theatre director, was born on Feb. 2, 1903 at 1 Bathurst Mansions, 460 Holloway Road, N7 the only child of Thomas George Cecil Edwards (d. 1910), a district magistrate in India, and his second wife, Emily Murphy (d. 1926).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Boasting such artistic luminaries as Hilton Edwards and his lifelong partner and fellow actor Micheál MacLiammóir, who lived at no. 4, among its former residents, Dublin’s Harcourt Terrace has been a magnet for creative types for more than a hundred years. Recently number 9 has been for auction by its owner for 1.7 million euros.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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St. Fintan's Cemetery is located in Sutton, on the south side of Carrickbrack Road in Dublin, Ireland. It is in two parts: one older, with a ruined keeper's cottage and the remnants of old St. Fintan's Church; one newer, and actively used, lower down the hill. Just beyond the older portion is the still-flowing, still-visited St. Fintan's Holy Well.
Address: St Fintan's Cres, Dublin, Ireland (53.37883, -6.09371)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Place
Hilton Edwards, director, is buried here with his long-time partner Micheál Mac Liammhóir, author and playwright.
Life
Who: Hilton Edwards (February 2, 1903 – November 18, 1982) and Alfred Willmore aka Micheál MacLiammóir (October 25, 1899 – March 6, 1978)
Hilton Edwards was an English-born Irish actor and theatrical producer. Micheál MacLiammóir was an English-born Irish actor, dramatist, impresario, writer, poet and painter. As Alfred Willmore, he was one of the leading child actors on the English stage, in the company of Noël Coward. While acting in Ireland with a touring company of his brother-in-law Anew MacMaster, MacLiammóir met Edwards. Deciding to remain in Dublin, where they lived at Harcourt Terrace, MacLiammóir and Edwards threw themselves into their venture, cofounding the Gate Theatre in Dublin in 1928, which remains Dublin’s most progressive theatre. MacLiammóir is the subject of the 1990 play The Importance of Being Micheál (also published as a book) by John Keyes. Edwards and MacLiammóir were the subject of a biography, titled The Boys by Christopher Fitz-Simon.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Buried: Montefiore Cemetery, Springfield Gardens, Queens County, New York, USA
Anniversary: February 2, 1974

Israel David Fishman was best known for founding the Task Force on Gay Liberation (TFGL), a section of the Social Responsibilities Round Table of the American Libraries Association. After leaving librarianship, Fishman went to Los Angeles, California for a period of work and study at the Gay Community Services Center. He returned to New York in the winter of 1973. A course in Swedish massage led to a new career as a masseur. On February 2, 1974, Fishman met Carl Navarro at a performance of the play Out of the Frying Pan at the West Side Discussion Group (a regular gathering of gay men in New York City). The two became boyfriends (their preferred term), and began living together shortly thereafter, beginning a lasting relationship. The couple's activities included, for a number of years, lengthy annual trips to Italy, where they established many friendships. They celebrated their twentieth anniversary with a festive dinner party in 1994. They celebrated their 32 anniversary just before Fishman’s sudden death.
Together from 1974 to 2006: 32 years.
Israel David Fishman (February 21, 1938 - 2006)
Anniversary: February 2, 1974



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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At Montefiore Cemetery (121-83 Springfield Blvd, Laurelton, NY 11413) is buried Israel David Fishman (1938-2006), best known for founding the Task Force on Gay Liberation, a section of the Social Responsibilities Round Table of the American Libraries Association. In 1974, Fishman met Carl Navarro at the West Side Discussion Group. The two became boyfriends, and began living together, beginning a relationship lasting more than 30 years.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lou Silver Harrison was an American composer. He was a student of Henry Cowell, Arnold Schoenberg, and K. P. H. Notoprojo.
Born: May 14, 1917, Portland, Oregon, United States
Died: February 2, 2003, Lafayette, Indiana, United States
Education: University of California, Los Angeles
Burlingame High School
San Francisco State University
Black Mountain College
Lived: Harrison House, 6881 Mt Lassen Ave, Joshua Tree, CA 92252, USA (34.12816, -116.22678)
Partner: Todd Burlingame, William Colvig
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts, US & Canada

Lou Silver Harrison was an American composer. He was a student of Henry Cowell, Arnold Schoenberg, and KPH Notoprojo (formerly called KRT Wasitodiningrat, informally called Pak Cokro). William (Bill) Colvig was an electrician and amateur musician who was the partner for 33 years of Harrison, whom he met in San Francisco, California in 1967. Colvig helped construct the so-called "American gamelan“, a full Javanese-style gamelan, modeled on the instrumentation of Kyai Udan Mas at U.C. Berkeley. Harrison lived for many years with Colvig in Aptos, California. They purchased land in Joshua Tree, California, where they designed and built the Harrison House Retreat, a straw bale house. Harrison died in Lafayette, Indiana, from a heart attack while on his way to a festival of his music at The Ohio State University. Harrison is particularly noted for incorporating elements of the music of non-Western cultures into his work, with a number of pieces written for Javanese style gamelan instruments, including ensembles constructed and tuned by Harrison and his partner William Colvig.
Together from 1967 to 2000: 33 years.
William “Bill” Colvig (1917-2000)
Lou Silver Harrison (May 14, 1917 - February 2, 2003)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Harrison House Music & Arts is a non-profit artist residency, performance and community arts program based in the late composer Lou Harrison’s desert retreat in Joshua Tree, California. In addition to providing an enriching creative setting to dedicated artists the program offers high-quality performing arts and workshops to the local and visiting community.
Address: 6881 Mt Lassen Ave, Joshua Tree, CA 92252, USA (34.12816, -116.22678)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 760-366-4712
Place
Harrison House is the straw bale "composer’s cave" that Lou Harrison completed in 2002 on the edge of Joshua Tree National Park. Of his chosen construction method Lou Harrison noted, "America grows enough straw in one year to satisfy all of its building needs." The design, inspired by the great Egyptian architect Hassan Fathy, is a unique structure featuring a vaulted hall that measures 36' X 12' with a sixteen foot ceiling-- proportions chosen by Harrison to create a superb and intimate sound environment for acoustic music. Harrison had one year to visit and enjoy his studio retreat where he worked on his final musical composition "Scenes from Nek Chand" for custom-made steel guitar. This structure is a special integration of design, form, materials, light, acoustics and history. The experience of being inside has been likened to a chapel, mosque or temple. It is a special gem of approximately 1,000 square feet. The vaulted main room is flanked on both sides by three equal-sized spaces. To the north are three outdoor patios separated by rounded buttresses. To the south is a "monkish" bedroom, a bathroom with all fixtures built into the corners, and a fully equipped kitchen in which Harrison’s long-time friend, and renowned artist/choreographer, Remy Charlip painted the cabinetry. Artists who have been in residence have continued to adorn the house with their work. Harrison chose Joshua Tree as the location for his retreat because the dry desert air agreed with him, the stark beauty and desert ecology attracted him and he delighted in taking his friends on tours of the area. A rich cultural history, surreal geological features and a fascinating variety of plants and animals describes the area in and around Joshua Tree National Park. The arts also hold a place in its history, including prehistoric petroglyphs and historic murals painted on buildings throughout the nearby town of Twentynine Palms. Artists have been visiting the Joshua Tree desert for decades to nourish their creativity and this burgeoning arts community continues to flourish.
Life
Who: William “Bill” Colvig (1917-2000) and Lou Silver Harrison (May 14, 1917- February 2, 2003)
Lou Harrison was an American composer. Bill Colvig was an electrician and amateur musician who was the partner for 33 years of Harrison, whom he met in San Francisco, California in 1967. Harrison lived for many years with Colvig in Aptos, California. They purchased land in Joshua Tree, California, where they designed and built the Harrison House Retreat, a straw bale house. Harrison died in Lafayette, Indiana, from a heart attack while on his way to a festival of his music at The Ohio State University.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Lived: The Grange, Alresford SO24, UK (51.12188, -1.19812)
Buried: Kinlochluichart Church, Kinlochluichart Forest, Garve, Highland IV23

Harriet Hosmer was an American sculptor. In November, 1852, with her father and her friend Charlotte Saunders Cushman, she went to Rome. While living in Rome, she was associated with Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thorvaldsen, Thackeray, George Eliot and George Sand; and she was frequently the guest of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning at Casa Guidi, in Florence. Novelist Henry James (brother of Alice James) unflatteringly referred to the group of women artists in Rome of which she was a part as "The White Marmorean Flock,“: lesbians Anne Whitney, Emma Stebbins, Edmonia Lewis and non-lesbians Louisa Lander, Margaret Foley, Florence Freeman, and Vinnie Ream. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton. Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie, and had one daughter, the Hon. Mary Florence ("Maisie"), born 1860 in London. She was a Patron of Arts after the death of her husband. Mount Hosmer, near Lansing, Iowa is named after Hosmer, the result a race to the top that she won as a youth.
Together from 1878 to 1903: 25 years.
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (October 9, 1830 - February 21, 1908)
Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, Lady Ashburton (March 5, 1827 – February 2, 1903)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The Grange is a XIX century country house—mansion and landscape park near Northington in Hampshire. It is currently owned by the Ashburton family.
Address: Alresford SO24, UK (51.12188, -1.19812)
Type: Public Park (open to public)
Hours: Open daily for exterior viewing only (Managed by English Heritage)
Phone: +44 1962 779668
English Heritage Building ID: 145178 (Grade I, 1955)
Place
Built in 1670-3, Design by William Samwell (1628-1676), Remodelled in 1804-9, Design by William Wilkins (1778-1839), Added in 1817, Design by Sir Robert Smirke (1780-1867), in 1823-5 and 1852, Design by Charles Robert Cockerell (1788-1863), in 1868-70, Design by John Cox, Restored in 1980-82.
The Grange, Greek Revival style, landscaping by Robert Adam, is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. Bought in 1821 by Alexander Baring, 1st Baron Ashburton (1774–1848), he later bought many other estates in the area, including Itchen Stoke and Itchen Abbas. The Grange Park Opera stages a festival annually, during June and July, in The Grange’s Orangery theatre. Built in 1670s for Sir Robert Henley, encased and remodelled in 1800s for Henry Drummond, added to in 1860s for Sir Francis Baring, later Lord Ashburton and his descendants. Brick with stone dressings, encased in stucco, roof slate. Originally 9 bay sides with projecting centre 3 and end bays, and 7 bay ends with projecting centre 3 bays and blind end bays, 2 storeys and attic on raised basement. West Front revealed by demolition of additions and restored. Wilkins work important early example of Greek Revival. He encased existing house to create 9 bay sides with giant pilasters, projecting centre 3 bays with 4 square piers, and massive entablature, with wreaths in frieze, to hide attic and roof. To East end he added a large Greek Doric portico, 6 columns wide and 2 deep, overlooking falling ground to the lake. The basement was concealed by a massive stucco, with stone coping, podium on East and South sides and raised ground on other sides. Most of the additions have gone except for Cockerell’s conservatory and Cox’s 2nd floor windows inserted in frieze. The house stands on a promontory overlooking the lake, landscaped by Robert Adam, with the remains of terraces to the South and East and with wide views over the wooded park.
Note: Guy Burgess (1911–1963) was a British radio producer, intelligence officer and Foreign Office official. He was a member of the Cambridge Five spy ring that passed Western secrets to the Soviets before and during the Cold War. He died aged 52, having become dependent on alcohol in his last years. His remains were interred in the family plot at St John the Evangelist Church (Church Lane, West Meon, Hampshire, GU32 1LF).
Bedales School (Church Rd, Steep, Petersfield GU32 2DG, UK) is a co-educational, boarding and day independent school in the village of Steep, near the market town of Petersfield. It was founded in 1893 by John Haden Badley in reaction to the limitations of conventional Victorian schools. Bedales continues to be one of the most expensive public schools in the UK. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Alix Strachey (1892–1973); Frances Partridge (1900–2004).
Life
Who: Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie (May 5, 1827 – February 2, 1903)
Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton was a British businessman and a Whig politician who later became a Tory. Lord Ashburton married his first wife, Lady Harriet Mary Montagu, eldest daughter of George Montagu, 6th Earl of Sandwich, on April 12, 1823. Their only child, Alexander Montagu Baring (1828–1830), died as an infant. Lady Harriet is well known for inspiring the devotion of Thomas Carlyle, to the great dismay of his wife Jane Welsh Carlyle. Lady Harriet died on May 4, 1857, aged 51. Lord Ashburton married his second wife Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie, on 17 November, 1858. They had one daughter, the Hon. Mary Florence, born on June 26, 1860 at Bath House, Piccadilly, London (a site now occupied by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority), who married William Compton, 5th Marquess of Northampton. Lord Ashburton died at The Grange, Hertfordshire, in March 1864, aged 64. He was succeeded in the barony by his younger brother, Francis. Lady Ashburton subsequently had an intimate relationship with the sculptor Harriet Hosmer (1830-1908.) She died in London in February 1903, aged 75, and is buried at Kinlochluichart Church (Kinlochluichart Forest, Garve, Highland IV23).


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Lord Ashburton married as his second wife Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie (1827-1903), youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie, on 17 November, 1858. They had one daughter, the Hon. Mary Florence, born on 26 June, 1860 at Bath House, Piccadilly, London (a site now occupied by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority), who married William Compton, 5th Marquess of Northampton. Lord Ashburton died at The Grange, Hertfordshire, in Mar. 1864, aged 64. Lady Ashburton subsequently had an intimate relationship with the sculptor Harriet Hosmer. She died in London in Feb. 1903, aged 75, and is buried at Kinlochluichart Church (Kinlochluichart Forest, Garve, Highland IV23).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Buried: Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, Baltimore City, Maryland, USA

Martha Carey Thomas was an American educator, suffragist, linguist, and second President of Bryn Mawr College. She was part of the “Friday Night Group”: Julia Rebecca Rogers, the daughter of a prosperous Baltimore iron and steel merchant; Mary Elizabeth Garrett, daughter of John Work Garret, the president of the B&O Railroad; Elizabeth King; M. Carey Thomas and Mamie Gwinn. In 1879, accompanied by Mamie Gwinn, her “devoted companion,” Thomas went off to Europe to study and received a Ph.D. from the University of Zurich in 1882. Both then came to Bryn Mawr to teach, and Thomas was soon appointed dean. In 1885, Thomas, together with Garrett, Gwinn, King, and Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. The school would produce well-educated young women who met the very high entrance standards of Bryn Mawr College. Carey Thomas lived for many years in a relationship with Gwinn. After Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry Alfred Hodder (1866-1907) (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein’s Fernhurst), Thomas moved in with Garrett; they shared the campus home, living together until Garrett's death in 1915. Thomas spent the last two decades of her life traveling the world in luxury, including trips to India, the Sahara, and France.
Together from 1878 to 1904: 26 years.
Martha Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857 - December 2, 1935)
Mary "Mamie" Mackall Gwinn (1861-1940)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Bryn Mawr College is a private women’s liberal arts college founded in 1885 in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, in Pennsylvania, four miles (6.4 km) west of Philadelphia. The phrase bryn mawr means "big hill" in Welsh.
Address: 101 N Merion Ave, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010, USA (40.02665, -75.31439)
Type: Education facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 610-526-5000
National Register of Historic Places: Bryn Mawr College Historic District (Morris Ave., Yarrow St. and New Gulph Rd.), 79002299, 1979. M. Carey Thomas Library is also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Martha Carey Thomas was president at Bryn Mawr College from 1894 until 1922 and remained as Dean until 1908. Bryn Mawr is one of the Seven Sister colleges, and is part of the Tri-College Consortium along with two other colleges founded by Quakers—Swarthmore College and Haverford College. The school has an enrollment of about 1300 undergraduate students and 450 graduate students. Bryn Mawr was the name of an area estate granted to Rowland Ellis by William Penn in the 1680s. Ellis’s former home, also called Bryn Mawr, was a house near Dolgellau, Merionnydd, Gwynedd, Wales. The College was largely founded through the bequest of Joseph W. Taylor, and its first president was James Evans Rhoads. Bryn Mawr was the first higher education institution to offer graduate degrees, including doctorates, to women. The first class included 36 undergraduate women and eight graduate students. Bryn Mawr was originally affiliated with the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), but by 1893 had become non-denominational. In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked it 25th in Best Liberal Arts Colleges. In 1912, Bryn Mawr became the first college in the United States to offer doctorates in social work, through the Department of Social Economy and Social Research. This department became the Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research in 1970. In 1931, Bryn Mawr began accepting men as graduate students, while remaining women-only at the undergraduate level. From 1921 to 1938 the Bryn Mawr campus was home to the Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, which was founded as part of the labor education movement and the women’s labor movement. The school taught women workers political economy, science, and literature, as well as organizing many extracurricular activities. On February 9, 2015, the Board of Trustees announced approval of a working group recommendation to expand the undergraduate applicant pool. Trans women and intersex individuals identifying as women may now apply for admission, while trans men may not. This official decision made Bryn Mawr the fourth women’s college in the United States to accept trans women.
Notable queer alumni and faculty at Bryn Mawr:
• Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979), upon receiving a substantial ($2,500) traveling fellowship (Lucy Martin Donelly Fellowship) in 1951, set off to circumnavigate South America by boat.
• Ethel Collins Dunham (1883-1969), and her life partner, Martha May Eliot, devoted their lives to the care of children.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health.
• H.D. (1886-1961) attended Bryn Mawr College to study Greek literature, but left after only three terms due to poor grades and the excuse of poor health.
• Edith Hamilton (1867-1963), educator and author who was "recognized as the greatest woman Classicist.”
• Margaret Hamilton (1871-1969), taught English at Bryn Mawr and took over as head of the school when her sister Edith retired.
• Katherine Hepburn (1907-2003), began to act while studying at Bryn Mawr College.
• Ellen Kushner (born 1955), writer of fantasy novels.
• Clara Landsberg (1873-1966), after graduating from Bryn Mawr, became a part of Hull House in Chicago, founded by Jane Addams, and shared a room with Alice Hamilton (sister of Edith.) She eventually left Hull House to teach Latin at Bryn Mawr while Edith was headmistress.
• Mary Meigs (1917-2002), American-born painter and writer.
• Frieda Miller (1909-1973) was an economics professor at Bryn Mawr College.
• Tracy Dickinson Mygatt (1885-1973), writer and pacifist, co-founder with Frances M. Witherspoon of the War Resisters League, and longtime officer of the Campaign for World Government.
• Eva Palmer-Sikelianos (1874–1952), American woman notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music
• Martha Carey Thomas (1857-1935), notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music, at Bryn Mawr she studied literature and the theater arts.
• Eva Palmer-Sikelianos (1874-1952), who had a long-lasting special friendship with Natalie Clifford Barney.
• Paula Vogel (born 1951) is an American playwright and university professor. She received the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for her play How I Learned to Drive.
• Agnes E. Wells (1876-1959), one of the American’s leading educators, and a vigorous standard bearer in the women’s equal rights movement
• Agnes Wergeland (1857-1914) was the first woman ever to earn a doctoral degree in Norway. She received a fellowship in history from Bryn Mawr College in 1890 and lectured there for two years before lecturing at the University of Illinois in 1893. She was a docent in history and nonresident instructor at the University of Chicago from 1896 to 1902. In 1902, Wergeland was offered the position of chair of the department of history at the University of Wyoming. Agnes Wergeland remained a University of Wyoming history professor until her death.
• Frances May Witherspoon (1886-1973), writer and activist, co-founder with Tracy Dickinson Mygatt of the War Resisters League, and executive secretary of the New York Bureau of Legal Advice, a forerunner of the American Civil Liberties Union.
Life
Who: Martha Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857 – December 2, 1935)
Martha Carey Thomas was an educator, suffragist, linguist, and second President of Bryn Mawr College. In 1882, Thomas wrote a letter to the trustees of Bryn Mawr College, requesting that she be made president of the university. She was not granted the position, however, as the trustees were concerned about her relative youth and lack of experience. Instead, Thomas entered in 1884 as the dean of the college and chair of English. Despite not receiving her desired role at Bryn Mawr, Thomas was active in the college’s administration, working closely with then President James Rhoads. According to the biographical dictionary Notable American Women: 1607–1950, by 1892 she was "acting president in all but name.” In 1885 Thomas, together with Mary Elizabeth Garrett (1854-1915), Marie “Mamie” Gwinn (1861-1940), Elizabeth King, and Julia Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. The school would produce well-educated young women who met the very high entrance standards of Bryn Mawr College. In 1894, President Rhoads died, and Thomas was narrowly elected to succeed him on September 1, 1894. With respect to the President Rhoads’s recent death, Thomas was not given any ceremony. For many years Thomas maintained an intimate relationship with long-time friend, Mamie Gwinn. Thomas and Gwinn lived together at Bryn Mawr College in a small cottage that came to be known as "the Deanery.” When Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein’s “Fernhurst”) Alfred Hodder, a fellow Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, Thomas pursued a relationship with Mary Elizabeth Garrett. Thomas shared her campus home, the Deanery, with Garrett and together they endeavored to grow Bryn Mawr’s resources. Upon her death, Garrett, who had been prominent in suffrage work and a benefactor of Bryn Mawr, left to President Thomas "a sum which would, in 1994, be close to $15,000,000" to be disposed of as she saw fit. M. Carey Thomas had firm views on marriage, and in a letter to her mother she described it as a "Loss of freedom, poverty, and a personal subjection for which I see absolutely no compensation." Thomas retired in 1922, at age sixty-five. Mary Garrett left a considerable fortune to Thomas, who spent the last two decades of her life traveling the world in luxury, including trips to India, the Sahara, and France. Thomas died at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on December 2, 1935 of a coronary occlusion. She had returned to the city to address Bryn Mawr College on the fiftieth anniversary of its founding. Her ashes were scattered on the Bryn Mawr College campus in the cloisters of the Thomas Library.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Green Mount Cemetery is a historic cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland. Established on March 15, 1838, and dedicated on July 13, 1839, it is noted for the large number of historical figures interred in its grounds as well as a large number of prominent Baltimore-area families. It retained the name Green Mount when the land was purchased from the heirs of Baltimore merchant Robert Oliver.
Address: 1501 Greenmount Ave, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA (39.30922, -76.60588)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 410-539-0641
National Register of Historic Places: 80001786, 1980
Place
Green Mount is a treasury of precious works of art, including striking works by major sculptors including William H. Rinehart and Hans Schuler. Nearly 65,000 people are buried here, including the poet Sydney Lanier, philanthropists Johns Hopkins and Enoch Pratt, Napoleon Bonaparte's sister-in-law Betsy Patterson, John Wilkes Booth, and numerous military, political and business leaders. In addition to John Wilkes Booth, two other conspirators in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln are buried here, Samuel Arnold and Michael O'Laughlen. It is common for visitors to the cemetery to leave pennies on the graves of the three men; the one-cent coin features the likeness of the president they successfully sought to murder. Until a 1965 agreement with Queen Elizabeth II, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor had planned for a burial in a purchased plot in Rose Circle at Green Mount Cemetery, near where the father of the Duchess was interred. The 1965 agreement allowed for the former King Edward VIII and wife, the Duchess of Windsor, to be buried near other members of the royal family in the Royal Burial Ground near Windsor Castle.
Notable queer burials at Green Mount Cemetery:
• Mary Elizabeth Garrett (1854-1915), American suffragist and philanthropist. At her death, she gave $15,000,000 to M. Carey Thomas, the president of Bryn Mawr College, with whom she was romantically involved and had lived with at Bryn Mawr in the Deanery.
• Mamie Gwinn (1860-1940). In 1885 M. Carey Thomas, together with Mary Garrett, Mamie Gwinn, Elizabeth King, and Julia Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. For many years Thomas maintained an intimate relationship with long-time friend, Mamie Gwinn. Thomas and Gwinn lived together at Bryn Mawr College in a small cottage that came to be known as "the Deanery". When Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein's “Fernhurst”) Alfred Hodder, a fellow Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, Thomas pursued a relationship with Mary Elizabeth Garrett.
• Harry Lehr (1869-1929), American socialite during the Gilded Age. He was known for staging elaborate parties alongside Marion "Mamie" Fish, such as the so-called "dog's dinner", in which 100 pets of wealthy friends dined at foot-high tables while dressed in formal attire At a later party, he impersonated the Czar of Russia, and was henceforth dubbed "King Lehr". He was married to heiress Elizabeth "Bessie" Wharton Drexel. He refused to sleep with her on their wedding night.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Natalie Clifford Barney was an American playwright, poet and novelist who lived as an expatriate in Paris.
Born: October 31, 1876, Dayton, Ohio, United States
Died: February 2, 1972, Paris, France
Lived: 4 Rue Chalgrin, 75116 Paris, France (48.87412, 2.28996)
20 Rue Jacob, 75006 Paris, France (48.85535, 2.33564)
1626 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, D.C.
97 Cadogan Gardens, SW3
Ban-y-Bryn, Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, Hancock County, Maine, USA (44.38761, -68.20391)
Buried: Cimetiere de Passy, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 9.
Buried alongside: Romaine Brooks
Parents: Alice Pike Barney
Nominations: Lambda Literary Award for Small Press Book Award
Anniversary: May 1, 1910
Married: June 20, 1918

Renée Vivien was a British poet who wrote in the French language. She took to heart all the mannerisms of Symbolism, as one of the last poets to claim allegiance to the school. Her compositions include sonnets, hendecasyllabic verse, and prose poetry. Upon inheriting her father's fortune at 21, she immigrated permanently to France. In Paris, Vivien's dress and lifestyle were as notorious among the bohemian set as was her verse. She lived lavishly, as an open lesbian, and carried on a well-known affair with American heiress and writer Natalie Clifford Barney. She also harbored a lifelong obsession with her closest childhood friend and neighbor, Violet Shillito – a relationship that remained unconsummated. In 1900, Vivien abandoned this chaste love, when the great romance with Natalie Barney ensued. The following year Shillito died of typhoid fever, a tragedy from which Vivien, guilt-ridden, would never fully recover. By 1901, the tempestuous and often jealous relationship with Natalie Barney had already collapsed. Vivien died in Paris on the morning of November 18, 1909, at the age of 32.
Together from (around) 1898 to 1901: 3 years.
Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 – February 2, 1972)
Pauline Mary Tarn aka Renée Vivien (June 11, 1877 – November 18, 1909)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Natalie Clifford Barney was a bilingual American playwright, poet and novelist who lived as an expatriate in Paris and ran a salon there for nearly fifty years, attracting the avant-garde of Modernism. She was the wealthy heiress of a railroad fortune. Élisabeth, Duchess of Clermont-Tonnerre, was a French writer, a descendant of Henry IV of France; when she was a child, according to Janet Flanner, "peasants on her farm begged her not to clean her shoes before entering their houses". They became lovers on May 1, 1910, a date that became their anniversary. In 1918, the two filed an "unofficial" but to them, binding "marriage contract": "After nine years of life together, joys and worries shared, and affairs confessed. For the survival of the bond, that we believe-and wish to believe-is unbreakable, since at its lowest level of reciprocal emotionalism that is the conclusion reached. The union, sorely tried by the passing years, failed doubly the faithfulness test in its sixth year, showing us that adultery is inevitable in these relationships where there is no prejudice, no religion other than feelings, no laws other than desire, incapable of vain sacrifices that seem to be the negation of life...“ Barney wrote in French about women’s same-sex desire and she was openly lesbian.
Together from 1910 to 1954: 44 years.
Antoinette Corisande Elisabeth de Gramont (Apr. 23, 1875 – Dec. 6, 1954)
Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 – February 2, 1972)
Anniversary: May 1, 1910 / Married: June 20, 1918



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Romaine Brooks was an American painter who worked mostly in Paris and Capri. The most important relationship of her life was with Natalie Clifford Barney, whom she met around the start of WW I. Barney was an American-born writer who hosted a literary salon in Paris. She was avowedly no monogamous; when they met, she was already in a close long-term relationship with Duchess Elisabeth de Gramont, which would last until the Duchess' death in 1954. Romaine had many other relationships of varying length and devotion as well but at one point, she gave Barney an ultimatum to choose between her and Dolly Wilde-relenting once Barney had given in. Her own lovers were Renata Borgatti, Marchesa Luisa Casati and Winnaretta Singer, Princesse Edmond de Polignac. Barney and Brooks are both buried at Cimetière de Passy, Paris, France, Barney in the same place with her sister Laura.
Together from 1914 to 1970: 56 years.
Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 – February 2, 1972)
Beatrice Romaine Goddard aka Romaine Brooks (May 1, 1874 – December 7, 1970)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Liane de Pougy was a Folies Bergères dancer renowned as one of Paris's most beautiful and notorious courtesans. Her lesbian affair with writer Natalie Clifford Barney is recorded in her novel Idylle Saphique (1901). In 1899, after seeing de Pougy at a dance hall in Paris, Barney presented herself at de Pougy's residence in a page costume and announced that she was a "page of love" sent by Sappho. Although de Pougy was one of the most famous women in France at the time, constantly sought after by wealthy and titled men, Barney's audacity charmed and seduced her. The two were said to have had deep feelings for each other for the remainder of their lives. One of Barney’s most compelling works, Amants féminins ou la troisième (1926) is based on a tumultuous three-way love affair between Barney, Italian baroness Mimi Franchetti (one of Renata Borgatti’s lovers), and de Pougy. Liane married two time, at 16 with a naval officer, Armand Pourpe (one son, Marc Pourpe), and in 1910 with Prince Georges Ghika. Her son's death as an aviator in WWI turned her towards religion and she became a tertiary of the Order of Saint Dominic as Sister Anne-Mary.
They met in 1899 and remained friends until de Pougy’s death in 1950: 51 years.
Liane de Pougy (July 2, 1869 – December 26, 1950)
Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 - February 2, 1972)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Lucie was a French journalist, poet, novelist, sculptor, historian and designer. She was a prolific writer who produced more than 70 books. She was married to the translator J. C. Mardrus from 1900 to 1915, but her primary sexual orientation was toward women. She was involved in affairs with several women throughout her lifetime, and she wrote extensively of lesbian love. In 1902-03, she wrote a series of love poems to the American writer and salon hostess Natalie Clifford Barney, published posthumously in 1957 as Nos secrètes amours (Our Secret Loves). She also depicted Barney in her 1930 novel, L'Ange et les Pervers (The Angel and the Perverts), in which she said she "analyzed and described Natalie at length as well as the life into which she initiated me". The protagonist of the novel is a hermaphrodite named Marion who lives a double life, frequenting literary salons in female dress, then changing from skirt to trousers to attend gay soirées. Barney appears as "Laurette Wells", a salon hostess who spends much of the novel trying to win back an ex-lover, loosely based on Barney's real-life attempts at regaining her relationship with her former lover, Renée Vivien.
Lucie Delarue-Mardrus (November 3, 1874 - April 26, 1945)
Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 - February 2, 1972)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Natalie Clifford Barney lived at 1626 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington DC in her childhood. She knew she was a lesbian by age twelve and lived an outspoken and independent life unusual for a woman of this time period. Her openness and pride about her sexuality, without shame, was at least 100 years ahead of its time. She published "Some Portrait-Sonnets of Women," a book of love poems to women, under her own name in 1900. American painter Romaine Brooks was one of Barney's partners and companions for fifty years.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Bar Harbor is a town on Mount Desert Island in Hancock County, Maine. As of the 2010 census, its population is 5,235.
Address: Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, Hancock County, Maine, USA (44.38761, -68.20391)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: West Street Historic District (West St. between Billings Ave. and Eden St.), 80000226, 1980, & Harbor Lane--Eden Street Historic District (Portions of Harbor Ln. and Eden St.), 09000550, 2009
Place
Louise DeKoven Bowen, Mrs. J.T. Bowen of Chicago, friend and patroness of Jane Addams, built his summer home, Baymeath, at Bar Harbor in 1896. Baymeath was a southern colonial house four miles from Bar Harbor Village. It was situated on a hillside from which a series of terraces led down to the bay. One of these, formerly a tennis court, was a formal garden enclosed by vine-covered stone walls on two sides and high fences with actinidia on the other two. Beyond the house, another lattice-enclosed garden stood with a rose bed. Climbing roses covered all the fences. Another rose arbor led into the woods where lupine, day lilies, and wild roses grew. From all these gardens, a wide view of Frenchman’s Bay added contrast to the color of the northern flowers. The house was razed in 1979. Near Baymeath, on Lookout Point in Hull’s Cove, was a cottage called Yule Craig, designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston for the son of Senator Yulee of Florida. In 1904, the house was purchased by Mrs. Bowen’s friend, Jane Addams. A half mile path connected Baymeath and Yule Craig, and there was much visiting back and forth, as Mrs. Bowen was one of the chief supporters of Jane Addams’s Hull House Settlement in Chicago, and donor of the Bowen Country Club. Miss Addams once famously said that she could raise more money in a single month in Bar Harbor than all the rest of the year back home in Chicago. Jane Addams sold the house in 1932 to Harry Hill Thorndikes, which renamed it Thorncraig. Mrs. Thorndike’s sister, Miss Belle Gurnee, owned the property between Yule Craig and Baymeath, a large chalet built in Switzerland and imported to her property on Lookout Point. Thorncraig was inherited by the Thorndike’s son, Augustus Gurnee Thorndike, and was later purchased by John J. Emery. Emery’s aunt was married to Benjamin Moore, brother-in-law of Mrs. Moore who later owned Baymeath. Thorncraig proved to have notoriously irresolvable plumbing troubles, and was demolished in the early 1980’s. Another famous queer resident at Bar Harbor was Natalie Clifford Barney. Alice Pike Barney (1857-1931) was an artist, actor, playwright, and socialite. The daughter of Cincinnati millionaire and patron of the arts Samuel Napthali Pike, Alice was born into a life of privilege. She married Albert Clifford Barney, son of a wealthy manufacturer of railway cars, prior to her twentieth birthday. The Barney’s had two daughters, Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972) and Laura Clifford Barney (1879-1974.) The family split their time between New York City and Paris, France, until 1900, when they purchased a home in Washington, DC. Well aware of the steamy summers of the eastern United States, the Barney’s would vacation in Bar Harbor, Maine, and in 1888, commissioned a "summer cottage" in Bar Harbor they named "Ban-y-Bryn." Designed by Architect S. V. Stratton, Ban-y-Bryn was built on a steep bluff, with the front of the cottage facing the rustic Maine landscape. The rear of the home, with its prominent turret and several grand porches, overlooked Frenchman’s Bay. Rising to four stories, the home consisted of 27 rooms, including seven bedrooms, five bathrooms, five fireplaces, a large stable, seven servants’ bedrooms, and additional servants’ facilities. The top floor was reserved as studio space for Ms. Barney and her artistic pursuits. Ban-y-Bryn’s exterior was constructed of granite. The interior featured exotic hardwoods and materials, and was furnished with antiques acquired by the Barney’s during their global travels. Ban-y-Bryn was one of their many luxuries; interest in the home began to fade as their respective pursuits and tastes evolved over time. The Barney’s sold their marvelous summer dwelling in 1930. Sadly, Ban-y-Bryn was one of 67 summer cottages incinerated in the Bar Harbor fire of October 1947.
Life
Who: Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) and Mary Rozet Smith (1868-1934)
Mary Rozet Smith was a Chicago-born US philanthropist who was one of the trustees and benefactors of Hull House. She was the companion of activist Jane Addams for over thirty years. Smith provided the financing for the Hull House Music School and donated the school’s organ as a memorial to her mother. There has been much speculation of Addams and Smith’s life and relationship. Many of their letters were burned by Addams, but Addams referred to their relationship as a "marriage.” They traveled together, co-owned a home in Maine, and were committed to each other. In 1895, after Addams had suffered from a bout with typhoid fever, she went abroad with Smith, traveling to London. There, they visited several settlement houses, including Oxford House, Browning House, Bermondsey Settlement and others. They proceeded on to Moscow and met Tolstoy, then traveled through southern Russia, into Poland and Germany, before returning to Chicago. Early in 1934, Addams had a heart attack and Smith nursed her at her home, neglecting her own illness. Smith succumbed to pneumonia, fell into a coma and then died on February 22, 1934. Addams was considered too ill to descend the stairs to attend Smith’s memorial service, which she could hear from her second-floor room. Addams died on May 21, 1935.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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As young adults in Paris, Natalie Clifford Barney and Eva Palmer-Sikelianos shared an apartment at 4, rue Chalgrin.
Address: 4 Rue Chalgrin, 75116 Paris, France (48.87412, 2.28996)
Type: Private Property
Place
It was during the family’s summer vacations at Bar Harbor in Maine that Eva Palmer became acquainted with Natalie Barney. The two shared an interest in poetry, literature and horseback riding. Barney likened Palmer to a medieval virgin, an homage to her ankle-length red hair and fair countenance. The two would become young lovers and later be neighbors in Paris. Rue Chalgrin is a street in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, in the neighborhood of Chaillot. Named after Jean-François-Thérèse Chalgrin (1739-1811), architect of the Arc de Triomphe and the church of Saint-Philippe du Roule (in the 8th arrondissement.)
Life
Who: Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 – February 2, 1972) and Evelina "Eva" Palmer-Sikelianos (January 9, 1874 – June 4, 1952)
Eva Palmer-Sikelianos was an American woman notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music. Palmer’s life and artistic endeavors intersected with numerous noteworthy artists throughout her life. She was both inspired by or inspired the likes of dancers Isadora Duncan and Ted Shawn, the French literary great Colette, the poet and author Natalie Barney and the actress Sarah Bernhardt. She would go on to marry Angelos Sikelianos, a Greek poet and playwright. Together they organized a revival of the Delphic Festival in Delphi, Greece. Embodied in these festivals of art, music and theater she hoped to promote a balanced sense of enlightenment that would further the goals of peace and harmony in Greece and beyond.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Natalie Clifford Barney’s salon was held at her home at 20 rue Jacob in Paris’ Left Bank for more than 60 years and brought together writers and artists from around the world, including many leading figures in French literature along with American and British Modernists of the Lost Generation.
Address: 20 Rue Jacob, 75006 Paris, France (48.85535, 2.33564)
Type: Private Property
Place
The play “Equivoque” may have led Natalie Barney to leave Neuilly in 1909. According to a contemporary newspaper article, her landlord objected to her holding an outdoor performance of a play about Sappho, which he felt "followed nature too closely.” She canceled her lease and rented the pavilion at 20, Rue Jacob in Paris’ Latin Quarter and her salon was held there until the late 1960s. This was a small two-story house, separated on three sides from the main building on the street. Next to the pavillon was a large, overgrown garden with a Doric "Temple of Friendship" tucked into one corner. In this new location, the salon grew a more prim outward face, with poetry readings and conversation, perhaps because Barney had been told the pavillon’s floors would not hold up to large dancing parties. Frequent guests during this period included Pierre Louÿs, Paul Claudel, Philippe Berthelot and translator J. C. Mardrus. During WWI the salon became a haven for those opposed to the war. Henri Barbusse once gave a reading from his anti-war novel “Under Fire” and Barney hosted a Women’s Congress for Peace at the Rue Jacob. Other visitors to the salon during the war included Oscar Milosz, Auguste Rodin and poet Alan Seeger, who came while on leave from the French Foreign Legion. Other visitors to the salon during the 1920s included French writers Jeanne Galzy, André Gide, Anatole France, Max Jacob, Louis Aragon and Jean Cocteau along with English-language writers Ford Madox Ford, W. Somerset Maugham, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sinclair Lewis, Sherwood Anderson, Thornton Wilder, T. S. Eliot and William Carlos Williams and moreover, German poet Rainer Maria Rilke, Bengali poet Rabindranath Tagore (the first Nobel laureate from Asia), Romanian aesthetician and diplomat Matila Ghyka, journalist Janet Flanner (who set the New Yorker style), journalist, activist and publisher Nancy Cunard, publishers Caresse and Harry Crosby, art collector and patron Peggy Guggenheim, Sylvia Beach (the bookstore owner who published James Joyce’s “Ulysses”), painters Tamara de Lempicka and Marie Laurencin and dancer Isadora Duncan. In the late 1920s Radclyffe Hall drew a crowd after her novel “The Well of Loneliness” had been banned in the UK. A reading by poet Edna St. Vincent Millay packed the salon in 1932. At another Friday salon in the 1930s Virgil Thomson sang from “Four Saints in Three Acts,” an opera based on a libretto by Gertrude Stein.
Note: Rue de Seine is a street in the 6th arrondissement of Paris. The Hotel La Louisiane at 60 rue de Seine is famous for having accommodated many notable jazz musicians and writers, including Miles Davis, Chet Baker, John Coltrane, Ernest Hemingway, Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. Amantine-Lucile-Aurore Dupin known as "George Sand", French novelist known for her numerous affairs with celebrities including Frederic Chopin, lived at number 52 Rue de Seine. From 1868 to 1876, George Sand rented 5 Rue Gay-Lussac, Val-de-Grace, for her stays in Paris.
Life
Who: Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 – February 2, 1972)
Natalie Clifford Barney was an American playwright, poet and novelist who lived as an expatriate in Paris. In November, 1899 Barney met the poet Pauline Tarn, better known by her pen name Renée Vivien. For Vivien it was love at first sight, while Barney became fascinated with Vivien after hearing her recite one of her poems, which she described as "haunted by the desire for death." In 1908 Vivien attempted suicide by overdosing on laudanum and died the following year. In a memoir written fifty years later Barney said "She could not be saved. Her life was a long suicide. Everything turned to dust and ashes in her hands." Barney had become more widely known for her many relationships than for her writing or her salon. She once wrote out a list, divided into three categories: liaisons, demi-liaisons, and adventures. Colette was a demi-liaison, while the artist and furniture designer Eyre de Lanux was listed as an adventure. Among the liaisons were Olive Custance, Renée Vivien, Elisabeth de Gramont, Romaine Brooks, and Dolly Wilde. Of these, the three longest relationships were with de Gramont, Brooks, and Wilde; from 1927, she was involved with all three of them simultaneously, a situation that ended only with Wilde’s death. Her shorter affairs, such as those with Colette and Lucie Delarue-Mardrus, often evolved into lifelong friendships.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Cadogan Square is a residential square in Knightsbridge, west London, that was named after Earl Cadogan. Whilst it is mainly a residential area, some of the properties are used for diplomatic and educational purposes. The square is known for being one of the most expensive residential streets in the United Kingdom, with an average house price of around £5.75 million in 2013.
Address: Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RJ, UK
Type: Private Property
Place
The square was built between 1877 and 1888. The west side has the greatest variety of houses, all variations on the same Flemish-influenced theme. Numbers 54-58 were designed by William Young in 1877 for Lord Cadogan, and the architect J. J. Stevenson was largely responsible for the south side, built in 1879-85. The east side was built in 1879 by G. T. Robinson. Number 61 is an early example of high-class mansion flats, and number 61A was once a studio-house for a Mr F. W. Lawson. Cadogan Square is one of the most desirable residential addresses in London and is one of the most expensive in the United Kingdom. It is formed of a garden (restricted to residents) surrounded by red-brick houses, the majority of which have been converted into flats or apartments. The square is south of Pont Street, east of Lennox Gardens, and west of Sloane Street. An independent preparatory school for boys, Sussex House School, at number 68, was founded in 1953. The school is sited in a house by architect Norman Shaw. Apartments or flats tend to be available on short leases and are sold for several million pounds. There are three or so houses on the square that have not been converted into flats, and these may be valued at over £25 million each. The freeholder of most of the properties is Earl Cadogan, a multi-billionaire whose family has owned the land for several hundred years. Numbers 4 (by G.E Street), 52, 62 and 62b, 68 and 72 are all Grade II listed buildings. Writer Arnold Bennet lived at number 75 during the 1920s. On July 25, 1899, at Holy Trinity Church, Sloane Street, Cadogan Square, in London, Adolph de Meyer married Donna Olga Caracciolo, an Italian noblewoman who had been divorced earlier that year from Nobile Marino Brancaccio; she was a goddaughter of Edward VII.
Notable queer residents at Cadogan Gardens:
• From 1898 to 1913 Adolph de Meyer (1868-1946) lived in fashionable 1 Cadogan Gardens, SW3 and between 1903 and 1907 his work was published in Alfred Stieglitz’s quarterly Camera Work.
• Sir Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999) lived from 1991 to 1999 and died at 2 Cadogan Gardens, SW3.
• Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972), US born one-time lover of Oscar Wilde’s niece, Dolly Wilde, and origin of the character Valerie Seymour in “The Well of Loneliness,” lived at 97 Cadogan Gardens, SW3 in the 1920s.
• Edward Sackville-West (1901-1965) was born at 105 Cadogan Gardens, SW3 the elder child and only son of Major-General Charles John Sackville-West, who later became the fourth Baron Sackville, and his first wife, Maud Cecilia, née Bell (1873–1920.)
• In 1907 at the Homburg spa in Germany, Radclyffe Hall met Mabel Batten (1856-1916), a well-known amateur singer of lieder. Batten (nicknamed "Ladye") was 51 to Hall's 27, and was married with an adult daughter and grandchildren. They fell in love, and after Batten's husband died they set up residence together at 59 Cadogan Square, SW1X. Batten gave Hall the nickname John, which she used the rest of her life. In 1915 Hall fell in love with Mabel Batten's cousin Una Troubridge (1887–1963), a sculptor who was the wife of Vice-Admiral Ernest Troubridge, and the mother of a young daughter. Batten died the following year, and in 1917 Radclyffe Hall and Una Troubridge began living together at 22 Cadogan Court, Draycott Avenue, SW3, a move Radclyffe originally planned to do with Mabel Batten. The relationship would last until Hall's death.
• On April 5, 1895, Oscar Wilde was arrested in room 118 of the upscale Edwardian Cadogan Hotel (now Belmond Cadogan Hotel, 75 Sloane Street, SW1X) on a charge of "gross indecency" stemming from his homosexual relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas. Friends had urged Wilde to flee the country once word of his impending arrest leaked out, but Wilde was resolute, saying, "I shall stay and do my sentence, whatever it is." The poet-dramatist was sentenced to two years imprisonment with hard labor, a cruel punishment that was to signal the beginning of the end for Wilde's brightly shining star. The arrest was immortalized by English poet laureate, John Betjeman, in his poem "The Arrest of Oscar Wilde at the Cadogan Hotel."
Life
Who: Baron Adolph de Meyer (September 1, 1868 – January 6, 1946) and Olga, the Baroness de Meyer (August 8, 1871 – 1930/1931)
Baron Adolph de Meyer was a photographer famed for his elegant photographic portraits in the early XX century, many of which depicted celebrities such as Mary Pickford, Rita Lydig, Luisa Casati, Billie Burke, Irene Castle, John Barrymore, Lillian Gish, Ruth St. Denis, King George V of the United Kingdom, and Queen Mary. He was also the first official fashion photographer for the American magazine Vogue, appointed to that position in 1913. In 1899 he married Donna Olga Caracciolo. The couple reportedly met in 1897, at the home of a member of the Sassoon banking family, and Olga would be the subject of many of her husband’s photographs. The de Meyers’ marriage was one of marriage of convenience rather than romantic love, since the groom was homosexual and the bride was bisexual or lesbian. As Baron de Meyer wrote in an unpublished autobiographical novel, before they wed, he explained to Olga "the real meaning of love shorn of any kind of sensuality.” He continued by observing, "Marriage based too much on love and unrestrained passion has rarely a chance to be lasting, whilst perfect understanding and companionship, on the contrary, generally make the most durable union." The de Meyers were characterised by Violet Trefusis—who counted Olga among her lovers and whose mother, Alice Keppel, was Edward VII’s best known mistress—as "Pederaste and Médisante" because, as Trefusis observed, "He looked so queer and she had such a vicious tongue." Among Olga’s affairs was one with Winnaretta, Princess Edmond de Polignac, the Singer sewing machine heiress and arts patron, in the years 1901–05. Cecil Beaton dubbed Adolph de Maeye "the Debussy of photography.” In 1912 he photographed Nijinsky in Paris. After the death of his wife in 1930/31, Baron de Meyer became romantically involved with a young German, Ernest Frohlich (born circa 1914), whom he hired as his chauffeur and later adopted as his son. The latter went by the name Baron Ernest Frohlich de Meyer.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Passy Cemetery is a cemetery in Passy, in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, France.
Address: 2 Rue du Commandant Schloesing, 75016 Paris, France (48.8625, 2.28528)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 53 70 40 80
Place
The current cemetery replaced the old cemetery (l’ancien cimetière communal de Passy, located on Rue Lekain), which was closed in 1802. The current entrance was built in 1934 (designed by René Berger.) The retaining wall of the cemetery is adorned with a bas relief (by Louis Janthial) commemorating the soldiers who fell in the Great War.
Notable queer burials at Passy:
• Renée Vivien (June 11, 1877 –November 18, 1909), writer, poet. She was interred at Passy Cemetery in the same exclusive Parisian neighbourhood where she had lived.
• Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972) and Romaine Brooks (1874-1970) are both buried at Cimetière de Passy, Barney in the same place with her sister Laura.
• Romaine Brooks (1874-1970), painter. In 1915 Brooks met and fell in love with the writer and salon patroness Natalie Barney, and they began a relationship that would last for fifty years.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Robert Menzies McAlmon was an American author, poet and publisher.
Born: March 9, 1895, Clifton, NJ
Died: February 2, 1956, Desert Hot Springs, CA
Education: University of Southern California
Buried: Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA, Plot: Sect 29 Lot 46 grave 3
Spouse: Bryher (m. 1921–1927)

At Lakewood Cemetery (3600 Hennepin Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55408) is buried Robert McAlmon (1895-1956). American author, poet and publisher, McAlmon collaborated with William Carlos Williams on the Contact Review, which did not last for long, but published poetry by Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, H. D., Hilda Doolittle, Kay Boyle and Marsden Hartley. The next year, he moved to Paris after marrying the wealthy and lesbian English writer Annie Winifred Ellerman, better known as Bryher. McAlmon typed and edited the handwritten manuscript of “Ulysses” by James Joyce, with whom he had a friendship.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Thomas Ernest Boulton and Frederick William Park (1848-1881) were two Victorian cross-dressers who appeared as defendants in a celebrated trial in London in 1871, charged "with conspiring and inciting persons to commit an unnatural offence." After the prosecution failed to establish that they had had anal sex, which was then a crime, or that wearing women's clothing was in any sense a crime, both men were acquitted. Lord Arthur Clinton was an English aristocrat and Liberal Party politician. A Member of Parliament for three years, he was notorious for involvement in the homosexual scandal and trial of Boulton and Park. Ernest Boulton was the son of a stockbroker. From childhood he liked wearing female clothing, and was encouraged in his impersonations of maids and other women by his mother; he used the nickname "Stella." As a young man, he met Frederick William Park and the two became friends. The two men then formed a theatrical double act, touring as Stella Clinton (or Mrs. Graham) and Fanny Winifred Park, and receiving favorable press reviews for their performances. For around two years, they also frequented the West End of London in both women's and men's dress, attending theatres and social events. Lord Arthur Clinton had lived with "Stella" as his/her "husband“; he presumably committed suicide on June 18, 1870, the day after receiving his subpoena for the trial.
Lord Arthur Pelham-Clinton (June 23, 1840 – June 18, 1870)
Thomas Ernest Boulton (February 2, 1848 – December 1904)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Thomas Michael Disch was an American science fiction author and poet. He won the Hugo Award for Best Related Book – previously called "Best Non-Fiction Book" – in 1999, and he had two other Hugo ...
Born: February 2, 1940, Des Moines, Iowa, United States
Died: July 4, 2008, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Cooper Union
New York University
Buried: Saint Johns Episcopal Church Columbarium, Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa, USA
Parents: Helen Disch
Movies: The Brave Little Toaster, The Brave Little Toaster Goes to Mars, The Brave Little Toaster to the Rescue

Thomas M. Disch was an American author and poet. He won the Hugo Award for Best Related Book – previously called "Best Non-Fiction Book" – in 1999, and he had two other Hugo nominations and nine Nebula Award nominations to his credit, plus one win of the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, a Rhysling Award, and two Seiun Awards, among others. Following an extended period of depression following the death in 2005 of his partner of 35 years, poet Charles Naylor, Disch stopped writing almost entirely, except for poetry – although he did produce two novellas. Disch committed suicide by gunshot on July 4, 2008 in his apartment in Manhattan, New York City. His last book, The Word of God, which was written shortly before Naylor died, had just been published a few days before Disch's death. Disch's private life remained private, for the most part. He was publicly gay since 1968; this came out occasionally in his poetry and particularly in his 1979 novel On Wings of Song. He did not try to write to a particular community: "I'm gay myself, but I don't write 'gay' literature." He rarely mentioned his sexuality in interviews, though the Canadian gay periodical The Body Politic interviewed him in 1981.
Together from 1970 to 2005: 35 years.
Charles Naylor (died in 2005)
Thomas M. Disch (February 2, 1940 - July 4, 2008)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Thomas M. Disch (February 2, 1940 – July 4, 2008), American science fiction author and poet, and his partner, Charles Robert Naylor, Jr (1944-2005), are buried at St. John's Episcopal Church (1458 Locust St, Dubuque, IA 52001). 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Ngô Xuân Diệu more commonly known by the pen name Xuân Diệu, was a prominent Vietnamese poet.
Born: February 2, 1916, Binh Dinh Province, Vietnam
Died: December 18, 1985, Hanoi, Vietnam
Spouse: Diep Bach
Parents: Ngô Xuân Thọ, Nguyễn Thị Hiệp

Ngô Xuân Diệu was a prominent Vietnamese poet. A colossal figure in modern Vietnamese literature, he wrote about 450 poems (largely in posthumous manuscripts) especially love poems, several short stories, and many notes, essays, and literary criticisms. Although well known for his love poems, he was married for only six months without consummating the marriage before divorcing from his wife and died a bachelor. Many people believe that he was homosexual along with his lifelong friend the famous poet Huy Cận, as shown through his many poems about love dedicated to (and apparently addressed to) various men. These poems include Tình trai (Man's Love, about the love affair between the French poets Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine) and Em đi (You leave, a heartfelt poem dedicated to a younger man with whom the poet shared a house for several years). For two years (1938-1940), Xuân Diệu was Huy Cận's roommate at the College of Agriculture in Hanoi, from which he received his engineering degree in agricultural science in 1943.
They met in 1938 and remained friends until Xuân Diệu’s death in 1985: 47 years.
Cù Huy Cận (May 31, 1919 - February 19, 2005)
Ngô Xuân Diệu (February 2, 1916 – December 18, 1985)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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