Feb. 3rd, 2017

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Elizabeth Blackwell was a British-born physician, notable as the first woman to receive a medical degree in the United States, as well as the first woman on the UK Medical Register.
Born: February 3, 1821, Bristol, United Kingdom
Died: May 31, 1910, Hastings, United Kingdom
Education: Hobart and William Smith Colleges
St Bartholomew's Hospital
Bedford College, London
Lived: Rock House, 10 Exmouth Pl, Hastings, East Sussex TN34 3JA, UK (50.85682, 0.58974)
Dicksons Street, Bristol
1 Wilson Street, off Portland Square, Bristol
Buried: Kilmun Parish Church and Cemetery, Kilmun, Argyll and Bute, Scotland
Siblings: Emily Blackwell, Samuel Charles Blackwell, more
Parents: Hannah Lane Blackwell, Samuel Blackwell

Elizabeth Blackwell was born in a house on Dicksons Street in Bristol, to Samuel Blackwell, a sugar refiner, and his wife Hannah (Lane) Blackwell. She had two older siblings, Anna and Marian, and would eventually have six younger siblings: Samuel (married Antoinette Brown), Henry (married Lucy Stone), Emily (third woman in the U.S. to get a medical degree), Sarah, John and George. Four maiden aunts, Barbara, Ann, Lucy and Mary, also lived with the Blackwells during Blackwell's childhood. Blackwell's earliest memories were of her time living at a house on 1 Wilson Street, off Portland Square, Bristol.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Rock House at 10 Exmouth Place, Hastings, East Sussex TN34 3JA, ca. 1820, has red brick with blue headers.
Address: 10 Exmouth Pl, Hastings, East Sussex TN34 3JA, UK (50.85682, 0.58974)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 293976 (Grade II, 1976)
Place
“Here lived and worked for thirty years Dr Elizabeth Blackwell, Born at Bristol 1821, died at Hastings 1910” Stuccoed east front. Slate hipped roof. 2 storeys and basement. Sash windows with glazing bars, louvred shutters. Bay windows to east on ground and 1st floors. Brick string course. Central moulded panelled door with rectangular fanlight with glazing bars. Inscription “The first woman to graduate in medicine in the United States, at Geneva (Syracuse University) New York 1849. The first woman to be placed on the British medical register 1859. One who never turn her back but marched breast forward never doubted clouds would break. Never dreamed, though right were worsted, wrong would triumph held we fall to rise, are baffled to fight better, sleep to wake.”
Life
Who: Elizabeth Blackwell (February 3, 1821 – May 31, 1910)
Elizabeth Blackwell was a British-born medical practitioner, notable as the first woman to receive a medical degree in the United States, as well as the first woman on the UK Medical Register. She was the first woman to graduate from medical school, a pioneer in promoting the education of women in medicine in the United States, and a social and moral reformer in both the United States and in the United Kingdom. Her sister Emily was the third woman in the US to get a medical degree. In 1856, when Blackwell was establishing the New York Infirmary, she adopted Katherine "Kitty" Barry, an Irish orphan from the House of Refuge on Randall’s Island. Diary entries at the time show that she adopted Barry half out of loneliness and a feeling of obligation, and half out of a utilitarian need for domestic help. Barry was brought up as a half-servant, half-daughter. Blackwell did provide for Barry’s education. She even instructed Barry in gymnastics as a trial for the theories outlined in her publication, “The Laws of Life with Special Reference to the Physical Education of Girls.” However, Blackwell never permitted Barry to develop her own interests. She didn’t make an effort to introduce Barry to young men or women of her age. Barry herself was rather shy, awkward and self-conscious about her slight deafness. Barry followed Blackwell during her many trans-Atlantic moves, during her furious house hunt between 1874 and 1875, during which they moved six times, and finally to Blackwell’s final home, Rock House, a small house off Exmouth Place in Hastings, Sussex, in 1879. Barry stayed with Blackwell all her life. After Blackwell’s death, Barry stayed at Rock House, and then moved to Kilmun in Argyllshire, Scotland, where Blackwell was buried in the churchyard of St Munn’s Parish Church. In 1920, she moved in with the Blackwells and took the Blackwell name. On her deathbed, in 1930, Barry called Blackwell her "true love,” and requested that her ashes be buried with those of Elizabeth. Emily Blackwell (1826-1910) was the second woman to earn a medical degree at what is now Case Western Reserve University, and the third openly identified woman to earn a medical degree in the United States. From 1883 Emily lived with her partner Elizabeth Cushier, who also served as a doctor at the New York infirmary. Blackwell and Cushier retired at the turn of the century. After traveling abroad for a year and a half, they spent the next winters at their home in Montclair, New Jersey and summers in Maine. Blackwell died on September 7, 1910 in York Cliffs, Maine, a few months after her sister Elizabeth’s death in England.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Elizabeth Blackwell (February 3, 1821 – May 31, 1910) was a British-born physician, notable as the first woman to receive a medical degree in the United States, as well as the first woman on the UK Medical Register. She was the first woman to graduate from medical school, a pioneer in promoting the education of women in medicine in the United States, and a social and moral reformer in both the United States and in the United Kingdom. Her sister Emily was the third woman in the US to get a medical degree. Her adopted daughter Kitty Barry stayed with Blackwell all her life. After Blackwell's death, Barry stayed at Rock House, Hastings, where they had lived together, and then moved to Kilmun in Argyllshire, Scotland, where Blackwell was buried in the churchyard of St Munn's Parish Church. In 1920, she moved in with the Blackwells and took the Blackwell name. On her deathbed, in 1930, Barry called Blackwell her "true love", and requested that her ashes be buried with those of Elizabeth.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Gertrude Stein was an American novelist, poet, playwright, and art collector. Born in the Allegheny West neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and raised in Oakland, California, Stein moved to Paris ...
Born: February 3, 1874, Allegheny, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: July 27, 1946, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France
Education: Harvard University
Johns Hopkins University
Lived: Algonquin Hotel, 59 W 44th St, New York, NY 10036
Manor House, Bilignin, 01300 Belley, France (45.76579, 5.66466)
5 Rue Christine, 75006 Paris, France (48.8543, 2.33972)
27 Rue de Fleurus, 75006 Paris, France (48.84683, 2.32934)
20 Bloomsbury Square, Bloomsbury, WC1A
David Bachrach House, 2406-2408 Linden Ave, Baltimore, MD 21217, USA (39.31391, -76.63612)
850 Beech Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15233, USA (40.4531, -80.01646)
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 94
Buried alongside: Alice B. Toklas
Movies: Paris Was a Woman
Anniversary: September 8, 1907



Gertrude Stein was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays that eschewed the narrative, linear, and temporal conventions of 19th century literature, and a fervent collector of Modernist art. Alice B. Toklas met Stein in Paris on September 8, 1907, the day she arrived. Acting as Stein's confidante, lover, cook, secretary, muse, editor, critic, and general organizer, Toklas remained a background figure, chiefly living in the shadow of Stein, until Stein published her memoirs in 1933 under the teasing title The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. It became Stein's bestselling book. In her will, Stein willed much of her estate to Toklas but Stein's relatives took action to claim the couple shared art collection, eventually removing it from Toklas's residence while she was away on vacation. Toklas remained in Paris until her death and is buried next to Stein in the Père Lachaise Cemetary.
Together from 1907 to 1946: 39 years.
Alice B. Toklas (April 30, 1877 – March 7, 1967)
Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946)
Anniversary: September 8, 1907

Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Gertrude Stein’s birthplace and childhood home is located at 850 Beech Avenue in the Allegheny West neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The historical marker on the front of the house says the following: "Allegheny West. Birthplace of Gertrude Stein. In this house on February 3, 1874, Gertrude Stein was born to Daniel and Amelia Stein. Author, poet, feminist, playwright, and catalyst in the development of modern art and literature. “In the United States there is more space where nobody is than where anybody is. This is what makes America what it is.” Allegheny West Historic District."
Address: 850 Beech Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15233, USA (40.4531, -80.01646)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: Allegheny West Historic District (Roughly bounded by Brighton Rd., Jabok Way, Ridge and Allegheny Aves.), 78002334, 1978
Place
Allegheny West is a historic neighborhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania’s North Side. It has two zip codes of both 15233 and 15212, and has representation on Pittsburgh City Council by the council member for District 6 (Downtown, North Side.) The area was frequented by Native Americans until late in the XVIII century. In 1787 David Redick began a survey of the area, with land to be given to Continental soldiers as part of their pay for service in the American Revolution. In 1788 lots in the area were auctioned off in Philadelphia. Houses were first built in the district in 1846-47 and streets were laid out about the same time. In the 1860s there was another boom in housing construction. In the late XIX century Ridge Avenue became known as "Millionaire’s Row" with mansions built for Henry W. Oliver, William Penn Snyder, Harmar Denny, Alexander M. Byers, and others. Lincoln Avenue also became known for its mansions.
Life
Who: Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946)
Gertrude Stein, the youngest of a family of five children, was born on February 3, 1874, in Allegheny, Pennsylvania (which merged with Pittsburgh in 1907) to upper-class Jewish parents, Daniel and Amelia Stein. Her father was a wealthy businessman with real estate holdings. German and English were spoken in their home. When Stein was three years old, she and her family moved to Vienna, and then Paris. Accompanied by governesses and tutors, the Steins endeavored to imbue their children with the cultured sensibilities of European history and life. After a year-long sojourn abroad, they returned to America in 1878, settling in Oakland, California, where her father became director of San Francisco’s street car lines, the Market Street Railway, in an era when public transportation was a privately owned enterprise. Stein attended First Hebrew Congregation of Oakland’s Sabbath school.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The David Bachrach House, also known as Gertrude Stein House, is a historic home located at Baltimore, Maryland.
Address: 2406-2408 Linden Ave, Baltimore, MD 21217, USA (39.31391, -76.63612)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 85001947, 1985
Place
Gertrude Stein was a niece of Mrs. David Bachrach and lived in this house for a short time in 1892. It is a late XIX century Victorian style frame structure consisting of two stories plus a mansard roof in height. It was constructed about 1886 and occupied by David Bachrach (1845-1921), a commercial photographer who figures prominently in the annals of American photographic history. Also on the property is a one-story brick building on a high foundation that was built for Ephraim Keyser (1850-1937) as a sculpture studio about 1890 and a one-story brick stable.
Life
Who: Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946)
Gertrude Stein was a writer of novels, poetry and plays. Born in the Allegheny West neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and raised in Oakland, California, Stein moved to Paris in 1903, and made France her home for the remainder of her life. A literary innovator and a pioneer of Modernist literature, Stein’s work broke with the narrative, linear, and temporal conventions of the XIX century. She was also known as a collector of Modernist art. In 1888, Stein’s mother died, and her father died in 1891. Michael Stein, the eldest brother, took over the family business holdings, and arranged for Gertrude and another sister, Bertha, to live with their mother’s family in Baltimore in 1892, where she lived with her uncle David Bachrach. Bachrach had married Fanny Keyser, sister of Gertrude’s mother Amelia, in 1877. In Baltimore, Stein met Claribel Cone and Etta Cone, who held Saturday evening salons that she would later emulate in Paris. The Cones shared an appreciation for art and conversation about it and modeled a domestic division of labor that Stein would replicate in her relationship with Alice B. Toklas. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Alice B. Toklas, her life partner. The book became a literary bestseller and vaulted Stein from the relative obscurity of cult literary figure into the light of mainstream attention.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Towards the end of her medical studies, Gertrude Stein embarked on an emotionally draining affair with fellow student May Bookstaver and decided to flee America and join her brother Leo in London. During her time in the city Stein studied Elizabethan prose residing at 20 Bloomsbury Square, Bloomsbury, WC1A. In 1903 Stein followed Leo to Paris where they began to assemble a collection of modern art.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

27 rue de Fleurus is the location of the former home of Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas on the Left Bank of Paris. It was also the home of Leo Stein for a time in the early XIX-hundreds.
Address: 27 Rue de Fleurus, 75006 Paris, France (48.84683, 2.32934)
Type: Private Property
Place
27 rue de Fleurus was a renowned Saturday evening gathering place for both expatriate American artists and writers and others noteworthy in the world of vanguard arts and letters, most notably Pablo Picasso. In the early decades of the XX century, hundreds of visitors flocked to the display of vanguard modern art, many came to scoff, but several went away converted. Entrée into the Gertrude Stein salon was a sought-after validation, and Stein became combination mentor, critic, and guru to those who gathered around her, including Ernest Hemingway, who described the salon in “A Moveable Feast.” The principal attraction was the collection of Paul Cézanne oils and watercolors and the early pictures by Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso which Gertrude and Leo Stein had had the funds and the foresight to buy. The walls of their atelier at 27 rue de Fleurus were hung to the ceiling with now-famous paintings, the double doors of the dining room were lined with Picasso sketches. On a typical Saturday evening one would have found Gertrude Stein at her post in the atelier, garbed in brown corduroy, sitting in a high-backed Renaissance chair, her legs dangling, next to the big cast-iron stove that heated the chilly room. A few feet away, Leo Stein would expound to a group of visitors his views on modern art. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. The book became a literary bestseller and vaulted Stein from the relative obscurity of cult literary figure into the light of mainstream attention.
Life
Who: Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946)
From 1903 until 1914, when they dissolved their common household, Gertrude Stein and her brother Leo shared living quarters near the Luxembourg Garden on the Left Bank of Paris in a two-story apartment (with adjacent studio) located on the interior courtyard at 27 rue de Fleurus, 6th arrondissement. Here they accumulated the works of art that formed a collection that became renowned for its prescience and historical importance. The gallery space was furnished with imposing, Renaissance era furniture manufactured in Florence, Italy. The paintings lined the walls in tiers trailing many feet to the ceiling. Initially illuminated by gaslight, the artwork was later lit by electric light shortly prior to WWI. In April 1914 Leo relocated to Settignano, Italy, near Florence, and the art collection was divided. The split between brother and sister was acrimonious. Stein did not see Leo Stein again until after WWI, and then through only a brief greeting on the street in Paris. After this accidental encounter, they never saw or spoke to each other again. The gatherings in the Stein home "brought together confluences of talent and thinking that would help define modernism in literature and art.” Dedicated attendees included Pablo Picasso, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sinclair Lewis, Ezra Pound, Gavin Williamson, Thornton Wilder, Sherwood Anderson, Francis Cyril Rose, René Crevel, Élisabeth de Gramont, Francis Picabia, Claribel Cone, Mildred Aldrich, Carl Van Vechten and Henri Matisse. Saturday evenings had been set as the fixed day and time for formal congregation so Stein could work at her writing uninterrupted by impromptu visitors. It was Stein’s partner Alice who became the de facto hostess for the wives and girlfriends of the artists in attendance, who met in a separate room. Gertrude herself attributed the beginnings of the Saturday evening salons to Matisse, as “more and more frequently, people began visiting to see the Matisse paintings—and the Cézannes: ‘Matisse brought people, everybody brought somebody, and they came at any time and it began to be a nuisance, and it was in this way that Saturday evenings began’.”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1929, Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas leased a XVII century manor house at Bilignin in southeast France for summer use. Their white poodle, Basket, arrived, joined in 1933 by a chihuahua, Pépé.
Address: Bilignin, 01300 Belley, France (45.76579, 5.66466)
Type: Private Property
Place
“For fourteen successive years the gardens at Bilignin were my joy, working in them during the summers and planning and dreaming of them during the winters. The summers frequently commenced early in April with the planting, and ended late in October with the last gathering of the winter vegetables. Bilignin surrounded by mountains and not far from the French Alps…” “The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book” is one of the bestselling cookbooks of all time. Written by Alice B. Toklas, writer Gertrude Stein’s life-partner. Toklas wrote this book as a favor to Random House to make up for her unwillingness at the time to write her memoirs, in deference to Stein’s 1933 book about her, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas.” The manor house at Bilignin was picture-book France, old and full of character. Its living room walls were paneled and decorated with paintings of musical instruments; tall windows with outside shutters opened up to the terrace garden. When the English artists Cecil Beaton and Francis Rose came for a visit in the summer of 1939, they were so taken by the beauty of this room and its four occupants—Stein, Toklas, and the two dogs, Basket and Pépé—that they both made images of it. Rose’s drawing offers a genre scene of marital harmony: Toklas knitting in a wicker chair and Stein reading in her favorite rocker.
Life
Who: Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946) and Alice B. Toklas (April 30, 1877 – March 7, 1967)
During the 1930s, Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas became famous with the 1933 mass market publication of “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas.” She and Alice had an extended lecture tour in the United States during this decade. They also spent several summers in the town of Bilignin, in the Ain district of eastern France situated in the picturesque region of the Rhône-Alpes. The two women doted on their beloved poodle named "Basket" whose successor, "Basket II,” comforted Alice in the years after Gertrude’s death. With the outbreak of WWII, Stein and Toklas relocated to a country home that they had rented for many years previously in Bilignin, Ain, in the Rhône-Alpes region. Gertrude and Alice, who were both Jewish, escaped persecution probably because of their friendship to Bernard Faÿ who was a collaborator with the Vichy regime and had connections to the Gestapo, or possibly because Gertrude was an American and a famous author. Gertrude’s book "Wars I Have Seen" written before the German surrender and before the liberation of German concentration camps, likened the German army to Keystone cops. When Faÿ was sentenced to hard labor for life after the war, Gertrude and Alice campaigned for his release. Several years later, Toklas would contribute money to Faÿ’s escape from prison.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1938, Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas move to 5, rue Christine in Paris.
Address: 5 Rue Christine, 75006 Paris, France (48.8543, 2.33972)
Type: Private Property
Place
Although Gertrude Stein willed much of her estate to Alice B. Toklas, including their shared art collection (some of them Picassos) housed in their apartment at 5, rue Christine, the couple’s relationship had no legal recognition. As many of the paintings appreciated greatly in value, Stein’s relatives took action to claim them, eventually removing them from Toklas’s residence while she was away on vacation and placing them in a bank vault. Toklas then relied on contributions from friends as well as her writing to make a living.
Life
Who: Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946) and Alice B. Toklas (April 30, 1877 – March 7, 1967)
Alice B. Toklas was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century, and the life partner of American writer Gertrude Stein. Toklas met Gertrude Stein in Paris on September 8, 1907, the day she arrived there from San Francisco after the devastating 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Together they hosted a salon in the home they shared that attracted expatriate American writers, such as Ernest Hemingway, Paul Bowles, Thornton Wilder, and Sherwood Anderson; and avant-garde painters, including Picasso, Matisse, and Braque. Acting as Stein’s confidante, lover, cook, secretary, muse, editor, critic, and general organizer, Toklas remained a background figure, chiefly living in the shadow of Stein, until the publication by Stein of Toklas’ "memoirs" in 1933 under the teasing title “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas.” It became Stein’s bestselling book. W. G. Rogers wrote in his memoir of the couple, published in 1946, that Toklas "was a little stooped, somewhat retiring and self-effacing. She doesn’t sit in a chair, she hides in it; she doesn’t look at you, but up at you; she is always standing just half a step outside the circle. She gives the appearance, in short, not of a drudge, but of a poor relation, someone invited to the wedding but not to the wedding feast." James Merrill wrote that before meeting Toklas "one knew about the tiny stature, the sandals, the mustache, the eyes," but he had not anticipated "the enchantment of her speaking voice—like a viola at dusk." Toklas and Stein remained a couple until Stein’s death in 1946. In 1963 Toklas published her autobiography “What Is Remembered,” which ends abruptly with the death of Gertrude Stein. Stein died on July 27, 1946 at the age of 72 after surgery for stomach cancer at the local hospital in Neuilly-sur-Seine. She was interred in Paris in Père Lachaise Cemetery. Toklas’s later years were very difficult because of poor health and financial problems. She died in poverty at the age of 89, and is buried next to Stein; her name is engraved on the back of Stein’s headstone.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1919, the Algonquin Hotel (59 W 44th St, New York, NY 10036) hosted the Algonquin Round Table, a lunch-time gathering of wits. Members included drama critic Alexander Woollcott and writer Dorothy Parker, Talullah Bankhead, Estelle Winwood, Eva LaGallienne, and Blythe Daly. Overnight guests included Noel Coward, Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, Gertrude Stein, and Alice B. Toklas.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.
Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on May 21, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”
Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942), buried together.
• Jean Börlin (1893-1930) was a Swedish dancer and choreographer born in Härnösand. He worked with Michel Fokine, who was his teacher in Stockholm. Jean Borlin was a principal dancer of the Royal Swedish Ballet when Rolf de Mare brought him to Paris in in 1920 as first dancer and choreographer of the Ballets Suedois at the Theatre de Champs-Elysees. According to Paul Colin, de Mare “was very rich” and he had brought the Swedish Ballet to Paris “especially to show his young lover, Jean Borlin.” The Stockholm press derided de Mare's sexual orientation. In contrast, open-minded Paris welcomed the Ballets Suedois. One wonders what might have happened if de Mare had not disbanded the company in 1925, reportedly because its recent performances had disappointed him. But he had a new lover. Borlin's last years were melancholy. By 1925, he was exhausted: he had choreographed all 23 ballets in his company's repertory and danced in each of its 900 performances -- a grueling schedule that led him to alcohol and drugs. In 1930, he opened a school in New York but died of heart failure shortly thereafter. He was only 37. He was buried at his own wish in the cemetery of Pére Lachaise in Paris in January l931. A stricken de Mare founded Les Archives Internationales de Danse, in his memory.
• Jean Jacques Régis de Cambacérès (1753-1824) 1st Duke of Parma, later 1st Duke of Cambacérès, was a French lawyer and statesman during the French Revolution and the First Empire, best remembered as the author of the Napoleonic Code, which still forms the basis of French civil law and inspired civil law in many countries. The common belief that Cambacérès is responsible for decriminalizing homosexuality in France is in error. Cambacérès was not responsible for ending the legal prosecution of homosexuals. He did play a key role in drafting the Code Napoléon, but this was a civil law code. He had nothing to do with the Penal Code of 1810, which covered sexual crimes. Before the French Revolution, sodomy had been a capital crime under royal legislation. The penalty was burning at the stake. Very few men, however, were ever actually prosecuted and executed for consensual sodomy (no more than five in the entire XVIII century). Sodomites arrested by the police were more usually released with a warning or held in prison for (at most) a few weeks or months. The National Constituent Assembly abolished the law against sodomy when it revised French criminal law in 1791 and got rid of a variety of offenses inspired by religion, including blasphemy. Cambacérès was a homosexual, his sexual orientation was well-known, and he does not seem to have made any effort to conceal it. He remained unmarried, and kept to the company of other bachelors. Napoleon is recorded as making a number of jokes on the subject. Robert Badinter once mentioned in a speech to the French National Assembly, during debates on reforming the homosexual age of consent, that Cambacérès was known in the gardens of the Palais-Royal as "tante Turlurette".
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Loie Fuller (1862–1928) was an American dancer who was a pioneer of both modern dance and theatrical lighting techniques. Fuller supported other pioneering performers, such as fellow United States-born dancer Isadora Duncan. Fuller helped Duncan ignite her European career in 1902 by sponsoring independent concerts in Vienna and Budapest. She was cremated and her ashes are interred in the columbarium at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Her sister, Mollie Fuller, had a long career as an actress and vaudeville performer.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Eileen Gray (1878–1976) was an Irish furniture designer and architect and a pioneer of the Modern Movement in architecture. Gray was bisexual. She mixed in the lesbian circles of the time, being associated with Romaine Brooks, Gabrielle Bloch, Loie Fuller, the singer Damia and Natalie Barney. Gray's intermittent relationship with Damia (or Marie-Louise Damien) ended in 1938, after which they never saw each other again, although both lived into their nineties in the same city. Damia died at La Celle-Saint-Cloud, a western suburb of Paris, and was interred in the Cimetière de Pantin (163 Avenue Jean Jaurès, 93500 Aubervilliers). Today, she is considered to be the third greatest singer of chansons réalistes, after Edith Piaf and Barbara.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Marie Laurencin (1883-1956) was a French painter and printmaker. She became an important figure in the Parisian avant-garde as a member of the Cubists associated with the Section d'Or. She became romantically involved with the poet Guillaume Apollinaire, and has often been identified as his muse. In addition, Laurencin had important connections to the salon of the American expatriate and famed lesbian writer Natalie Clifford Barney. She had heterosexual and lesbian affairs. During WWI, Laurencin left France for exile in Spain with her German-born husband, Baron Otto von Waëtjen, since through her marriage she had automatically lost her French citizenship. The couple subsequently lived together briefly in Düsseldorf. After they divorced in 1920, she returned to Paris, where she achieved financial success as an artist until the economic depression of the 1930s. During the 1930s she worked as an art instructor at a private school. She lived in Paris until her death.
• Mary Elizabeth Clarke Mohl (1793–1883) was a British writer who was known as a salon hostess in Paris. She was known by her nickname of "Clarkey". She was admired for her independence and conversation. She eventually married the orientalist Julius von Mohl. She was an ardent Francophile, a feminist, and a close friend of Florence Nightingale. She wrote about her interest in the history of women's rights. She was buried with her husband, Julius von Mohl, at Père Lachaise Cemetery (56th division).
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Francis Poulenc (1899–1963) was a French composer and pianist. The biographer Richard D. E. Burton comments that, in the late 1920s, Poulenc might have seemed to be in an enviable position: professionally successful and independently well-off, having inherited a substantial fortune from his father. He bought a large country house, Le Grande Coteau (Chemin Francis Poulenc, 37210 Noizay), 140 miles (230 km) south-west of Paris, where he retreated to compose in peaceful surroundings. Yet he was troubled, struggling to come to terms with his sexuality, which was predominantly gay. His first serious affair was with the painter Richard Chanlaire, to whom he sent a copy of the Concert champêtre score inscribed, "You have changed my life, you are the sunshine of my thirty years, a reason for living and working". Nevertheless, while this affair was in progress Poulenc proposed marriage to his friend Raymonde Linossier. As she was not only well aware of his homosexuality but was also romantically attached elsewhere, she refused him, and their relationship became strained. He suffered the first of many periods of depression, which affected his ability to compose, and he was devastated in January 1930, when Linossier died suddenly at the age of 32. On her death he wrote, "All my youth departs with her, all that part of my life that belonged only to her. I sob ... I am now twenty years older". His affair with Chanlaire petered out in 1931, though they remained lifelong friends. On 30 January 1963, at his flat opposite the Jardin du Luxembourg, Poulenc suffered a fatal heart attack. His funeral was at the nearby church of Saint-Sulpice. In compliance with his wishes, none of his music was performed; Marcel Dupré played works by Bach on the grand organ of the church. Poulenc was buried at Père Lachaise Cemetery, alongside his family.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Raymond Radiguet (1903–1923) was a French novelist and poet whose two novels were noted for their explicit themes, and unique style and tone. In early 1923, Radiguet published his first and most famous novel, “Le Diable au corps” (The Devil in the Flesh). The story of a young married woman who has an affair with a sixteen-year-old boy while her husband is away fighting at the front provoked scandal in a country that had just been through WWI. Though Radiguet denied it, it was established later that the story was in large part autobiographical. He associated himself with the Modernist set, befriending Picasso, Max Jacob, Jean Hugo, Juan Gris and especially Jean Cocteau, who became his mentor. Radiguet also had several well-documented relationships with women. An anecdote told by Ernest Hemingway has an enraged Cocteau charging Radiguet (known in the Parisian literary circles as "Monsieur Bébé" – Mister Baby) with decadence for his tryst with a model: "Bébé est vicieuse. Il aime les femmes." ("Baby is depraved. He likes women.") Radiguet, Hemingway implies, employed his sexuality to advance his career, being a writer "who knew how to make his career not only with his pen but with his pencil." Aldous Huxley is quoted as declaring that Radiguet had attained the literary control that others required a long career to reach. On December 12, 1923, Radiguet died at age 20 in Paris of typhoid fever, which he contracted after a trip he took with Cocteau. Cocteau, in an interview with The Paris Review stated that Radiguet had told him three days prior to his death that, "In three days, I am going to be shot by the soldiers of God." In reaction to this death Francis Poulenc wrote, "For two days I was unable to do anything, I was so stunned". In her 1932 memoir, “Laughing Torso,” British artist Nina Hamnett describes Radiguet's funeral: "The church was crowded with people. In the pew in front of us was the negro band from the Boeuf sur le Toit. Picasso was there, Brâncuși and so many celebrated people that I cannot remember their names. Radiguet's death was a terrible shock to everyone. Coco Chanel, the celebrated dressmaker, arranged the funeral. It was most wonderfully done. Cocteau was too ill to come." ... "Cocteau was terribly upset and could not see anyone for weeks afterwards.”
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) was a French actress.
• Oscar Wilde’s tomb in Père Lachaise was designed by sculptor Sir Jacob Epstein, at the request of Robert Ross (1869-1918), who also asked for a small compartment to be made for his own ashes. Ross's ashes were transferred to the tomb in 1950.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. They are buried together.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. The modernist angel depicted as a relief on the tomb was originally complete with male genitals. They were broken off as obscene and kept as a paperweight by a succession of Père Lachaise Cemetery keepers. Their current whereabouts are unknown. In the summer of 2000, intermedia artist Leon Johnson performed a 40 minute ceremony entitled Re-membering Wilde in which a commissioned silver prosthesis was installed to replace the vandalised genitals.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
James Bridges was an American screenwriter, film director, producer and actor.
Born: February 3, 1936, Paris, Arkansas, United States
Died: June 6, 1993, Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: University of Central Arkansas
Buried: Oakwood Cemetery, Paris, Logan County, Arkansas, USA
Books: The Baby Maker: A Novel, Perfect!: The Screenplay, more
Awards: Edgar Award for Best Television Episode Teleplay, Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Drama

James Bridges was an American screenwriter and film director. He got his start as a writer for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and one of his episodes, An Unlocked Window, earned him a 1966 Edgar Award. Bridges went on to write and direct a number of notable films, including The Baby Maker, The Paper Chase, September 30, 1955, The China Syndrome, Urban Cowboy, Perfect, and Bright Lights, Big City. From 1958 to 1993, his life partner was actor Jack Larson, best known for his portrayal of Jimmy Olsen in the TV series Adventures of Superman, whom he met during the filming of “Johnny Trouble” (1957). Among his other work, Larson wrote the libretto to the opera Lord Byron to music by Virgil Thomson. He was the first playwright to be awarded a grant by the Rockfeller Foundation. Bridges died in Los Angeles, California of cancer. The James Bridges Theater at University of California, Los Angeles was named in his honor in Nov. 1999. Larson owned the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed George Sturges House in the Brentwood section of Los Angeles, California. Larson died on September 20, 2015, and his memorial was held at UCLA James Bridges Theatre on Dec. 6, 2015.
Together from 1958 to 1993: 35 years.
Jack Larson (February 8, 1928 – September 20, 2015)
James Bridges (February 3, 1936 - June 6, 1993)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Oakwood Cemetery (Paris, AR 72855) is buried James Bridges (February 3, 1936- June 6, 1993), American screenwriter, film director, producer and actor. From 1958 till Bridges' death in 1993, his life partner was actor Jack Larson, best known for his portrayal of Jimmy Olsen in the TV series Adventures of Superman. 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Mabel Mercer was an English-born cabaret singer who performed in the United States, Britain, and Europe with the greats in jazz and cabaret.
Born: February 3, 1900, Burton upon Trent, United Kingdom
Died: April 20, 1984, Pittsfield, Massachusetts, United States
Buried: Red Rock Cemetery, Red Rock, Columbia County, New York, USA
Movies: Mabel Mercer: A Singer's Singer, The Sand Castle
Albums: Mabel Mercer Sings Cole Porter, more
Genres: Jazz, Cabaret

Although she never achieved the fame she deserved, Mabel Mercer was one of the most respected singers of the mid-20th century, a most original stylist, and the toast of the New York cabaret scene. After the end of World War I, Mercer settled in Paris, where she met the celebrated Ada "Bricktop" Smith, an American singer and cabaret proprietor whose patrons included Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, and Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald. During her Paris years, Mercer became friends (and possibly more) with the notoriously eccentric lesbian heiress, speedboat racer, and womanizer Marion “Joe” Carstairs. Carstairs, who had settled in her own "kingdom"--Whale Cay, on an island in the Bahamas--paid Mercer's way across the Atlantic, fearing what the Nazis would do to the biracial singer. Mercer resided in the Bahamas until 1941, when she married Kelsey Pharr, an openly gay African-American musician, and obtained an entry visa from the United States government. The marriage was clearly one of convenience, as Mercer and Pharr never lived together and rarely saw each other; however, Mercer, as a devout Catholic, would not divorce Pharr, and they remained legally married until his death. Pharr was one of The Delta Rhythm Boys, an American vocal group active for over 50 years from 1934 to 1987.
Together from 1941 to 1961: 20 years.
Mabel Mercer (February 3, 1900 - April 20, 1984)
Kelsey Leroy Pharr, Jr (January 10, 1917 - April 20, 1961)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Red Rock Cemetery (East Chatham, NY 12060) is buried Mabel Mercer (1900-1984), English-born cabaret singer who performed in the United States, Britain, and Europe with the greats in jazz and cabaret. During her Paris years, Mercer became friends (and possibly more) with the notoriously eccentric lesbian heiress, speedboat racer, and womanizer Marion "Joe" Carstairs. Carstairs, who had settled in her own "kingdom"--Whale Cay, on an island in the Bahamas--paid Mercer's way across the Atlantic, fearing what the Nazis would do to the biracial singer.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
William Vincent Astor was a businessman, philanthropist, and member of the prominent Astor family.
Born: November 15, 1891, New York City, New York, United States
Died: February 3, 1959, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Harvard University
Lived: Ferncliff, Astor Courts, Astor Dr, Rhinebeck, NY 12572, USA (41.93635, -73.92604)
130 E 80th St, New York, NY 10075, USA (40.77573, -73.959)
Buried: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, Westchester County, New York, USA, Plot: Section 88, row 2
Spouse: Brooke Astor (m. 1953–1959), Mary Benedict Cushing (m. 1940–1953)
Books: Memphis Movie Theatres
Parents: John Jacob Astor IV, Ava Lowle Willing
Siblings: John Jacob Astor VI

Helen Huntington was a prominent socialite, patron of the arts, heiress and political hostess. Having grown up in Rhinebeck, New York, she played alongside Vincent Astor, who lived at 'Ferncliff' nearby. They married on April 30, 1914. At the ceremony, he was stricken with the mumps, a disease that made him sterile; as for the bride, her friend Glenway Wescott, the novelist, admiringly described her in his unpublished diaries as "a grand, old-fashioned lesbian." "Mrs. (Vincent) Astor said she always had a homosexual to dinner" because they were "the only people who could talk," the architect Philip Johnson remembered. The couple divorced in 1940. A year later, Helen became the second wife of Lytle Hull (1882-1958), a real-estate broker who was a friend and business associate of her former husband. She also considered Leonard Bernstein, Cole Porter, Elsa Maxwell and Cholly Knickerbocker good friends. A supreme lover of animals, she owned three large dogs and three small dogs, as well as five horses, six cows, four sheep, 5 chickens, 2 parrots and numerous other pets. Shortly after his divorce, Astor married Mary Benedict Cushing. They divorced in September, 1953, and the following month, Mary wed James Whitney Fosburgh, a painter who worked as an art lecturer at the Frick Museum, and gay. On 8 October, 1953, several weeks after divorcing his second wife, Astor married the once-divorced, once-widowed Roberta Brooke Russell. Together, Vincent and Brooke developed the Vincent Astor Foundation, designed to give back to New York City. Brooke died in 2007 at the age of 105.
Together from 1914 to 1940: 26 years.
Helen Dinsmore Huntington (April 9, 1893 - December 11, 1976)
William Vincent Astor (November 15, 1891 – February 3, 1959)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Ferncliff, the Astor family estate on the Hudson, had been demolished in the 1940s. Astor Courts, the guest house on the same property, is a wedding place facility, which hosted, among other, Chelsea Clinton’s wedding.
Address: Astor Courts, Astor Dr, Rhinebeck, NY 12572, USA (41.93635, -73.92604)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Place
Built in the XIX century
“Minnie (Mary Benedict Cushing, Vincent Astor’s second wife) made him tear down the old mansion. If I had been married to him I would certainly never have made him do this. Ohhh! I can’t imagine a house, where you came in the front door into a hall that ran straight through and looked out on the river – to tear that down, and live in an old swimming pool house which didn’t have one view. Perhaps she didn’t want to run it. I don’t know because I never discussed it with her. And Vincent when he came up after it was gone, and saw just the steps of the big house still standing almost cried. The tennis court (house) was designed by Stanford White and built by Lady Ribblesdale (Vincent’s mother whose second husband was Lord Ribblesdale) when she was married to Jack Astor.” Brooke Astor. The current 50-ish acre estate, most often referred to as Astor Courts, was once part of the sprawling 2,800 acre spread of John Jacob Astor IV, the great-grandson of John Jacob Astor who made a mountain of money in real estate, opium, and fur trades. Astor Courts–sometimes referred to as Ferncliff Casino and/or Astor Casino–was commissioned by John Jacob “Jack” Astor IV and his first wife Eva in the early XX century as a sporting pavilion and guest quarters to go along with the estate’s main house built in the late 1850s by another of the wildly wealthy of the Astor clan. The long and low Beaux Arts style building, inspired by the Grand Trianon at Versailles and completed 1904, was one of the last buildings finished by architect Stanford White before he was shot and killed in 1906 at Madison Square Garden by Harry K. Thaw, the notoriously volatile heir to a Pittsburgh coal and railroad fortune. Along with vast entertaining spaces and several guest rooms, the Astor Courts housed what some believe was the first indoor swimming pool at a private residence, as well as an indoor clay tennis court with soaring vault and truss ceiling of industrial glass, two indoor squash courts, a bowling alley, and a shooting range. There was a grass tennis court that sat along side the building. The entire estate was inherited by Vincent Astor who in the 1940s razed the monumental main house at Ferncliff and, after an extensive renovation and re-purposing of some rooms, moved into the sporting pavilion. In the spring of 2003 the property was purchased for $3,200,000 by its current owners, real estate developer Arthur Seelbinder and his Democratic fundraiser and former tee-vee producer wife Kathleen Hammer. The couple hired architect Sam White–Stanford White’s great-grandson–to oversee the renovation of the hotel-sized house that stretches out over 40,000 square feet.
Life
Who: William Vincent Astor (November 15, 1891 – February 3, 1959)
In 1953 Vincent Astor married for a third time. His new bride was the once-divorced and once-widowed Brooke Russell Kuser Marshall who became the powerful queen of New York high society Brooke Astor, a formidable woman who once upon a time Your Mama would sometimes see swaddled in fur at big shindigs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Although it has been reported that Brooke Astor didn’t particularly care for the drafty and vast Astor Courts, the couple used the former sporting pavilion as a country retreat until Vincent Astor died in 1959. Subsequent to Vincent Astor’s death, Ferncliff was cut up into bite sized pieces, some of which was sold off and some of which–the part where Astor Courts is situated–was donated by Brooke Astor to The Catholic Archdiocese of New York who used the former Astor family playhouse as a nursing home where the old folks were cared for by nuns. Vincent Astor is buried at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, New York.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The East 80th Street Houses are a group of four attached rowhouses on that street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. They are built of brick with various stone trims in different versions of the Colonial Revival architectural style.
Address: 130 E 80th St, New York, NY 10075, USA (40.77573, -73.959)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 80002686, 1980
Place
They were built in the 1920s as homes for wealthy New Yorkers of that era, including Vincent Astor, Clarence Dillon and George Whitney. All were designated city landmarks by 1967, the first group of houses on the Upper East Side so recognized. The last house in the row, the Vincent and Helen Astor House at 130 East 80th, is the only one not of brick. It is a five-story, three-bay Neo-Adamesque building faced in French limestone laid in an ashlar pattern. It shares classical detailing with the two houses to the west. The entrance, two paneled doors surmounted by a fanlight, is sheltered by a small portico supported by Ionic columns. The window above echoes the fanlight with a blind arch, and on either side two-story Ionic pilasters support a full entablature with dentil course and four paterae. Above it a pediment with gently pitched slate roof runs the full width of the house. The first of the houses to be built on East 80th Street was 116. The firm of Cross and Cross, known for other designs in New York of the era such as Tiffany’s and the Links Club, built the neo-Federal home for Lewis Spencer Morris, a descendant of Lewis Morris, signer of the Declaration of Independence. It was joined in 1927 by Mott B. Schmidt’s neo-Adamesque style home for Vincent Astor at 130. Astor also had Schmidt design a matching garage to replace the brownstone at 121 East 79th. The four houses were among the last built in their styles before the Great Depression changed American ideas about luxury housing. The residents kept the block and their vacant rear lots together until 1942, when they began to sell them off. The Junior League of New York moved into the Astor House later in the decade, and found it so well maintained it did not need a sprinkler system in the yard. The last parcel, the Astors’ garage, was sold by Brooke Astor in 1964. Three years later, in 1967, the Morris and Dillon houses were the first houses on the Upper East Side recognized by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. The Astor House followed three months later. Late in 1968, the Whitney House completed the set.
Life
Who: William Vincent Astor (November 15, 1891 – February 3, 1959) and Helen Dinsmore Hull Huntington (1893 - 1976)
Vincent Astor was a businessman and philanthropist and a member of the prominent Astor family. He was born in the Fifth Avenue mansion where his paternal grandmother Caroline Webster Schermerhorn reigned over American society. He was the son of John Jacob Astor IV, millionaire and inventor; and his first wife, Ava Lowle Willing, an heiress from Philadelphia. In 1912, Vincent inherited an estimated $69 million when his father went down with the Titanic, while Vincent was a student at Harvard University. After his father’s death, he quit college to manage his family’s vast properties. He also was called "the richest boy in the world." In 1919, his mother Ava married a recently widowed English nobleman, Thomas Lister, Baron Ribblesdale. Astor married Helen Dinsmore Huntington, on April 30, 1914. At the ceremony, he was stricken with the mumps, a disease that made him sterile; as for the bride, her friend Glenway Wescott, the novelist, admiringly described her in his unpublished diaries as "a grand, old-fashioned lesbian." The couple divorced in 1940. A year later, Helen became the second wife of Lytle Hull (1882-1958), a real-estate broker who was a friend and business associate of her former husband.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

120 East End Avenue at 85th Street, designed by Charles A. Platt, overlooking Carl Schurz Park and the East River, was built by Vincent Astor (1891–1959) in 1931 and it was his last residence in New York City. Before marrying Vincent Astor on October, 1953, Brooke Astor briefly worked for Ruby Ross Wood, a prominent New York interior decorator who, with her associate Billy Baldwin, decorated Brooke Astor’s second husband, Charles Henry Marshall's apartment at 1 Gracie Square.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Sleepy Hollow, New York, is the resting place of numerous famous figures, including Washington Irving, whose story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is set in the adjacent Old Dutch Burying Ground. Incorporated in 1849 as Tarrytown Cemetery, it posthumously honored Irving's request that it change its name to Sleepy Hollow Cemetery.
Address: 540 N Broadway, Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591, USA (41.09702, -73.86162)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: 09000380, 2009
Place
The cemetery is a non-profit, non-sectarian burying ground of about 90 acres (360,000 m2). It is contiguous with, but separate from, the church yard of the colonial-era church that was a setting for "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow". The Rockefeller family estate (see Kykuit), whose grounds abut Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, contains the private Rockefeller cemetery. Several outdoor scenes from the 1970 feature film “House of Dark Shadows” were filmed at the cemetery's receiving vault.
Notable queer burials at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery:
• Elizabeth Arden (1878–1966), businesswoman who built a cosmetics empire.
• Brooke Astor (1902–2007), philanthropist and socialite.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959), philanthropist; member of the Astor family.
• Paul Leicester Ford (1865–1902), editor, bibliographer, novelist, and biographer; brother of Malcolm Webster Ford by whose hand he died.
• Leila Howard Griswold Webb Codman (1856-1910), widow of railroad magnate H. Walter Webb, in 1904 married Ogden Codman, Jr. but died unexpectedly in 1910.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Profile

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
reviews_and_ramblings

April 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
91011121314 15
16 1718 1920 21 22
23 242526272829
30      

Most Popular Tags

Disclaimer

All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
I'm associated with Amazon/USA Affiliates Programs.
Books reviewed on this site were usually provided at no cost by the publisher or author. However, some books were purchased by the reviewer and not provided for free. For information on how a particular title was obtained, please contact by email the blog's owner.
Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Apr. 26th, 2017 09:47 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios