Feb. 8th, 2017

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Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet was a British artist, art teacher and plantsman. He was born in Swansea in South Wales, but worked mainly in East Anglia. As an artist he is best known for his portraits, flower paintings and landscapes.
Born: December 11, 1889, Sketty, United Kingdom
Died: February 8, 1982, Ipswich, United Kingdom
Education: Charterhouse School
Académie Colarossi
St Cyprian's School
Lived: Corfe, Taunton, Somerset TA3
Benton End House, Benton Street, Hadleigh, Suffolk IP7 5JR, UK (52.03691, 0.95912)
The Pound, Hadleigh Road, Higham, Suffolk CO7 6LE, UK(51.99071, 0.95763)
32 Great Ormond St, London WC1N, UK (51.52201, -0.11983)
Buried: Friars Road Cemetery, Hadleigh, Babergh District, Suffolk, England
Buried alongside: Arthur Lett-Haines
Parents: George Lockwood Morris

Arthur Lett-Haines was a British painter and sculptor who experimented in many different media, though he characterized himself as "an English surrealist". He was part of a London artistic circle, which included D.H. Lawrence, the Sitwells (Dame Edith Sitwell and Sir Osbert Sitwell) and Wyndham Lewis. Sir Cedric Morris was a British artist, art teacher and plantsman. As an artist, he is best known for his portraits, flower paintings and landscapes. In 1916, Lett-Haines married Gertrude Aimee Lincoln at Hailsham, but he met the painter Cedric Morris in 1918. Morris and Lett Haines fell in love and began a lifetime relationship, and shortly afterwards Morris moved in with Haines and his wife, Aimee. The trio planned to go to America, but in the event, Aimee Lett-Haines left on her own, and the two men moved to Cornwall. This relationship lasted some 60 years, despite its open nature that included attachments on both sides such as Haines' affair with the artist and author Kathleen Hale. In 1937, Morris and Haines founded the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing at Dedham. The school closed when Haines died in 1978, though Morris continued to live at Benton End until his death in 1984.
Together from 1918 to 1978: 60 years.
Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
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After staying with his sister Nancy Morris in Corfe (Taunton, Somerset TA3), Cedric Morris (December 11, 1889 –February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines found a studio in London at Great Ormond Street to which they moved in 1927. 



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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At the time of the Armistice with Germany in Nov. 1918 Cedric Morris was in London, where he met the painter Arthur Lett-Haines.
Address: 32 Great Ormond St, London WC1N, UK (51.52201, -0.11983)
Type: Private Property
Place
Cedric Morris settled in London in 1927, with a big studio at 32, Great Ormond Street, which soon became a gathering place for most of his contemporaries. Upon his arrival Roger Fry, whom he had known in Paris, elected him to the London Group and took two of his canvasses for the International Exhibition at Buenos Aires. Later, Ben Nicholson elected him to the 7 & 5 Society. He continued to exhibit with these groups for several years. In May 1927, he had his first One Man Show at Messrs. Arthur Tooth and Sons, which was a phenomenal success and thereafter has held exhibitions with West End dealers at intervals of two or three years. He has also had exhibitions at the Hague and in New York, and has been an international exhibitor at Brussells, Buenos Aires, Venice, Chicago, Pittsburg, and San Francisco. There are samples of his work in most of the important public galleries. The success of his first exhibition at Messrs. Tooth enabled him to fulfill a long defined project of painting in Wales and much of his work is of Welsh landscapes. He initiated the Welsh Contemporary Art Exhibitions in 1935, from which sprang the Welsh Contemporary Art Society.
Life
Who: Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
Sir Cedric Morris was a British artist, art teacher and plantsman. He was born in Swansea in South Wales, but worked mainly in East Anglia. As an artist he is best known for his portraits, flower paintings and landscapes. Morris went to Zennor in Cornwall, where he studied plants and painted water colours. At the time of the Armistice with Germany in Nov. 1918 he was in London, when he met the painter Arthur Lett-Haines. Morris and Lett-Haines fell in love and began a life-time relationship, and shortly afterwards Morris moved in with Lett-Haines and his second wife, Aimee. The trio planned to go to America, but in the event Aimee Lett-Haines left on her own, and the two men moved to Cornwall. They converted a row of cottages at Newlyn into a larger house and stayed there until the end of 1920, when they moved to Paris. This relationship lasted some 60 years, despite its open nature that included attachments on both sides such as Haines’ affair with the artist and author Kathleen Hale. Paris was their base for the next five years, when they travelled extensively in Europe. Morris also studied at the Academies Moderne and La Grande Chaumiere. Morris had successful exhibitions in London in 1924 and 1926, and later in that year they settled back in Britain. After staying with his sister Nancy Morris in Corfe, Morris and Haines found a studio in London at Great Ormond Street to which they moved in 1927. Morris became a member of the London Artists Association and the Seven and Five Society, for which he was proposed by Winifred Nicholson and seconded by Ben Nicholson. He became especially friendly with the painter Christopher Wood, and renewed friendship with Frances Hodgkins. At the end of the 1920s Morris became involved with much commercial work designing textiles for Cresta Silks with Paul Nash and posters for Shell and B. P.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Cedric Morris chose the country life to pursue his passion for horticulture. Early in 1929 Morris and his companion, Arthur Lett-Haines, took the lease of Pound Farm, Higham, Suffolk, and in February 1930 they gave up the London studio.
Address: Hadleigh Road, Higham, Suffolk CO7 6LE, UK(51.99071, 0.95763)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 277246 (Grade II, 1955)
Place
The Pound is a XVI-XVII century house with XIX century wing to left and XX century alterations. Timber-framed, rendered with red brick stack, XIX century wing red brick with some dark brick headers. Plain tile roof. Single-storey and attic range with gabled jettied cross wing at left. 2-storey brick addition. Half-glazed door to cross wing, jettied 1st floor. 3-light XX century casement, bargeboards to gable. 24-pane fixed window with single opening light to hall, end of beam protrudes at floor level. XX century casements and further door to right. 2 gabled dormers with XX century windows. Small XX century ridge stack to right and sawtooth stack between cross wing and hall. Brick range 3-light windows under segmental arches, 2 replaced 16-pane sashes in flush architraves above. Pair of large gabled wall dormers to rear hall range. XX century extension under pent roof. Interior: hall, somewhat rebuilt inglenook. Chamfered beam and exposed joists.
Life
Who: Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
In 1932 the owner of Pound Farm, Vivien Gribble, who was for a while his student, died and left it to Cedric Morris. Morris had resigned from the Seven and Five Society in 1930 and he resigned from the London Artist’s Association in 1933. There were many visitors at Pound Farm, including Frances Hodgkins, Barbara Hepworth and John Skeaping. Joan Warburton who was a student described Pound Farm as a paradise, mainly because of the spectacular gardens which Morris developed. She was also impressed by their spectacular parties. Morris often went painting in his native South Wales, and in 1935 at the time of the Depression was moved by the plight of the people of South Wales Valleys. He initiated a major touring exhibition of Welsh art in 1935, and was a regular teacher at Mary Horsfall’s Art’s centre at Merthyr Tydfil. In 1935 he painted two large flower murals on board the liner Queen Mary. In late 1937 Morris and Haines joined the Hadleigh Labour Party after attending a meeting addressed by Professor Catlin.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Benton End House was originally a large medieval farmhouse. From 1940 it was the home of Sir Cedric Morris, artist and plantsman, who formed the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing there. Students included Lucian Freud and Maggi Hambling.
Address: Benton Street, Hadleigh, Suffolk IP7 5JR, UK (52.03691, 0.95912)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 277783 (Grade II, 1950)
Place
Built from the XVI century, Design by Sir Peter Cheyney
XVI century and later, 2 storeys and attics, timber framed and plastered, roofs tiled. Front wings extend North and South, and wing at back extends East. The front has been largely altered and includes XVIII century features. There are 3 gabled attic dormers. 3 window range, flush frame, sash. Upper storey projects. Large, shouldered, chimney at either end. The central doorcase has flat hood on scroll brackets. At North end of front is an octagonal brick pier with pointed cap. The East wing has a brick gable with octagonal flank piers, coping and chimney stack with 2 octagonal shafts (moulded bases.) The timber framing is exposed and there is some brick nogging.
Life
Who: Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
Cedric Morris and Lett-Haines opened the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing at Dedham in April 1937. Within a year they had 60 students. Lucian Freud was one of his most noted students. In 1939 the building at Dedham was destroyed by fire with several of Morris’s paintings also destroyed. By the end of the year the school was re-established at Benton End. Benton End was a rambling “Suffolk Pink” farmhouse on the outskirts of Hadleigh, set in 3 or 4 acres (1.6 ha) of orchard. Morris was intolerant of cruelty to animals and at Benton End had a running feud with a local gamekeeper who shot cats and dogs - until the latter tripped over his shotgun and killed himself. In addition to running the school, Morris indulged his passion for plants. He grew about 1,000 new Iris seedlings each year and opened Benton End to display his collection. He produced at least 90 named varieties, 45 of which were registered with the American Iris Society. Some were sold commercially and exhibited at the Chelsea Flower Show. Many of his named varieties carried the prefix "Benton,” including “Benton Menace” named after his cats, and “Benton Rubeo,” named for his pet macaw. He also used to walk the fields and hedgerows searching for softer colour variants of poppies. Morris’s work as a horticulturalist resulted in a number of plants being names after him. Morris bred birds as a hobby and his knowledge and understanding of them may have contributed to his ability to paint them. In his “Peregrin Falcons” (1942), the birds are presented in a slightly formalised and simplified manner. His intention, he explained, was to "provoke a lively sympathy with the mood of the birds which ornithological exactitude may tend to destroy." In 1947 the Morris baronetcy came to his father from a distant cousin three months before his death and Cedric Morris succeeded his father in the same year to become the 9th Baronet Morris. He became a lecturer at the Royal College of Art in 1950. From about 1975 Morris virtually gave up painting because of failing eyesight. The school closed when Haines died in 1978, though Morris continued to live at Benton End until his death. Cedric Morris died on February 8, 1982. His former pupil, Maggi Hambling visited him on the day before his death and afterwards drew a portrait of him. His grave in Hadleigh cemetery is marked by a Welsh slate headstone cut by Donald Simpson.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lived: Via di S. Nicola da Tolentino, 00187 Roma
Buried: Campo Cestio, Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy, Plot: 1091
Buried alongside: Hélène de Kuegelgen

The Cimitero Acattolico ("Non-Catholic Cemetery") of Rome, often referred to as the Cimitero dei protestanti ("Protestant Cemetery") or Cimitero degli Inglesi ("Englishmen's Cemetery"), is a public cemetery in the rione of Testaccio in Rome.
Address: Via Caio Cestio, 6, 00153 Roma, Italy (41.8763, 12.4795)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 06 574 1900
Place
The Protestant Cemetery is near Porta San Paolo and adjacent to the Pyramid of Cestius, a small-scale Egyptian-style pyramid built in 30 BC as a tomb and later incorporated into the section of the Aurelian Walls that borders the cemetery. It was formerly called Cimitero Anticattolico, the anti-Catholic cemetery. It has Mediterranean cypress, pomegranate and other trees, and a grassy meadow. It is the final resting place of non-Catholics including but not exclusive to Protestants or British people. The earliest known burial is that of a University of Oxford student named Langton in 1738. The English poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley are buried there.
Notable queer burials at Campo Cestio:
• Hendrik Christian Andersen (April 15, 1872 – December 19, 1940), sculptor, friend of Henry James. A bust of the young Count Alberto Bevilacqua, a muse of sculptor Hendrik Christian Andersen, remains in the home of Henry James, Lamb House, in Rye, England. Henry James to Henrik Andersen, three years later, upon the death of Andersen’s brother: “The sense that I can’t help you, see you, talk to you, touch you, hold you close & long, or do anything to make you rest on my, & feel my deep participation – this torments me, dearest boy, makes my ache for you, & for myself; makes me gnash my teeth & groan at the bitterness of things. . . . This is the one thought that relieves me about you a little – & I wish you might fix your eyes on it for the idea, just, of the possibility. I am in town for a few weeks, but return to Rye Apr. 1, & sooner or later to have you there & do for you, to put my arm round you & make you lean on me as on a brother & a lover, & keep you on & on, slowly comforted or at least relieved of the bitterness of pain – this I try to imagine as thinkable, attainable, not wholly out of the question.”
• Dario Bellezza (1944–1996), Italian poet, author and playwright
• Enrico Coleman (1846–1911), artist and orchid-lover, friend of Giovanni “Nino” Costa (who was special friend with Elihu Vedder)
• Gregory Corso (1930–2001), American beat generation poet
• The tomb of Maria Bollvillez (Zona V.7.18) was the first of de Fauveau’s commissions from the Russian aristocracy. Félicie de Fauveau (1801–1886) was a XIX-century French sculptor who was a precursor of the pre-Raphaelite style. Her multiple sculptural works showcase a variety of techniques and mediums including marble, stone, glass and bronze. Her family connections to the restored Bourbon court of Charles X led to commissions that helped launch her early career in Paris. But in 1830 when Charles X was forced to abdicate, de Fauveau paid for her opposition to the new order by being imprisoned for three months and then, in 1833, went into exile in Florence. She made a striking figure on arrival there: as Ary Scheffer’s portrait shows, she had adopted an androgynous appearance, with cropped hair and male clothing. One visitor reported that she had vowed to keep her hair short until the Bourbon monarchy was restored in France (it never was). Her admirers included Italian opera singer Angelica Catalani and Elizabeth and Robert Browning, who had also made their home in Florence. De Fauveau’s works were coveted by the city’s Russian ex-pats including Anatole Demidoff; the artist received multiple commissions from the industrialist and enjoyed the friendship of his wife Caroline Bonaparte. The Tsar Nicolas I purchased various works from the artist and his daughter Maria Nikolaieva was given a dagger, now at the Louvre, whose handle is engraved with scenes from Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” Guy Cogeval (Musée d’Orsay) uses the word lesbienne (lesbian) in his introduction to the catalogue for the exhibition “The Amazon of sculpture”, whereas Christophe Vital mentions on the adjacent page that Félicie de Fauveau was sans doute (without doubt) in love with the young (male) page who died in the Vendée (Charles de Bonnechose, for whom Félicie designed a monument on her prison wall). Michelle Facos also explicitly suggests that Félicie de Fauveau might have been a lesbian in her “Introduction to Nineteenth-Century Art” ( 2011). Usually her relationship to the Countess de la Rochejaquelein is then referred to.
• Denham Fouts (1914-1948), referenced in literary works by Christopher Isherwood, Truman Capote, and Gore Vidal. He was also a friend of George Platt Lynes, who photographed him. Isherwood described him as a mythic figure, "the most expensive male prostitute in the world." Fouts died in 1948, at the Pensione Foggetti, in Rome, at the age of 35.
• Wilhelm von Humboldt (1794–1803), son of the German diplomat and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt and nephew of Alexander von Humboldt
• Hans von Marées (1837–1887), German painter
• Dora Ohlfsen (1878-1948) was born as Dorothea Ohlfsen-Bagge in Ballarat, Victoria. Her father was Norwegian, Christian Herm Ohlfsen-Bagge, probably born in Schleswig (northern Germany now), and her mother, Kate Harison, Australian. She claimed that her great-grandfather was the Sydney convict printer, Robert Howe. Dora was educated at Sydney Girls High School and studied piano privately with Max Volgrich and Henri Kowalski. She traveled to Germany in 1883 to continue her piano studies under Moritz Moszkowski in Berlin; however, when she contracted neuritis, she began teaching music in Germany and later in Russia, after completing piano studies at Theodor Kullak’s Neue Akademie der Tonkunst. She lived in St Petersburg with a Madame Kerbitz and took up painting; she sold one of her work to the Czarina. Her extentive knowledge of languages gained her employement with the American ambassador and allowed her to write on music, theatre, drama and art for Russian and American newspaper. After traveling through various Baltic countries, she settled in Rome to study sculpture at the French Academy and with French engraver, Pierre Dautel. She produced many medallions using academic portraits, included Lord Chelmsford, Sir James Fairfax and General Peppino Garibaldi, and Symbolyst compositions. Church commissions came from Cardinal O’Connell of Boston and Josef Alteneisel, Prince-Bishop of Brixen in the Tyrol. The medallion in bas-relief of the Prince Bishop of Brizen, Tyrol, is among her finest productions. It has been praised in the French and Italian papers as "the wonderful achievement of a beautiful young Australian, who has only studied art for a comparatively short time" (June 10 1908). During WWI she became a Red Cross nurse in Italy. The Fascist government were patrons of her work and she produced a large relief portrait medallion of Mussolini and a war memorial, “Sacrificio,” at Formia, in 1924-26. Ohlfsen was commissioned by Mussolini to design this memorial because her art studies had been solely in Italy and she had nursed Italian soldiers during the war. This is the only work of its kind in Italy to be made by a woman or a foreigner. William Moore in the Brisbane Courier of 8 March 1930 referred to her as the artist who modelled a bust of Nellie Stewart; she also sculpted the head of W.A. Holman in plaster. In 1948, she and her companion, the Russian Baroness Hélène de Kuegelgen (1879-1948), were found gassed in her studio in Rome at Via di S. Nicola da Tolentino, 00187 Roma, close to the Spanish Steps. They had been living at that address, in an area traditionally associated with artists’ studios, for nearly half a century. Police said the deaths were accidental. Hélène de Kuegelgen was the daughter of Pavel Kuegelgen and Alexandra, nee Zhudlovsky. They had moved to Italy in 1902 from St. Petersburg, a city they both loved but which they accurately saw as being on the brink of revolution. Hélène (Elena) was from a well-connected family of Balten Germans, with one uncle a physician to the Tsar and another editor of the Petersburger German newspaper. Her family also boasted several prominent artists, two of them court painters. Dora and Hélène are buried together. A relief bust of the god Dionysius, one hand raised in a gesture of blessing, watches over one of the most distinctive graves in the Cemetery (Zone 1.15.28). Ohlfsen's work is represented in the collections of the British Museum and the Petit Palais in Paris, and in Australian collections including Museum Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales.
• John Addington Symonds (1840–1893), English poet and critic
• Pavel Fedorovich Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian surrealist painter, long-time partner of Charles Henri Ford. Campo Cestio is the original burial place, he was then moved to Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris.
• Una Vincenzo, Lady Troubridge (1887-1983), died in Rome in 1963; she had left written instructions that her coffin be placed in the vault in Highgate Cemetery where Hall and Batten had been buried, but the instructions were discovered too late. She is buried in the English Cemetery in Rome, and on her coffin is inscribed "Una Vincenzo Troubridge, the friend of Radclyffe Hall".
• Elihu Vedder (1836–1923), American painter, sculptor, graphic artist
• Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840–1894) was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe. In 1893 Woolson rented an elegant apartment on the Grand Canal of Venice. Suffering from influenza and depression, she either jumped or fell to her death from a fourth story window in the apartment in January 1894, surviving for about an hour after the fall She is also memorialized by Anne's Tablet on Mackinac Island, Michigan.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Elizabeth Bishop was an American poet and short-story writer. She was Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 1949 to 1950, the Pulitzer Prize winner for Poetry in 1956, the National Book ...
Born: February 8, 1911, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States
Died: October 6, 1979, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Lived: 529 Whitehead Street, Key West, FL 33040, USA (24.55904, -81.79362)
624 White St, Key West, FL 33040, USA (24.55904, -81.79362)
611 Frances Street
Bertha Looker’s Boardinghouse, 1312 30th Street Northwest, Washington, D.C., USA (38.90725, -77.05952)
Elizabeth Bishop House, 8740 No 2 Highway, Great Village, NS B0M, Canada (45.4165, -63.5996)
Education: Vassar College
Walnut Hill School
Buried: Hope Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 6662473
Movies: Bishopric, First Death in Nova Scotia
Parents: William Thomas Bishop, Gertrude May Bulmer

Louise Crane was a prominent American philanthropist. Crane was a friend to some of New York’s leading literary figures, including Tennessee Williams and Marianne Moore. Crane's father was Winthrop Murray Crane, an American millionaire and former governor of Massachusetts. Her mother was MoMA founder Josephine Porter Boardman. Louise smoothly moved into the role of patron of the arts. She was a prominent supporter of jazz and orchestral music, initiating a series of "coffee concerts" at MoMA and commissioning a vocal and orchestral work by Lukas Foss. She even worked representing musicians, including Mary Lou Williams. Crane met Elizabeth Bishop while classmates together at Vassar in 1930. After graduation, Bishop moved into a small apartment in Greenwich Village, New York, and worked briefly at a correspondence school. From 1935, the pair traveled extensively in Europe and in 1938, they bought a house together in Key West, Florida. While Bishop lived in Key West, Crane occasionally returned to New York. In 1941, Bishop began a six-year-long relationship with Marjorie Stevens.
Together from 1930 to 1941: 11 years.
Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 - October 6, 1979)
Louise Crane (November 11, 1913 – October 20, 1997)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Elizabeth Bishop was an American poet and short-story writer. She was the Poet Laureate of the United States from 1949 to 1950 and the Pulitzer Prize winner for Poetry in 1956. Lota de Macedo Soares was a Brazilian aesthete who conceived and constructed the Flamengo Park in Rio de Janeiro. In 1951, Bishop travelled to South America on Norwegian freighter S.S. Bowplate, intending to stop in Brazil for only a few weeks. While in Brazil, she had an allergic reaction to the fruit of a cashew tree and was nursed back to health by her Brazilian friend, Lota de Macedo Soares. The two women fell in love and Bishop accepted Macedo Soares’s offer to build her a studio behind Macedo Soares’s Modernist house in the mountains above Petrópolis. In 1966, Bishop taught at the University of Washington in Seattle where she began a relationship with Roxanne Cumming. In 1967, Soares followed Bishop back to the United States, having recovered from an ailment with extensive hospitalization. The same day she arrived in New York, September 19, 1967, Soares committed suicide by overdosing on tranquilizers, and died several days later. Reaching for the Moon (2013) (original "Flores Raras"), directed by Bruno Barreto, tells the tragic love affair between them.
Together from 1951 to 1967: 16 years.
Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 - October 6, 1979)
Maria Carlota “Lota” Costallat de Macedo Soares (1910 – September 25, 1967)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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After Elizabeth Bishop’s death, the Elizabeth Bishop House, an artists’ retreat in Great Village, Nova Scotia, was dedicated to her memory.
Address: Elizabeth Bishop House, 8740 No 2 Highway, Great Village, NS B0M, Canada (45.4165, -63.5996)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built: Although the Bulmers bought the property in 1874, it is not known when it was built.
The Elizabeth Bishop House, also known as the Bulmer House, is an historic single-family house that today is used as an artists’ retreat in Great Village, Nova Scotia. The house is associated with Pulitzer Prize winning author Elizabeth Bishop who in her youth lived in the house each summer with her maternal grandparents, William Brown Bulmer and Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Bulmer. Bishop based many of her stories (such as "In the Village") and poems (such as "Filling Station") on aspects of Great Village and Nova Scotia. On May 21, 1997, the Bulmer House was recognized as a Nova Scotia Provincially Recognized Heritage Site for its connection to Elizabeth Bishop and her writings as well as for its architectural significance; it is a good example of a typical one-and-one-half storey Classical Revival dwelling dating from between 1800 and 1850, a type common to rural Nova Scotia.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979)
Elizabeth Bishop, an only child, was born in Worcester, Massachusetts. After her father, a successful builder, died when she was eight months old, Bishop’s mother became mentally ill and was institutionalized in 1916. (Bishop would later write about the time of her mother’s struggles in her short story "In The Village.") Effectively orphaned during her very early childhood, she lived with her grandparents on a farm in Great Village, Nova Scotia, a period she also referred to in her writing. Bishop’s mother remained in an asylum until her death in 1934, and the two were never reunited. Later in childhood, Bishop’s paternal family gained custody. She was removed from the care of her grandparents and moved in with her father’s wealthier family in Worcester, Massachusetts. However, Bishop was unhappy there, and her separation from her maternal grandparents made her lonely. Her time in Worcester is briefly chronicled in her poem "In The Waiting Room." In 1918, her grandparents, realizing that Bishop was unhappy living with them, sent her to live with her mother’s oldest sister, Maud Boomer Shepherdson, and her husband George. The Bishops paid Maud to house and educate their granddaughter. The Shepherdsons lived in a tenement in an impoverished Revere, Massachusetts neighborhood populated mostly by Irish and Italian immigrants. The family later moved to better circumstances in Cliftondale, Massachusetts. It was Bishop’s aunt who introduced her to the works of Victorian poets, including Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Thomas Carlyle, Robert Browning, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Elizabeth Bishop came to the island in the 1930s and initially rented an apartment at 529 Whitehead Street. In 1938, she purchased a XIX century clapboard Eyebrow house at 624 White Street, where she lived until 1946. She later lived in an apartment at 611 Frances Street, which looked out across tin shanty roofs and palm trees.
Address: 624 White St, Key West, FL 33040, USA (24.55904, -81.79362)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: The Armory (600 White St.), 71000243, 1971
Place
In a letter to Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop describes her surroundings: “I have one Key West story that I must tell you. It is more like the place than anything I can think of. The other day I went to the china closet to get a little white bowl to put some flowers in and when I was rinsing it I noticed some little black specks. I said to Mrs. Almyda, “I think we must have mice” – but she took the bowl over to the light and studied it and after a while she said, “No, them’s lizard.”” “It is very well made, with slightly arched beams so that it looks either like a ship’s cabin or a freight car.” The house was located right on the beach and was to Bishop “perfectly beautiful… inside and out.” Bishop’s first volume of poems, “North and South,” was published during the time she lived in Key West.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979) and Louise Crane (1913–1997)
Elizabeth Bishop was a poet and short-story writer. Poet Laureate of the United States from 1949 to 1950, the Pulitzer Prize winner for Poetry in 1956, the National Book Award winner in 1970, and the recipient of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature in 1976. She lived in France for several years in the mid-1930s with a friend from Vassar, Louise Crane, who was a paper-manufacturing heiress. In 1938, Elizabeth Bishop and Louise Crane purchased a house in Key West. Bishop lived at this residence off and on for the next nine years, first with Crane, then with a subsequent lover, Marjorie Stevens. While living there Bishop made the acquaintance of Pauline Pfeiffer Hemingway, who had divorced Ernest Hemingway in 1940.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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From 1949 to 1950, Elizabeth Bishop was the Consultant in Poetry for the Library of Congress, and lived at Bertha Looker’s Boardinghouse, 1312 30th Street Northwest, Washington, D.C., in Georgetown.
Address: 1312 30th Street Northwest, Washington, D.C., USA (38.90725, -77.05952)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1868
The Grafton Tyler Double House located at 1312 & 1314 30th Street, NW in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C., a Second Empire duplex, is a contributing property to the Georgetown Historic District and valued at $5,601,610. From 1949 to 1950, Poet Laureate of the United States Elizabeth Bishop lived at the address (then known as Bertha Looker’s Boardinghouse.)
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979)
Jane Dewey drove Elizabeth Bishop down to Washington on 12 September, 1949, and she moved into Bertha Looker’s all-female boardinghouse (“no gentlemen callers”) right away. Elizabeth pronounced it okay but asked a Washington acquaintance to help her look for an apartment; there were “too many ladies” at Miss Locker’s. In her first week in Washington, Elizabeth worked part time with Leonie Adams, hoping to ensure a smooth transition from one consultant to the next. In the afternoon, she visited and fell in love with the Phillips Collection, a private museum holding a wonderful group of paintings, French impressionists and others, including Renoir’s Luncheon of the Boating Party and a couple of Daumiers that Elizabeth said later made her feel as if her entire life had been wasted. On Monday, September 19, she sat behind the consultant’s desk alone for the first time. Her secretary, Phyllis Armstrong, quickly became a confidante, and together – with much more work done by Armstrong, one surmises – they kept the office running.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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At Hope Cemetery (119 Webster St, Worcester, MA 01603) is buried Elizabeth Bishop (1911–1979), American poet and short-story writer. Poet Laureate of the United States from 1949 to 1950 and Pulitzer Prize winner for Poetry in 1956.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Georgette Leblanc was a French operatic soprano, actress, author, and the sister of novelist Maurice Leblanc. She became particularly associated with the works of Jules Massenet and was an admired interpreter of the title role in Bizet's Carmen.
Born: February 8, 1869, Rouen, France
Died: October 27, 1941, Le Cannet, France
Lived: Tancarville Lighthouse, 4 route du Havre, 76430 Tancarville, France (49.47756, 0.46687)
Buried: Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery, Le Cannet, Departement des Alpes-Maritimes, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Buried alongside: Margaret Anderson
Movies: L'Inhumaine, Macbeth
Books: The children's Blue bird
Siblings: Maurice Leblanc

Margaret Anderson was the American founder, editor and publisher of the art and literary magazine The Little Review. In 1916, Anderson met Jane Heap, a spirited intellectual and artist immersed in the Chicago Arts and Crafts Movement, and a former lesbian lover to novelist Djuna Barnes. The two became lovers, and Anderson convinced her to become co-editor of The Little Review. Georgette Leblanc was a French operatic soprano, actress, author, and the sister of novelist Maurice Leblanc. Leblanc was the lover of Maurice Maeterlinck, and he wrote several parts for her. She was also a close friend of fellow Gurdjieff’s student Anderson and some scholars speculate the two may have been lovers during the last 15 years of Leblanc's life. By 1942, Anderson’s relationship with Heap had cooled, and Anderson sailed for the United States. With her passage paid by Ernest Hemingway, Anderson met on the voyage Dorothy Caruso, widow of the singer and famous tenor Enrico Caruso. The two began a romantic relationship, and lived together until Caruso's death in 1955. Anderson died in 1973 and is buried beside Georgette Leblanc in the Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery.
Together from 1926 to 1941: 15 years.
Georgette Leblanc (February 8, 1869 – October 27, 1941)
Margaret Caroline Anderson (November 24, 1886 – October 19, 1973)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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After Jane Heap moved to London, Margaret Anderson moved in the Tancarville Lighthouse for many years living with the French singer Georgette Leblanc, Anderson’s sister Lois and Lois’s daughter Linda Card.
Address: 4 route du Havre, 76430 Tancarville, France (49.47756, 0.46687)
Type: Administrative building (open to public)
Place
Built in 1838
Inactive since 1868, the Tancarville Lighthouse is a 10 m (30 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one end of a 2-story keeper's house. The Lighthouse and entire building are painted in white. Long in use as a private residence, the house has been expanded and altered from its original appearance. Located on a bluff on the north side of the Seine just east of the Tancarville bridge (E-05), about 30 km (19 mi) west of Le Havre.
Life
Who: Georgette Leblanc (February 8, 1869 – October 27, 1941)
Georgette Leblanc was born in Tancarville. Sister of the writer Maurice Leblanc, she grew up in a literary climate exaltation shines through in the course of his life. Noticed by Massenet, she debuted in 1893 at the Opera-Comique in the role of Françoise in “L’Attaque du moulin” by Bruneau, but abandoned in 1894 the Parisian scene for the Theatre de la Monnaie, emigrating in Brussels hoping to met her idol, Maurice Maeterlinck. On the sidelines of their romantic idyll, she managed to forge with him a working relationship and played “Carmen” in 1895, “Thais” and “La Navarraise” by Massenet the following year. Back to Paris, where she introduced her companion, she performed in the lieder recitals of Schubert and Schumann (translated by Maeterlinck), played “Sappho” by Gounod at the Opera-Comique in 1897 and the following year inaugurated the new “Salle Favart” in the role of Carmen. In 1902 Debussy preferred Mary Garden for the role of Mélisande that Leblanc will sing at the Opera Boston (led by A. Caplet). Meanwhile, she was in “Ariane” and “Barbe-bleue” by Dukas (Opera-Comique, 1907). She was in “L’Oiseau Blue” by A. Wolff (Met, 1919). She made lectures on the works of Maeterlinck and took part in theatrical production of his plays: “Monna Vanna” (1903), “Marie-Magdalene” (1913), “Pelléas et Mélisande” (Sarah Bernhardt playing Pelléas). During a trip to the United States she met with Helen Keller and she disclosed the Keller’s extraordinary history in Europe by publishing between 1912 and 1914 two books in English: “The Girl Who Found the Blue Bird: A Visit to Helen Keller” and “Man's Miracle, the Story of Helen Keller and her European Sisters.” After the breakup with Maeterlinck in 1918, Georgette Leblanc acquired the Tancarville Lighthouse, where she lived with her partner Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), author and publisher, American native of Indianapolis. Both were members of "La Cordée" (The Rope), a Sapphic group formed and led by the guru George Gurdjieff in 1935. Seriously ill, she moved to Le Cannet in the French Riviera in 1940, dying in 1941.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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After much suffering from emphysema, Margaret Anderson died of heart failure in 1973 at the Clinique Beausoleil in Cannes; she was buried in Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery besides Georgette Leblanc.
Address: Rue de l’Ouest, 06110 Le Cannet, France (43.57218, 7.01507)
Type: Religious Building (open to public)
Phone: +33 4 93 46 28 68
Place
After her companion Jane Heap left for London to lead Gurdjieff study groups, Anderson stayed in France and continued working with Gurdjieff, bringing two of her companions (Georgette Leblanc and Dorothy Caruso) and even Leblanc’s salt-of-the-earth housekeeper, Mathilde Serrure, into The Rope as well. She published three volumes of her own autobiography (“My Thirty Years War,” “The Fiery Fountains,” and “The Strange Necessity”), as well as her own account of the Rope years, “The Unknowable Gurdjieff.” The first volume of Georgette Leblanc autobiography was translated into English by Janet Flanner; the second, “La Machine à Courage,” deals with her impressions of Gurdjieff and her long battle with cancer, to which she succumbed in 1941, being the first of the Rope to die. Leblanc decided to move from Tancarville in the north to Le Cannet, where friends found her a modest little house, “Le Chalet Rose”. She moved there in Feb. 1940 with her two friends, Mathilde Serrure and Margaret Anderson. Georgette Leblanc died at Le Cannet, Alpes-Maritimes in 1941 and was buried in the Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery, and Mathilde Serrure and Margaret Anderson, who died later, are buried with her. Dorothy Caruso, widow of Enrico Caruso, became Anderson’s companion after Leblanc’s death and describes her latter-day acquaintance with Gurdjieff in her autobiography, “A Personal History.” After Gurdjieff’s death Anderson and Caruso moved back to United States, where Caruso died of cancer in 1955. Anderson then returned to southern France, where Mathilde Serrure lived with her until she died at the age of 90 in 1968. Anderson herself died there in the village of Le Cannet in 1973. Both of them are buried beside Georgette Leblanc.
Life
Who: Georgette Leblanc (February 8, 1869 - October 27, 1941) and Margaret Caroline Anderson (November 24, 1886 – October 19, 1973)
Georgette Leblanc was a French operatic soprano, actress, author, and the sister of novelist Maurice Leblanc. For many years Leblanc was the lover of Belgian playwright and writer Maurice Maeterlinck, and he wrote several parts for her within his stage plays. After her relationship with Maeterlinck ended, Leblanc remained active on the stage within his plays throughout the 1920s, although her singing career was pretty much over. She had a number of romantic relationships with high profile individuals during the 1920s and 1930s. For a brief time she was involved with Greco-Armenian mystic G. I. Gurdjieff. She was also a close friend of fellow Gurdjieff student Margaret Anderson and some scholars speculate the two may have been lovers during the last fifteen years of Leblanc’s life. Margaret Anderson was the American founder, editor and publisher of the art and literary magazine The Little Review, which published a collection of modern American, English and Irish writers between 1914 and 1929. In 1916, Anderson met Jane Heap, a spirited intellectual and artist immersed in the Chicago Arts and Crafts Movement, and a former lover to novelist Djuna Barnes. The two became lovers, and Anderson convinced her to become co-editor of The Little Review. Heap maintained a low profile, signing her contributions simply "jh,” but she had a major impact on the success of the journal through its bold and radical content. In early 1924, through Alfred Richard Orage, Anderson came to know of spiritual teacher George Ivanovitch Gurdjieff, and saw performances of his “Sacred dances,” first at the “Neighbourhood Playhouse,” and later at Carnegie Hall. Shortly after Gurdjieff’s automobile accident, Anderson, along with Georgette Leblanc, Jane Heap and Mathilde Serrure, moved to France to visit him at Fountainebleau-Avon, where he had set up his institute at Château du Prieuré in Avon. Anderson and Heap adopted the two sons of Anderson’s ailing sister, Lois. They brought Lois and sons Tom and Arthur “Fritz” Peters to Prieuré in June, 1924. After they returned to New York in 1925, two of the boys were taken in by Alice B. Toklas and Gertrude Stein. Later, Anderson moved to France to live in the Tancarville Lighthouse for many years with the French singer Georgette Leblanc and Lois and her daughter Linda Card. Leblanc died in 1941. By 1942 Anderson’s relationship with Heap had cooled, and, evacuating from the war in France, Anderson sailed for the United States. Jane Heap had moved to London in 1935, where she led Gurdjieff study groups until her death in 1964. With her passage paid by Ernest Hemingway, Anderson met on the voyage Dorothy Caruso, widow of the singer and famous tenor Enrico Caruso. The two began a romantic relationship, and lived together until Caruso’s death in 1955. Jane Heap died in London in 1964 and is buried at East Finchley, London Borough of Barnet. Anderson returned to Le Cannet after Caruso’s death, and there she died of emphysema on October 19, 1973. She is buried beside Georgette Leblanc in the Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lived: Via di S. Nicola da Tolentino, 00187 Roma
Buried: Campo Cestio, Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy, Plot: 1091
Buried alongside: Dora Ohlfsen

The Cimitero Acattolico ("Non-Catholic Cemetery") of Rome, often referred to as the Cimitero dei protestanti ("Protestant Cemetery") or Cimitero degli Inglesi ("Englishmen's Cemetery"), is a public cemetery in the rione of Testaccio in Rome.
Address: Via Caio Cestio, 6, 00153 Roma, Italy (41.8763, 12.4795)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 06 574 1900
Place
The Protestant Cemetery is near Porta San Paolo and adjacent to the Pyramid of Cestius, a small-scale Egyptian-style pyramid built in 30 BC as a tomb and later incorporated into the section of the Aurelian Walls that borders the cemetery. It was formerly called Cimitero Anticattolico, the anti-Catholic cemetery. It has Mediterranean cypress, pomegranate and other trees, and a grassy meadow. It is the final resting place of non-Catholics including but not exclusive to Protestants or British people. The earliest known burial is that of a University of Oxford student named Langton in 1738. The English poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley are buried there.
Notable queer burials at Campo Cestio:
• Hendrik Christian Andersen (April 15, 1872 – December 19, 1940), sculptor, friend of Henry James. A bust of the young Count Alberto Bevilacqua, a muse of sculptor Hendrik Christian Andersen, remains in the home of Henry James, Lamb House, in Rye, England. Henry James to Henrik Andersen, three years later, upon the death of Andersen’s brother: “The sense that I can’t help you, see you, talk to you, touch you, hold you close & long, or do anything to make you rest on my, & feel my deep participation – this torments me, dearest boy, makes my ache for you, & for myself; makes me gnash my teeth & groan at the bitterness of things. . . . This is the one thought that relieves me about you a little – & I wish you might fix your eyes on it for the idea, just, of the possibility. I am in town for a few weeks, but return to Rye Apr. 1, & sooner or later to have you there & do for you, to put my arm round you & make you lean on me as on a brother & a lover, & keep you on & on, slowly comforted or at least relieved of the bitterness of pain – this I try to imagine as thinkable, attainable, not wholly out of the question.”
• Dario Bellezza (1944–1996), Italian poet, author and playwright
• Enrico Coleman (1846–1911), artist and orchid-lover, friend of Giovanni “Nino” Costa (who was special friend with Elihu Vedder)
• Gregory Corso (1930–2001), American beat generation poet
• The tomb of Maria Bollvillez (Zona V.7.18) was the first of de Fauveau’s commissions from the Russian aristocracy. Félicie de Fauveau (1801–1886) was a XIX-century French sculptor who was a precursor of the pre-Raphaelite style. Her multiple sculptural works showcase a variety of techniques and mediums including marble, stone, glass and bronze. Her family connections to the restored Bourbon court of Charles X led to commissions that helped launch her early career in Paris. But in 1830 when Charles X was forced to abdicate, de Fauveau paid for her opposition to the new order by being imprisoned for three months and then, in 1833, went into exile in Florence. She made a striking figure on arrival there: as Ary Scheffer’s portrait shows, she had adopted an androgynous appearance, with cropped hair and male clothing. One visitor reported that she had vowed to keep her hair short until the Bourbon monarchy was restored in France (it never was). Her admirers included Italian opera singer Angelica Catalani and Elizabeth and Robert Browning, who had also made their home in Florence. De Fauveau’s works were coveted by the city’s Russian ex-pats including Anatole Demidoff; the artist received multiple commissions from the industrialist and enjoyed the friendship of his wife Caroline Bonaparte. The Tsar Nicolas I purchased various works from the artist and his daughter Maria Nikolaieva was given a dagger, now at the Louvre, whose handle is engraved with scenes from Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” Guy Cogeval (Musée d’Orsay) uses the word lesbienne (lesbian) in his introduction to the catalogue for the exhibition “The Amazon of sculpture”, whereas Christophe Vital mentions on the adjacent page that Félicie de Fauveau was sans doute (without doubt) in love with the young (male) page who died in the Vendée (Charles de Bonnechose, for whom Félicie designed a monument on her prison wall). Michelle Facos also explicitly suggests that Félicie de Fauveau might have been a lesbian in her “Introduction to Nineteenth-Century Art” ( 2011). Usually her relationship to the Countess de la Rochejaquelein is then referred to.
• Denham Fouts (1914-1948), referenced in literary works by Christopher Isherwood, Truman Capote, and Gore Vidal. He was also a friend of George Platt Lynes, who photographed him. Isherwood described him as a mythic figure, "the most expensive male prostitute in the world." Fouts died in 1948, at the Pensione Foggetti, in Rome, at the age of 35.
• Wilhelm von Humboldt (1794–1803), son of the German diplomat and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt and nephew of Alexander von Humboldt
• Hans von Marées (1837–1887), German painter
• Dora Ohlfsen (1878-1948) was born as Dorothea Ohlfsen-Bagge in Ballarat, Victoria. Her father was Norwegian, Christian Herm Ohlfsen-Bagge, probably born in Schleswig (northern Germany now), and her mother, Kate Harison, Australian. She claimed that her great-grandfather was the Sydney convict printer, Robert Howe. Dora was educated at Sydney Girls High School and studied piano privately with Max Volgrich and Henri Kowalski. She traveled to Germany in 1883 to continue her piano studies under Moritz Moszkowski in Berlin; however, when she contracted neuritis, she began teaching music in Germany and later in Russia, after completing piano studies at Theodor Kullak’s Neue Akademie der Tonkunst. She lived in St Petersburg with a Madame Kerbitz and took up painting; she sold one of her work to the Czarina. Her extentive knowledge of languages gained her employement with the American ambassador and allowed her to write on music, theatre, drama and art for Russian and American newspaper. After traveling through various Baltic countries, she settled in Rome to study sculpture at the French Academy and with French engraver, Pierre Dautel. She produced many medallions using academic portraits, included Lord Chelmsford, Sir James Fairfax and General Peppino Garibaldi, and Symbolyst compositions. Church commissions came from Cardinal O’Connell of Boston and Josef Alteneisel, Prince-Bishop of Brixen in the Tyrol. The medallion in bas-relief of the Prince Bishop of Brizen, Tyrol, is among her finest productions. It has been praised in the French and Italian papers as "the wonderful achievement of a beautiful young Australian, who has only studied art for a comparatively short time" (June 10 1908). During WWI she became a Red Cross nurse in Italy. The Fascist government were patrons of her work and she produced a large relief portrait medallion of Mussolini and a war memorial, “Sacrificio,” at Formia, in 1924-26. Ohlfsen was commissioned by Mussolini to design this memorial because her art studies had been solely in Italy and she had nursed Italian soldiers during the war. This is the only work of its kind in Italy to be made by a woman or a foreigner. William Moore in the Brisbane Courier of 8 March 1930 referred to her as the artist who modelled a bust of Nellie Stewart; she also sculpted the head of W.A. Holman in plaster. In 1948, she and her companion, the Russian Baroness Hélène de Kuegelgen (1879-1948), were found gassed in her studio in Rome at Via di S. Nicola da Tolentino, 00187 Roma, close to the Spanish Steps. They had been living at that address, in an area traditionally associated with artists’ studios, for nearly half a century. Police said the deaths were accidental. Hélène de Kuegelgen was the daughter of Pavel Kuegelgen and Alexandra, nee Zhudlovsky. They had moved to Italy in 1902 from St. Petersburg, a city they both loved but which they accurately saw as being on the brink of revolution. Hélène (Elena) was from a well-connected family of Balten Germans, with one uncle a physician to the Tsar and another editor of the Petersburger German newspaper. Her family also boasted several prominent artists, two of them court painters. Dora and Hélène are buried together. A relief bust of the god Dionysius, one hand raised in a gesture of blessing, watches over one of the most distinctive graves in the Cemetery (Zone 1.15.28). Ohlfsen's work is represented in the collections of the British Museum and the Petit Palais in Paris, and in Australian collections including Museum Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales.
• John Addington Symonds (1840–1893), English poet and critic
• Pavel Fedorovich Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian surrealist painter, long-time partner of Charles Henri Ford. Campo Cestio is the original burial place, he was then moved to Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris.
• Una Vincenzo, Lady Troubridge (1887-1983), died in Rome in 1963; she had left written instructions that her coffin be placed in the vault in Highgate Cemetery where Hall and Batten had been buried, but the instructions were discovered too late. She is buried in the English Cemetery in Rome, and on her coffin is inscribed "Una Vincenzo Troubridge, the friend of Radclyffe Hall".
• Elihu Vedder (1836–1923), American painter, sculptor, graphic artist
• Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840–1894) was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe. In 1893 Woolson rented an elegant apartment on the Grand Canal of Venice. Suffering from influenza and depression, she either jumped or fell to her death from a fourth story window in the apartment in January 1894, surviving for about an hour after the fall She is also memorialized by Anne's Tablet on Mackinac Island, Michigan.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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limyrevandra-20
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Jack Edward Larson was an American actor, librettist, screenwriter and producer. He is best known for his portrayal of photographer/cub reporter Jimmy Olsen on the television series Adventures of Superman.
Born: February 8, 1928, Los Angeles, California, United States
Died: September 20, 2015, Brentwood, Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: Pasadena City College
Montebello High School
Lived: George Sturges House, 449 N Skyewiay Rd, Los Angeles, CA 90049, USA (34.06688, -118.48125)
Buried: Rose Hills Memorial Park, Whittier, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Garden of Peace, Section 4, Lot 148, Grave 3
Libretti: Lord Byron
Parents: Anita Calicoff Larson, George Larson

James Bridges was an American screenwriter and film director. He got his start as a writer for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and one of his episodes, An Unlocked Window, earned him a 1966 Edgar Award. Bridges went on to write and direct a number of notable films, including The Baby Maker, The Paper Chase, September 30, 1955, The China Syndrome, Urban Cowboy, Perfect, and Bright Lights, Big City. From 1958 to 1993, his life partner was actor Jack Larson, best known for his portrayal of Jimmy Olsen in the TV series Adventures of Superman, whom he met during the filming of “Johnny Trouble” (1957). Among his other work, Larson wrote the libretto to the opera Lord Byron to music by Virgil Thomson. He was the first playwright to be awarded a grant by the Rockfeller Foundation. Bridges died in Los Angeles, California of cancer. The James Bridges Theater at University of California, Los Angeles was named in his honor in Nov. 1999. Larson owned the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed George Sturges House in the Brentwood section of Los Angeles, California. Larson died on September 20, 2015, and his memorial was held at UCLA James Bridges Theatre on Dec. 6, 2015.
Together from 1958 to 1993: 35 years.
Jack Larson (February 8, 1928 – September 20, 2015)
James Bridges (February 3, 1936 - June 6, 1993)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The home is a privately owned residence (owned by Jack Larson until his death in 2015), but it can be viewed easily from the street.
Address: 449 N Skyewiay Rd, Los Angeles, CA 90049, USA (34.06688, -118.48125)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1939, Design by Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959)
The George Sturges House is a single-family house built for George D. Sturges in the Brentwood Heights neighborhood of Brentwood, Los Angeles, California. The one-story residence is fairly small, 1,200 square feet (110 m2), but features a 21-foot panoramic deck. The home is made out of concrete, steel, brick and redwood. Wright hired Taliesin fellow John Lautner to oversee its construction. The Sturges House is the only structure in Southern California built in the modern style Wright called Usonian design. Other Wright homes in the area were built in the 1920s with interlocking, pre-cast concrete blocks, which he named "textile block" style, and seen in such homes as the Ennis House. The Sturges House was designated as Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #577 on May 25, 1993.
Life
Who: Jack Edward Larson (February 8, 1928 – September 20, 2015)
Jack Larson was an actor, librettist, screenwriter and producer. He is best known for his portrayal of photographer/cub reporter Jimmy Olsen on the television series Adventures of Superman. Larson was the life partner of director James Bridges from 1958 until Bridges’ death on June 6, 1993. Prior to that, he was the companion of actor Montgomery Clift. He died on September 20, 2015 at the age of 87. His interment was at Rose Hills Memorial Park in Whittier, California.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Jack Larson (1928-2015), American actor, librettist, screenwriter and producer, is buried at Rose Hills Memorial Park (3888 Workman Mill Rd, Whittier, CA 90601).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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James Byron Dean was an American actor. He is remembered as a cultural icon of teenage disillusionment and social estrangement, as expressed in the title of his most celebrated film, Rebel Without a ...
Born: February 8, 1931, Marion, Indiana, United States
Died: September 30, 1955, Cholame, California, United States
Education: University of California, Los Angeles
Santa Monica College
Actors Studio
Lived: 19 W 68th St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.7742, -73.97854)
Warwick New York Hotel, 65 W 54th St, New York, NY 10019, USA (40.76253, -73.97816)
Buried: Park Cemetery, Fairmount, Grant County, Indiana, USA, GPS (lat/lon): 40.43417, -85.64556
Height: 1.73 m

James Dean had a 12 x 12 ft room with the bathroom down the hall at 19 West 68th Street. He left New Yotk and his apartment in 1955, just 9 months before his death in a car accident.
Address: 19 W 68th St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.7742, -73.97854)
Type: Private Property
Place
In October 1951, following the encouragement of actor James Whitmore and the advice of his mentor Rogers Brackett, James Dean moved to New York City. Screenwriter William Bast was one of Dean’s closest friends, a fact acknowledged by Dean’s family. According to Bast, who was also Dean’s first biographer (1956), he was Dean’s roommate at UCLA and later in New York, and knew Dean throughout the last five years of his life. Fifty years after Dean’s death, he stated that their friendship had included some sexual intimacy. While at UCLA, Dean dated Beverly Wills, an actress with CBS, and Jeanette Lewis, a classmate. Bast and Dean often double-dated with them. Wills began dating Dean alone, later telling Bast, "Bill, there’s something we have to tell you. It’s Jimmy and me. I mean, we’re in love." They broke up after Dean "exploded" when another man asked her to dance while they were at a function: "Jimmy saw red. He grabbed the fellow by the collar and threatened to blacken both of his eyes," she said. Dean had also remained in contact with his girlfriend in New York, Barbara Glenn, whom he dated for two years. Their love letters sold at auction in 2011 for $36,000. Actress Liz Sheridan detailed her relationship with Dean in New York in 1952. Speaking of the relationship in 1996, she said that it was "just kind of magical. It was the first love for both of us." Sheridan published her memoir, “Dizzy & Jimmy: My Life with James Dean; A Love Story” in 2000. William Bast died in May 4, 2015, at 74, after 49 years of life together with his partner Paul Huson.
Life
Who: James Byron Dean (February 8, 1931 – September 30, 1955)
Early in Dean’s career, after Dean signed his contract with Warner Brothers, the studio’s public relations department began generating stories about Dean’s liaisons with a variety of young actresses who were mostly drawn from the clientele of Dean’s Hollywood agent, Dick Clayton. Studio press releases also grouped Dean together with two other actors, Rock Hudson and Tab Hunter, identifying each of the men as an “eligible bachelor” who has not yet found the time to commit to a single woman: "They say their film rehearsals are in conflict with their marriage rehearsals." Aside from Bast’s account of his own relationship with Dean, Dean’s fellow biker and "Night Watch" member John Gilmore claims he and Dean "experimented" with gay acts on one occasion in New York, and it is difficult to see how Dean, then already in his twenties, would have viewed this as a "trade" means of advancing his career. James Bellah, the son of James Warner Bellah who was a friend of Dean’s at UCLA said "Dean was a user. I don’t think he was homosexual. But if he could get something by performing an act..." Screenwriter Gavin Lambert, himself gay and part of the Hollywood gay circles of the 1950s and 1960s, described Dean as being gay. Rebel director Nicholas Ray is on record as saying that Dean was gay, while author John Howlett believes that Dean was "certainly bisexual.” George Perry’s biography reduces these reported aspects of Dean’s sexuality to "experimentation.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The Warwick New York Hotel is a luxury hotel located at 65 West 54th Street, near Sixth Avenue in Manhattan, New York City. It is owned by Warwick International Hotels.
Address: 65 W 54th St, New York, NY 10019, USA (40.76253, -73.97816)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 (212) 247-2700
Place
Built in 1926
William Randolph Hearst built the Warwick New York Hotel for $5 million. Long catering to the elite, Hearst built the 36-story residential tower to accommodate his Hollywood friends as well as his mistress, the actress Marion Davies, who had her own specially-designed floor in the building. The hotel’s restaurant, Murals on 54, features the 1937 murals of illustrator Dean Cornwell. The famed murals were fully restored following a 2004 renovation of the restaurant. The Warwick is also home to Randolph’s Bar & Lounge, whose rosebud leitmotif references Hearst’s purported nickname for Marion Davies.
Notable queer residents at Warwick Hotel:
• James Dean (1931–1955) was a frequent guest.
• Cary Grant (1904-1986) resided at the Warwick and lived in the hotel for 12 years.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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At Park Cemetery (Fairmount, IN 46928) is buried James Dean (February 8, 1931 – September 30, 1955). Dean is often considered an icon because of his "experimental" take on life, which included his ambivalent sexuality. There have been several claims that Dean had sexual relationships with both men and women. When questioned about his sexual orientation, he is reported to have said, "No, I am not a homosexual. But I'm also not going to go through life with one hand tied behind my back." In 2005, Germaine Greer wrote, "Looking back over half a century to the meteoric career of James Dean, the one thing that now seems obvious is that the boy was as queer as a coot." She based her opinion partly on the then-new revelations of William Bast, one of Dean's closest friends. 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Kate Chopin, born Katherine O'Flaherty, was a U.S. author of short stories and novels. She is now considered by some to have been a forerunner of the feminist authors of the 20th century of Southern or Catholic background, such as Zelda Fitzgerald.
Born: February 8, 1850, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
Died: August 22, 1904, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
Education: Academy of the Sacred Heart, St. Charles
Lived: 4232 McPherson Ave, St Louis, MO 63108, USA (38.64271, -90.24881)
Buried: Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum, Saint Louis, St. Louis City, Missouri, USA, Plot: Sec 17, lot 47
Spouse: Oscar Chopin (m. 1870–1882)
Children: Marie Laïza Chopin, Felix Andrew Chopin, more

Kate Chopin was an American author of short stories and novels. She is considered to have been a forerunner of feminist authors of the 20th century. An early feminist, many of Chopin’s writings feature intimate female-female relationships. So did her life, one of her friends was Sister Katherine "Kitty" Garesche, from school days. Garesche entered the Sacred Heart convent shortly after Chopin married but the two women continued their intimate friendship for the rest of their lives. In 1900, Chopin wrote a poem for Garesche’s fiftieth birthday: “It is not all of life / to cling together while the years / glide past. / It is not all of love / to walk with clasped hands from / first to last. / that mystic garland which the / spring did twine / of scented lilac and the new- / blown rose, / Faster than chains will hold my / soul to thine / Thro’ joy, and grief, thro’ life- / unto its close.” Chopin's short story Lilacs portrays at least a yearning for intimacy between a nun and a sometime female visitor.
They met in before 1868 and remained friends until Chopin’s death in 1904: 36 years.
Kate Chopin (February 8, 1850 — August 22, 1904)
Kitty Garesche (1850 - March 10, 1940)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The Kate Chopin House in St. Louis, Missouri, is the former home of author Kate Chopin. The house was built by contractor Oscar F. Humphrey.
Address: 4232 McPherson Ave, St Louis, MO 63108, USA (38.64271, -90.24881)
Type: Private Property
LGBTQ-friendly Bookstores: Left Bank Books (399 N. Euclid, St. Louis, MO 63108 and 321 N. 10th Street, St. Louis, MO 63101)
National Register of Historic Places: 86000209, 1986
Place
Built in 1897
Kate Chopin moved to the house in 1903 and lived there until her death in 1904; while living in the house, she wrote her last poem and story. The house at 4232 McPherson is her only surviving former residence in St. Louis. Kate Chopin is buried at Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum (5239 W Florissant Ave, St. Louis, MO 6311), where you can also find the burial place of Tennesse Williams (his family, against his last wishes, buried him in St. Louis), and of author William S. Burroughs of the Beat Generation, at the nearby Bellefontaine Cemetery (4947 W Florissant Ave, St. Louis, MO 63115). As Mother Kitty Garesché, RSCJ, Katherine Milligan "Kitty" Garesché (Chopin life-long friend) had a long career in education, ending her days as superior at the Academy of the Sacred Heart in Grosse Pointe, MI. She is buried at Mount Olivet Cemetery, Detroit.
Life
Who: Kate Chopin, nèe Katherine O’Flaherty (February 8, 1850 – August 22, 1904)
Kate Chopin was an author of short stories and novels. She is now considered by some to have been a forerunner of the feminist authors of the XX century of Southern or Catholic background, such as Zelda Fitzgerald. Kate Chopin moved to Louisiana with her husband Oscar and their five children in 1879. Her house was located on Main Street (Louisiana Highway 1) in Cloutierville, in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. The home was built by the town’s founder, Alexis Cloutier and was constructed in a combination of handmade brick, hand-hewn cypress boards, and bousillage. Its construction, done through the use of slave labor, dated to between 1806 and 1813. Kate Chopin’s sixth child, a daughter named Lélia, was born there shortly after the family’s arrival in 1879. Oscar set up a general store and ran the business end of the family plantation. Shortly after their arrival in Cloutierville, he inherited a quarter of the family property. Chopin would later describe the neighborhood in her 1891 short story "For Marse Chouchoute" as "two long rows of very old frame houses, facing each other closely across a dusty roadway.” Neighbors, mostly of French-Creole descent, did not approve of Chopin’s fashion and tendency to smoke cigarettes, play cards, and go for walks alone. Local gossip also suggested that Chopin lifted her skirt higher than necessary when walking, showing her ankles. Kate Chopin only lived there for about four years when her husband died. Oscar Chopin had suffered from malaria and overdosed on quinine, leading to his wife Kate to take over the business. However, she soon left the home and relocated to St. Louis, Missouri by mid-1884 to be with her mother. She left her sons with the family of her husband in Cloutierville. One of her friends was Sister Katherine “Kitty” Garesche (1850-1940) since their school days together. In 1900, Chopin wrote a poem for Garesche’s 50th birthday:
It is not all of life
To cling together while the years
Glide past.
It is not all of love
To walk with clasped hands from
First to last.
That mystic garland which the
Spring did twine
Of scented lilac and the new-
Blown rose,
Faster than chains will hold my
Soul to thine
Thro’ joy, and grief, thro’ life-
Unto its close.
Her stories discussed the evolving role of women in American society, and contemporary literary critics considered her one of the most significant St. Louis authors of the period.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Kate Cory was an American photographer and artist. She studied art in New York, and then worked as commercial artist.
Born: February 8, 1861, Waukegan, Illinois, United States
Died: June 12, 1958, Prescott, Arizona, United States
Education: Cooper Union
Art Students League of New York
Lived: Thumb Butte Rd, Prescott, AZ, USA (34.5276, -112.54503)
Buried: Arizona Pioneers Home Cemetery, Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona, USA, Plot: Simmons Section
Books: The Hopi photographs

Kate T. Cory moved to Prescott, Arizona in 1913 and lived in a stone house in the Idylwild Tract. Cory exhibited a painting, Arizona desert, at the Armory Show of 1913 which sold for $150, and received an honorable mention at the show.
Address: Thumb Butte Rd, Prescott, AZ, USA (34.5276, -112.54503)
Type: Private Property
Place
Kate T. Cory’s friend, Louis Akin, suggested Prescott as a good place for an artist. In 1912, at the age of 51, Kate moved into her little pueblo style house in the Idylwild Tract on Thumb Butte Road. She continued to live simply; a vegetarian, she tended a garden and cooked on a wood stove. She fulfilled commissions for private collectors as well as the Santa Fe railroad. Her paintings garnered State Fair awards and national recognition. Her painting “Arizona Desert” was shown at the groundbreaking 1913 Armory Show in New York. During WWI, she returned east and worked in a Women’s Land Army garden project raising vegetables for the war effort. She also experimented with camouflage techniques and tested materials used in the construction of aircraft designs. After the war, Kate joined Sharlot Hall working in the “Way Out West” program, intended to help preserve Native American customs and to raise money for the Frontier Days Rodeo. In Prescott, she gained a reputation as an eccentric spinster. Her church family at the First Congregational Church was concerned for her welfare; she was thin and dressed in old, worn clothes. Possessions were not important to Kate; she often shared or gave away what she had. She was described as a lesbian and having had "a plain, weather-beaten face, pulled-back hair, a determined black-clothed walk with a cane, as if every trip downtown were aimed at confronting the mayor."



Life
Who: Kate Cory (February 8, 1861 – June 12, 1958)
Kate Thompson Cory was an American photographer and artist. She studied art in New York, and then worked as commercial artist. She traveled to the southwestern United States in 1905 and lived among the Hopi for several years, recording their lives in about 600 photographs. Cory was born in Waukegan, Illinois on February 8, 1861. Her parents were James Young Cory (1828-1901), born in Canada, and Eliza P. Kellogg Cory (1829-1903), born in Maine. They also had a son, named James Stewart Cory. An abolitionist, her father was involved in the Underground Railroad. Kate Cory was related to Fanny Cory, illustrator of the Little Miss Muffet comic book. She died in Prescott on June 12, 1958 at the Arizona Pioneers' Home and was buried at the cemetery there near her friend Sharlot Hall (Prescott, Yavapai County, Plot: Simmons Section). The inscription at her gravesite names her "Artist of Arizona" below which is: "Hers Was The Joy of Giving".



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Louisa D'Andelot Carpenter was a du Pont heiress, Jazz Age socialite and aviator.
Born: October 16, 1907
Died: February 8, 1976, Talbot County, Maryland, United States
Buried: Du Pont de Nemours Cemetery, Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware, USA
Parents: R. R. M. Carpenter
Uncle: Walter S. Carpenter, Jr.
People also search for: Libby Holman, R. R. M. Carpenter, Walter S. Carpenter, Jr.

Libby Holman was an American torch singer and stage actress notorious for her unconventional personal life. Her famous lovers included Louisa d'Andelot Carpenter, actress Jeanne Eagels and modernist writer Jane Bowles. Louisa was a du Pont Jenney heiress, Jazz Age socialite, aviatrix, and bon vivant. Holman married Zachary Smith Reynolds, the heir to the R. J. Reynolds's tobacco company. When Reynolds was found dead and Holman framed for his murder, Carpenter paid the bail. Free after the trial, Libby and Louisa raised their children, lived together, and were openly accepted by their theater companions. Holman committed suicide in 1971, apparently never getting over losing her son, Christopher Smith "Topper" Reynolds. Less than 5 years later, Louisa died in a crash of her private plane near her Easton, Maryland farm. In 2001, a successful effort was made by local citizens to save Holman’s Connecticut estate, Treetops.
Together from 1929 to 1971: 42 years.
Libby Holman (May 23, 1904 – June 18, 1971)
Louisa D'Andelot Carpenter (October 16, 1907 - February 8, 1976)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Louisa D'Andelot Carpenter (1907-1976) was a du Pont heiress, Jazz Age socialite and aviator. Her circle of friends, socialites, acquaintances and lovers included Evelyn Eugenia (known as "Sister") and her sister Tallulah Bankhead, Louise Brooks, Marion Carstairs, Noël Coward, Greta Garbo, Libby Holman, Jane Bowles and Z. Smith Reynolds. She is buried at Du Pont de Nemours Cemetery (215 Buck Rd, Wilmington, DE 19807).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Scotty Cade started writing stories as soon as he could read. When not at the inn he runs with Kell, his husband of over twenty years, you can find him on the bow of his boat writing romance novels with his Shetland sheepdog, Mavis, at his side. He believes that, in the end, the boy should always ge…
Lived: Lambert’s Cove Inn, Martha’s Vineyard (02568)
Married: December 31, 1998
August 24, 2013

Scotty Cade hails from “The Big Easy,” none other than New Orleans Louisiana. He attended Louisiana State University and shortly after joining a high-tech, company in New Orleans was transferred to Atlanta, Georgia where his career took off and ultimately landed him the position of Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing and Public Relations for an international payments processor. Georgia is where he met Kell, the love of his life. Ten years ago, after being in corporate America for over twenty-five years, Kell and Scotty gave up the rat race and bought a small hotel and restaurant on the island of Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts. From the beginning, they worked 24/7 building the business from the ground up and about four years into their venture, fighting burnout, hired a general manager to take over and took a year off to decompress. For the first time in their lives, with little to do but relax, Scotty finally had time to attempt a story that had been nagging at him for as long as he could remember…and that is how his first novel, Final Encore was born. It took a full year to write and once Scotty built up the nerve to submit it to a publisher, Dreamspinner Press picked it up almost immediately. He has not stopped writing since and after ten published novels, he is still going strong.
Together since 1998: 17 years.
Kell Hicklin (born September 28, 1959)
Scotty Cade (born February 8, 1960)
Married: December 31, 1998 / August 24, 2013
“Kell and I lived in the same neighborhood and one day as I drove by his house I saw him on a ladder in his front yard cleaning out his gutters. I had no idea if he was gay, but I was immediately smitten and determined to find out. Luckily, there was a house for sale next door to his and the next time I saw him in his yard, I stopped and pretended to be interested in the house. He came walking over with a broad smile and that is how it all started. We have been together monogamously for over seventeen years and recently married in August of this past year. He is the most loving, kind, generous, and unselfish man I’ve ever had the privilege of meeting and I love him dearly.” After his first novel, Scotty was hooked on writing gay fiction and Kell convinced him that they should split their time between their business and his writing. They purchased a forty-two foot motor yacht called “One Mo Time,” which is where most of Scotty’s writing is now done. During the summer, they work part time and travel the waters of New England with their Shetland sheepdog, Mavis and in October, they become snowbirds and cruise down south to relax for the winter. -Scotty Cade



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The Lambert’s Cove Inn, Farm & Restaurant is known as one of the most romantic retreats on Martha’s Vineyard. Situated on 7 acres of spacious lawns, gardens, forest and meadows in the pastoral town of West Tisbury, the well appointed inn and award-winning restaurant offers tranquility, seclusion, and unmatched hospitality. Owners took steps to return the Inn to its XVIII century agricultural roots by expanding the produce garden and adding 50 hens to provide fresh eggs daily. In addition, they have two future cheese makers — Ava and Zsa Zsa — friendly and adorable goats.
Address: 90 Manaquayak Rd, Vineyard Haven, MA 02568 (41.43366, -70.65782)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 508-693-2298
Place
The estate dates back to 1790 and was originally a farmhouse. As you enter the front door and foyer, you are immediately aware of the English country décor accented by warm colors and elegant, but comfortable furnishings. To the left there is the comfortably stylish Red Room, decorated with mahogany leather furnishings with several cozy sitting areas for reading, listening to music or just relaxing in front of the fireplace. To the right there is the more formal club room decorated in dark green, royal blue and a just hint of gold. Straight ahead and to the right lies the library and Main Dining rooms with fireplaces, a 100 year old grand piano and French doors opening out onto the beautiful salt mineral pool, spa, and expansive patio. Although all rooms offer data ports, the upstairs foyer offers a study complete with telephone and computer for checking e-mail or simply searching the internet. The main house has beautifully decorated guest rooms as well as our renovated carriage house and guest house and the eight additional guests rooms.
Life
Who: Kell Hicklin (born September 28, 1959) and Scotty Cade (born February 8, 1960)
Scotty Cade attended Louisiana State University and shortly after joining a high-tech, company in New Orleans was transferred to Atlanta, Georgia where his career took off and ultimately landed him the position of Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing and Public Relations for an international payments processor. Georgia is where he met Kell, the love of his life. After being in corporate America for over twenty-five years, Kell and Scotty gave up the rat race and bought the Lambert’s Cove Inn on the island of Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts. From the beginning, they worked 24/7 building the business from the ground up and about four years into their venture, fighting burnout, hired a general manager to take over and took a year off to decompress. For the first time in their lives, with little to do but relax, Scotty finally had time to attempt a story that had been nagging at him for as long as he could remember…and that is how his first novel, “Final Encore” was born. It took a full year to write and once Scotty built up the nerve to submit it to a publisher, Dreamspinner Press picked it up almost immediately. He has not stopped writing since then.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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