Feb. 10th, 2017

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Charles Henri Ford was an American poet, novelist, filmmaker, photographer, and collage artist best known for his editorship of the Surrealist magazine View in New York City, and as the partner of the artist Pavel Tchelitchew.
Born: February 10, 1913, Brookhaven, Mississippi, United States
Died: September 27, 2002, New York City, New York, United States
Lived: Dakota Apartments, 1 W 72nd St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.77652, -73.97614)
Buried: Rose Hill Cemetery, Brookhaven, Lincoln County, Mississippi, USA, Plot: Section 46 Lot 15
Find A Grave Memorial# 118275865
Parents: C. N. Ford
Siblings: Ruth Ford
Niece: Shelley Scott
People also search for: Ruth Ford, C. N. Ford, Victor Koshkin-Youritzin

Pavel Tchelitchew was a Russian-born surrealist painter, set designer and costume designer. Tchelitchew was born to an aristocratic family of landowners and was educated by private tutors. Tchelitchew expressed an early interest in ballet and art. He left Russia in 1920, lived in Berlin from 1921 to 1923, and moved to Paris in 1923. In Paris Tchelitchew became acquainted with Gertrude Stein and, through her, the Sitwell and Gorer families. He and Dame Edith Sitwell had a long-standing close friendship and they corresponded frequently. Charles Henri Ford was an American poet, novelist, filmmaker, photographer, and collage artist. Actress Ruth Ford (1911–2009) was his sister and only known sibling. Ford traveled to Europe to meet artists and writers and in Paris he met Pavel Tchelitchew. Pavel, apparently dazzled by Ford, moved with him to New York City and thus began the stormy 26-year relationship that continued until Tchelitchew's death in 1957. From 1940 to 1947, he provided illustrations for the Surrealist magazine View, edited by Ford and writer and film critic Parker Tyler. Parker Tyler wrote The Divine Comedy of Pavel Tchelitchew: A Biography in 1967.
Together from 1931 to 1957: 26 years.
Charles Henri Ford (February 10, 1913 - September 27, 2002)
Pavel Tchelitchew (September 21, 1898 - July 31, 1957)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Charles Henri Ford died in 2002. He was survived by his elder sister, actress Ruth Ford, who died in 2009. Upon her death, Ruth Ford left the apartments she owned in the historic Dakota Building on the Upper West Side to Indra Tamang, Charles Henri Ford’s caretaker, along with a valuable Russian surrealist art collection, making him a millionaire.
Address: 1 W 72nd St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.77652, -73.97614)
Type: Private Property
Phone: +1 212-362-1448
National Register of Historic Places: 72000869, 1972 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built between 1880 and 1884, Design by Henry Janeway Hardenbergh (1847-1918)
The Dakota (also known as Dakota Apartments) is a cooperative apartment building located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West in the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. It is famous as the home of former Beatle John Lennon from 1973 to 1980, as well as the location of his murder. The Dakota is considered to be one of Manhattan’s most prestigious and exclusive cooperative residential buildings, with apartments generally selling for between $4 million and $30 million. Henry Janeway Hardenbergh was commissioned to create the design for Edward Clark, head of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The firm also designed the Plaza Hotel. The Dakota was purportedly so named because at the time of construction, the Upper West Side was sparsely inhabited and considered as remote in relation to the inhabited area of Manhattan as the Dakota Territory was. However, the earliest recorded appearance of this account is in a 1933 newspaper interview with the Dakota’s long-time manager, quoted in Christopher Gray’s book “New York Streetscapes”: "Probably it was called “Dakota” because it was so far west and so far north.” According to Gray, it is more likely that the building was named the Dakota because of Clark’s fondness for the names of the new western states and territories. Beginning in 2013, the Dakota’s facade was being renovated. In the 1970s, the co-op board refused to admit playwright Mart Crowley, who wrote "The Boys in the Band," apparently because Crowley was an out gay man.
Notable queer residents at The Dakota Building:
• Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), composer, conductor, author, music lecturer, and pianist. Arthur Laurents (Bernstein’s collaborator in “West Side Story”) said that Bernstein was "a gay man who got married. He wasn’t conflicted about it at all. He was just gay."
• Bob Crewe (1930-2014), songwriter, record producer, artist. Crewe was portrayed as "overtly gay" in "Jersey Boys,” but his brother Dan told The New York Times he was discreet about his sexuality, particularly during the time he was working with the Four Seasons. "Whenever he met someone, he would go into what I always called his John Wayne mode, this extreme machoism."
• Charles Henri Ford (1908–2002), poet, novelist, filmmaker, photographer, and collage artist best known for his editorship of the Surrealist magazine View (1940–1947) in New York City, and as the partner of the artist Pavel Tchelitchew. Ford is buried at Rose Hill Cemetery (Brookhaven, MS 39601).
• Judy Garland (1922-1969), actress. Garland had a large fan base in the gay community and became a gay icon. Reasons given for her standing, especially among gay men, are admiration of her ability as a performer, the way her personal struggles mirrored those of gay men in America during the height of her fame and her value as a camp figure. In the 1960s, a reporter asked how she felt about having a large gay following. She replied, "I couldn’t care less. I sing to people."
• Judy Holliday (1921-1965), actress, comedian, and singer, she was a resident of the Dakota for many years. She inhabited apartment #77 until her death from breast cancer at age 43 on June 7, 1965. She is interred in the Westchester Hills Cemetery in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.
• William Inge (1913-1973), playwright and novelist, whose works typically feature solitary protagonists encumbered with strained sexual relations. “The Last Pad” is one of three of Inge’s plays that either have openly gay characters or address homosexuality directly. “The Boy in the Basement,” a one-act play written in the early 1950s, but not published until 1962, is his only play that addresses homosexuality overtly, while Archie in “The Last Pad” and Pinky in “Where’s Daddy?” (1966) are gay characters. Inge himself was closeted. Inge is buried at Mt Hope Cemetery (Independence, KS 67301).
• Carson McCullers (1917-1967), novelist, short story writer, playwright, essayist, and poet. Among her friends were W. H. Auden, Benjamin Britten, Gypsy Rose Lee and the writer couple Paul Bowles and Jane Bowles. After WWII McCullers lived mostly in Paris. Her close friends during these years included Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams.
• Rudolf Nureyev (1938-1993), dancer. Depending on the source, Nureyev is described as either bisexual as he did have heterosexual relationships as a younger man, or gay. Nureyev met Erik Bruhn, the celebrated Danish dancer, after Nureyev defected to the West in 1961. Bruhn and Nureyev became a couple and the two remained together off and on, with a very volatile relationship for 25 years, until Bruhn’s death in 1986. Nureyev’s grave is at a Russian cemetery in Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois near Paris.
Who: Alfred Corning Clark (November 14, 1844 – April 8, 1896) and Lorentz Severin Skougaard (March 10, 1887 – January 18, 1965)
Alfred Corning Clark (November 14, 1844 – April 8, 1896) was an American heir and philanthropist. His father, Edward Cabot Clark (1811–1882) was an American businessman and lawyer, founder of the Singer Sewing Machine Company, along with his business partner Isaac Merritt Singer. Together, they began investing in real estate in the 1870s. They built The Dakota. Determined to escape from his family Alfred Corning Clark went abroad and studied the piano in Milan. He confessed later to an intimate companion, that away from home he felt free “to worship at the shrine of friendship.” Among these friends, all male, was Lorentz Severin Skougaard, a young Norwegian tenor whom he met in Paris. It became an all-consuming relationship that lasted until Lorentz’s death nineteen years later. Although Alfred did the right thing by marrying and siring four sons, he did not give up the private half of his life. Summers he sent his family to the country— to a large farm he owned in Cooperstown, New York, his mother’s birthplace. While they enjoyed the fresh air, he continued his travels in Europe: France, Italy, and Norway, this time with Lorentz. And becoming bolder after his father’s death, he bought Lorentz a house in New York almost next door to the house where he lived with his wife and children. When Lorentz died he commissioned a marble memorial from George Grey Barnard, a handsome young indigent American sculptor he picked up in Paris. Brotherly Love is a highly erotic work showing two muscular athletic naked men with broad shoulders, triangular torsos, perfect buttocks, and powerful legs, groping toward each other: a perfect metaphor for Alfred and Lorentz and their love. After Alfred’s death Barnard, now rich, famous, and the toast of New York and Paris, thanks to his patron’s munificence, helped Alfred’s sons Sterling and Stephen Clark build their collections of art, now the glory of three museums: the Metropolitan and the Modern in New York, and the Sterling and Francine Clark in Williamstown, Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Edgar Domingo Evia y Joutard, known professionally as Edgar de Evia, was a Mexican-born American interiors photographer.
Born: July 30, 1910, Mérida, Mexico
Died: February 10, 2003, New York City, New York, United States
Education: The Dalton School
Lived: Quiet Corner, 12 Hill Rd, Greenwich, CT 06830, USA (41.06536, -73.60869)
Rhinelander Waldo House, 867 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10021, USA (40.77143, -73.96542)
Buried: Church of the Transfiguration Columbarium, Manhattan, New York County (Manhattan), New York, USA, Plot: Columbarium

Edgar de Evia owned Quiet Corner in Hill Road in Greenwich, Connecticut, the old house of Clyde Fitch. It was in this house where he was happier in the 1960s.
Address: 12 Hill Rd, Greenwich, CT 06830, USA (41.06536, -73.60869)
Type: Private Property
Place
Currently no. 12 Hill Road is a lovely home sitting on 1.13 Acres, surrounded by green space. Mature trees soring 60-80 feet. It has an original Italian landscape design from the 1920’s. Original Walls and Blue Stone Artisinal Craftmenship. Quiet neighborhood, built in 1977 high on a hill, former Quiet Corner Estate, last sold in 1999 for $1,700,000. The original Quiet Corner was built by architect Benjamin William Morris for William Clyde Fitch, completed circa Dec. 1903, with later additions by John Wesley Baxter.
Notable queer residents in Greenwich:
• Truman Capote (1924–1984), writer, moved to town with his family in 1939, attended Greenwich High School.
• Wanda Sykes (born 1964), comedian and actress, lives in town
Life
Who: Edgar Domingo Evia y Joutard (July 30, 1910 – February 10, 2003) aka Edgar de Evia
During almost two decades Edgar de Evia’s house and study were in the three higher floors of 867 Madison Avenue, the present main store of Ralph Lauren and in this rural residence. When the relationship of his companion Robert Denning with Vincent Fourcade began and they formed Denning & Fourcade, they remained in New York. This took to the formation of the company Denning & Fourcade and the dissolution of the one of Edgar de Evia. Douglas James Johnson (1937-1998) was a painter who lived in Michigan and France. Douglas Johnson is known for painting, collage, mixed media, drawing, teaching. He did many paintings of the Edgar de Evia home Quiet Corner on Hill Road in Greenwich, CT. These were done in the early 1960s when Johnson had his studio over the garage of this home and was in a relationship with de Evia for several years before moving to Iran. He had an exhibition at a gallery Rive Gauche in Daren, CT in the early 1960s.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Edgar de Evia leased the Rhinelander Mansion in the 1950s and 1960s, used as his residence, and often rented out portions of as studios and offices.
Address: 867 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10021, USA (40.77143, -73.96542)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 80002727, 1980
Place
Built in 1898, Design by Alexander Mackintosh (1861-1945)
The Gertrude Rhinelander Waldo House is a French Renaissance revival mansion located at 867 Madison Avenue on the corner of East 72nd Street in the Lenox Hill neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Although the house had been commissioned by Gertrude Rhinelander Waldo, the eccentric heiress never moved into it, preferring to live across the street. The mansion was modeled on the chateaux of the Loire Valley in France. Architecture critic Henry Hope Reed Jr. has observed about it: “The fortress heritage of the rural, royal residences of the Loire was not lost in the transfer to New York. The roof-line is very fine... The Gothic is found in the high-pitched roof of slate, the high, ornate dormers and the tall chimneys. The enrichment is early Renaissance, especially at the center dormers on both facades of the building, which boast colonnettes, broken entablatures, finials on high bases, finials in relief and volutes. In fact, although the dormers are ebullient, ornamentation is everywhere, even in the diamond-shaped pattern in relief on the chimneys (traceable to Chambord.)” The first floor was a large center hall with rooms on each side for reception and servants activities. The second floor housed the main salon, the dining room and the butler’s pantry. The third floor was where the master bedroom was located while the fourth floor housed the servants quarters and guest bedrooms. The building remained vacant until 1921, at which time the first floor was converted into stores and two apartments were carved out of the upper four floors. Commercial enterprises which have used the location at various times include an antique store, Christie’s auction house and a Zabar’s-owned restaurant. Photographer Edgar de Evia first saw the duplex apartment on the fourth and fifth floors when it was occupied by Dr. Stanton, a homeopathic physician who de Evia consulted on the recommendation of Dr. Guy Beckley Stearns, for whom de Evia worked as a researcher. When de Evia’s photographic career was taking off in the late 1940s the duplex became available and he rented it as his home with his companion and business partner Robert Denning and his mother Miirrha Alhambra, the former Paula Joutard de Evia. It would remain his home for over 15 years. The building was owned by the 867 Madison Corporation in the 1950s, which offered it to de Evia for sale or net lease in 1956. At that time he created Denvia Realty Corporation with his partner Denning and they entered into a ten-year net lease, becoming the landlords of the building. At this time de Evia and Denning began using the entire third floor for de Evia’s studios, while the fourth floor, the lower floor of their original duplex, contained the living room, dining room, ballroom and de Evia’s mother’s bedroom. The fifth and top floor contained the master bedroom which had a bathroom at either end and the servants’ rooms. Offices on the second floor were rented to the interior decorators Tate and Hall, among others. The shops on the street level included the Pharmacy on the corner and the Rhinelander Florist on the Madison Avenue side. After meeting Vincent Fourcade in 1959 Denning started to entertain prospective decorating clients in the apartment while de Evia was at his Greenwich, Connecticut estate. These included Ogden and Lillian Phipps and led to the forming of Denning & Fourcade. By 1963 de Evia took the fifth floor and converted it into his own residence, opening up the smaller rooms. The 10 rooms on the fourth floor were at this time rented to the restaurateur Larry Ellman, owner of the Cattleman Restaurant. During the Denvia net lease the building was sold by the 867 Madison Avenue Corporation to Central Ison, Ltd. for US$590,000. From 1967 until the early 1980s a nearby church used the top two floors for their offices. Ralph Lauren obtained the net lease in 1983 and started a massive overhaul of the building to create his Polo Ralph Lauren flagship store. Naomi Leff supervised the rehabilitation of the building. It took around 18 months working in the final months around the clock. Published figures put the cost around $14–15 million. Ownership of the building has changed several times during his lease; from US$6.4 million in 1984, five years later in 1989 it sold for US$43 million, and the most recent sale in 2005 was reported at a record US$80 million.
Life
Who: Edgar Domingo Evia y Joutard (July 30, 1910 – February 10, 2003) aka Edgar de Evia
Edgar de Evia was a Mexican-born American photographer. In a career that spanned the 1940s through the 1990s, his photography appeared in magazines and newspapers such as Town & Country, House & Garden, Look and The New York Times Magazine and advertising campaigns for Borden Ice Cream, Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation, Jell-O among other corporations. In the 1950s, de Evia’s companion and business partner was Robert Denning, who worked in his studio and who would become a leading interior designer and partner in the firm Denning & Fourcade. From 1966 until his death, de Evia’s companion and business partner was David McJonathan-Swarm. Edgar de Evia, age 92, died at St. Vincent’s Hospital in New York City from pneumonia following a broken hip. His ashes were interred in the columbarium of the Little Church Around the Corner in New York City.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Ellen Gates Starr was an American social reformer and activist. She, along with Jane Addams, founded Chicago's Hull House in 1889.
Born: March 19, 1859, Illinois, United States
Died: February 10, 1940, Suffern, New York, United States
Education: Rockford University
Lived: Hull House, 800 S Halsted St, Chicago, IL 60607, USA (41.87162, -87.64743)
Buried: Convent of the Holy Child, Suffern, Rockland County, New York, USA
Parents: Susan Gates Child

Ellen Gates Starr was an American social reformer and activist. She was a student at the Rockford Female Seminary (1877–78), where she met Jane Addams; their friendship lasted many years. Ellen appears to have been Jane’s first serious attachment. For years, they celebrated September 11—even when they were apart—as the anniversary of their first meeting. During their separations, Jane stationed Ellen’s picture, as she wrote her, “where I can see you almost every minute.” Ellen prodded Jane to leave her family, come to Chicago, and open Hull House together with her. On accepting the plan, Jane wrote Ellen: “Let’s love each other through thick and thin and work out a salvation.” It was Ellen’s devotion and emotional support that permitted Jane to cast off the self-doubts that had been plaguing her as a female who wanted to be both socially useful and independent during unsympathetic times and to commit herself to action: to create a settlement house in the midst of poverty where young, comfortably brought-up women who had spent years in study might now “learn of life from life itself,” as Addams later wrote. Starr taught for ten years in Chicago before joining Addams in 1888 for a tour of Europe. They returned to Chicago and co-founded Hull House as a kindergarten and then a day nursery, an infancy care center, and a center for continuing education for adults.
Together from 1877 to 1892: 15 years.
Ellen Gates Starr (March 19, 1859 – February 10, 1940)
Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Ellen Gates Starr (March 19, 1859 – February 10, 1940) was a student at the Rockford Female Seminary (1877–78, 5050 E State St, Rockford, IL 61108), where she first met Jane Addams (1860-1935). Rockford University is a private American liberal arts college in Rockford, Illinois. It was founded in 1847 as Rockford Female Seminary and changed its name to Rockford College in 1892, and to Rockford University in 2013.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Located in the Near West Side of Chicago, Illinois, in the XIX century Hull House opened its doors to recently arrived European immigrants.
Address: 800 S Halsted St, Chicago, IL 60607, USA (41.87162, -87.64743)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10.00-16.00, Sunday 12.00-16.00
Phone: +1 (312) 413-5353
National Register of Historic Places: 66000315, 1966. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Hull House was a settlement house in the United States that was co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr. By 1911, Hull House had grown to 13 buildings. In 1912 the Hull House complex was completed with the addition of a summer camp, the Bowen Country Club. With its innovative social, educational, and artistic programs, Hull House became the standard bearer for the movement that had grown, by 1920, to almost 500 settlement houses nationally. The Hull mansion and several subsequent acquisitions were continuously renovated to accommodate the changing demands of the association. The original building and one additional building (which has been moved 200 yards (182.9 m)) survive today. On June 12, 1974, the Hull House building was designated a Chicago Landmark. The Hull House Association ceased operations in Jan. 2012, but the Hull mansion remains open as a museum.
Life
Who: Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) and Ellen Gates Starr (March 19, 1859 – February 10, 1940)
Ellen Gates Starr taught for ten years in Chicago before joining Addams in 1888 for a tour of Europe. While in London, they were inspired by the success of the English Settlement movement and became determined to establish a similar social settlement in Chicago. They returned to Chicago and co-founded Hull House as a kindergarten and then a day nursery, an infancy care centre, and a center for continuing education for adults. Lillian Faderman argues that Starr was Addams’ "first serious attachment.” The friendship between the two lasted many years, and the two became domestic partners. Addams wrote to Starr, "Let’s love each other through thick and thin and work out a salvation.” The director of the Hull-House Museum at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Lisa Lee, has argued that the relationship was a lesbian one. Victoria Bissell Brown agrees that the two can be regarded as lesbians if they are seen as "women loving women,” although we do not necessarily have any evidence for genital sexual contact. The intensity of the relationship dwindled when Addams met Mary Rozet Smith, and the two women subsequently set up home together. Ellen died in 1940 and is buried at Convent of the Holy Child, Suffern, NY.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At the former ground of the Academy of the Holy Child (Suffern, NY 10901) is buried Ellen Gates Starr (1859-1940), American social reformer and activist. Lillian Faderman argues that Starr was Jane Addams' "first serious attachment". The friendship between the two lasted many years, and the two became domestic partners. Addams wrote to Starr, "Let's love each other through thick and thin and work out a salvation" In 1931, seriously ill, Ellen Gates Starr retired to a Roman Catholic convent where she was cared for by the Society of the Holy Child Jesus.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Elijah Hadyn "Lige" Clarke was an American LGBT activist and journalist. Together with his partner Jack Nichols, Clarke created and wrote "The Homosexual Citizen" as a continuation to their original ...
Born: February 22, 1942
Died: February 10, 1975, Veracruz, Mexico
Find A Grave Memorial# 110873135
Books: Roommates can't always be lovers

Elijah Hadyn "Lige" Clarke was an American LGBT activist and journalist. Together with his partner Jack Nichols, Clarke created and wrote The Homosexual Citizen in 1968, which sounded the first call to arms following the Stonewall uprising. Running in Screw magazine, it was the first regular LGBT-interest column printed in a non-LGBT publication. Because of the success of their column, Nichols and Clarke became known as the "most famous gay couple in America"--making them the first and only "Super-Stars” the gay community had ever known. Nichols and Clarke together wrote I have more fun with you than anybody and Roommates Can't Always Be Lovers. From 1964, Lige wrote, thought about and fought for same-sex love, for the obliteration of destructive prejudices and boundaries and for a new human being freed from the shackles of traditional conditioning and its resultant moral shackles. On February 10, 1975, Clarke was shot and killed in Vera Cruz, Mexico. Nichols was convinced that the murder was the result of "machismo's homophobic influences", but it remains officially unsolved.
Together from (before) 1968 to 1975: 7 years.
Elijah Hadyn "Lige" Clarke (February 22, 1942 - February 10, 1975)
John Richard "Jack" Nichols (March 16, 1938 – May 2, 2005)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Paul Landry Monette was an American author, poet, and activist best known for his essays about gay relationships.
Born: October 16, 1945, Lawrence, Massachusetts, United States
Died: February 10, 1995
Education: Yale University
Phillips Exeter Academy
Buried: Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Hollywood Hills), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Revelation, L-3275, GPS (lat/lon): 34.14571, -118.32359
Buried alongside: Roger Horwitz
Find A Grave Memorial# 2519
Parents: Paul Monette Sr.
Siblings: Robert Monette
Awards: National Book Award for Nonfiction, more

Paul Monette was an American author, poet, and activist best remembered for his essays about gay relationships. On September 3, 1974, Monette was introduced to lawyer Roger Horwitz at a party given by Richard Howard in Boston. "And from that moment on the brink of summer's end, no one would ever tell me again that men like me couldn't love." In 1978, they moved to West. Monette's most acclaimed book, Borrowed Time, chronicles Horwitz's fight against and eventual death from AIDS in 1986. His 1992 memoir, Becoming a Man, tells of his life in the closet before coming out, culminating with his meeting Horwitz in 1974. Becoming a Man won the 1992 National Book Award for Nonfiction. By the end of his life, Monette had healed most of his psychic wounds, but his rage persisted. Monette died in Los Angeles, California, where he lived with his partner of five years, Winston Wilde. Monette and Horwitz are buried together at Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Hollywood Hills), Los Angeles, California. Horwitz’s headstone reads: “My little friend, we sail together, if we sail at all.”
Together from 1974 to 1986: 12 years.
Paul Landry Monette (October 16, 1945 – February 10, 1995)
Roger David Horwitz (November 22, 1941 – October 22, 1986)
Anniversary: September 3, 1974



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries is a corporation that owns and operates a chain of cemeteries and mortuaries in Los Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties in Southern California.
Addresses:
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cathedral City), 69855 Ramon Rd, Cathedral City, CA 92234, USA (33.81563, -116.4419)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Covina Hills), 21300 Via Verde Drive, Covina, CA 91724, USA (34.06783, -117.84183)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cypress), 4471 Lincoln Ave, Cypress, CA 90630, USA (33.8337, -118.0552)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Glendale), 1712 S Glendale Ave, Glendale, CA 91205, USA (34.12524, -118.24371)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Hollywood Hills), 6300 Forest Lawn Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.14688, -118.32208)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Long Beach), 1500 E San Antonio Dr, Long Beach, CA 90807, USA (33.84384, -118.17116)
Place
The company was founded by a group of San Francisco businessmen in 1906. Dr. Hubert Eaton assumed management control in 1917 and is credited with being Forest Lawn’s "founder" because of his origination of the "memorial-park" plan. The first location was in Tropico which later became part of Glendale, California. Its facilities are officially known as memorial parks. The parks are best known for the large number of celebrity burials, especially in the Glendale and Hollywood Hills locations. Eaton opened the first mortuary (funeral home) on dedicated cemetery grounds after a long battle with established funeral directors who saw the "combination" operation as a threat. He remained as general manager until his death in 1966 when he was succeeded by his nephew, Frederick Llewellyn.
Notable queer burials at Forest Lawn Memorial Parks:
• Lucile Council (1898-1964), Section G, Lot 5 Space 9, Glendale. Florence Yoch (1890–1972) and Lucile Council were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California.
• George Cukor (1899-1983), Garden of Honor (Private Garden), Glendale. American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
• Brad Davis (1949-1991), Court of Remembrance/Columbarium of Valor, G64054, Hollywood Hills. American actor, known for starring in the 1978 film Midnight Express and 1982 film Querelle. Davis married Susan Bluestein, an Emmy Award-winning casting director. They had one child, Alex, a transgender man born as Alexandra. Davis acknowledged having had sex with men and being bisexual in an interview with Boze Hadleigh.
• Helen Ferguson (1901-1977), Ascension, L-7296, space 1, Glendale. For nearly thirty years, former actress and publicist Helen Ferguson had an intimate relationship with Barbara Stanwyck. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, Loretta Young and Robert Taylor, among others.
• Edmund Goulding (1891–1959), Wee Kirk Churchyard, L-260, Space 4, Glendale. He was a British film writer and director. As an actor early in his career he was one of the Ghosts in the 1922 British made Paramount silent “Three Live Ghosts” alongside Norman Kerry and Cyril Chadwick. Also in the early 1920s he wrote several screenplays for star Mae Murray for films directed by her then husband Robert Z. Leonard. Goulding is best remembered for directing cultured dramas such as “Love” (1927), “Grand Hotel” (1932) with Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, “Dark Victory” (1939) with Bette Davis, and “The Razor's Edge” (1946) with Gene Tierney and Tyrone Power. He also directed the classic film noir “Nightmare Alley” (1947) with Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell, and the action drama “The Dawn Patrol.” He was also a successful songwriter, composer, and producer.
• Howard Greenfield (1936-1986) and Tory Damon (1939-1986), Hollywood Hills. Plot: Courts of Remembrance, wall crypt #3515. Damon’s epitaph reads: Love Will Keep Us Together..., Greenfield’s continues: ... Forever.
• Francis Grierson aka Jesse Shepard (1849-1927), Glendale, Great Mausoleum, Coleus Mezzanine Columbarium. Composer and pianist.
• Edward Everett Horton (1886-1970), Whispering Pines section, Map #03, Lot 994, Ground Interment Space 3, at the top of the hill. American character actor, he had a long career in film, theater, radio, television, and voice work for animated cartoons.
• Charles Laughton (1899–1962), Court of Remembrance, C-310 (wall crypt), Hollywood Hills. English stage and film character actor, director, producer and screenwriter.
• W. Dorr Legg (1904-1994), Eternal Love, Map E09, Lot 1561, Space 3, Hollywood Hills. W. Dorr Legg was a landscape architect and one of the founders of the U.S. gay rights movement, then called the homophile movement.
• David Lewis (1903-1987) and James Whale (1889-1957), Columbarium, Glendale. When David Lewis died in 1987, his executor and Whale biographer, James Curtis, had his ashes interred in a niche across from Whale’s.
• Liberace (1919-1987), Courts of Remembrance section, Map #A39, Distinguished Memorial – Sarcophagus 4, Hollywood Hills. American pianist, singer, and actor. A child prodigy and the son of working-class immigrants, Liberace enjoyed a career spanning four decades of concerts, recordings, television, motion pictures, and endorsements.
• Paul Monette (1945-1995) and Roger Horwitz (1941-1986), Hollywood Hills. Horwitz’s headstone reads: “My little friend, we sail together, if we sail at all.”
• Marion Morgan (1881-1971), The Great Mausoleum, Dahlia Terrace, Florentine Columbarium, Niche 8446, Glendale. Choreographer, longtime companion of motion picture director Dorothy Arzner.
• George Nader (1921-2002), Mark Miller, with friend Rock Hudson (1925-1985), Cenotaph, Cathedral City. Nader inherited the interest from Rock Hudson’s estate after Hudson’s death from AIDS complications in 1985. Nader lived in Hudson’s LA home until his own death. This is a memorial, George Nader’s ashes were actually scattered at sea.
• Alla Nazimova (1879-1945), actress,Whispering Pines, lot 1689, Glendale.
• Orry-Kelly (1897-1964), prominent Australian-American Hollywood costume designer. 3 times Oscar Winner. His partner was Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was acknowledged also by Kelly's mother. When Orry-Kelly died, his pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and Jack Warner read his eulogy.
• Charles Pierce (1926–1999), Columbarium of Providence, niche 64953, Hollywood Hills. He was one of the XX century's foremost female impersonators, particularly noted for his impersonation of Bette Davis. He performed at many clubs in New York, including The Village Gate, Ted Hook's OnStage, The Ballroom, and Freddy's Supper Club. His numerous San Francisco venues included the Gilded Cage, Cabaret/After Dark, Gold Street, Bimbo's 365 Club, Olympus, The Plush Room, the Venetian Room at the Fairmont Hotel, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, and the War Memorial Opera House. He died in North Hollywood, California, aged 72, and was cremated. His memorial service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park was carefully planned and scripted by Pierce before his death.
• George Quaintance (1902-1957), Eventide Section - Lot 2116 - Space 1, Glendale. American artist famous for his "idealized, strongly homoerotic" depictions of men in physique magazines. In 1938, he returned home with his companion Victor Garcia, described as Quaintance's "model, life partner, and business associate". In the early 1950s, Quaintance and Garcia moved to Rancho Siesta, which became the home of Studio Quaintance, a business venture based around Quaintance's artworks.
• Robert J. Sandoval (1950–2006), Glendale. Sandoval was a judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Sandoval and his long-time partner, Bill Martin, adopted a son in 1992, making them one of the first gay male couples in Los Angeles County to adopt a child. The couple named their son Harrison Martin-Sandoval, combining their last names to symbolize their familial unity. Sandoval died in 2006. He is survived by his partner of 24 years, Bill Martin, and his son, Harrison Martin-Sandoval. After his death, his alma mater McGeorge School of Law honored his contributions by placing him on the Wall of Honor.
• Emery Shaver (1903-1964) and Tom Lyle (1896-1976), Sanctuary, Glendale. Tom Lyle was the founder of Maybelline.
• Ethel Waters (1896-1977), Ascension Garden, Glendale. African-American blues, jazz and gospel vocalist and actress. In 1962. Ethel Waters had a lesbian relationship with dancer Ethel Williams that led to them being nicknamed “The Two Ethels.”
• Paul Winfield (1941–2004) was an American television, film and stage actor. He was known for his portrayal of a Louisiana sharecropper who struggles to support his family during the Great Depression in the landmark film “Sounder,” which earned him an Academy Award nomination. He portrayed Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 1978 television miniseries “King,” for which he was nominated for an Emmy Award. Winfield was also known to science fiction fans for his roles in “The Terminator,” “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” and “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” Winfield was gay, but remained discreet about it in the public eye. His partner of 30 years, architect Charles Gillan, Jr., died on March 5, 2002, of bone cancer. Winfield died of a heart attack in 2004 at age 62, at Queen of Angels – Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles. Winfield and Gillan are interred together.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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