Feb. 11th, 2017

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Lee Alexander McQueen, CBE was a British fashion designer and couturier. He is known for having worked as chief designer at Givenchy from 1996 to 2001 and for founding his own Alexander McQueen label.
Born: March 17, 1969, Lewisham, London, United Kingdom
Died: February 11, 2010, Mayfair, London, United Kingdom
Education: Central Saint Martins
Buried: Kilmuir Cemetery, Kilmuir (Isle of Skye), Highland, Scotland
Find A Grave Memorial# 48009485
Height: 1.8 m
Books: Alexander McQueen
Movies: Volumen

Near the tip of the Trotternish Peninsula, just a mile and a half south west of the ruin of Duntulm Castle and a quarter of a mile east of the Skye Museum of Island Life, is one of Scotland's most fascinating - and most beautifully located - graveyards. Kilmuir Graveyard (Portree IV51 9EU) is well visited because of the identity of one person who was laid to rest here. One gravestone at Kilmuir literally towers above all the others. This is the tall cross marking the last resting place of Flora MacDonald, the "Preserver of Prince Charles Edward Stuart" complete with an epitaph written by the notable author Samuel Johnson (who, with James Boswell had met Flora in life during their tour of the Highlands). This reads "Her name will be mentioned in history and if courage and fidelity be virtues, mentioned with honour." Seven other members of her family are also buried here. There is also a memorial to fashion designer Alexander McQueen (1969-2010), a severely weathered standing gravestone that looks extremely old, and the head of a very old stone cross, simply lying unremarked in the grass near the memorial to Flora MacDonald.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Buried: Congressional Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, District Of Columbia, USA, Plot: R20/167S
Buried alongside: Larry Martin Worrell

The Congressional Cemetery or Washington Parish Burial Ground is a historic and active cemetery located at 1801 E Street, SE, in Washington, D.C., on the west bank of the Anacostia River.
Address: 1801 E St SE, Washington, DC 20003, USA (38.88128, -76.98056)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 202-543-0539
National Register of Historic Places: 69000292, 1969. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
It is the only American "cemetery of national memory" founded before the Civil War. Over 65,000 individuals are buried or memorialized at the cemetery, including many who helped form the nation and the city of Washington in the early XIX century. Though the cemetery is privately owned, the U.S. government owns 806 burial plots administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Congress, located about a mile and a half (2.4 km) to the northwest, has greatly influenced the history of the cemetery. The cemetery still sells plots, and is an active burial ground. From the Washington Metro, the cemetery lies three blocks east of the Potomac Avenue station and two blocks south of the Stadium-Armory station. Many members of the U.S. Congress who died while Congress was in session are interred at Congressional Cemetery. Other burials include early landowners and speculators, the builders and architects of early Washington, Native American diplomats, Washington mayors, and Civil War veterans. XIX century Washington, D.C. families unaffiliated with the federal government also have graves and tombs at the cemetery. In all, there are one Vice President, one Supreme Court justice, six Cabinet members, 19 Senators and 71 Representatives (including a former Speaker of the House) buried there, as well as veterans of every American war, and the first director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, J. Edgar Hoover. Peter Doyle, (June 3, 1843-April 19, 1907), a veteran of the Confederate Army, and the greatest love of poet Walt Whitman is buried here. They met in Washington, D.C. on the horse-drawn streetcar for which Doyle was the conductor who later recalled, “We were familiar at once – I put my hand on his knee – we understood. He did not get out at the end of the trip – in fact went all the way back with me.” Whitman wrote in one letter to him, “I will imagine you with my arm around my neck saying Good night, Walt - & me – Good night, Pete.”
Notable queer burials at Congressional Cemetery:
• Everett Lysle Boyer (1927-1998) & Forrest Leroy Snakenberg (1932-1986). Boyer's tombstone reads: Arise up my love, Tis the time of singing birds (Song of Solomon 2:12), Snakenberg's, same style of that of Everett, reads: So be truely glad there is wonderful joy ahead (Peter 1:6)
• Kenneth Dresser (1938-1995) and Charles Fowler (1931-1995) are buried together. Dresser designed the Electric Light Parade at Disneyland, the Electric Water Pageant at Epcot, and the Fantasy of Lights at Callaway Gardens, Georgia. Fowler was an arts educator and writer, director of National Cultural Resources, Inc, and a guest professor at several American universities.
• James Richard Duell (1947-1992) and Larry Martin Worrell (1954-1989). The tombstone reads: "Two most excellent adventures"
• John Frey (1929-1997) and Peter Morris (1929-2010), together 43 years, met while at college together. Frey was a Fulbright Scholar, professor of Romance Languages at George Washington University, and author of books on Victor Hugo and Emile Zola. Morris was an expert French cook, and on the Board of Directors of the gay Catholic organization Dignity for whom he coauthored a community cookbook.
• Barbara Gittings (1932-2007) helped convince the American Psychiatric Association to declassify homosexuality as a mental illness. She founded the New York chapter of the lesbian rights organization the Daughter of Bilitis. The tombstone reads: Gay Pioneers who spoke truth to power: Gay is good. Partners in life, Married in our hearts.
• Dan Hering (1925-2012) was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and served 20 years in the U.S. Army. He and his partner Joel were members of one of the earliest gay right groups, the Society for Individual Rights (SIR) formed in 1964. They were founding members of the earliest known gay boat club, San Francisco’s Barbary Coast Boating Club. Dan was also a member of Service Academy Gay & Lesbian Alumni (SAGLA) and Knights Out, the association of gay West Point graduates. His partner Joel Leenaars (born 1935) lives at 1533 Weybridge Cir, Naples, FL.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) was a WWII veteran and the father of the modern gay rights movement.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) was an American writer, philosopher, educator, and patron of the arts. Distinguished as the first African American Rhodes Scholar in 1907, Locke was the philosophical architect —the acknowledged "Dean"— of the Harlem Renaissance. Locke was gay, and may have encouraged and supported other gay African-Americans who were part of the Harlem Renaissance. However, he was not fully public in his orientation and referred to it as his point of "vulnerable/invulnerability", taken to mean an area of risk and strength in his view. Howard University officials initially considered having Locke's ashes buried in a niche at Locke Hall on the Howard campus, similar to the way that Langston Hughes' ashes were interred at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York City in 1991. But Kurt Schmoke, the university's legal counsel, was concerned about setting a precedent that might lead to other burials at the university. After an investigation revealed no legal problems to the plan, university officials decided the remains should be buried off-site. At first, thought was given to burying Locke beside his mother, Mary Hawkins Locke. But Howard officials quickly discovered a problem: She had been interred at Columbian Harmony Cemetery in Washington, D.C., but that cemetery closed in 1959 and her remains transferred to National Harmony Memorial Park—which failed to keep track of them. (She was buried in a mass grave along with 37,000 other unclaimed remains from Columbian Harmony.) Howard University eventually decided to bury Alain Locke's remains at historic Congressional Cemetery, and African American Rhodes Scholars raised $8,000 to purchase a burial plot there. Locke was interred at Congressional Cemetery on September 13, 2014. His tombstone reads: 1885–1954, Herald of the Harlem Renaissance, Exponent of Cultural Pluralism. On the back of the headstone is a nine-pointed Bahá'í star (representing Locke's religious beliefs); a Zimbabwe Bird, emblem of the nation Locke adopted as a Rhodes Scholar; a lambda, symbol of the gay rights movement; and the logo of Phi Beta Sigma, the fraternity Locke joined. In the center of these four symbols is an Art Deco representation of an African woman's face set against the rays of the sun. This image is a simplified version of the bookplate that Harlem Renaissance painter Aaron Douglas designed for Locke. Below the bookplate image are the words "Teneo te, Africa" ("I hold you, my Africa").
• T. Sgt. Leonard Matlovich (1943-1988), was a gay civil rights and AIDS activist, his tombstone reads: "When I was in the military they gave me a medal for killing two men and a discharge for loving one."
• William Boyce Mueller (1942–1993) was the gay grandson of the founder of the Boy Scout of America. Mueller helped create the first organization to lobby today’s Scout oligarchs to end their ban on gay Scouts and Scout leaders, Forgotten Scouts.
• Frank Warren O’Reilly (1922-2001) was a WWII veteran with a Ph.D. in International Relations, and a music critic for The Washington Times, and founder of Miami’s Charles Ives Centennial Festival and the American Chopin Foundation which sponsors an annual national Chopin competition.
• Emanuel “Butch” Zeigler (1951-2009) was a onetime elementary school teacher, and co-owner of Capital Promoting Service whose clients include Heads of State and major corporations.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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John Wallowitch was an American songwriter and cabaret performer. He wrote over 2,000 songs; his works include "Bruce", "I See the World Through Your Eyes", "Back on the Town" and "Mary's Bar".
Born: February 11, 1926, South Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: August 15, 2007, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Juilliard School
Temple University
Central High School
Buried: Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, Westchester County, New York, USA, Plot: Actors Fund Lot 1114
Buried alongside: Bertram Ross
Find A Grave Memorial# 60632819
Genre: Easy listening
Albums: Back on the Town, My Manhattan, Wallowitch & Ross: This Moment (Music from the Motion Picture)

John Wallowitch was an American songwriter and cabaret performer. He wrote over 2,000 songs; his works include Bruce, I See the World through Your Eyes, Back on the Town and Mary's Bar. For over 50 years, he played and sang a catalogue of original songs at nightspots around New York City with his longtime partner, Bertram Ross. Ross was the principal male dancer for Martha Graham for over twenty years. In 1953 he replaced Graham's former partner and husband , going on to create many great roles such as he created leading roles in many of her works. Ross and Wallowitch sang in nightspots ranging from London's Pizza on the Park to the Ballroom in New York City. A CD of their performance cabaret, Wallowitch and Ross (Miranda Music) was released in 2003 to accompany the documentary film of the couple, Wallowitch & Ross: This Moment. Wallowitch lived and performed in New York City with Ross, until Ross's death on April 20, 2003, at 82 years old. Wallowitch died on August 15, 2007 in New York City. They are buried together at Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, New York (Actors Fund Lot).
Together from 1967 to 2003: 36 years.
Bertram Ross (November 14, 1920 – April 20, 2003)
John Wallowitch (February 11, 1926 – August 15, 2007)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Bertram Ross and John Wallowitch are buried together at Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, New York, Actors Fund Lot.
Address: 273 Lakeview Ave, Valhalla, NY 10595, USA (41.08328, -73.78491)
Type: Cemetery (open to publich)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00, Saturday and Sunday 9.00-16.00
Phone: +1 914-949-0347
Place
Kensico Cemetery, located in Valhalla, Westchester County, New York, was founded in 1889, when many New York City cemeteries were becoming full, and rural cemeteries were being created near the railroads that served the city. Initially 250 acres (1.0 km2), it was expanded to 600 acres (2.4 km²) in 1905, but reduced to 461 acres (1.9 km²) in 1912, when a portion was sold to the neighboring Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Several baseball players are buried in this cemetery. Also many entertainment figures of the early XX century, including the Russian-born Sergei Rachmaninoff, were buried here. The cemetery has a special section for members of the Actors’ Fund of America and the National Vaudeville Association, some of whom died in abject poverty. Sharon Gardens is a 76-acre (31 ha) section of Kensico Cemetery, which was created in 1953 for Jewish burials.
Notable queer burials at Kensico Cemetery:
• Robert De Niro, Sr. (1922-1993), artist, father of actor Robert De Niro. De Niro Sr. lived openly as a gay man in his last years.
• Danny Kaye (1913–1987), comedic actor. Rumored to have been Laurence Olivier’s lover.
• Bertram Ross (November 14, 1920 – April 20, 2003), dancer best known for his work with the Martha Graham Dance Company, with which he performed for two decades. After leaving Graham’s company, Ross taught, choreographed and formed his own dance company. In later life, he toured in a cabaret duo with his real life partner, the composer and pianist John Wallowitch.
• John Wallowitch (February 11, 1926 – August 15, 2007), songwriter and cabaret performer. He wrote over 2,000 songs. For over 50 years he played and sang a catalogue of original songs at nightspots around New York City. His brother was photographer Edward Wallowitch, an associate of Andy Warhol.
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Gladys Bentley (1907-1960), one of the most flamboyant blues entertainers of the XX century, began performing in New York City as a singer and male impersonator. Bentley was known for being open about her lesbianism, and incorporated it into her stage show. In the years prior to her death, she adamantly tried to recant her lesbianism and married a man several years her junior. Bentley became an active member of the "Temple of Love In Christ" Church and was on her way to becoming an ordained minister at the time of her death from pneumonia at the age of 52. She is buried at Lincoln Memorial Park (Carson, CA 90746).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lived: Treemans, Horsted Keynes, Haywards Heath, West Sussex RH17, UK (51.03196, -0.03138) [English Heritage Building ID: 302579 (Grade II, 1983)]
Ludwell, Waterbury Hill, Horsted Keynes, Haywards Heath, West Sussex RH17 7EG, UK (51.03623, -0.03339) [English Heritage Building ID: 302549 (Grade II, 1983)]
Buried: St Mary the Blessed Virgin, Addington Village Road, Addington, Surrey, CR0 5AS - Opposite the Harvester
Buried alongside: Mary Benson
Find A Grave Memorial# 120733648

Mary Benson was the wife of Revd. Edward White Benson, who during their marriage became Archbishop of Canterbury, i.e. chief bishop of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican communion. Gladstone, the British Prime Minister, described her as the ‘cleverest woman in Europe’. They had six children. Their fifth child was the novelist, E. F. Benson, best remembered for the Mapp and Lucia novels (E. F. Benson never married but there is no evidence that he was homosexual, though thought so by many people). Another son was A. C. Benson, the author of the lyrics to Elgar's Land of Hope and Glory and master of Magdalene College, Cambridge. Their sixth and youngest child, Robert Hugh Benson, became a presbyter in the Church of England before converting to Roman Catholic Christianity and writing many popular novels. Their daughter, Margaret Benson was an artist, author and amateur Egyptologist. None of the children married. After her husband's death in 1896 Mary set up household at Treemans, South of Horsted Keynes, Surrey, with Lucy Tait, daughter of the previous archbishop of Canterbury, Archibald Campbell Tait. Lucy had first moved in with the Bensons in 1889. They lived together until Mary’s death when Lucy moved to Ludwell, which had just been enlarged and restored by Mrs. C.B.O. Clarke, to live with her sister Edith, widow of Randall Davidson. Mary and Lucy are both buried at St Mary the Blessed Virgin Churchyard, Addington, England.
Together from 1889 to 1918: 29 years.
Lucy Sydney Murray Tait (February 11, 1856 - December 5, 1938)
Mary “Minnie” Sidgwick Benson (1841 – June 15, 1918)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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After the death of Revd. Edward White Benson, the Archbishop of Canterbury, in 1896 his widow, Mary Benson (1841-June 15, 1918), set up household at Treemans with Lucy Tait, daughter of the previous Archbishop of Canterbury, Archibald Campbell Tait. They lived together until Mary’s death in 1918.
Addresses:
Treemans, Horsted Keynes, Haywards Heath, West Sussex RH17, UK (51.03196, -0.03138) [English Heritage Building ID: 302579 (Grade II, 1983)]
Ludwell, Waterbury Hill, Horsted Keynes, Haywards Heath, West Sussex RH17 7EG, UK (51.03623, -0.03339) [English Heritage Building ID: 302549 (Grade II, 1983)]
Place
The original portion of Treemans is XVI century and timber-framed but now mostly tile-hung, though the timbering with red brick infilling is exposed in one place. The old XVII Century manor house lies to the South of Horsted Keynes with the avenue of ancient Scotch firs, and was originally owned by the Wyatt family, infamous in the days of Elizabeth I, and famed for poetry and statesmanship. The small wing of grey stone was built by Thomas Wyatt, kinsman of the poet. The rest of the brickwork was completed in the XVII century. The interior is mostly panelled in oak, partly Elizabethan and partly William and Mary, with large open fireplaces backed with old Sussex ironwork. In one of the chimneys a small chamber still exists which is said to have been used as a priest hiding place or "priest hole.” One large room is thought to have formed the upper part of the original great hall with its ancient beams and vaulted roof, presumably dated back to the XIV or XV century. The whole property is described by A.C. Benson, author of "Land of Hope and Glory,” elder son of Archbishop Benson whose widow lived at Treemans for many years, as “An almost incredibly picturesque house.” Treemans is an L-shaped building. The south front of the south-east wing is faced with ashlar with long and short quoins and a large brick chimney breast. The north-east wing has a projection of 2 storeys with a gable on its east side which is the end of the Elizabethan part of the house. Beyond this the wing was been extended to the east in the late XVII century and refaced or enlarged on its north-west face. This front has 3 storeys and 5 windows. Red brick and grey headers. Stone stringcourse above each floor. Brick parapet. Casement windows with stone keystones and small square leaded panes. Doorway with semi-circular doorsteps, door of 8 fielded panels and flat hood over. The north gable end of this wing has moulded bargeboards and brackets with the date 1693 and a brick stringcourse. Ludwell is a XVII century or earlier timber-framed building with plaster infilling and tiled canopy on brackets above ground floor. Tiled roof. Casement wiwowa. Two storeys. Three windows. East wall faced with ashlar with red brick chimney breast having 3 stacks. After Mary’s death, Lucy moved to Ludwell, which had just been enlarged and restored by Mrs. C.B.O. Clarke, to live with her sister Edith, widow of Randall Davidson.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The church of St Mary the Blessed Virgin Church, built in 1080, in Addington village was once the only church when it was the centre of a larger parish then incorporating Shirley.
Address: Addington Village Road, Opposite the Harvester, Addington, Surrey, CR0 5AS, UK (51.35843, -0.03224)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Tuesday 20.00-21.00, Friday 13.30-15.00, Sunday 08:00–08:30, 09:30–10:30, 14:30–16:00
Phone: +44 1689 842167
English Heritage Building ID: 399377 (Grade II, 1966)
Place
Who: Mary Benson, née Sidgwick (1841 – June 15, 1918)
After her husband’s death in 1896 Mary set up household with Lucy Tait, daughter of the previous archbishop of Canterbury, Archibald Campbell Tait, who had first moved in with the Bensons in 1889. Mary died in 1918, Lucy in 1938, and they are both buried at St Mary the Blessed Virgin, Addington. Now the church ministers to the people living in the more immediate vicinity that includes Addington village, the southern elevation of and escarpment running down from the Addington Hills, the residences along Fieldway on the northernmost part of the New Addington estate, Addington and Forestdale. It has an XI century chancel and windows. The south aisle, built in the early XIII century, is narrow as it once had a thatched roof, hence its falling roofline. The belltower assumed its current form in 1876. The church tower has a belfry with 6 bells, the earliest probably dating from 1380 as well as two XVII Century bells. The bells were restored in 1957. The chancel was richly decorated in 1898 in memory of Archbishop Benson. The crypt is now inaccessible, but the church is the burial place of a Lord Mayor of the City of London, the armigerous Leigh family who were Lords of the manor, and five of the six Archbishops of Canterbury who spent time at their residence nearby of Addington Palace. The Archbishops interred at St Mary’s are:
Archbishop Charles Manners-Sutton – Died 1828 (buried in a vault under the vestry.)
Archbishop William Howley – Died 1848 (buried in the chancel.)
Archbishop John Bird Sumner – Died 1862 (buried in the churchyard.)
Archbishop Charles Longley – Died 1868 (buried in the churchyard.)
Archbishop Archibald Campbell Tait – Died 1882 (buried in churchyard.)
There is also a memorial to the Archbishops in the graveyard.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Buried: Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA, Plot: Section 20, Lot 43458 (private mausoleum along lake)

Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Kings County, New York.
Address: 500 25th St, Brooklyn, NY 11232, USA (40.65901, -73.99569)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 7.45-17.00
National Register of Historic Places: 97000228, 1977 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Located in Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn, it lies several blocks southwest of Prospect Park, between Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, Borough Park, Kensington, and Sunset Park. Paul Goldberger in The New York Times, wrote that it was said "it is the ambition of the New Yorker to live upon the Fifth Avenue, to take his airings in the Park, and to sleep with his fathers in Green-Wood.” The Pierrepont papers deposited at the Brooklyn Historical Society contain material about the organizing of Green-Wood Cemetery.
Notable queer burials at Green-Wood Cemetery:
• Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988), was one of the most important artists of the XX century. In 2006, Equality Forum featured Jean-Michel Basquiat during LGBT history month.
• Henry Ward Beecher (1813–1887), was a Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer, and speaker, known for his support of the abolition of slavery.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990), was a composer, conductor, author, music lecturer, and pianist. In a book released in October, 2013, “The Leonard Bernstein Letters,” his wife reveals his homosexuality.
• Elizabeth M. Cushier (died 1931). Doctors Emily Blackwell (1826-1910) and Elizabeth Cushier had a Boston Marriage. Blackwell co-founded the New York Infirmary for Women and Children (1857) and its Women's Medical College. Cushier was professor of medicine at the college and Blackwell's life-partner for twenty-eight years. About the relationship, Dr. Cushier wrote, “Thus the years happily passed” until in 1910 “a sad blow came in the death of Dr. Blackwell, making an irreparable beak in my life.” Dr. Blackwell is buried at Chilmark Cemetery, Massachusetts.
• Mary Elisabeth Dreier (September 26, 1875- August 15, 1963), was a New York social reformer along with her sister Margaret. Two other sisters, Dorothea and Katherine, were painters. She never married, but shared a home with fellow reformer Frances Kellor (buried alongside her). After Kellor’s death, Dreier lived alone for the rest of her life until dying in 1963, at her summer home in Bar Harbor, Maine.
• Fred Ebb (1928–2004), was a musical theatre lyricist who had many successful collaborations with composer John Kander. Ebb is interred in a mausoleum with Edwin “Eddie” Aldridge (1929–1997) and Martin Cohen (1926–1995) on the banks of Sylvan Water. In addition to the names and dates of each man, the phrase, “Together Forever” is also chiseled on the front of the mausoleum.
• Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829–1869), was a composer and pianist, best known as a virtuoso performer of his own romantic piano works.
• Richard Isay (1934–2012), was a psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, author and gay activist. Isay is considered a pioneer who changed the way that psychoanalysts view homosexuality.
• Paul Jabara (1948–1992), was an actor, singer, and songwriter. Paul Jabara died from AIDS complications after a long illness in Los Angeles, California.
• Frances Alice Kellor (October 20, 1873 – January 4, 1952), shared a home with fellow reformer Mary Dreier from 1905 until her death in 1952. Kellor was an American social reformer and chief investigator for the Bureau of Industries and Immigration of New York State in 1910-13, who specialized in the study of immigrants to the United States and women.
• Violet Oakley (1874–1961), was the first American woman to receive a public mural commission. Oakley and her friends, the artists Elizabeth Shippen Green and Jessie Willcox Smith, all former students of Howard Pyle, were named the Red Rose girls by him.
• Emma Stebbins (1815–1882), was among the first notable American woman sculptors, companion to actress Charlotte Cushman.
• Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933), artist. His daughter, Dorothy Trimble Tiffany (1891–1979), as Dorothy Burlingham, became a noted psychoanalyst and lifelong friend and partner of Anna Freud.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Ona Munson was an American actress perhaps best known for her portrayal of madam Belle Watling in Gone with the Wind.
Born: June 16, 1903, Portland, Oregon, United States
Died: February 11, 1955, New York City, New York, United States
Buried: Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum, Hartsdale, Westchester County, New York, USA, Plot: Ferncliff Mausoleum, Unit 8, Tier Y, Column G, Niche 5
Find A Grave Memorial# 4749
Spouse: Eugene Berman (m. 1949–1955), Stewart McDonald (m. 1941), Edward Buzzell (m. 1927)

Ona Munson was an American actress perhaps best known for her portrayal of prostitute Belle Watling in Gone with the Wind (1939). When David O. Selznick was casting his production Gone with the Wind, he first announced that Mae West was to play Belle, but this was a publicity stunt. Tallulah Bankhead refused the role as too small. Munson herself was the antithesis of the voluptuous Belle: freckled and of slight build. Munson’s career was stalemated by the acclaim of Gone with the Wind; for the remainder of her career, she was typecast in similar roles. Two years later, she played a huge role as another madam, albeit a Chinese one, in Josef von Sternberg's film noir The Shanghai Gesture. Her last film was The Red House, released in 1947. She was married three times, to actor and director Edward Buzzell in 1926, to Stewart McDonald in 1941, and designer Eugene Berman in 1949. These have been termed "lavender" marriages, in that they were intended to conceal her bisexuality and her affairs with women, including filmmaker Dorothy Arzner and playwright Mercedes de Acosta. Munson has been listed as a member of a group called the "Sewing circle", a clique of lesbians organized by actress Alla Nazimova. In 1955, plagued by ill health, she committed suicide at the age of 51 with an overdose of barbiturates in her apartment in New York. A note found next to her deathbed read, "This is the only way I know to be free again...Please don't follow me.“
Dorothy Arzner (January 3, 1897 – October 1, 1979)
Ona Munson (June 16, 1903 – February 11, 1955)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum is located in the hamlet of Hartsdale, town of Greenburgh, Westchester County, New York, about 25 miles (40 km) north of Midtown Manhattan. It was founded in 1902, and is non-sectarian. Ferncliff has three community mausoleums, a crematory, a small chapel, and a main office located in the rear of the main building.
Address: 280 Secor Rd, Hartsdale, NY 10530, USA (41.02737, -73.83234)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 914-693-4700
Place
Ferncliff Cemetery has three community mausoleums that offer what The New York Times has described as "lavish burial spaces". As of 2001, a standard crypt space in the mausoleums was priced at $15,000. The highest-priced spaces were private burial rooms with bronze gates, crystal chandeliers, and stained-glass windows, priced at $280,000. The Ferncliff Mausoleum, aka "The Cathedral of Memories", is the cemetery's oldest mausoleum, constructed in 1928. It has classic architecture, but the corridors are dark without glass panes to admit natural light. Judy Garland, Ed Sullivan, and Joan Crawford are three of the most famous interments in the main mausoleum. The Shrine of Memories is Ferncliff's second mausoleum and was constructed in 1956. "Shrine of Memories" is a more contemporary structure than "Ferncliff Mausoleum." It has many panes of glass to admit natural light, and there is a large frieze of Christopher Columbus in the main hall of the building. Basil Rathbone is one of the most famous interments in "Shrine of Memories." Rosewood is Ferncliff's most recently completed community mausoleum, having been constructed in 1999. Aaliyah and her father Michael Haughton have a private room in Rosewood. Cab Calloway is interred with his wife Zulme "Nuffie". The cemetery is also known for its in-ground burials in sections located in front of the mausoleums. Ferncliff is one of the very few cemeteries that does not permit upright headstones in its outdoor plots. All outdoor grave markers are flush with the ground. This feature facilitates maintenance of the cemetery grounds. However, there are several upright headstones that were placed before this policy was instituted. Malcolm X is one of the most famous ground burials, in plot Pinewood B.
Notable queer burials at Ferncliff Cemetery:
• James Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – December 1, 1987), novelist, essayist
• Joan Crawford (c. 1905–1977), actress
• Alice Delamar (1895-1983), heiress and socialite, cremated here but buried in Palm Beach
• Judy Garland (1922–1969), singer, actress
• Moss Hart (1904–1961), playwright and director
• Alberta Hunter (1895-1984), blues singer
• Elsa Maxwell (1883–1963), columnist, society figure
• Ona Munson (1910–1955), actress
• Basil Rathbone (1892–1967), actor. In 1924 he was involved in a brief relationship with Eva Le Gallienne.
• Paul Robeson (1898–1976), actor, singer, and civil rights activist.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Sir Patrick Michael Leigh Fermor, DSO, OBE, also known as Paddy Fermor, was a British author, scholar and soldier who played a prominent role behind the lines in the Cretan resistance during the Second World War.
Born: February 11, 1915, London, United Kingdom
Died: June 10, 2011, Dumbleton, United Kingdom
Education: The King's School, Canterbury
Lived: Kalamitsi 240 22, Greece (36.88091, 22.24041)
Buried: St Peter, Main Street, Centre of village, Dumbleton, Gloucestershire, WR11 7TL
Spouse: Joan Leigh Fermor (m. 1968–2003)
Parents: Lewis Leigh Fermor
Movies: The Roots of Heaven

The village of Kalamitsi, just outside Kardamili was, in his later years, the principal home of Patrick Leigh Fermor and his wife Joan. Patrick was an English writer who was made an honorary citizen of the village for his participation in the Greek Resistance during World War II, especially in Crete. He died in hospital in 2011 the day after returning to his other home in Dumbleton in England. The ashes of his friend, the writer Bruce Chatwin, were scattered near a Byzantine chapel above the village in 1989.
Address: Kalamitsi 240 22, Greece (36.88091, 22.24041)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Place
The Stavros Niarchos Foundation has approved a grant to the Benaki Museum to fully cover the repair and restoration works as well as the cost of the necessary equipment for the Patrick and Joan Leigh Fermor House in Kardamyli. This unique property will soon start operating as a centre for hosting notable figures from the intellectual and artistic worlds as well as a centre for educational activities in collaboration with Institutions in Greece and abroad. The Fermor property is located in the Kalamitsi area on the outskirts of Kardamyli, in Messenia, and has a total area of about nine stremmata, a little over two acres. It is, by general consensus, one of the most beautiful properties in Greece. Its direct contact with the sea—narrow stone steps lead to a small pebble beach just below the estate—the low, discreet, stone buildings and the Mediterranean garden that goes down to the water, comprise an ideal environment for focus and the creative process. In short, a sojourn in this place is a great gift that Greece can offer to notable figures from the intellectual and artistic worlds.
Life
Who: Sir Patrick Michael Leigh Fermor, DSO, OBE (February 11, 1915 – June 10, 2011) and Charles Bruce Chatwin (May 13, 1940 – January 18, 1989)
Paddy Fermor was a British author, scholar and soldier who played a prominent role behind the lines in the Cretan resistance during the WWII. He was widely regarded as Britain's greatest living travel writer during his lifetime, based on books such as “A Time of Gifts” (1977). He influenced the whole generation of British writers such as Bruce Chatwin, Colin Thubron, Philip Marsden, Nicholas Crane, and Rory Stewart. A BBC journalist once described him as "a cross between Indiana Jones, James Bond and Graham Greene." After many years together, Leigh Fermor was married in 1968 to the Honourable Joan Elizabeth Rayner (née Eyres Monsell), daughter of Bolton Eyres-Monsell, 1st Viscount Monsell. She accompanied him on many of his travels until her death in Kardamyli in June 2003, aged 91. They had no children. They lived part of the year in their house in an olive grove near Kardamyli in the Mani Peninsula, southern Peloponnese, and part of the year in Gloucestershire. The house at Kardamyli was featured in the 2013 film “Before Midnight.” Bruce Chatwin (1940-1989) was an English travel writer, novelist, and journalist. His first book, “In Patagonia” (1977), established Chatwin as a travel writer, although he considered himself instead a storyteller, interested in bringing to light unusual tales. For “In Patagonia” Chatwin received the Hawthornden Prize and the E. M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Graham Greene, Patrick Leigh Fermor, and Paul Theroux praised the book. As a result of the success of In Patagonia, Chatwin's circle of friends expanded to include individuals such as Jacqueline Onassis, Susan Sontag, and Jasper Johns. Chatwin's ashes were scattered near a Byzantine chapel above Kardamyli in the Peloponnese. This was close to the home of one of his mentors, Patrick Leigh Fermor. Near here, Chatwin had spent several months in 1985 working on “The Songlines.”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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For the last few months of his life Patrick Leigh Fermor (1915-2011) suffered from a cancerous tumour, and in early June 2011 he underwent a tracheotomy in Greece. As death was close, according to local Greek friends, he expressed a wish to visit England to say good-bye to his friends, and then return to die in Kardamyli, though it is also stated that he actually wished to die in England and be buried next to his wife. Leigh Fermor died in England, aged 96, on June 10, 2011, the day after his return. His funeral took place at St Peter (Main Street, Centre of village, Dumbleton, Gloucestershire, WR11 7TL) on June 16, 2011. A Guard of Honour was provided by serving and former members of the Intelligence Corps, and a bugler from the Irish Guards sounded the Last Post and reveille. Leigh Fermor is buried next to his wife in the churchyard at Dumbleton.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Anniversary: September 17, 1988
Married: September 17, 2004

William J. Mann is an American historian and novelist best known for his studies of Hollywood and the American film industry, especially his 2006 biography of Katharine Hepburn, Kate: The Woman Who Was Hepburn, which was named a Notable Book of 2006 by The New York Times. Mann’s most recent book is Tinseltown: Murder, Morphine and Madness at the Dawn of Hollywood, and he is working on several film, television and stage projects. Dr. Timothy Huber is a psychologist and homeopath with practices in Connecticut and New York. They divide their time between Connecticut and Provincetown, Massachusetts. On September 17, 2013, they celebrated their 25th anniversary of being together, and the ninth anniversary of their marriage on the beach of Provincetown, one of the first legal unions performed in the United States.
Together since 1988: 27 years.
Timothy Huber (born February 11) & William J. Mann (born August 7)
Anniversary: September 17, 1988 / Married: September 17, 2004
Erasure was playing. Chains of Love. Whether I asked him to dance or he asked me is a matter of some dispute. Do people still ask each other to dance in clubs? I do not think so. But we danced and 25 years later, here we are. It has not always been easy, or traditional, but it has always been exciting, and fun, and challenging, and comforting, and sustaining. And filled with love. -William J. Mann 



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Provincetown is a New England town located at the extreme tip of Cape Cod in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. A small coastal resort town with a year-round population of just under 3,000, Provincetown has a summer population of as high as 60,000. Often called "P-town" or "P'town", the town is known for its beaches, harbor, artists, tourist industry, and its status as a vacation destination for the LGBTQ community.
Address: Provincetown, MA 02657, USA (42.05844, -70.17864)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Provincetown is considered one of the principal destinations in the world for LGBT tourism. By the 1970s Provincetown had a significant gay population, especially during the summer tourist season, when restaurants, bars and small shops serving the tourist trade were open. There had been a gay presence in Provincetown as early as the start of the XX century as the artists' colony developed, along with experimental theatre. Drag queens could be seen in performance as early as the 1940s in Provincetown. In 1978 the Provincetown Business Guild (PBG) was formed to promote gay tourism. Today more than 200 businesses belong to the PBG, and Provincetown is perhaps the best-known gay summer resort on the East Coast. The 2010 US Census revealed Provincetown to have the highest rate of same-sex couples in the country, at 163.1 per 1000 couples. Since the 1990s, property prices have risen significantly, causing some residents economic hardship. The housing bust of 2005 - 2012 caused property values in and around town to fall by 10 percent or more in less than a year. This did not slow down the town's economy, however. Provincetown's tourist season has expanded, and the town has scheduled created festivals and week-long events throughout the year. The most established are in the summer: the Portuguese Festival, Bear Week and PBG's Carnival Week. Timothy Huber (born February 11) & William J. Mann (born August 7) married September 17, 2004, on the beach at Provincetown.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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