Feb. 14th, 2017

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Anna Howard Shaw was a leader of the women's suffrage movement in the United States. She was also a physician and one of the first ordained female Methodist ministers in the United States.
Born: February 14, 1847, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
Died: July 2, 1919, Nether Providence Township, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Albion College
Boston University School of Medicine
Boston University
Boston University School of Theology
Lived: 240 S Ridley Creek Rd, Media, PA 19063, USA (39.90486, -75.39242)
Find A Grave Memorial# 101267300
Books: The Story of a Pioneer, Anna Howard Shaw

Anna Howard Shaw was a leader of the women's suffrage movement in the United States. She was also a physician and one of the first ordained female Methodist ministers in the United States.
Address: 240 S Ridley Creek Rd, Media, PA 19063, USA (39.90486, -75.39242)
Type: Private Property
Life
Who: Anna Howard Shaw (February 14, 1847 – July 2, 1919) and Lucy Elmina Anthony (October 24, 1859 – July 4, 1944)
Beginning in 1886, Shaw served as the chair of the Franchise Department of Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). Her task was "to work for woman suffrage and then to use the ballot to gain 'home protection' and temperance legislation.” However her focus on temperance subsided as she became more heavily involved in the suffrage movement by lecturing for the Massachusetts Suffrage Association and later the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA). Shaw first met Susan B. Anthony in 1887. In 1888, Shaw attended the first meeting of the International Council of Women. Susan B. Anthony encouraged her to join the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA). Having agreed, Shaw played a key role when the two suffrage associations merged when she "helped to persuade the AWSA to merge with Anthony's and Elizabeth Cady Stanton's NWSA, creating for the first time in two decades a semblance of organizational unity within the [suffrage] movement." Beginning in 1904 and for the next eleven years, Shaw was the president of NAWSA. Under her leadership, NAWSA continued to "lobby for a national constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote." During the early 20th century, Alice Paul and Lucy Burns, NAWSA members, began employing militant techniques (e.g. picketing the White House during World War I) to fight for women's suffrage. They, like other members, were inspired by the success of the militant suffragettes in England. As president of NAWSA, Shaw was pressured to support these tactics. Nevertheless, Shaw maintained that she was "unalterably opposed to militancy, believing nothing of permanent value has ever been secured by it that could not have been more easily obtained by peaceful methods.” She remained aligned with Anthony's philosophy that was against any militant tactics. In 1915, she resigned as NAWSA president and was replaced by her ally Carrie Chapman Catt. An immigrant from a poor family, Shaw grew up in an economic reality that encouraged the adoption of non-traditional gender roles. Challenging traditional gender boundaries throughout her life, she put herself through college, worked as an ordained minister and a doctor, and built a tightly-knit family with her secretary and longtime companion Lucy E. Anthony. Lucy, the niece of Susan B. Anthony, was the trusted partner and spouse of Anna Howard Shaw. Committed to gaining more rights for women. Some may argue that she was lost in the shadows of her aunt and her partner, but she was well-regarded in the circles that Anna, Lucy, and Susan were in. Anna and Lucy were together for 30 years until Anna's death in 1919. In her will, Lucy left a bulk of estate to the National League of Women Voters, Philadelphia League of Voters, and her family.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Donald Jess "Don" Bachardy is an American portrait artist. He resides in Santa Monica, California. Bachardy was the life partner of writer Christopher Isherwood.
Born: May 18, 1934 (age 82), Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: Chouinard Art Institute
Lived: 145 Adelaide Dr, Santa Monica, CA 90402, USA (34.02865, -118.51404)
Artwork: Mary Lansbury, Tom Wudl, Richard Sassin, John Sonsini, more
Movies: Frankenstein: The True Story
Nominations: Nebula Award for Best Script, Lambda Literary Award for Visual Arts
Anniversary: February 14, 1953

Christopher Isherwood was an Anglo-American novelist. Donald Jess "Don" Bachardy is an American portrait artist. On Valentine's Day 1953, at the age of 48, Isherwood met teenaged Don Bachardy among a group of friends on the beach at Santa Monica. Reports of Bachardy's age at the time vary, but Bachardy later said, "At the time I was, probably, 16." In fact, Bachardy was 18. Despite the age difference, this meeting began a partnership that, though interrupted by affairs and separations, continued until the end of Isherwood's life. The two became a well-known and well-established couple in Southern Californian society with many Hollywood friends. Isherwood's finest achievement was his 1964 novel A Single Man that depicted a day in the life of George, a middle-aged, gay Englishman who is a professor at a Los Angeles university, and probably inspired by a temporary split between Isherwood and Bachardy. The 2008 film Chris & Don: A Love Story chronicled Isherwood and Bachardy's lifelong relationship.
Together from 1953 to 1986: 33 years.
Christopher Isherwood (August 26, 1904 - January 4, 1986)
Don Bachardy (born May 18, 1934)
Anniversary: February 14, 1953



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The residence at 145 Adelaide Drive was home to acclaimed author Christopher Isherwood and his partner, artist Don Bachardy, for thirty years.
Address: 145 Adelaide Dr, Santa Monica, CA 90402, USA (34.02865, -118.51404)
Type: Private Property
Place
As Christopher Isherwood's home for three decades, the house on Adelaide Drive was the backdrop to the creation of seminal works within the fields of literature, theater, television, and fine art. In 1963, the residence played a key role in events that would later inspire Isherwood's most famous novel, “A Single Man.” Following an incident with Don Bachardy that nearly ended their relationship, Isherwood temporarily moved out of the home that they had shared for seven years. It was this event, as well as Isherwood's jealousy around Bachardy's affairs and the emotional turmoil that followed, that served as creative material for “A Single Man.”
Life
Who: Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood (August 26, 1904 – January 4, 1986)
Born near Manchester, England in 1904, Isherwood became a U.S. citizen in 1946 and lived in Southern California until his death in 1986. Professionally, Isherwood was a well-known novelist, playwright, screenwriter, autobiographer, and diarist. He identified as gay and often explored this identity as a central theme in his literary work. One of his most celebrated accomplishments was his classic American novel, “A Single Man,” which was published in 1964. Isherwood was good friends with Dr. Evelyn Hooker and lived with her at 400 South Saltair Avenue from 1952 to 1953. In 1953, Isherwood met and fell in love with Don Bachardy, considered by many as Los Angeles' most celebrated portrait painter. Despite their thirty-year age difference, the couple lived together in this hillside residence from 1956 until Isherwood's death. Isherwood died at age 81 in 1986 in Santa Monica, California, from prostate cancer. His body was donated to the UCLA Medical School. Over the course of their relationship, Isherwood and Bachardy collaborated on many artistic projects, including the television film “Frankenstein: The True Story” and their diary-portrait series “October.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Enrico Coleman was an Italian painter of British nationality. He was the son of the English painter Charles Coleman and brother of the less well-known Italian painter Francesco Coleman.
Born: June 21, 1846, Rome
Died: February 14, 1911, Rome
Buried: Campo Cestio, Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 95282554
Movement: In arte libertas

The Cimitero Acattolico ("Non-Catholic Cemetery") of Rome, often referred to as the Cimitero dei protestanti ("Protestant Cemetery") or Cimitero degli Inglesi ("Englishmen's Cemetery"), is a public cemetery in the rione of Testaccio in Rome.
Address: Via Caio Cestio, 6, 00153 Roma, Italy (41.8763, 12.4795)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 06 574 1900
Place
The Protestant Cemetery is near Porta San Paolo and adjacent to the Pyramid of Cestius, a small-scale Egyptian-style pyramid built in 30 BC as a tomb and later incorporated into the section of the Aurelian Walls that borders the cemetery. It was formerly called Cimitero Anticattolico, the anti-Catholic cemetery. It has Mediterranean cypress, pomegranate and other trees, and a grassy meadow. It is the final resting place of non-Catholics including but not exclusive to Protestants or British people. The earliest known burial is that of a University of Oxford student named Langton in 1738. The English poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley are buried there.
Notable queer burials at Campo Cestio:
• Hendrik Christian Andersen (April 15, 1872 – December 19, 1940), sculptor, friend of Henry James. A bust of the young Count Alberto Bevilacqua, a muse of sculptor Hendrik Christian Andersen, remains in the home of Henry James, Lamb House, in Rye, England. Henry James to Henrik Andersen, three years later, upon the death of Andersen’s brother: “The sense that I can’t help you, see you, talk to you, touch you, hold you close & long, or do anything to make you rest on my, & feel my deep participation – this torments me, dearest boy, makes my ache for you, & for myself; makes me gnash my teeth & groan at the bitterness of things. . . . This is the one thought that relieves me about you a little – & I wish you might fix your eyes on it for the idea, just, of the possibility. I am in town for a few weeks, but return to Rye Apr. 1, & sooner or later to have you there & do for you, to put my arm round you & make you lean on me as on a brother & a lover, & keep you on & on, slowly comforted or at least relieved of the bitterness of pain – this I try to imagine as thinkable, attainable, not wholly out of the question.”
• Dario Bellezza (1944–1996), Italian poet, author and playwright
• Enrico Coleman (1846–1911), artist and orchid-lover, friend of Giovanni “Nino” Costa (who was special friend with Elihu Vedder)
• Gregory Corso (1930–2001), American beat generation poet
• The tomb of Maria Bollvillez (Zona V.7.18) was the first of de Fauveau’s commissions from the Russian aristocracy. Félicie de Fauveau (1801–1886) was a XIX-century French sculptor who was a precursor of the pre-Raphaelite style. Her multiple sculptural works showcase a variety of techniques and mediums including marble, stone, glass and bronze. Her family connections to the restored Bourbon court of Charles X led to commissions that helped launch her early career in Paris. But in 1830 when Charles X was forced to abdicate, de Fauveau paid for her opposition to the new order by being imprisoned for three months and then, in 1833, went into exile in Florence. She made a striking figure on arrival there: as Ary Scheffer’s portrait shows, she had adopted an androgynous appearance, with cropped hair and male clothing. One visitor reported that she had vowed to keep her hair short until the Bourbon monarchy was restored in France (it never was). Her admirers included Italian opera singer Angelica Catalani and Elizabeth and Robert Browning, who had also made their home in Florence. De Fauveau’s works were coveted by the city’s Russian ex-pats including Anatole Demidoff; the artist received multiple commissions from the industrialist and enjoyed the friendship of his wife Caroline Bonaparte. The Tsar Nicolas I purchased various works from the artist and his daughter Maria Nikolaieva was given a dagger, now at the Louvre, whose handle is engraved with scenes from Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” Guy Cogeval (Musée d’Orsay) uses the word lesbienne (lesbian) in his introduction to the catalogue for the exhibition “The Amazon of sculpture”, whereas Christophe Vital mentions on the adjacent page that Félicie de Fauveau was sans doute (without doubt) in love with the young (male) page who died in the Vendée (Charles de Bonnechose, for whom Félicie designed a monument on her prison wall). Michelle Facos also explicitly suggests that Félicie de Fauveau might have been a lesbian in her “Introduction to Nineteenth-Century Art” ( 2011). Usually her relationship to the Countess de la Rochejaquelein is then referred to.
• Denham Fouts (1914-1948), referenced in literary works by Christopher Isherwood, Truman Capote, and Gore Vidal. He was also a friend of George Platt Lynes, who photographed him. Isherwood described him as a mythic figure, "the most expensive male prostitute in the world." Fouts died in 1948, at the Pensione Foggetti, in Rome, at the age of 35.
• Wilhelm von Humboldt (1794–1803), son of the German diplomat and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt and nephew of Alexander von Humboldt
• Hans von Marées (1837–1887), German painter
• Dora Ohlfsen (1878-1948) was born as Dorothea Ohlfsen-Bagge in Ballarat, Victoria. Her father was Norwegian, Christian Herm Ohlfsen-Bagge, probably born in Schleswig (northern Germany now), and her mother, Kate Harison, Australian. She claimed that her great-grandfather was the Sydney convict printer, Robert Howe. Dora was educated at Sydney Girls High School and studied piano privately with Max Volgrich and Henri Kowalski. She traveled to Germany in 1883 to continue her piano studies under Moritz Moszkowski in Berlin; however, when she contracted neuritis, she began teaching music in Germany and later in Russia, after completing piano studies at Theodor Kullak’s Neue Akademie der Tonkunst. She lived in St Petersburg with a Madame Kerbitz and took up painting; she sold one of her work to the Czarina. Her extentive knowledge of languages gained her employement with the American ambassador and allowed her to write on music, theatre, drama and art for Russian and American newspaper. After traveling through various Baltic countries, she settled in Rome to study sculpture at the French Academy and with French engraver, Pierre Dautel. She produced many medallions using academic portraits, included Lord Chelmsford, Sir James Fairfax and General Peppino Garibaldi, and Symbolyst compositions. Church commissions came from Cardinal O’Connell of Boston and Josef Alteneisel, Prince-Bishop of Brixen in the Tyrol. The medallion in bas-relief of the Prince Bishop of Brizen, Tyrol, is among her finest productions. It has been praised in the French and Italian papers as "the wonderful achievement of a beautiful young Australian, who has only studied art for a comparatively short time" (June 10 1908). During WWI she became a Red Cross nurse in Italy. The Fascist government were patrons of her work and she produced a large relief portrait medallion of Mussolini and a war memorial, “Sacrificio,” at Formia, in 1924-26. Ohlfsen was commissioned by Mussolini to design this memorial because her art studies had been solely in Italy and she had nursed Italian soldiers during the war. This is the only work of its kind in Italy to be made by a woman or a foreigner. William Moore in the Brisbane Courier of 8 March 1930 referred to her as the artist who modelled a bust of Nellie Stewart; she also sculpted the head of W.A. Holman in plaster. In 1948, she and her companion, the Russian Baroness Hélène de Kuegelgen (1879-1948), were found gassed in her studio in Rome at Via di S. Nicola da Tolentino, 00187 Roma, close to the Spanish Steps. They had been living at that address, in an area traditionally associated with artists’ studios, for nearly half a century. Police said the deaths were accidental. Hélène de Kuegelgen was the daughter of Pavel Kuegelgen and Alexandra, nee Zhudlovsky. They had moved to Italy in 1902 from St. Petersburg, a city they both loved but which they accurately saw as being on the brink of revolution. Hélène (Elena) was from a well-connected family of Balten Germans, with one uncle a physician to the Tsar and another editor of the Petersburger German newspaper. Her family also boasted several prominent artists, two of them court painters. Dora and Hélène are buried together. A relief bust of the god Dionysius, one hand raised in a gesture of blessing, watches over one of the most distinctive graves in the Cemetery (Zone 1.15.28). Ohlfsen's work is represented in the collections of the British Museum and the Petit Palais in Paris, and in Australian collections including Museum Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales.
• John Addington Symonds (1840–1893), English poet and critic
• Pavel Fedorovich Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian surrealist painter, long-time partner of Charles Henri Ford. Campo Cestio is the original burial place, he was then moved to Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris.
• Una Vincenzo, Lady Troubridge (1887-1983), died in Rome in 1963; she had left written instructions that her coffin be placed in the vault in Highgate Cemetery where Hall and Batten had been buried, but the instructions were discovered too late. She is buried in the English Cemetery in Rome, and on her coffin is inscribed "Una Vincenzo Troubridge, the friend of Radclyffe Hall".
• Elihu Vedder (1836–1923), American painter, sculptor, graphic artist
• Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840–1894) was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe. In 1893 Woolson rented an elegant apartment on the Grand Canal of Venice. Suffering from influenza and depression, she either jumped or fell to her death from a fourth story window in the apartment in January 1894, surviving for about an hour after the fall She is also memorialized by Anne's Tablet on Mackinac Island, Michigan.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692 
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Frederick Loewe, was an Austrian-American composer. He collaborated with lyricist Alan Jay Lerner on a series of Broadway musicals, including My Fair Lady and Camelot, both of which were made into films.
Born: June 10, 1901, Berlin, Germany
Died: February 14, 1988, Palm Springs, California, United States
Buried: Desert Memorial Park, Cathedral City, Riverside County, California, USA, Plot: B-8, #89
Find A Grave Memorial# 1417
Spouse: Ernestine Zwerline (m. 1931–1957)
Albums: Paint Your Wagon: Music from the Motion Picture Soundtrack, more
Parents: Rosa Loewe, Edmond Loewe

Frederick Loewe (1901–1988) was an Austrian-American composer. He collaborated with lyricist Alan Jay Lerner on a series of Broadway musicals, including “My Fair Lady” and “Camelot,” both of which were made into films. After “Camelot” Loewe decided to retire to Palm Springs, California, not writing anything until he was approached by Lerner to augment the “Gigi” film score with additional tunes for a 1973 stage adaptation, which won him his second Tony, this time for Best Original Score. He remained in Palm Springs, California until his death. He was buried in the Desert Memorial Park (31705 Da Vall Dr, Cathedral City, CA 92234).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Anniversary: February 14, 1982

Sam Irvin is an award-winning film and television director, producer, screenwriter, author, and film teacher. His directing credits include Guilty as Charged, Oblivion, Elvira's Haunted Hills, and two gay television series: Dante's Cove and From Here on Out. His other credits include co-producing The Broken Hearts Club and the Academy Award winning film Gods and Monsters. As an author, Irvin wrote the acclaimed biography Kay Thompson: From Funny Face to Eloise (Simon & Schuster). Between projects, Irvin teaches graduate courses on directing at the University Of Southern California School Of Cinematic Arts. He resides in Los Angeles with Gary Bowers, his partner since 1982. Bowers is a hairdresser and artist. "We met at a club on Christopher Street in New York," Irvin recalled. "It was called The Cock Ring -- which sounds really raunchy but, in fact, was just a neighborhood bar that played great dance music. I spotted Gary across the tiny dance floor. It was love at first sight. I asked him to dance, the music swelled, and the rest is history."
Together since 1982: 33 years.
Gary Bowers (born August 11, 1946)
Sam Irvin (born June 14, 1956)
Anniversary: February 14, 1982



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Marc-André Raffalovich was a French poet and writer on homosexuality, best known today for his patronage of the arts and for his lifelong relationship with the poet John Gray.
Born: September 11, 1864, Paris, France
Died: February 14, 1934, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Lived: 9 Whitehouse Terrace, Edinburgh EH9 2EU, UK (55.93111, -3.19378)
72 South Audley Street, W1K
11 Egerton Gardens, SW3
Buried: Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, City of Edinburgh, Scotland
Find A Grave Memorial# 139612960
Books: Letters to Edward Playfair, In Fancy Dress, Tuberose and Meadowsweet

John Gray was an English poet whose works include Silverpoints, The Long Road and Park: A Fantastic Story. It has often been suggested that he was the inspiration behind Oscar Wilde's fictional Dorian Gray. Gray's life partner was Marc-Andre Raffalovich, a wealthy poet and early defender of homosexuality. On Nov. 28, 1898, at the age of 32, Gray entered the Scots College, Rome, to study for the priesthood. Cardinal Pietro Respighi at St John Lateran ordained him on Dec. 21, 1901. Raffalovich himself became a Catholic in 1896 and joined the tertiary order of Dominicans. When Gray went to Edinburgh, Raffalovich settled nearby. He helped finance St Peter's Church in Morningside where Gray would serve as priest for the rest of his life. The two maintained a chaste relationship until Raffalovich's sudden death in 1934. A devastated Gray died exactly four months later at St. Raphael's nursing home in Edinburgh after a short illness. The critic, Valentine Cunningham, has described Gray as the "stereotypical poet of the nineties“.
Together from 1896 to 1934: 38 years.
John Gray (March 9, 1866 – June 14, 1934)
Marc-Andre Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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In 1882, aged eighteen, Marc André Raffalovich (1864-1934) moved to London with his governess, Miss Florence Truscott Gribbell (c.1842-1930), with the intention of studying at the University of Oxford. Instead, he settled at 72 South Audley Street, W1K with the intention of setting up a salon. Unlike his mother, he was not entirely successful. It was during his time in London that he was introduced to the poet and writer John Henry Gray (1866–1934), through Arthur William Symons (1865–1945), literary scholar and author. They were to remain close friends and companions throughout the next forty years, dying within months of each other.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Marc André Raffalovich stayed at 11 Egerton Gardens, SW3 from 1898 to 1905 and John Gray spent his holidays there while whilst studying for the priesthood.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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St. Peter’s, Falcon Avenue, is a church that gives a remarkable experience of spaciousness for a relative small interior.
Address: 77 Falcon Avenue, Edinburgh EH10 4AN, UK (55.93024, -3.20693)
Type: Religious Building (open to public)
Phone:+44 131 447 2502
Historic Scotland Building ID: 27257 (Grade A, 1970)
Place
Built in 1905, Design by Sir Robert Lorimer (1864-1929)
The church was opened on April 25, 1907. The idea was conceived by Fr. John Gray, at the time curate at St. Patrick’s Church (40 High St, Old Town, Edinburgh EH1 1TQ), together with Marc-André Raffalovitch. On a painting inside the church, an angel with raised and partially spread wings and head bowed to right shoulder is holding a model of the Presbytery, whilst kneeling on left leg on what appears to be a coiled serpent. A large flowering plant rises vertically on the angel’s right from a two-handled vase. The work is housed in a stepped niche. In 1906, John Gray was appointed the first parish priest of St. Peter’s church in Edinburgh, which was a huge change of professional environment for him – from shabby Cowgate to affluent Morningside. His friend Raffalovich financed the building of the church in Falcon Avenue, completed in 1907. John Duncan was commissioned to paint the Stations of the Cross for the church, and was often among the guests at Raffalovich’s parties. The paintings were sold around 1965 and their present whereabouts is unknown. One visitor to the church buildings in Falcon Avenue later remembered: “The whole house was in a dim, mysterious, and elusive twilight. It was a world of half-tones: in fact it only needed an invisible gramophone playing Debussy or bits from Maeterlinck to make it quite perfect. To think of “Pellèas et Mèlisande” or “Le Cathèdrale englouti” is to capture the impression of St. Peter’s presbytery – and its creator.” Anson, 1963.
Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
John Gray was a poet whose works include “Silverpoints,” “The Long Road” and “Park: A Fantastic Story.” Gray is best known today as an aesthetic poet of the 1890s and as a friend of Ernest Dowson, Aubrey Beardsley and Oscar Wilde. He was also a talented translator, bringing works by the French Symbolists Stéphane Mallarmé, Paul Verlaine, Jules Laforgue and Arthur Rimbaud into English, often for the first time. He is purported to be the inspiration behind the title character in Wilde’s “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” but distanced himself from this rumour. In fact, Wilde’s story was serialised in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine a year before their relationship began. His relationship with Wilde was initially intense, but had cooled for over two years by the time of Wilde’s imprisonment. The relationship appears to have been at its height in the period 1891-1893. In 1882 he passed the Civil Service exams and, five years later, the University of London matriculation exams. He joined the Foreign Office where he became a librarian. He left his position at the Foreign Office on Nov. 28, 1898, at the age of 32, and he entered the Scots College, Rome, to study for the priesthood. He was ordained by Cardinal Pietro Respighi at St John Lateran on Dec. 21, 1901. He served as a priest in Edinburgh, first at Saint Patrick’s and then as rector at Saint Peter’s. John Gray was to become a close friend of the “Michael Fields” – Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper. His most important supporter, and life partner, was Marc-André Raffalovich, a wealthy poet and early defender of homosexuality. Raffalovich himself became a Catholic in 1896 and joined the tertiary order of Dominicans. When Gray went to Edinburgh he settled nearby. He helped finance St Peter’s Church in Morningside where Gray would serve as priest for the rest of his life. In 1930, Gray was installed as canon in St. Mary’s cathedral (35 Manor Pl, Edinburgh EH3 7EB). The two maintained a chaste relationship until Raffalovich’s sudden death in 1934. A devastated Gray died exactly four months later at St. Raphael’s nursing home in Edinburgh after a short illness.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In Whitehouse Terrace, Marc-André Raffalovich established a successful salon. His guests included Henry James, Lady Margaret Sackville, Compton Mackenzie, Max Beerbohm and Herbert Read.
Address: 9 Whitehouse Terrace, Edinburgh EH9 2EU, UK (55.93111, -3.19378)
Type: Private Property
Historic Scotland Building ID: 30678 (Grade B, 1993)
Place
While John Gray studied in Rome, Marc-André Raffalovich and Miss Florence Truscott Gribbell (the daughter of a Scottish bank manager and Marc-André’s former governess) spent part of each year in Edinburgh, and in 1905, they moved to Morningside, to 9 Whitehouse Terrace, where Raffalovich’s longed-for salon was finally established. “A place of intellectualism and faded decandence,” according to John Kemplay. For 25 years, until Miss Gribbell’s death in 1930, Raffalovich’s Sunday luncheon and Tuesday dinner parties were established features of the city’s social life. His home was last on the market in 2013 and sold for £2,800,000.
Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
Marc-André Raffalovich was a French poet and writer on homosexuality, best known today for his patronage of the arts and for his lifelong relationship with the poet John Gray. Marc-André went up to study in Oxford in 1882 before settling down in London and opening a salon in the 1890s. Oscar Wilde attended, calling the event a saloon rather than a salon. This is where Raffalovich met the love and companion of his life, John Gray. In 1890, his sister Sophie married the Irish nationalist politician William O’Brien (1852–1928.) In 1896, under the influence of John Gray, Raffalovich embraced Catholicism and joined the tertiary order of the Dominicans as Brother Sebastian in honour of Saint Sebastian. At the same time Gray was ordained a priest. In 1905, Gray was appointed to the parish of St Patrick in the working class Cowgate area of Edinburgh. Raffalovich followed and settled down nearby, purchasing No. 9, Whitehouse Terrace. He contributed greatly to the cost of St Peter’s Church in Morningside, Edinburgh, of which Gray was appointed the first parish priest.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Archdiocese of St Andrews & Edinburgh acquired the land in 1895 and it became Mount Vernon Cemetery. The first burial was in 1895.
Address: 49 Mount Vernon Rd, Edinburgh EH16 6JG, UK (55.91498, -3.1576)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +44 131 664 3064
Place
The land now known as Mount Vernon Cemetery was previously known as the “Lands of Nellfield” and in 1827 was renamed by the then owners as “Mount Vernon”.
Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
Given his close and intense friendship with Canon John Gray, Raffalovich is buried as close as possible to him. His tombstone reads: IN PEACE + MARC ANDRE SEBASTIAN RAFFALOVICH 11TH SEPTEMBER 1864 + FEBRUARY 14, 1934. John Gray is probably buried in the Priests' Circle as he was the founder and first priest of St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church, Falcon Road.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Martha May Eliot, was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health.
Born: 1891, Massachusetts, United States
Died: February 14, 1978, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
Education: Radcliffe College
Harvard Univeristy
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 105839248
Books: Infant Care
Awards: Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award

Martha May Eliot was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health. During undergraduate study at Bryn Mawr College, she met Ethel Collins Dunham, who was to become her life partner. Dunham established national standards for the hospital care of newborn children, and expanded the scope of health care for growing youngsters by monitoring their progress. After completing their undergraduate education, the two enrolled together at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1914. Lillian Faderman writes: "[At] Bryn Mawr she met a twenty-six year old freshman, Ethel Dunham. From 1910 to Ethel's death in 1969, the two women were inseparable. As a couple, Martha Eliot and Ethel Dunham succeeded in times that were as unsympathetic to professional women as they were to lesbians.” In the 1970s, during Martha's travels for WHO, they wrote each other every day: "Dearest, it was hard to say goodbye and I shall miss you terribly... Ever and ever so much love, my darling." Martha to Ethel. "How I count the time until you do arrive. I miss you my darling." Ethel to Martha.
Together from 1910 to 1969: 59 years.
Ethel Collins Dunham (1883 - 1969)
Martha May Eliot (April 7, 1891 – February 14, 1978)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Sam Irvin is a film and television director, producer, screenwriter, actor, author and film teacher.
Born: June 14, 1956 (age 60), Asheville, North Carolina, United States
Partner: Gary Bowers (1982–)
Parents: Sam Irvin, Sr.
Books: Kay Thompson: From Funny Face to Eloise
Siblings: Tim Irvin
Anniversary: February 14, 1982

Sam Irvin is an award-winning film and television director, producer, screenwriter, author, and film teacher. His directing credits include Guilty as Charged, Oblivion, Elvira's Haunted Hills, and two gay television series: Dante's Cove and From Here on Out. His other credits include co-producing The Broken Hearts Club and the Academy Award winning film Gods and Monsters. As an author, Irvin wrote the acclaimed biography Kay Thompson: From Funny Face to Eloise (Simon & Schuster). Between projects, Irvin teaches graduate courses on directing at the University Of Southern California School Of Cinematic Arts. He resides in Los Angeles with Gary Bowers, his partner since 1982. Bowers is a hairdresser and artist. "We met at a club on Christopher Street in New York," Irvin recalled. "It was called The Cock Ring -- which sounds really raunchy but, in fact, was just a neighborhood bar that played great dance music. I spotted Gary across the tiny dance floor. It was love at first sight. I asked him to dance, the music swelled, and the rest is history."
Together since 1982: 33 years.
Gary Bowers (born August 11, 1946)
Sam Irvin (born June 14, 1956)
Anniversary: February 14, 1982



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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