Feb. 15th, 2017

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Bill T. Jones is an American artistic director, choreographer and dancer. Jones has received numerous awards for his work and is the co-founder of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company.
Born: February 15, 1952 (age 64), Bunnell, Florida, United States
Education: Binghamton University
Awards: Kennedy Center Honors, more
Movies: The 11th of September: Moyers in Conversation
Nominations: Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical, more

Bill T. Jones is an American artistic director, choreographer and dancer. Jones has received numerous awards for his work and is the co-founder of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Arnie Zane was an American photographer, choreographer, and dancer. Zane was immensely interested in the human body, particularly its gestures, its movement, and its essence. Zane met Jones, the man who would later become his lifelong partner, while visiting his Alma mater. The story goes that the 22-year-old Zane was immediately enamored of Bill T. Jones (a freshman studying dance and theater at SUNY) when he spied him across campus in 1971. During that spring semester, Zane convinced Jones to travel to Amsterdam with him and explore their burgeoning romantic relationship. Jones and Bjorn Amelan found a second chapter in love after both losing their long-term partners. Jones’s spent the last 20 years and more living and collaborating with Amelan, who had a long romantic and professional relationship with famed fashion designer Patrick Kelly before he died. Since they met in 1992, the two have successfully entwined their creative work and domestic lives.
Together from 1971 to 1988: 17 years.
Arnie Zane (September 26, 1948 – March 30, 1988)
Bill T. Jones (born February 15, 1952)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Find A Grave Memorial# 161872368

The Oldest Gay Couple in America tells the moving and, at times, frightening story of Bruhs Mero and Gean Harwood, as they journey through the gay and lesbian scene of New York City from 1927 to the present. Covering Harwood's childhood, their professional life in the arts, the fear and repression of the McCarthy era, and their triumphant "coming out" in the eighties, it is an intimate look at the strife and joy of two lives intertwined. Gean Harwood was born in Auburn, NY, and learned to be a musician there, but the comparatively inhospitable climate for gays in an Upstate New York town like Auburn led him to New York City, where he met Mero at a party in 1929, and the two men soon became partners in both life and music, remaining together over many decades to follow. Bruhs and Gean were together for 66 years. Sixty Years with Bruhs & Gean is a lively 90-minute musical that traces their remarkable lives: both funny and touching, their story covers the breadth of 20th century gay history, from the early-closeted days of the Great Depression and World War II, into the McCarthy era, Stonewall and beyond.
Together from 1929 to 1995: 66 years.
Bruhs Mero (February 15, 1911 - August 10, 1995)
L. Eugene “Gean” Harwood (1909-2006)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Jane Chambers was an American playwright. She was a "pioneer in writing theatrical works with openly lesbian characters".
Born: March 27, 1937, Columbia, South Carolina, United States
Died: February 15, 1983, Greenport, New York, United States
Buried: Sterling Cemetery, Greenport, Suffolk County, New York, USA, Plot: 906
Find A Grave Memorial# 18998879
Awards: Writers Guild of America Award for Television: Daytime Serials
Books: A late snow, My Blue Heaven, 2 from Chambers, more
Plays: Last Summer at Bluefish Cove
Nominations: GLAAD Media Award for Outstanding Los Angeles Theater
People also search for: Liz Tennant, Andrew Boulton, Jenny Davis, more

Jane Chambers was one of the first American playwrights to create openly lesbian characters who were comfortable with their own homosexuality. She believed that this would help eliminate homophobia. While at Goddard, she met Beth Allen, who was to become her lover, manager, and devoted lifelong companion. Subsequently Chambers’s death, Allen published a collection of her poetry as a memorial to her courage and spirit. The Women in Theatre Program of the Association for Theatre in Higher Education honored Chambers by creating the Jane Chambers Playwriting Award to encourage the writing of plays that reflect women's experience. As Chambers told the New York Times, "As we become more comfortable with ourselves, the rest of the world will become comfortable with us." She opened the door for other playwrights who wished to write affirming plays about lesbians.
Together from 1968 to 1983: 15 years.
Beth A. Allen (born 1959)
Jane Chambers (March 27, 1937 - February 15, 1983)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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At Sterling Cemetery (735 1st St, Greenport, NY 11944) is buried Jane Chambers (1937-1983), American playwright. She was a "pioneer in writing theatrical works with openly lesbian characters".



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Education: University of Oxford
Lived: Lewes House, 23 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU, UK (50.87371, 0.01296)
Buried: English Cemetery, Bagni di Lucca, Provincia di Lucca, Toscana, Italy
Buried alongside: Ned Warren
Find A Grave Memorial# 139948443

Ned Warren was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum, which he did not attempt to sell during his lifetime because of its explicit depiction of homoerotic scenes. At Oxford, he met John Marshall, whom he called "Puppy." Ned and John lived together at Lewes House in East Sussex, for a time with John’s wife, Mary. On February 15, 1928, John retired for the evening, saying that he was not feeling well. Ned gave him a kiss and joined him in bed, but John died during the night. Marshall's took his last breath while Ned sat at his bedside. Servants reported that Ned's final words to the dying man were, “Goodbye, Puppy." Warren died less than one year later. Mary, John and Ned were buried in the non-Catholic cemetery in Bagni di Lucca, Italy, a town known as a spa in Etruscan and Roman times; that was John and Ned’s expressed desire, including having Mary near them. The same cemetery is the final resting place of Evangeline Whipple and Rose Cleveland.
Together from 1885 to 1928: 43 years.
Edward Perry "Ned" Warren (January 8, 1860 – December 28, 1928)
John Marshall (1862 - February 15, 1928)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The principal rooms, known to Ned Warren as the Business Room, the Red Drawing Room, the Hepplewhite Bedroom and the Dining Room, remain as originally constructed and require only the return of some of their former furnishings to recreate the grace and elegance of a typical XVIII Century country gentleman’s retreat.
Address: 23 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU, UK (50.87371, 0.01296)
Type: Administrative Building (open to public)
Phone: +44 01273 471600
English Heritage Building ID: 293121 (Grade II, 1952)
Place
Ned Warren and John Marshall lived together at Lewes House, a large residence in Lewes, East Sussex, where they became the center of a circle of like-minded men interested in art and antiquities who ate together in a dining room overlooked by Lucas Cranach’s “Adam and Eve,” now in the Courtauld Institute of Art. One account said that "Warren’s attempts to produce a supposedly Greek and virile way of living into his Sussex home" produced "a comic mixture of apparently monastic severity (no tea or soft chairs allowed) and lavish living." The early Georgian features of Lewes House probably date from 1733. The earlier two-storey part of the present house was probably built, or remodelled, around the late mediaeval core, either by John Tabor, a “Doctor of Physick” or his son-in-law, William Kempe. At the close of the XVIII Century, the property was in the ownership of Henry Humphrey. It was during his occupation that the building was sketched in 1783 by James Lambert. A copy of the drawing hangs in Lewes House and shows the house at that time to be of its original two storeys with a gabled roof and entrance porch with living accommodation over, supported by Ionic columns. A garden occupied the site of the front and western parts of the present house. It was enclosed by a high flint wall and entered by an imposing gateway on its High Street frontage. By 1812 the property had passed to Humphrey’s nephew, Henry Jackson, who was responsible for the addition of the west wing, rebuilding the front of the house and extending the property northwards to the High Street. Jackson’s new structure was of three storeys and incorporated the more fashionable high ceilings in the newly-created rooms. The work also included the construction of the present Doric porch and the flight of stone steps to pavement level, bringing the house to the appearance which it has today. By 1836 Lewes House was in the ownership of Edward Shewell, who died in 1838. Edward fathered no fewer than 20 children by two wives, the second of whom, having borne him six of those children, outlived her husband by 45 years. She died in the house on Mar. 22, 1883 aged 80 years. The property then descended to Edward’s grandsons of his first marriage, Edward Louis Shewell and Henry Shewell. E.L. Shewell was drowned at sea on May 5, 1887, during a voyage from Barcelona to Marseilles, in a collision between the two steamships “Asic” and “Ajaccio.” This left the property in the sole ownership of Henry, a Major General in the British Army, who sold the property in August 1887 to his distant aunt, Elizabeth Cooper. By 1890 the occupant was Edward Perry Warren, the third son of Samuel Denis Warren of Massachusetts who founded the Cumberland Paper Mills at Maine. He furnished the house with fine examples of antique furniture. Oriental carpets and rugs. He hung the walls with tapestries and primitive paintings, filled the bookcases with rare books and displayed his vast collection of vases, bronzes, ivories and other priceless antiquities throughout the house. In 1928 Warren had made a gift of this house (and also School Hill House, an adjoining Georgian property) to the man who began his association with Warren as Private Secretary but who was to become one of Warren’s most trusted and highly valued business associates and friend, H. Asa Thomas Esq. On April 1, 1974, following the reorganisation of local government, the house came into the ownership of the present occupant and custodian, Lewes District Council, whose principal offices are located here. The house itself is virtually unaltered except for the conversion of the domestic quarters into offices and storage accommodation.
Life
Who: Edward Perry “Ned” Warren (January 8, 1860 – December 28, 1928) and John Marshall (1862–1928)
Edward Perry Warren was born in 1860, educated at Harvard (Class of 1883) and later entered Oxford to read Classics where he gained his MA degree. From an early age Warren’s interest was antiquities – particularly Grecian – and, like his father and mother, he became a great collector of pictures, fine arts and china. Edward had little interest in the family business and, following his father’s death in 1888 (at which time he was in England) he was happy to leave those affairs in the hands of a trust so that he was free to follow his own pursuits of travel and collecting on his recently acquired income of £10,000 a year. Warren did not enjoy good health and was plagued with eye problems which necessitated early withdrawal from his studies at Oxford. However, he found the lifestyle at Lewes House very much to his liking and, as his health improved, he began the serious collection of fine arts, not only for his own satisfaction, but also, for a time, on behalf of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in America. His extensive circle of friends reflected his interest in the arts and he entertained regularly. Large parties were common and included numerous members of the Bloomsbury Group, one of whom, the artist Roger Fry, painted a water colour of the house and garden in 1910 which was presented to the Council and is now on display in the house. Warren, his lifelong friend and resident assistant John Marshall, the constant stream of visitors, whose lifestyles were quite alien to the average Lewesian, the Arab horses and the six St. Bernard dogs gave the house a reputation of eccentricity and few local people, except for his household staff, ever saw it from the inside.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Bagni di Lucca (formerly Bagno a Corsena) is a comune of Tuscany, Italy, in the Province of Lucca with a population of about 6,500. Bagni di Lucca with its thermal baths reached its greatest fame during the XIX century, especially during the French occupation.
Address: Cimitero Inglese, Via Letizia, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00566, 10.58808)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Address: Via Bagno alla Villa, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00971, 10.5879)
Type: Private Property
Address: Villa San Francesco, Via S. Francesco, 6, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00832, 10.58725)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +39 333 765 8629
Place
The town became the summer residence of the court of Napoleon and his sister, Elisa Baciocchi. A casino was built, where gambling was part of social nightlife, as well as a large hall for dances. At the Congress of Vienna (1814), the Duchy of Lucca was assigned to Maria-Louisa of Bourbon as ruler of Parma. It continued as a popular summer resort, particularly for the English, who built a Protestant church there. The church now has been converted to the Bagni di Lucca Biblioteca (library) and holds archives and records that date back to centuries ago. In 1847 Lucca with Bagni di Lucca was ceded to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, under the domain of the Grand Duke Leopold II of Lorraine. His rule started a period of decline for the springs and casino as a destination, since he was used to a secluded life. In 1853 the casino was closed. It was reopened after 1861, when Lucca became part of the unified Kingdom of Italy. In the 1940s, during the German invasion of Italy, Bagni di Lucca, along with many other towns located in the Apennines, was occupied, as they were along the Gothic Line. Several houses and mansions in the area were used as residences for German soldiers and some residents born after 1940 in this region have German ancestry. The English cemetery is a sacred place which is located in Bagni di Lucca, about 300 meters from the Church of England, on the other side of the river Lima. In 1842 Carlo Ludovico di Borbone granted to the British colony of Bagni di Lucca the faculty to establish a Protestant cemetery. They chose a place called "al Prato Santo (the Holy Meadow)" and, although the works were finished in 1844, the first burial happened immediately after the purchase. The graveyard was in operation until 1953 and there are 137 people who rest there. In 1982, with the exhaustion of a legacy for maintenance, the holy site was purchased by the town of Bagni di Lucca. The cemetery is currently managed by the Fondazione Michel de Montaigne and Istituto Storico Lucchese and is accessible to visitors every day (except Sunday) from 10.00 to 18.00. Among the people buried here, often in tombs made by famous sculptors such as Benjamin Gibson, Joseph Norfini and Emilio Duccini, are the novelist Ouida, Henry and Elizabeth Stisted and Irish entomologist Alexander Henry Haliday.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Inglese di Bagni di Lucca:
• Rose Elizabeth Cleveland (June 13, 1846 – November 22, 1918), was the First Lady of the United States from 1885 to 1886, during the first of her brother U.S. President Grover Cleveland’s two administrations.
• Nelly Erichsen (1862-1918) was an English illustrator and painter. From 1912 until Nov. 1918, Erichsen was living in the quiet Tuscan spa town of Bagni di Lucca with two companions - Evangeline Whipple and Rose Cleveland. Whipple was the widow of the American Episcopal Bishop Henry Whipple, known for his evangelical work among the native Indian population. Whipple and Cleveland had first met in the winter of 1889–1890, and resumed their relationship in 1901 (after the death of Henry Whipple), moving from the USA to Italy in 1910. In 1918 tragedy struck, when both Rose Cleveland and Nelly Erichsen were carried off by the 1918 flu pandemic which decimated the post-war World. Evangeline Whipple died in London in 1930, but she was laid to rest in Bagni di Lucca next to the tombs of the two friends who had preceded her.
• Ouida (1839-1908) was the pseudonym of the English novelist Maria Louise Ramé (although she preferred to be known as Marie Louise de la Ramée.)
• Edward Perry Warren (1860-1928), known as Ned Warren, was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum. At Oxford Edward Perry Warren met archeologist John Marshall (1862–1928), a younger man he called "Puppy," with whom he formed a close and long-lasting relationship, though Marshall married in 1907. Beginning in 1888, Warren made England his primary home. He and Marshall lived together at Lewes House (with Marshall’s wife, Mary), a large residence in Lewes, East Sussex, where they became the center of a circle of like-minded men interested in art and antiquities who ate together in a dining room overlooked by Lucas Cranach’s “Adam and Eve,” now in the Courtauld Institute of Art. Ned Warren, John Marshall and Mary are all buried together in Bagni di Lucca.
• Evangeline Marrs Whipple (1860-1930), widow for the second time (she first married the wealthy businessman Michael Hodge Simpson and then bishop Henry Benjamin Whipple), visited Bagni di Lucca in 1910, lodging at Hotel Continental and then taking residence at Casa Bernardini at Bagno alla Villa. This is the house she shared with Rose Cleveland and Nelly Ericksen. Rose and Nelly died in 1918. In 1928 Evangeline wrote “A Famous Corner of Tuscany” about Bagni di Lucca. Around this time she bought Casa Burlamacchi, completing restoring the “Casa Piccola” (Little House, now Villa San Francesco), in front of the garden at the back of the “Casa Grande” (Big House.)



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Paul Chalfin was an artist and interior designer with an interest in architecture, most known for his work on Villa Vizcaya.
Born: November 2, 1874, New York City, New York, United States
Died: February 16, 1959, Clifton, New Jersey, United States
Education: Harvard University
Buried: Mount Hebron Cemetery, Upper Montclair, Essex County, New Jersey, USA, GPS (lat/lon): 40.8536, -74.19783
Find A Grave Memorial# 161267748
Structures: Villa Vizcaya
People also search for: James Deering, Diego Suarez, F. Burrall Hoffman

James Deering was a socialite and an antiquities collector; he was an executive in the family Deering Harvester Company and subsequent International Harvester. He is known for his landmark Vizcaya estate, where he was an early 20th century resident on Biscayne Bay, in the present day Coconut Grove district of Miami, Florida. Begun in 1910, with architecture and gardens in a Mediterranean Revival style, Vizcaya was his passionate endeavor with artist Paul Chalfin, and his winter home from 1916 to his death in 1925. While staying at Vizcaya, John Singer Sargent painted a series of watercolors of male nudes, using the African-American workers on the premises as models. Many speculate James Deering to have had a relationship with Sargent, a life-long bachelor. James Deering died in September 1925, on board the steamship SS City of Paris en route back to the United States. Despite high praise for his work on Villa Vizcaya, Chalfin never worked on another mansion; he decorated the apartment of actress Lillian Gish, friend of James Deering. Chalfin died on February 15, 1959 at the age of 84 in a nursing home in Upper Montclair, New Jersey.
Together from 1910 to 1925: 15 years.
James Deering (November 12, 1859 – September 21, 1925)
Paul Chalfin (November 2, 1874 - February 15, 1959)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Villa Vizcaya, now named the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, is the former villa and estate of businessman James Deering, of the Deering McCormick-International Harvester fortune, on Biscayne Bay in the present day Coconut Grove neighborhood of Miami, Florida.
Address: 3251 S Miami Ave, Miami, FL 33129, USA (25.74438, -80.21047)
Type: Museum (open to publich)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 9.30-16.30
National Register of Historic Places: 70000181, 1970. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built in 1916, Design by F. Burrall Hoffman (1882-1980), Interior Design Paul Chalfin (1874-1959), Landscape Design by Diego Suarez (1888-1974)
The early XX century Vizcaya estate also includes: extensive Italian Renaissance gardens; native woodland landscape; and a historic village outbuildings compound. The landscape and architecture were influenced by Veneto and Tuscan Italian Renaissance models and designed in the Mediterranean Revival architecture style, with Baroque elements. Paul Chalfin, a former art curator, painter, and interior designer, was the project’s director. He assisted and encouraged Deering to collect art items, antiquities, and architectural elements for the project. Chalfin recommended the architect F. Burrall Hoffman to design the structural and envelope of the villa, garden pavilions, and estate outbuildings. The landscape master plan and individual gardens were designed with the Colombian landscape designer Diego Suarez, who had trained with Sir Harold Acton at the gardens of Villa La Pietra outside Florence, Italy. Vizcaya’s villa exterior and garden architecture is a composite of different Italian Renaissance villas and gardens, with French Renaissance parterre features, based on visits and research by Chalfin, Deering, and Hoffman. The villa facade’s primary influence is the Villa Rezzonico designed by Baldassarre Longhena at Bassano del Grappa in the Veneto region of northern Italy. It is referred to sometimes as the "Hearst Castle of the East.” James Deering died in September, 1925, on board the steamship SS City of Paris en route back to the United States. After his death Vizcaya was inherited by his two nieces, Marion Chauncey Deering McCormick and Ely Deering McCormick Danielson. Over the decades, after hurricanes and increasing maintenance costs, they began selling the estate’s surrounding land parcels and outer gardens. In 1945 they sold significant portions of the Vizcaya property to the Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine, Florida, to build Miami’s Mercy Hospital. In 1952 Miami-Dade County acquired the villa and formal Italian gardens, needing significant restoration, for $1 million. Deering’s heirs donated the villa’s furnishings and antiquities to the County-Museum. Vizcaya began operation in 1953 as the Dade County Art Museum.
Life
Who: James Deering (November 12, 1859 – September 21, 1925)
James Deering was an industrial executive in the family Deering Harvester Company and subsequent International Harvester, a socialite, and an antiquities collector. Begun in 1910, with architecture and gardens in a Mediterranean Revival style, Vizcaya was his passionate endeavor with artist Paul Chalfin (1874-1959), and his winter home from 1916 to his death in 1925. Paul Chalfin had attended Harvard, trained as a painter at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and was an associate of renowned decorator Elsie de Wolfe. She introduced Chalfin to Deering for the interiors of his Chicago home in 1910. In 1910, Chalfin and Deering traveled through Europe together for the first trip of many over the years, in part to collect ideas and begin acquiring art, antiquities, and furnishings for the new Florida estate. The culmination of their shared effort and lasting memorial to their creative relationship is Villa Vizcaya, the Miami estate created between 1914 and 1923. Among James Deering’s closest friends were painter Gari Melchers and his wife Corinne. Through his brother Charles, also a patron of the arts and collector, he had friendships with the painters John Singer Sargent and Anders Zorn. Sargent visited Vizcaya in Mar. 1917 and produced a series of watercolors of the estate, as well as portrait of James and male nudes of the African-American workers there. After the extensive gardens were completed in 1923, Deering’s health began to weaken. Nonetheless, he traveled and entertained guests, including the silent film stars Lillian Gish and Marion Davies. James Deering died aboard the steamship SS City of Paris. His body was brought to Chicago for burial at the family plot in Graceland Cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) was an artist and interior designer with an interest in architecture, most known for his work on Villa Vizcaya. Paul Chalfin, while living at Vizcaya, maintained a homosexual relationship with Louis Koons, in the mid-1910s and early 1920s. In 1940 Chalfin retired due to failing eyesight. Paul Chalfin died on February 15, 1959 at the age of 84 in a nursing home in Upper Montclair, New Jersey, and is buried at Mount Hebron Cemetery (851 Valley Rd, Montclair, NJ 07042).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Susan Brownell Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement.
Born: February 15, 1820, Adams, Massachusetts, United States
Died: March 13, 1906, Rochester, New York, United States
Lived: Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum, 67 East Road, Adams, MA 01220, USA (42.61546, -73.10229)
Susan B. Anthony Childhood House, 2835 NY 29, Battenville, NY 12834, USA (43.11053, -73.42311)
Susan B. Anthony House, 17 Madison St, Rochester, NY 14608, USA (43.15318, -77.62806)
Buried: Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester, Monroe County, New York, USA, Plot: Section C, Lot 93
Find A Grave Memorial# 31
Siblings: Daniel Read Anthony, Mary Stafford Anthony, Hannah Anthony, Guelma Anthony McLean, Merritt Anthony

Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. In 1851, she met Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who became her lifelong co-worker in social reform activities, primarily in the field of women's rights. Anthony and Stanton worked together in a close and productive relationship. They referred to each other as "Susan" and "Mrs. Stanton". At Anthony's 70th birthday celebration, Stanton teased her by saying, "Well, as all women are supposed to be under the thumb of some man, I prefer a tyrant of my own sex, so I shall not deny the patent fact of my subjection.” Their interests began to diverge somewhat as they grew older. Anthony began to form alliances with more conservative groups. Despite such friction, their relationship continued to be close. When Stanton died in 1902, Anthony grieved for months. Writing a tribute that appeared in The New York Times, Anthony described Stanton as having "forged the thunderbolts" that she (Anthony) "fired."
They met in 1851 and remained friends until Stanton’s death in 1902: 51 years.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902)
Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Jane Addams was a pioneer settlement social worker, public philosopher, sociologist, author, and leader in women's suffrage and world peace. She revolutionized American social reform by founding Hull House, an institution Addams established in a poor neighborhood of Chicago to provide services for recent immigrants. Addams later became the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Her closest adult companion and friend was wealthy philanthropist Mary Rozet Smith, who supported Addams's work at Hull House, and with whom she shared a romantic friendship. They always slept in the same room and the same bed, and when they traveled Jane even wired ahead to be sure they would get a hotel room with a double bed. It was said that, "Mary Smith became and always remained the highest and clearest note in the music that was Jane Addams' personal life". Together they owned a summerhouse in Bar Harbor, Maine. When apart, they would write to each other at least once a day - sometimes twice. Addams would write to Smith, "I miss you dreadfully and am yours 'til death". The letters also show that the women saw themselves as a married couple: "There is reason in the habit of married folks keeping together", Addams wrote to Smith.
Together from 1893 to 1934: 41 years.
Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935)
Mary Rozet Smith (December 23, 1868 - 1934)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Susan B. Anthony, who led the movement to obtain voting rights for women, had a passionate love affair with abolitionist Anna E. Dickinson. In one surviving letter, Anthony enticed Dickinson (whom she called a "naughty Teaze") to join her in bed, ensuring her it was "big enough and good enough to take you in.” Dickinson was an American orator and lecturer. An advocate for the abolition of slavery and for women's suffrage, as well as a gifted teacher, Dickinson was the first woman to speak before the United States Congress. At a very young age, she aided the Republican Party in the hard-fought 1863 elections and significantly influenced the distribution of political power in the Union just prior to the Civil War. Dickinson also was the first white woman on record to climb Colorado’s Longs Peak, in 1873. Among her papers there is a letter signed “Ida” that recalls, “This time last evening you were sitting on my knee, nestled close to my heart and I was the happiest of mortals.” The letter does not stop with such a maternal description. Ida goes on to remember Anna in bed, “tempting me to kiss her sweet mouth and to caress her until—well, poor little me, poor ‘booful princess.’ How can I leave thee, queen of my loving heart?”
Anna Elizabeth Dickinson (October 28, 1842 – October 22, 1932)
Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The Anthony House is a historic house at 67 East Road in Adams, Massachusetts.
Address: 67 East Road, Adams, MA 01220, USA (42.61546, -73.10229)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Thursday through Monday 10.00-16.00
Phone: +1 413-743-7121
National Register of Historic Places: 85000021, 1985
Place
Built in 1817
The house is a conventional center hall 2.5 story colonial in the Federalist style. Twin chimneys rise from the building’s center line, and a modest 1.5 story ell was added onto the rear of the house, and a porch added onto the side of the rear ell in the 1950s was enclosed in the 1960s. A barn has been replaced by a modern garage on the property. Inside the house the original floorplan has been retained, with a central hall flanked by large public rooms in front of the house and smaller service rooms in the rear. The rear ell contains two small rooms. Most of the original woodwork has been retained, although one fireplace has been bricked up. The house is now a museum dedicated to showcasing Susan B. Anthony’s early years. The house is notable for its association with early educators and industrialists in Adams, and as the birthplace of suffragist Susan B. Anthony: she was born in this house on February 15, 1820. The first of the Anthonys to arrive in Adams, Massachusetts was David Anthony, the great-grandfather of Susan B. Anthony, in the years before the American Revolutionary War. He came as part of a more general migration of Quakers to the area from Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts. He established a cider mill that remains in the Anthony family to this day. His grandson, David Anthony, built this house as a gift to his son, Daniel Anthony, the father of Susan B. Anthony. Daniel was an influential member of the local Quaker community: a strong proponent of education, teaching at the East Road School, and joining with others in the tightly knit Quaker community to found the Adams Academy in 1825 on land owned by his father. Daniel Anthony also continued the family interest in mills, establishing with his brother a cotton yarn-producing mill, known as the Pump Log Mill, in 1822. In 1827 Daniel was lured by financial interests to Battenville, New York. Alma Lutz was the author of “Susan B. Anthony, Rebel, Crusader, Humanitarian” (1959). Lutz and Marguerite Smith shared a Boston apartment and a summer home in the Berkshires, Highmeadow, Berlin, N.Y., not far from Susan B. Anthony's birthplace in Adams. Lutz and Smith worked in the National Woman’s Party. They travelled together, visiting Europe several times in the 1950s. When Smith died in 1959, Lutz struggled with her grief: “It’s a hard adjustment to make, but one we all have to face in one way or another and I am remembering that I have much to be grateful for.”
Life
Who: Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)
The house remained in Anthony family hands until 1895, after which it went through a succession of owners. The Society of Friends Descendants acquired the property in 1926, and established a museum. The building was returned to private hands in 1949. It underwent restoration from 2006 to 2009. It is now home to the non-profit Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum, showcasing Susan B. Anthony’s early years and her legacy as a tireless advocate of women’s right to vote.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Susan B. Anthony Childhood House in Battenville, New York, is the childhood home of suffragette Susan B. Anthony.
Address: 2835 NY 29, Battenville, NY 12834, USA (43.11053, -73.42311)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 06001079, 2007
Place
Built in 1832
Battenville is a hamlet on the south town line of Greenwich, New York, located on the Batten Kill. As of 2006, the Susan B. Anthony Childhood House is owned by the state; it is controlled by the OPRHP / Saratoga State Park. The listing includes the house, a retaining wall, and a carriage barn. Italianate features were added to the house in 1885. The Thomas McLean House and Stoops Hotel are also listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Life
Who: Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)
Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906) lived here from age 13 to age 19, from 1833 to 1839. The family moved from Adams, Massachusetts, where she was born.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Artifacts and materials displayed in Susan B. Anthony’s former home and site of her 1872 arrest.
Address: 17 Madison St, Rochester, NY 14608, USA (43.15318, -77.62806)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Tuesday through Sunday 11.00-17.00
Phone: +1 585-235-6124
National Register of Historic Places: 66000528, 1966 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Susan B. Anthony House, in Rochester, New York, was the home of Susan B. Anthony for forty years, while she was a national figure in the women’s rights movement. She was arrested in the front parlor after attempting to vote in the 1872 Presidential Election. She resided here until her death. The Susan B. Anthony House is located at 17 Madison Street in Rochester. Access to the house is through the Susan B. Anthony Museum entrance at 19 Madison Street. Today the Susan B. Anthony House is a learning center and museum open to the public for tours and programs. The Visitor Center and Museum Shop are located in the historic house next door, 19 Madison Street, which was owned by Hannah Anthony Mosher, sister of Susan and Mary Anthony. The mission of the Susan B. Anthony House is to keep Susan B. Anthony’s vision alive and relevant. The house hosts an annual celebration of Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave women the right to vote. In 2011, the New York Times reported that the museum at the house had sold a large quantity of "a $250 handbag made of fake alligator that was inspired by one of Anthony’s own club bags, similar to a doctor’s bag," noting that for Anthony, "a bag was not a fashion statement but a symbol of independence at a time when women were not allowed to enter into a contract or even open a bank account." Papers and memorabilia about the suffrage movement were donated to the house at the request of Carrie Chapman Catt, Susan B. Anthony’s successor as President of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. They are held by the River Campus Libraries of the University of Rochester.
Life
Who: Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)
Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) worked together in a close and productive relationship. From 1880 to 1886 they were together almost every day working on the History of Woman Suffrage. They referred to each other as "Susan" and "Mrs. Stanton.” At Anthony’s 70th birthday celebration, Stanton teased her by saying, "Well, as all women are supposed to be under the thumb of some man, I prefer a tyrant of my own sex, so I shall not deny the patent fact of my subjection." Their interests began to diverge somewhat as they grew older. Despite such friction, their relationship continued to be close. When Stanton died in 1902, Anthony wrote to a friend: "Oh, this awful hush! It seems impossible that voice is stilled which I have loved to hear for fifty years. Always I have felt I must have Mrs. Stanton’s opinion of things before I knew where I stood myself. I am all at sea..." Susan B. Anthony died at the age of 86 of heart failure and pneumonia in her home in Rochester, New York, on March 13, 1906. She was buried at Mount Hope Cemetery (1133 Mt Hope Ave, Rochester, NY 14620). In the same cemetery are buried: Lilliam D. Wald (1867-1940), a nurse, humanitarian and author, known for contributions to human rights and was the founder of American community nursing, who founded the Henry Street Settlement and was an early advocate for nursing in schools; cotton broker James O. Bloss (1847-1918) who lived for nearly fifty years in a same-sex intimate partnership with John William Sterling (1844-1918).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Wallace Maynard "Wally" Cox was an American comedian and actor, particularly associated with the early years of television in the United States.
Born: December 6, 1924, Detroit, Michigan, United States
Died: February 15, 1973, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: Denby High School
Lived: 53 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019, USA (40.76595, -73.98029)
Buried: Death Valley, California, along with those of his close friend, actor Marlon Brando (ashes)
Buried alongside: Marlon Brando
Find A Grave Memorial# 2538
Height: 1.68 m
Books: My life as a small boy, The Tenth Life of Osiris Oaks
Spouse: Patricia Tiernan (m. 1967–1973), Milagros Tirado Fink (m. 1963–1966), Marilyn Gennaro (m. 1954–1961)

Mousy TV actor Wally Cox and his longtime roommate, the brooding Marlon Brando, were definitely one of New York’s oddest couples. Brando and Cox met when they were 9 years old. As adults, they were weight-lifting partners, and the diminutive Cox was rumored to be well built in a number of important ways. There was a widely disseminated photograph of the two men engaged in a sex act, but it may have been intentionally posed in order to provoke controversy. Though married many times and the father of many children, perhaps Brando’s longest relationship was with Cox. The two shared an apartment, and after Cox’s death in 1973, Brando rushed back to the US from Tahiti to procure his friend’s ashes. He did so telling Cox’s wife he was to scatter them on a place they used to go climbing. Instead, he kept Cox’s remains at home, and sometime even under the passenger sit in his car, often talking to the urn as if it were his still-living friend. After Brando’s own death and cremation in 2004, their ashes along with those of another longtime friend, Sam Gilman, were scattered together in Tahiti and Death Valley.
They met in 1933 and remained friends until Cox’s death in 1973: 40 years.
Marlon Brando (April 3, 1924 – July 1, 2004)
Wally Cox (December 6, 1924 – February 15, 1973)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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57th Street is one of New York City’s major thoroughfares, which runs east-west in the Midtown section of the borough of Manhattan, from the New York City Department of Sanitation’s dock on the Hudson River at the West Side Highway to a small park overlooking the East River built on a platform suspended above the FDR Drive. It is two blocks south of Central Park between Fifth Avenue and Central Park West. 57th Street is notable for prestigious art galleries, restaurants and up-market shops.
Address: 205 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019, USA (40.76595, -73.98029)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: Osborne Apartments, 93000333, 1993
Place
Beginning with the construction of One57, a 1,004 foot tall apartment building between Sixth and Seventh Avenues which was completed in 2014, a large number of very tall ultra-luxury residential buildings have been constructed or proposed on the section of 57th Street roughly corresponding to the southern edge of Central Park. Due to the often record-breaking prices that have been set for the apartments in these buildings, the press has dubbed this section of 57th Street as "Billionaires” Row.” Other projects contributing to this construction boom include the 1,396 foot tall 432 Park Avenue (located on East 57th Street), the 1,438 foot tall 111 West 57th Street, the 1,775 foot tall 225 West 57th Street, and the proposed 41 West 57th Street. These projects have generated controversy concerning the economic conditions and zoning policies that have encouraged these buildings, as well as the impact these towers will have on the surrounding neighborhoods and the shadows they will cast on Central Park.
Notable queer residents at West 57th Street:
• In 1949, Marlon Brando and his close friend Wally Cox roomed together in a 2-room apartment in a building on 53 West 57th Street. In 1943, Marlon Brando lived also at Patchin Place, while rooming with his sister, and in 1946 at 43 5th Ave, in a tiny apartment with a roommate named Igor, a Russian violinist. This was when he was studying acting in NYC. Marlon Brando was an actor, film director, and activist. He is hailed for bringing a gripping realism to film acting and is often cited as one of the greatest and most influential actors of all time. In 1973, Brando suffered a great personal loss with the death of his childhood and best friend Wally Cox. Brando appeared unannounced at Cox’s wake. As told by Patricia Bosworth to A&E, Marlon showed up and "climbed up a tree and looked down on everybody. He got the ashes away from Wally Cox’s wife, the box of ashes, and they literally fought over the ashes... He kept them first in his car and then by his bed... Mrs. Cox was going to sue for the ashes but she finally said "I think Marlon needs the ashes more than I do”." At Brando’s death, he was cremated, and his ashes were put in with those of his childhood friend and another longtime friend, Sam Gilman. They were then scattered partly in Tahiti and partly in Death Valley.
• The Osborne Apartments are located at 205 West 57th Street. The Osborne began construction in 1883 and was completed in 1885. The building stands behind its dour and reticent rusticated brownstone cladding, on the northwest corner of 57th Street and Seventh Avenue, catercorner from Carnegie Hall. The Osborne, far less prominent for the city’s visitors than The Dakota, was designed and built by James Edward Ware in 1883–85 and expanded with an annex to the west in 1906, designed by Alfred S. G. Taylor and Julien Clarence Levi. The stone contractor Thomas Osborne, whose ruinous speculative investment it was, gave the building his name. A visual connection to Osborne House, Queen Victoria’s summer residence in the Isle of Wight is also made. Three modillioned cornices divide the height into three broad horizontal bandings, with a two-story attic added for servants’ quarters in 1891 that is capped with a top cornice. The original building is constructed of masonry bearing walls ranging from 4 1/2 feet thick at its base to 18 inches at the top floor. The 1906 Annex is constructed of steel-framing behind brick and brownstone curtain walls. Its range of street-level shopfronts is broken at the center of the main, 57th Street front by its entrance. The unusually richly decorated lobby, in American Renaissance taste, has stuccoed and mosaic-tiled walls, floors that mix tile mosaics and slabs of varicolored Italian marble. Complementary marble was used for the wainscoting and carved marble recesses with benches. Mosaics and glazed terracotta "Della Robbia" panels cover the walls and ceilings in rich hues of red, blue and gold leaf, with contributions by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, the great sculptor of the American Renaissance, the muralist John La Farge, glass by Tiffany Studios and French designer Jacob Adolphus Holzer. Leo Lerman (May 23, 1914 – August 22, 1994) was a writer and editor who worked for Condé Nast Publications for more than 50 years. Lerman’s lifelong love and partner was artist Gray Foy, together from 1948 until Lerman’s death in 1994. When Lerman died without completing his life story, Gray discovered that Leo had actually kept diary-like notebooks. Foy showed them to Stephen Pascal, who used these notebooks and other outside materials about Lerman’s life to put together the book. Gray Foy (August 10, 1922 - November 23, 2012) was an artist of considerable early reputation, who was known in later years as a tastemaker, bon vivant, salonnier, partygoer, party-giver, genteel accumulator and perennial fixture of New York cultural life. He died at 90, in the 3,500-square-foot, largely lilac-walled apartment in the Osborne, where he had lived since the 1960s in congenial Victorian profusion. After the death of his long time partner, Leo Lerman, he married Joel Kaye, who survives him. On any given night — first in the crumbling brownstone on upper Lexington Avenue where their romance began in the late 1940s, and later in the apartment in the Osborne, to which the couple moved in 1967 — the Foy-Lerman firmament might include many of these stars: Frederick Ashton, George Balanchine, Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, Maria Callas, Mr. Capote, Carol Channing, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, Aaron Copland, Marcel Duchamp, Margot Fonteyn, John Gielgud, Martha Graham, Cary Grant, Anaïs Nin, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Edith Sitwell, Susan Sontag, Virgil Thomson, Lionel and Diana Trilling and Anna May Wong. After Gray Foy’s death, the apartment’s content was auctioned off.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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