Feb. 18th, 2017

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Lived: 3574 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 (32.74269, -117.15871) - Alice Lee Residence
3560 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Katherine Teats Cottage
3578 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Alice Lee Cottage
Buried: Hillside Cemetery, Westport, Essex County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 20122751

Lee and Teats were companions who lived together from 1902 through 1943, when Lee died. Teats continued to live in their house until she died in 1952. The women were important in the early XX-century San Diego social scene, and entertained two US presidents in their home.
Addresses:
3574 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 (32.74269, -117.15871) - Alice Lee Residence
3560 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Katherine Teats Cottage
3578 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Alice Lee Cottage
Place
Known as the Teats Cottage, the Prairie-style house was built in 1905 for Katherine Teats, the domestic partner of prominent San Diego socialite Alice Lee. Originally was part of a compound with three residences sharing a garden designed by noted botanist/landscape architect Kate Sessions. In May of 1906, Alice Lee granted the property of the Teats Cottage to her companion Katherine Teats. Misses Lee and Teats lived in the main house and used the other two for rentals. Miss Lee was close friends with both Mrs. Grover Clevelend and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, and often dined at the White House. President and Mrs. Roosevelt, Mrs. Cleveland, and other distinguished visitors were often guests at Miss Lee's Seventh Avenue home.
Life
Who: Alice Lee (May 27, 1854-February 18, 1943)
Alice Lee was born in Westport, NY, and throughout her life was surrounded by individuals passionate about the Progressive movement including Teddy Roosevelt, who was married to her second cousin; Florence Nightingale; Ralph Waldo Emerson; and the Bronson Alcott family. When Lee moved to San Diego in 1902 for health reasons she became friends with the Marston Family who were involved with the Progressive movement in San Diego. Alice Lee became very involved with different organizations in San Diego including the First Unitarian Church, the Wednesday Club, the Civic Committee of the Chamber of Commerce, and other local civic and cultural groups. She took leadership positions as President of the San Diego Museum, Honorary Director of the Women’s Civic Center, Director of the Natural History Museum, President of the Balboa Park Auditorium Association, and President of the Balboa Park Commission. Alice Lee founded the group “Open Forum”, which was a public forum to openly talk about social, political, and international issues. According to a newspaper article from the San Diego Union, by 1935 the group had become one of the “oldest continuous non-legislative forum of free public discussion in the United States” before being disbanded sometime in the 1970s. Lee was also a leader of the Progressive movement in San Diego organizing Progressive thinking women to get out and vote for Teddy Roosevelt in 1932. She was recognized by the Progressive Party by being chosen to represent California at the National Convention for the Progressive Party in Chicago. Lee was the leader of the “Save the Beaches” campaign in San Diego which resulted in the city acquiring miles of beach for public use. She was also instrumental in developing the public playground system. Alice Lee was praised as a Civic leader in several publications including the San Diego Union, the Ticonderoga Sentinel, the Boston Globe, and a book entitled “Women of the West: A Series of Biographical Sketches of Living Eminent Women in the Eleven Western States of the United States of America.” Lee lived in the home at 3574 Seventh Avenue from its year of construction in 1905 until her death in 1943. Alice Lee is buried at Hillside Cemetery (165 Ridgefield Road, Wilton, Connecticut), established in 1818.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Alice Lee is buried at Hillside Cemetery (165 Ridgefield Road, Wilton, Connecticut), same cemetery where is buried M. Emma Wolley.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Audre Lorde was an African American writer, feminist, womanist, lesbian, and civil rights activist. As a poet, she is best known for technical mastery and emotional expression, particularly in her poems ...
Born: February 18, 1934, Harlem, New York City, New York, United States
Died: November 17, 1992, Christiansted, United States Virgin Islands
Education: Columbia University
Hunter College High School
Hunter College
National Autonomous University of Mexico
City College of New York
Lived: 207 St Pauls Ave, Staten Island, NY 10304, USA (40.63255, -74.07886)
Buried: St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (ashes)
Find A Grave Memorial# 11341370
Spouse: Edwin Rollins (m. 1962–1970)
Parents: Linda Gertrude Belmar Lorde, Frederick Byron Lorde

Audre Lorde was a Caribbean-American writer and civil rights activist. In 1968 Lorde was writer-in-residence at Tougaloo College in Mississippi, where she met Frances Clayton, a professor of psychology, who was to be her romantic partner until 1989. From 1977 to 1978, Lorde had a brief affair with the sculptor and painter Mildred Thompson. They met in Nigeria in 1977 at the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture. Their affair ran its course during the time that Thompson lived in Washington, D.C. and was teaching at Howard University. Lorde received the Bill Whitehead Award for Lifetime Achievement from Publishing Triangle in 1992. Publishing Triangle subsequently instituted the Audre Lorde Award to honor works of lesbian poetry in 2001. Lorde died in 1992, in St. Croix, where she had been living with Gloria I. Joseph. In her own words, Lorde was a "black, lesbian, mother, warrior, and poet." "What I leave behind has a life of its own. I have said this about poetry; I have said it about children. Well, in a sense I'm saying it about the very artifact of who I have been."
Together from 1968 to 1989: 21 years.
Audrey Geraldine “Audre” Lorde (February 18, 1934 - November 17, 1992)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Audre Lorde lived here with her partner Frances Clayton and Lorde's two children from 1972 to 1987. During these years, Lorde taught at Hunter College and John Jay College, and wrote several books of poetry and essays as well as “The Cancer Journals” (1980) and “Zami: A New Spelling of My Name” (1982).
Address: 207 St Pauls Ave, Staten Island, NY 10304, USA (40.63255, -74.07886)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: St. Paul’s Avenue-Stapleton Heights Historic District.
Place
This neo-Colonial-style house was designed by the prolific Stapleton architect OttoLoeffler and built in 1898 as the residence of Andrew Jackson, a harbor pilot, during the period when several previously-undeveloped tracts in the historic district were built up with Queen Anne, Shingle, and Colonial-style homes. The critically-acclaimed African-American novelist, poet, essayist, and feminist Audre Lorde resided here in the 1970s. She was professor of English at John Jay College and was appointed the New York State poet laureate in 1991. She published several books of proseand poetry, as well as articles in scholarly journals. The house is distinguished by it open porch featuring turned columns and closed pediment with sunburst and its gabled roofline.
Life
Who: Audrey Geraldine “Audre” Lorde (February 18, 1934 - November 17, 1992)
Audre Lorde was a Caribbean-American writer and civil rights activist. In 1968 Lorde was writer-in-residence at Tougaloo College in Mississippi, where she met Frances Clayton, a professor of psychology, who was to be her romantic partner until 1989. From 1977 to 1978, Lorde had a brief affair with the sculptor and painter Mildred Thompson. They met in Nigeria in 1977 at the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture. Their affair ran its course during the time that Thompson lived in Washington, D.C. and was teaching at Howard University. Lorde received the Bill Whitehead Award for Lifetime Achievement from Publishing Triangle in 1992. Publishing Triangle subsequently instituted the Audre Lorde Award to honor works of lesbian poetry in 2001. Lorde died in 1992, in St. Croix, where she had been living with Gloria I. Joseph. In her own words, Lorde was a "black, lesbian, mother, warrior, and poet." "What I leave behind has a life of its own. I have said this about poetry; I have said it about children. Well, in a sense I'm saying it about the very artifact of who I have been."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The Bagatelle, now a Mexican restaurant called El Cantinero (86 University Pl, New York, NY 10003), was a lesbian bar and hangout well into the 1950s. Saturday night was the big night when dykes slicked back their hair, and Sunday afternoon sessions were an added treat. There was a backroom for dancing, and a warning light that flashed on as a signal to stop when somebody dangerous came in up front. The black lesbian poet and activist Audre Lorde has also mentioned the Bagatelle on occasion. She described the "mommies and daddies" that dominated the bar's social structure and how difficult it was for black lesbians to exist within such a place.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Barbara Gittings was a prominent American activist for gay equality. She organized the New York chapter of the Daughters of Bilitis from 1958 to 1963, edited the national DOB magazine The Ladder from ...
Born: July 31, 1932, Vienna, Austria
Died: February 18, 2007, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Northwestern University
Buried: Congressional Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, District Of Columbia, USA
Buried alongside: Kay Tobin Lahusen
Find A Grave Memorial# 18047727
Awards: GLAAD Media Barbara Gittings Award
Organizations: Daughters of Bilitis, American Library Association

Barbara Gittings and Kay Tobin, two of the original "gay pioneers,” met in 1961 at a picnic in Rhode Island. "We hit it off, we started courting. I flew to Boston to visit her and got off the plane with a big bunch of flowers in my hand. I couldn't resist. I did not care what the world thought. I dropped the flowers, grabbed her and kissed her." Gittings organized the New York chapter of the Daughters of Bilitis (DOB), edited the national DOB magazine The Ladder, and worked closely with Frank Kameny on the first picket lines that brought attention to the ban on employment of gay people by the US government. Gittings was most involved in the American Library Association to promote positive literature about homosexuality in libraries. She was a part of the movement to get the American Psychiatric Association to drop homosexuality as a mental illness. Kay Lahusen is considered the first openly gay photojournalist of the gay rights movement. Lahusen's photographs appeared on several of the covers of The Ladder while her partner was the editor. She helped with the founding of the original Gay Activists Alliance (GAA), contributed to a New York-based weekly newspaper named Gay Newsweekly, and co-authored The Gay Crusaders with Randy Wicker.
Together from 1961 to 2007: 46 years.
Barbara Gittings (July 31, 1932 – February 18, 2007)
Kay Tobin Lahusen (born January 5, 1930)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The Congressional Cemetery or Washington Parish Burial Ground is a historic and active cemetery located at 1801 E Street, SE, in Washington, D.C., on the west bank of the Anacostia River.
Address: 1801 E St SE, Washington, DC 20003, USA (38.88128, -76.98056)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 202-543-0539
National Register of Historic Places: 69000292, 1969. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
It is the only American "cemetery of national memory" founded before the Civil War. Over 65,000 individuals are buried or memorialized at the cemetery, including many who helped form the nation and the city of Washington in the early XIX century. Though the cemetery is privately owned, the U.S. government owns 806 burial plots administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Congress, located about a mile and a half (2.4 km) to the northwest, has greatly influenced the history of the cemetery. The cemetery still sells plots, and is an active burial ground. From the Washington Metro, the cemetery lies three blocks east of the Potomac Avenue station and two blocks south of the Stadium-Armory station. Many members of the U.S. Congress who died while Congress was in session are interred at Congressional Cemetery. Other burials include early landowners and speculators, the builders and architects of early Washington, Native American diplomats, Washington mayors, and Civil War veterans. XIX century Washington, D.C. families unaffiliated with the federal government also have graves and tombs at the cemetery. In all, there are one Vice President, one Supreme Court justice, six Cabinet members, 19 Senators and 71 Representatives (including a former Speaker of the House) buried there, as well as veterans of every American war, and the first director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, J. Edgar Hoover. Peter Doyle, (June 3, 1843-April 19, 1907), a veteran of the Confederate Army, and the greatest love of poet Walt Whitman is buried here. They met in Washington, D.C. on the horse-drawn streetcar for which Doyle was the conductor who later recalled, “We were familiar at once – I put my hand on his knee – we understood. He did not get out at the end of the trip – in fact went all the way back with me.” Whitman wrote in one letter to him, “I will imagine you with my arm around my neck saying Good night, Walt - & me – Good night, Pete.”
Notable queer burials at Congressional Cemetery:
• Everett Lysle Boyer (1927-1998) & Forrest Leroy Snakenberg (1932-1986). Boyer's tombstone reads: Arise up my love, Tis the time of singing birds (Song of Solomon 2:12), Snakenberg's, same style of that of Everett, reads: So be truely glad there is wonderful joy ahead (Peter 1:6)
• Kenneth Dresser (1938-1995) and Charles Fowler (1931-1995) are buried together. Dresser designed the Electric Light Parade at Disneyland, the Electric Water Pageant at Epcot, and the Fantasy of Lights at Callaway Gardens, Georgia. Fowler was an arts educator and writer, director of National Cultural Resources, Inc, and a guest professor at several American universities.
• James Richard Duell (1947-1992) and Larry Martin Worrell (1954-1989). The tombstone reads: "Two most excellent adventures"
• John Frey (1929-1997) and Peter Morris (1929-2010), together 43 years, met while at college together. Frey was a Fulbright Scholar, professor of Romance Languages at George Washington University, and author of books on Victor Hugo and Emile Zola. Morris was an expert French cook, and on the Board of Directors of the gay Catholic organization Dignity for whom he coauthored a community cookbook.
• Barbara Gittings (1932-2007) helped convince the American Psychiatric Association to declassify homosexuality as a mental illness. She founded the New York chapter of the lesbian rights organization the Daughter of Bilitis. The tombstone reads: Gay Pioneers who spoke truth to power: Gay is good. Partners in life, Married in our hearts.
• Dan Hering (1925-2012) was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and served 20 years in the U.S. Army. He and his partner Joel were members of one of the earliest gay right groups, the Society for Individual Rights (SIR) formed in 1964. They were founding members of the earliest known gay boat club, San Francisco’s Barbary Coast Boating Club. Dan was also a member of Service Academy Gay & Lesbian Alumni (SAGLA) and Knights Out, the association of gay West Point graduates. His partner Joel Leenaars (born 1935) lives at 1533 Weybridge Cir, Naples, FL.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) was a WWII veteran and the father of the modern gay rights movement.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) was an American writer, philosopher, educator, and patron of the arts. Distinguished as the first African American Rhodes Scholar in 1907, Locke was the philosophical architect —the acknowledged "Dean"— of the Harlem Renaissance. Locke was gay, and may have encouraged and supported other gay African-Americans who were part of the Harlem Renaissance. However, he was not fully public in his orientation and referred to it as his point of "vulnerable/invulnerability", taken to mean an area of risk and strength in his view. Howard University officials initially considered having Locke's ashes buried in a niche at Locke Hall on the Howard campus, similar to the way that Langston Hughes' ashes were interred at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York City in 1991. But Kurt Schmoke, the university's legal counsel, was concerned about setting a precedent that might lead to other burials at the university. After an investigation revealed no legal problems to the plan, university officials decided the remains should be buried off-site. At first, thought was given to burying Locke beside his mother, Mary Hawkins Locke. But Howard officials quickly discovered a problem: She had been interred at Columbian Harmony Cemetery in Washington, D.C., but that cemetery closed in 1959 and her remains transferred to National Harmony Memorial Park—which failed to keep track of them. (She was buried in a mass grave along with 37,000 other unclaimed remains from Columbian Harmony.) Howard University eventually decided to bury Alain Locke's remains at historic Congressional Cemetery, and African American Rhodes Scholars raised $8,000 to purchase a burial plot there. Locke was interred at Congressional Cemetery on September 13, 2014. His tombstone reads: 1885–1954, Herald of the Harlem Renaissance, Exponent of Cultural Pluralism. On the back of the headstone is a nine-pointed Bahá'í star (representing Locke's religious beliefs); a Zimbabwe Bird, emblem of the nation Locke adopted as a Rhodes Scholar; a lambda, symbol of the gay rights movement; and the logo of Phi Beta Sigma, the fraternity Locke joined. In the center of these four symbols is an Art Deco representation of an African woman's face set against the rays of the sun. This image is a simplified version of the bookplate that Harlem Renaissance painter Aaron Douglas designed for Locke. Below the bookplate image are the words "Teneo te, Africa" ("I hold you, my Africa").
• T. Sgt. Leonard Matlovich (1943-1988), was a gay civil rights and AIDS activist, his tombstone reads: "When I was in the military they gave me a medal for killing two men and a discharge for loving one."
• William Boyce Mueller (1942–1993) was the gay grandson of the founder of the Boy Scout of America. Mueller helped create the first organization to lobby today’s Scout oligarchs to end their ban on gay Scouts and Scout leaders, Forgotten Scouts.
• Frank Warren O’Reilly (1922-2001) was a WWII veteran with a Ph.D. in International Relations, and a music critic for The Washington Times, and founder of Miami’s Charles Ives Centennial Festival and the American Chopin Foundation which sponsors an annual national Chopin competition.
• Emanuel “Butch” Zeigler (1951-2009) was a onetime elementary school teacher, and co-owner of Capital Promoting Service whose clients include Heads of State and major corporations.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Charlotte Saunders Cushman was an American stage actress. Her voice was noted for its full contralto register, and she was able to play both male and female parts.
Born: July 23, 1816, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Died: February 18, 1876, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Lived: Omni Parker House, 60 School St, Boston, MA 02108
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 248
Books: Fifteen Years in the Senior Order of Shakers: A Narration of Facts, Concerning that Singular People

Charlotte Saunders Cushman was an American stage actress. In 1848, Cushman met journalist, writer and part-time actress Matilda Hays. After a short amount of time and some correspondence, they became involved in a lesbian affair. In 1854, Hays left Cushman for lesbian sculptor Harriet Hosmer, which launched a series of jealous interactions among the three women. Hays eventually returned to live with Cushman, but by late 1857, Cushman was secretly involved with lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins. Emma Stebbins was among the first notable American woman sculptors, her best-known work is the Angel of the Waters (1873), also known as Bethesda Fountain, located on the Bethesda Terrace in Central Park, New York. In 1857, Stebbins moved to Rome quickly becoming involved in the bohemian and feminist lesbian lifestyle in Europe, which was more tolerated there than it would have been back in New York. In 1869, Cushman was treated for breast cancer. Stebbins devoted all her time during that ordeal to nursing her lover, ignoring her work during the next years.
Together from 1857 to 1876: 19 years.
Charlotte Saunders Cushman (July 23, 1816 – February 18, 1876)
Emma Stebbins (September 1, 1815 – October 25, 1882)
Matilda Mary Hays (September 8, 1820 – July 3, 1897)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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With its close proximity to Boston’s Theater District, the Omni Parker House (60 School St, Boston, MA 02108) played an important role for thespians. Many of the XIX century’s finest actors made the Parker House a home away from home, including Charlotte Cushman, Sarah Bernhardt, Edwin Booth, and the latter’s handsome, matinee-idol brother, John Wilkes. Charlotte Cushman (1816-1876) died of pneumonia in her hotel room on the third floor in 1876, aged 59. During the XX century, that list expanded to include stars of stage, screen, and television—including Joan Crawford, Judy Garland, Ann Magret, and Marlow Thomas.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston.
Address: 580 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37479, -71.14449)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +1 617-547-7105
National Register of Historic Places: 75000254, 1975. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, Mount Auburn Cemetery marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery,” derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. It is Watertown’s largest contiguous open space and extends into Cambridge to the east, adjacent to the Cambridge City Cemetery and Sand Banks Cemetery.
Notable queer burials are at Mount Auburn Cemetery:
• Roger Brown (1925–1997), professor at Harvard University from 1952 until 1957 and from 1962 until 1994, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1957 until 1962. During his time at the University of Michigan, he met Albert Gilman, later a Shakespeare scholar and a professor of English at Boston University. Gilman and Brown were partners for over 40 years until Gilman's death from lung cancer in 1989. Brown's sexual orientation and his relationship with Gilman were known to a few of his closest friends, and he served on the editorial board of The Journal of Homosexuality from 1985, but he did not come out publicly until 1989. Brown chronicled his personal life with Gilman and after Gilman's death in his memoir. Brown died in 1997, and is buried next to Gilman.
• Katharine Ellis Coman (1857-1915), author on economic subjects who lived with Katharine Lee Bates (Author of "America the Beautiful"), and died at her home, was cremated at Mount Auburn Cemetery but was buried with her parents at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
• Charlotte Cushman (1816–1876), actress, her last partner was lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins, who sculpted Angels of the Water on Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, New York City.
• Martha May Eliot (1891–1978), was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health. She was a scion of the Eliot family, an influential American family that is regarded as one of the Boston Brahmins, originating in Boston, whose ancestors became wealthy and held sway over the American education system in the late XIX and early XX centuries. Her father, Christopher Rhodes Eliot, was a Unitarian minister, and her grandfather, William G. Eliot, was the first chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis. The poet, playwright, critic, and Nobel laureate T.S. Eliot was her first cousin. During undergraduate study at Bryn Mawr College she met Ethel Collins Dunham, who was to become her life partner.
• Mary Katherine Keemle "Kate" Field (1838-1896), American journalist, lecturer, and actress, of eccentric talent. She was the daughter of actors Joseph M. Field and Eliza Riddle. Kate Field never married. In October 1860, while visiting his mother's home in Florence, she met the celebrated British novelist Anthony Trollope. She became one of his closest friends and was the subject of Trollope's high esteem. Trollope scholars have speculated on the nature of their warm friendship. Twenty-four of his letters to Kate survive, at the Boston Public Library; hers to Trollope do not.
• Annie Adams Fields (1834–1915), author and hostess; wife of James Thomas Fields, later companion to Sarah Orne Jewett.
• Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924) was a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. She founded the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.
• Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908), sculptor. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton (died 1864). Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie. Hosmer was good friend with Charlotte Cushman and Matilda Hays, Cushman’s partner, left Charlotte for her.
• Alice James (1848-1892) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American diarist. The only daughter of Henry James, Sr. and sister of psychologist and philosopher William James and novelist Henry James, she is known mainly for the posthumously published diary that she kept in her final years. Her companion was Katherine Peabody Loring and from their relationship it was conied the term “Boston Marriage”.
• Henry James (1843-1916) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of XIX century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
• Amy Lowell (1874–1925), poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
• Abby Adeline Manning (1836-1906), painter, and her partner, Anne Whitney (1821-1915), poet and sculptor, together.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) was an American poet, editor, and professor of English literature. Along with Gilbert Seldes, Mitchell’s editorship of The Dial magazine signaled a pivotal shift in content from political articles to aesthetics in art and literature. In 1929 he became the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Richard Cowan (1909-1939)’s diary, which he started while he was a student at Cornell, chronicles the life of a young gay man in Boston in the 1930s. Cowan committed suicide at the age of thirty. His forty-seven-year old mentor and long-term lover, Stewart Mitchell, was devastated. Mitchell resigned as president of the Massachusetts Historical Society on account of a “personal misfortune,” and wrote a friend, “There is no running away from a broken heart.” According to the Boston Herald Nov. 9, 1957: “Mitchell directed that the urn containing his mortal remains be buried, “but not in winter,” in the lot “where my dear friends Georgine Holmes Thomas and Richard David Cowan now repose”.”
• Francis Williams Sargent (1848 - 1920) and Jane Welles Hunnewell Sargent (1851 - 1936), Margarett Williams Sargent’s parents. Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) was born into the privileged world of old Boston money; she was a distant relative of John Singer Sargent.
• Henry Davis Sleeper (1878-1934), a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator, who had a long lasting friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, an economist, an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, the founder and director of the American Ambulance Field Service during WWI, and a United States Representative from Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Buried: Newton Cemetery, Newton, Sussex County, New Jersey, USA
Buried alongside: William August Liebherr
Find A Grave Memorial# 120800543

M. Allen Alexander died in 2000, aged 83, and is buried alongside his partner for over 40 years, William August “Bill” Liebherr, died in 2008, at Newton Cemetery (19 Lawnwood Ave, Newton, NJ 07860).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Mary Williams Dewson was a feminist and political activist. Head of the Women's Division of the Democratic National Committee in 1932 after an active role in the New York Consumer's League.
Born: 1874, Quincy, Massachusetts, United States
Died: October 1962, Castine, Maine, United States
Education: Wellesley College
Lived: Moss Acre, Castine, ME, USA (44.38886, -68.79895)
171 West 12th Street
Buried: Castine Cemetery, Castine, Hancock County, Maine, USA
Buried alongside: Polly Porter
Find A Grave Memorial# 11094134

From the 1920s through the 1950s, the building at 171 West 12th Street was home to a number of lesbian couples, an extended network of friends and comrades-in-arms that included artist Nancy Cook and educator Marion Dickerman; activist Polly Porter and Democratic Party official Molly Dewson; and Grace Hutchins and her partner Anna Rochester, both leaders in the Communist Party. Many of these women, particularly Dickerman and Cook, were good friends with Eleanor Roosevelt, who had apartments of her own at 20 East 11th Street from 1933 to 1942 and at 29 Washington Square West from 1942 to 1949. Since her young adulthood, Roosevelt had been pan of a circle of women reformers, many of them in long-term relationships with other women. When Franklin D. Roosevelt became president, Eleanor became a fierce champion for women in government, and many of her friends got government positions during the New Deal. Molly Dewson served as director of the Women's Division of the Democratic National Committee and as a member of the Social Security Board. Among President Roosevelt's other appointees were Frances Perkins, the secretary of labor from 1933 to 1945 and the first woman cabinet member, and Grace Abbot, who was chief of the Children's Bureau. From within the government, these women could press for action on the issues they had pursued for years, such as wages and hours' legislation, workers' compensation requirements, and child labor laws. Roosevelt herself had an intimate relationship with another woman. In 1932, an Associated Press reporter named Lorena Hickok was assigned to file stories on the new first lady. They quickly became fast friends. Hickok would eventually come to live in the White House. The nature of the Hickok-Roosevelt relationship has been hotly contested by biographers and historians, but their letters reveal a passionate intimacy—in 1933, for example, Hickok wrote to Roosevelt: “I've been trying today to bring back your face, to remember just how you look, most clearly I remember your eyes, with a kind of teasing smile in them, and the feeling of that soft spot just North-east of the corner of your mouth against my lips. Good night, dear one, I want to put my arms around you and kiss you at the corner of your mouth. And in a little more than a week now, I shall.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Moss Acre was built In 1895, on the Morse's Cove road, about two and one-half miles from the village, in what was formerly known as Hatch's woods, the largest and probably one of the finest houses in this vicinity of the time. It was owned by Mr. W. D. Porter, of Chicago. It had an extensive view up and down the Penobscot river. The grounds were very spacious, and were to be elaborately laid out.
Address: Castine, ME, USA (44.38886, -68.79895)
Type: Private Property
Life
Who: Mary ("Molly") Williams Dewson (February 18, 1874 - October 21, 1962) and Mary ("Polly") G. Porter (1884-1972)
Molly Dewson was born in Quincy, Massachusetts, to Edward Henry Dewson and Elizabeth Weld (Williams) Dewson. After earning her A.B. degree from Wellesley College (1897), Dewson was hired as secretary of the Domestic Reform Committee of the Women's Educational and Industrial Union in Boston. She left this position in 1900 to become the superintendent of parole at the Massachusetts State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster, where she remained until 1912. There she met Polly Porter. Porter, a student at the Boston School for Social Workers, began an internship under Dewson's supervision in 1909. When her internship ended, she withdrew from school, choosing to remain at the Industrial School as a volunteer. By 1910, Dewson and Mary G. Porter had come to think of their relationship as a "partnership"; it was to last for 52 years. After a brief stint running a small dairy farm with Porter, Dewson returned to reform work, a field that occupied her for the next two decades. She was particularly active in the woman's suffrage movement, and in the National Consumers' League's campaign to secure passage of minimum wage laws for women and children. During World War I Dewson and Porter spent 15 months with the American Red Cross's Bureau of Refugees in France. Between 1917 and 1938 the two women lived in New York City, spending summers at the Porter family's house in Castine, Maine. Dewson and Porter, Eleanor Roosevelt’s friends, had a co-op apartment in Greenwich Village, across the hall from two other of Roosevelt's favorites, Marion Dickerman and Nan Cook. From reports the whole building was filled with a few singles but mostly pairs of women. While Dewson was working in various reform movements, the independently wealthy Porter bred and raised Sheltie dogs at a kennel she owned in Connecticut. By the late 1920s, Dewson became convinced that needed reforms could best be accomplished from within organized political parties; she therefore initiated efforts to increase the number of women active in the Democratic Party. She organized women to work in Alfred E. Smith's presidential campaign (1928); and for Franklin D. Roosevelt's New York State gubernatorial race (1930), and his subsequent bids for the presidency. In 1933, thanks to the influence of Eleanor Roosevelt, her political ally and personal friend, she was appointed to head the Women's Division of the Democratic National Committee. She is credited with securing leadership positions for many women within the Democratic Party and the Roosevelt Administration. In 1937 she was appointed to the Social Security Board, but she resigned from the position the following year. Dewson and Porter spent the early years of their retirement in Castine, Georgetown (Connecticut), and New York, but eventually established permanent residence in Castine (1952), where Dewson died in 1962. They are both buried at Castine Cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect, and poet of the High Renaissance who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art.
Born: March 6, 1475, Caprese Michelangelo
Died: February 18, 1564, Rome
Buried: Basilica di Santa Croce, Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 1896
Sculptures: David, Pietà, Dying Slave, Crucifix, Madonna of Bruges, more

Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475–1564) was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect, and poet of the High Renaissance who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art. It is impossible to know for certain whether Michelangelo had physical relationships (Condivi ascribed to him a "monk-like chastity"), but the nature of his sexuality is made apparent in his poetry. The longest sequence displaying a great romantic friendship, was written to Tommaso dei Cavalieri (c. 1509–1587), who was 23 years old when Michelangelo met him in 1532, at the age of 57. Cavalieri remained devoted to Michelangelo until his death. In 1542 Michelangelo met Cecchino dei Bracci who died only a year later, inspiring Michelangelo to write forty-eight funeral epigrams. The openly homoerotic nature of the poetry was a source of discomfort to later generations and it was not until John Addington Symonds translated them into English in 1893 that the original genders were restored. Late in life, Michelangelo nurtured a great platonic love for the poet and noble widow Vittoria Colonna, whom he met in Rome in 1536 or 1538 and who was in her late forties at the time. Michelangelo died in Rome in 1564, at the age of 88 (three weeks before his 89th birthday). His body was taken from Rome for interment at the Basilica of Santa Croce (Piazza di Santa Croce, 16, 50122 Firenze, Italy), fulfilling the maestro's last request to be buried in his beloved Florence.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Nancy Hamilton was an American actress, playwright, lyricist, director and producer.
Born: July 27, 1908, Sewickley, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: February 18, 1985, New York City, New York, United States
Find A Grave Memorial# 161841675
Genre: Jazz
Movies: Helen Keller in Her Story, This Is Our Island
Albums: Dreamsville, Detour Ahead
Awards: Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature

Katharine Cornell was a member of the “Sewing circles” in New York, and had relationships with Nancy Hamilton, Tallulah Bankhead, and Mercedes de Acosta, among others. Nancy Hamilton was an American actress, playwright, lyricist, director and producer. She worked in the New York theater from 1932-1954. She wrote sketches and lyrics for the revues New Faces of 1934 (1934), One for the Money (1939), Two for the Show (1940) and Three to Make Ready (1946). She is best known as the lyricist for the popular song, How High the Moon. Helen Keller: A Life was produced by Nancy Hamilton and narrated by Katharine Cornell (about Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller). Dear Liar was both Cornell’s and Guthrie McClintic’s last play. On October 29, 1961, McClintic passed away at his and Cornell’s Palisades home. Nearing 70, feeling a lack of connection to the current theater and without the partner who had helped her shape her career for 40 years, Cornell retired from the stage. Over the next 13 years, she split her time between her Manhattan apartment and her beloved Martha’s Vineyard house, where she lived with lifelong friend and companion, Nancy Hamilton. She and Hamilton were active members of the Vineyard Haven community until Cornell’s death on June 9, 1974. Cornell was buried in Tisbury on Martha's Vineyard.
Together from (around) 1930 to 1974: 44 years.
Katharine Cornell (February 16, 1893 – June 9, 1974)
Nancy Hamilton (July 27, 1908 - February 18, 1985)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Buried: Mound Cemetery, Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, USA
Buried alongside: Owen Hawley
Find A Grave Memorial# 94845191

Owen Hawley (1930-2006) was a professor at Marietta College. He lived with his partner, Ralph Schroeder (1920-1976). They are buried side by side at Mound Cemetery (Marietta, OH 45750), along with many Revolutionary War soldiers and the early political and religious leaders of Marietta.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Buried: Weybridge Hill Cemetery, Weybridge, Addison County, Vermont, USA
Buried alongside: Charity Bryant
Find A Grave Memorial# 112580393

“At age twenty-nine, still defiantly single, Charity Bryant visited friends in Weybridge, Vermont. There she met a pious and studious young woman named Sylvia Drake. The two soon became so inseparable that Charity decided to rent rooms in Weybridge. In 1809, they moved into their own home together, and over the years, came to be recognized, essentially, as a married couple. Revered by their community, Charity and Sylvia operated a tailor shop employing many local women, served as guiding lights within their church, and participated in raising their many nieces and nephews.” --Rachel Hope Cleves. “Tuesday- 3 [July]—31 years since I left my mother’s house and commenced serving in company with Dear Miss B. Sin mars all earthly bliss, and no common sinner have I been, but God has spared my life, given me every thing I would enjoy and now I have a space, if I improve it, to exercise true penitence. --Sylvia Drake’s Diary, 1838. Charity’s nephew, William Cullen Bryant, one of 19th Century America’s best-known writers and editors, described their relationship: “If I were permitted to draw the veil of private life, I would briefly give you the singular, and to me interesting, story of two maiden ladies who dwell in this valley. I would tell you how, in their youthful days, they took each other as companions for life, and how this union, no less sacred to them than the tie of marriage, has subsisted, in uninterrupted harmony, for more than forty years.” Charity and Sylvia are buried together at Weybridge Hill Cemetery, Addison County, Vermont.
Together from 1807 to 1851: 44 years
Charity Bryant (1777 – October 6, 1851)
Sylvia Drake (1784 – February 18, 1868)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

When Charity Bryant died in 1851, Sylvia Drake moved in with her brother, Asaph, in his big brick house next to what is now the Morgan Horse Farm. When she died, in 1868, they opened Charity’s grave in the cemetery at Weybridge Hill and the two were reunited for eternity.
Address: Weybridge, VT 05753, USA (44.04107, -73.21371)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Place
Within a year since their meeting, Sylvia and Charity decided to move to Weybridge, Vermont, where they could live near Drake’s older brother, Asaph. They built a house, now gone, on the corner of Rte. 23 and Drake Road, where they set themselves up in a successful tailoring business. Weybridge is a small, rural town in Vermont, population 833 as of the 2010 census. Located in Addison County, Weybridge is home to the University of Vermont Morgan Horse Farm and Monument Farms Dairy. Otter Creek weaves through the town on its way to Lake Champlain. Chartered in 1761 by a hardy crew from Connecticut, Weybridge continues its traditions of farming, water power and close community.
Life
Who: Sylvia Drake (1784–1868) and Charity Bryant (1777–October 5, 1851)
Sylvia Drake and Charity Bryant met in 1806 in Bridgewater, Massachusetts and quickly formed a passionate friendship. Charity was open about her feelings, imploring Sylvia, “Do not disappoint my hopes and blast my expectations, for…I long to see you, and enjoy your company and conversation.” Sylvia Drake, celebrated the thirty-first anniversary of her life partnership with Charity Bryant in her diary: “Tuesday- 3 (July)—31 years since I left my mother’s house and commenced serving in company with Dear Miss B. Sin mars all earthly bliss, and no common sinner have I been, but God has spared my life, given me every thing I would enjoy and now I have a space, if I improve it, to exercise true penitence. —Sylvia Drake’s Diary, 1838” Charity’s nephew, William Cullen Bryant, one of XIX Century America’s best-known writers and editors, came to Weybridge to stay with the pair in the July, 1843 and described their relationship: “If I were permitted to draw the veil of private life, I would briefly give you the singular, and to me interesting, story of two maiden ladies who dwell in this valley. I would tell you how, in their youthful days, they took each other as companions for life, and how this union, no less sacred to them than the tie of marriage, has subsisted, in uninterrupted harmony, for more than forty years… they have shared each other’s occupations and pleasures and works of charity while in health, and watched over each other in sickness… I could tell you how they slept on the same pillow and had a common purse, and adopted each other’s relations… one of them, more enterprising and spirited than the other, might be said to represent the male head of the family, and took upon herself their transactions with the world without, until at length her health failed, and she was tended by her gentle companion, as a fond wife tends her invalid husband… I would speak of the friendly relations which their neighbors, people of kind hearts and simple manners, seem to take pleasure in bestowing upon them; but I have already said more than I fear they will forgive me for if this should ever meet their eyes, and I must leave the subject.” Their relationship was no barrier to their full participation in their church. They were Christians and very religious in their attendance at Weybridge Congregational. They were both devout, often attending four religious meetings each week. Sylvia frequently wrote of the comfort she took from sermons like that of Apr. 24, 1836, on “Romans 10,17, For whosoever will call on the name of the Lord will be saved.” Friends often came over after church for religious discussions. Both women tended to be sickly, though it is not clear whether their ailments were cured or caused by the great array of “remedies” they kept trying. One week’s medicines included catnip, harrow, castor oil and opium bought over the counter. Charity’s health finally broke down completely. The Sheldon Museum now has a large cradle they had made, big enough to hold an adult, in which Sylvia would rock Charity to sleep when she was unwell.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Ida Helmi Tuulikki Pietilä was a Finnish graphic artist and professor, born in Seattle, Washington, United States. Pietilä was one of the most influential people in Finnish graphic arts, and her work has been shown in numerous art exhibitions.
Born: February 18, 1917, Seattle, Washington, United States
Died: February 23, 2009, Helsinki, Finland
Education: Academy of Fine Arts, Helsinki
Konstfack
Lived: Klovharu Island, Pellinki, Finland (60.22053, 25.88207)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161889945
Movies: Haru, Island of the Solitary
Books: Gossip, markets, and gender

Tove Jansson was a Swedish-speaking Finnish novelist, painter, illustrator and comic strip author. For her contribution as a children's writer she received the Hans Christian Andersen Medal in 1966. Briefly engaged in the 1940s to Atos Wirtanen, she later met her future life partner Tuulikki Pietilä. Tuulikki Pietilä was a Finnish graphic artist and professor. The two women collaborated on many works and projects, including a model of the Moominhouse, in collaboration with Pentti Eistola. It is now exhibited at the Moomin museum in Tampere. Jansson is best known as the author of the Moomin books for children. The first such book, The Moomins and the Great Flood, appeared in 1945, though it was the next two books, Comet in Moominland and Finn Family Moomintroll, published in 1946 and 1948 respectively that brought her fame. Jansson's and Pietilä's travels and summers spent together on the Klovharu Island in Pellinki have been captured on several hours of film, shot by Pietilä. Several documentaries have been made of this footage, the latest being Haru, yksinäinen saari (Haru, the lonely island) (1998) and Tove ja Tooti Euroopassa (Tove and Tooti in Europe) (2004).
Together from (before) 1945 to 2001: 56 years.
Tove Marika Jansson (August 9, 1914 – June 27, 2001)
Tuulikki Pietilä (February 18, 1917 – February 23, 2009)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The small ascetic island of Klovharu lies off the coast of Porvoo in the Pellinki archipelago. This rocky islet in the Gulf of Finland was home to Tove Jansson and Tuulikki Pietilä for almost thirty years.
Address: Pellinki, Finland (60.22053, 25.88207)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1964
Although Tove Jansson had dreamed of her own lighthouse, the cottage she built on Klovharu was a small, low-rise structure. It was built quite high up, but slightly below the cliff top. The cottage boasts a surprising subterranean feature – a vast cellar, larger than the building above. “Our cellar is the largest cellar that’s ever been dug, at least in this area, the floor area measures 25 square metres and it’s two metres deep.” The island was (and still is) part of the Pellinki island community. Permission to build had, therefore, to be requested from the islanders. “But Pellinki, just like many other self-governing island communities, had its own patriarch who would give advice on delicate issues concerning the islands. This man cautioned us not to expect too much and, above all, not to have faith in legal papers, which would sooner or later become the bane of our lives – so, no rental agreement, just a friendly donation to the local fishing association. Take it easy, he said, put yourselves on the Söderbyhy yes-or-no list. If I write yes, then the others are sure to follow my example. We stuck the list on the shop’s veranda door, and got a string of nothing but yeses.” Tove and Tooti sent their ‘yes list’ to the rural municipality of Porvoo’s authorities, and then camped out in the rain on Klovharu, waiting for a building permit. One evening, a man came ashore and introduced himself as Brunström from Kråkö. Brunström, who had been fishing for salmon, had intended to sleep in his boat, but had decided to come ashore when he spotted lights on the island. “Brunström had heard about our yes-or-no list and told us that it would never go through, not even in Porvoo where they take a broader view on such things, that is, they take it easy. You’ll never get a building permit. The only thing you can do is to start building right now. The authorities will take ages to decide what they want, and that’s when you have to take the initiative. The law says that a building cannot be torn down if the logs are in place up to the roof ridge. “Believe me,” Brunström said. “I know about these things.”” Tove and Tooti believed him and started building immediately. Sven Brunström also brought Nisse Sjöblom into the construction project. Occasionally, other Pellinki neighbours brought fish soup to the workers. The only suitable place for a cottage was occupied by the Great Rock, which weighed an estimated fifty tons. Blasting the Great Rock out of the way was their first task. The explosions scattered rock debris across the island, which presented Tove with another way of letting off steam. Rolling rocks was a way of cooling off and freeing herself of the bothers brought about by writing and illustrating.
Life
Who: Tove Marika Jansson (August 9, 1914 – June 27, 2001) and Ida Helmi Tuulikki Pietilä (February 18, 1917 – February 23, 2009)
Tove Jansson was a Swedish-speaking Finnish novelist, painter, illustrator and comic strip author. For her contribution as a children's writer she received the Hans Christian Andersen Medal in 1966. Briefly engaged in the 1940s to Atos Wirtanen, she later during her studies met her future partner Tuulikki Pietilä. The two women collaborated on many works and projects, including a model of the Moominhouse, in collaboration with Pentti Eistola. This is now exhibited at the Moomin museum in Tampere. Although Jansson had a studio in Helsinki, she lived many summers on a small island called Klovharu, one of the Pellinki Islands near the town of Porvoo. Jansson's and Pietilä's travels and summers spent together on the Klovharu island in Pellinki have been captured on several hours of film, shot by Pietilä. Several documentaries have been made of this footage, the latest being “Haru, yksinäinen saari” (Haru, the lonely island) (1998) and “Tove ja Tooti Euroopassa” (Tove and Tooti in Europe) (2004). Tove Jansson is buried at Hietaniemi cemetery (Sanduddsgatan 20, 00100 Helsingfors).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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