Feb. 19th, 2017

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André Paul Guillaume Gide was a French author and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1947 "for his comprehensive and artistically significant writings, in which human problems and conditions ...
Born: November 22, 1869, Paris, France
Died: February 19, 1951, Paris, France
Lived: 1021 Route du Château, 76280 Cuverville, France (49.6585, 0.27183)
Education: Lycée Henri-IV
Buried: Cimetière de Cuverville, Cuverville, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
Find A Grave Memorial# 9267056
Movies: Travels in the Congo, La Symphonie pastorale, The Counterfeiters
Influenced by: Oscar Wilde, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, more

XVIII century manor house built by Chevalier de Cuverville. The Rondeaux family acquired it around 1820. André Gide lived there.
Address: 1021 Route du Château, 76280 Cuverville, France (49.6585, 0.27183)
Type: Private Property
Place
Cuverville-en-Caux (pop. 233) nestles in the Lezarde valley a few miles inland from the Normandy coast and would be unknown to the world if André Gide, Nobel Laureate for literature, hadn't lived there. In 1996 the current owner of Cuverville's manor house, in which Gide lived and wrote for more than 50 years, decided that the place needed renovating. He contacted respected architect Jean-Claude Rochette, formerly France's inspector general of historic monuments, for advice on what needed doing. Rochette decided that the manor needed to be restored to the way it looked when it was built in 1735. As a result, off came the white shutters that Gide knew during the last century, builders chipped away at the pale yellow rendering to uncover wine-coloured bricks, six rectangular columns were revealed and the pediment above them was painted white. According to Emmanuel de Roux of Le Monde: “The renovation works have given the place the profile of a British manor house, chic and elegant, but one that the writer who stayed there until his death would not recognise at all.” Dominique Rouin inherited the house from Gide's widow Madeleine, and sold it to the current owner in 1963. At present the house is private and is not open to the public. In one of Gide's best novels, “La Porte Etroite” (Strait is the Gate, 1909), Cuverville features under the guise of the fictional village of Fougueusemare (a rather poor guise since there is a real-life village of Fougueusemare just up the road). The manor house itself receives a less-than-glowing description: “Standing in a garden which is neither very large nor very fine, and which has nothing special to distinguish it from a number of other Normandy gardens, the white two-storeyed building, resembles a great many country houses of the century before last. A score of large windows look east onto the front of the garden; as many more on to the back; there are none at the sides.” The house also figures in Gide's novel “The Immoralists” and in his “Journals.” It was at Cuverville that Gide received some of the great European literary figures, including the poet Paul Valéry, for tennis parties and literary discussions. Here he also worked with the co-founders of the Nouvelle Revue Française, one of Europe's most important literary journals.
Life
Who: André Paul Guillaume Gide (22 November 1869 – 19 February 1951)
André Gide was a French author and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1947 "for his comprehensive and artistically significant writings, in which human problems and conditions have been presented with a fearless love of truth and keen psychological insight". Gide's career ranged from its beginnings in the symbolist movement, to the advent of anticolonialism between the two World Wars. Gide was born in Paris on 22 November 1869, into a middle-class Protestant family. His father was a Paris University professor of law who died in 1880. His uncle was the political economist Charles Gide, who owned much of Cuverville. Gide was brought up in isolated conditions in Normandy and became a prolific writer at an early age, publishing his first novel, “The Notebooks of André Walter” (French: Les Cahiers d'André Walter), in 1891, at the age of twenty-one. In 1893 and 1894, Gide travelled in Northern Africa, and it was there that he came to accept his attraction to boys. He befriended Oscar Wilde in Paris, and in 1895 Gide and Wilde met in Algiers. Wilde had the impression that he had introduced Gide to homosexuality, but, in fact, Gide had already discovered this on his own. He defended homosexuality in the public edition of “Corydon” (1924) and received widespread condemnation. He later considered this his most important work. In 1916, Marc Allégret, only 15 years old, became his lover. Marc was the son of Elie Allégret, best man at Gide's wedding. Of Allégret's five children, Gide adopted Marc. The two fled to London, in retribution for which his wife burned all his correspondence – "the best part of myself," he later commented. In 1918, he met Dorothy Bussy, who was his friend for over thirty years and translated many of his works into English. In 1923, he sired a daughter, Catherine, by Elisabeth van Rysselberghe, a woman who was much younger than he. He had known her for a long time, as she was the daughter of his closest female friend, Maria Monnom, the wife of his friend the Belgian neo-impressionist painter Théo van Rysselberghe. This caused the only crisis in the long-standing relationship between Allégret and Gide and damaged the relation with van Rysselberghe. This was possibly Gide's only sexual liaison with a woman, and it was brief in the extreme. Catherine became his only descendant by blood. He liked to call Elisabeth "La Dame Blanche" ("The White Lady"). Elisabeth eventually left her husband to move to Paris and manage the practical aspects of Gide's life (they had adjoining apartments built for each on the rue Vavin). She worshiped him, but evidently they no longer had a sexual relationship. Allégret’s relationship with Gide ended in 1927, as Allégret found out that he preferred women after having experiences with women. They nevertheless remained close friends until Gide's death in 1951. Gide is buried at Cuverville, in the churchyard.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Carson McCullers was an American novelist, short story writer, playwright, essayist, and poet. Her first novel, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, explores the spiritual isolation of misfits and outcasts in a small town of the U.S. South.
Born: February 19, 1917, Columbus, Georgia, United States
Died: September 29, 1967, Nyack, New York, United States
Education: New York University
Columbia University
Columbus High School
Juilliard School
Lived: Carson McCullers House, 131 S Broadway, Nyack, NY 10960, USA (41.08598, -73.91912)
The Dakota Building
February House, 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
1519 Stark Ave, Columbus, GA 31906
423 13th St, Columbus, GA 31901
Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Nyack, Rockland County, New York, USA, Plot: High Lawn section
Find A Grave Memorial# 696
Movies: Reflections in a Golden Eye, more
Spouse: Reeves McCullers (m. 1945–1953), Reeves McCullers (m. 1937–1941)

Carson McCullers (1917-1967) was born Lula Carson Smith in Columbus, Georgia in 1917. Her mother’s grandfather was a planter and Confederate war hero. Her father was a watchmaker and jeweler of French Huguenot descent. From the age of ten she took piano lessons; when she was fifteen her father gave her a typewriter to encourage her story writing. 1519 Stark Ave, Columbus, GA 31906, a modest white frame house, was her childhood home. Her actual birthplace was at 423 13th St, Columbus, GA 31901. Carson‘s mother lived in this house until her husband’s death in 1944. Plagued by illness throughout her life, Carson frequently returned to Columbus to recuperate under her mother’s care. Eventually, mother and daughter lived together in Nyack, NY, in a house bought with the money from the sale of the Stark Avenue house. The house is now open to the public by appointment; it also operates as an artists’ retreat, offering residencies to writers and musicians.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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February House was the most fertile and improbable live-in salon of the XX century. Its residents included, among others, Carson McCullers, W. H. Auden, Paul Bowles, and the famed burlesque performer Gypsy Rose Lee (January 8, 1911 – April 26, 1970). This ramshackle Brooklyn brownstone was host to an explosion of creativity, an extraordinary experiment in communal living, and a nonstop yearlong party fueled by the appetites of youth. Here these burgeoning talents composed many of their most famous, iconic literary works while experiencing together a crucial historical moment--America on the threshold of WWII.
Address: 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
In 1940, George Davis, an editor recently fired from Harper's Bazaar, rented a dilapidated house in Brooklyn Heights in which he installed brilliant, volatile artists, who spent the next year working, fighting, and drinking. Carson McCullers sipped sherry while, down the hall, the burlesque star Gypsy Rose Lee typed her mystery novel with three-inch fingernails, and, downstairs, Benjamin Britten and Paul Bowles fought over practice space. W. H. Auden was housemother, collecting rent, assigning chores, and declaring no politics at dinner. Like all bohemian utopias, February House (so named because of the residents' February birthdays) was unable to withstand the centrifugal force of its constituent egos. The artists dispersed—to return home, serve in the military, or follow wayward lovers—and the house was demolished to make way for the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Charles Henri Ford died in 2002. He was survived by his elder sister, actress Ruth Ford, who died in 2009. Upon her death, Ruth Ford left the apartments she owned in the historic Dakota Building on the Upper West Side to Indra Tamang, Charles Henri Ford’s caretaker, along with a valuable Russian surrealist art collection, making him a millionaire.
Address: 1 W 72nd St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.77652, -73.97614)
Type: Private Property
Phone: +1 212-362-1448
National Register of Historic Places: 72000869, 1972 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built between 1880 and 1884, Design by Henry Janeway Hardenbergh (1847-1918)
The Dakota (also known as Dakota Apartments) is a cooperative apartment building located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West in the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. It is famous as the home of former Beatle John Lennon from 1973 to 1980, as well as the location of his murder. The Dakota is considered to be one of Manhattan’s most prestigious and exclusive cooperative residential buildings, with apartments generally selling for between $4 million and $30 million. Henry Janeway Hardenbergh was commissioned to create the design for Edward Clark, head of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The firm also designed the Plaza Hotel. The Dakota was purportedly so named because at the time of construction, the Upper West Side was sparsely inhabited and considered as remote in relation to the inhabited area of Manhattan as the Dakota Territory was. However, the earliest recorded appearance of this account is in a 1933 newspaper interview with the Dakota’s long-time manager, quoted in Christopher Gray’s book “New York Streetscapes”: "Probably it was called “Dakota” because it was so far west and so far north.” According to Gray, it is more likely that the building was named the Dakota because of Clark’s fondness for the names of the new western states and territories. Beginning in 2013, the Dakota’s facade was being renovated. In the 1970s, the co-op board refused to admit playwright Mart Crowley, who wrote "The Boys in the Band," apparently because Crowley was an out gay man.
Notable queer residents at The Dakota Building:
• Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), composer, conductor, author, music lecturer, and pianist. Arthur Laurents (Bernstein’s collaborator in “West Side Story”) said that Bernstein was "a gay man who got married. He wasn’t conflicted about it at all. He was just gay."
• Bob Crewe (1930-2014), songwriter, record producer, artist. Crewe was portrayed as "overtly gay" in "Jersey Boys,” but his brother Dan told The New York Times he was discreet about his sexuality, particularly during the time he was working with the Four Seasons. "Whenever he met someone, he would go into what I always called his John Wayne mode, this extreme machoism."
• Charles Henri Ford (1908–2002), poet, novelist, filmmaker, photographer, and collage artist best known for his editorship of the Surrealist magazine View (1940–1947) in New York City, and as the partner of the artist Pavel Tchelitchew. Ford is buried at Rose Hill Cemetery (Brookhaven, MS 39601).
• Judy Garland (1922-1969), actress. Garland had a large fan base in the gay community and became a gay icon. Reasons given for her standing, especially among gay men, are admiration of her ability as a performer, the way her personal struggles mirrored those of gay men in America during the height of her fame and her value as a camp figure. In the 1960s, a reporter asked how she felt about having a large gay following. She replied, "I couldn’t care less. I sing to people."
• Judy Holliday (1921-1965), actress, comedian, and singer, she was a resident of the Dakota for many years. She inhabited apartment #77 until her death from breast cancer at age 43 on June 7, 1965. She is interred in the Westchester Hills Cemetery in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.
• William Inge (1913-1973), playwright and novelist, whose works typically feature solitary protagonists encumbered with strained sexual relations. “The Last Pad” is one of three of Inge’s plays that either have openly gay characters or address homosexuality directly. “The Boy in the Basement,” a one-act play written in the early 1950s, but not published until 1962, is his only play that addresses homosexuality overtly, while Archie in “The Last Pad” and Pinky in “Where’s Daddy?” (1966) are gay characters. Inge himself was closeted. Inge is buried at Mt Hope Cemetery (Independence, KS 67301).
• Carson McCullers (1917-1967), novelist, short story writer, playwright, essayist, and poet. Among her friends were W. H. Auden, Benjamin Britten, Gypsy Rose Lee and the writer couple Paul Bowles and Jane Bowles. After WWII McCullers lived mostly in Paris. Her close friends during these years included Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams.
• Rudolf Nureyev (1938-1993), dancer. Depending on the source, Nureyev is described as either bisexual as he did have heterosexual relationships as a younger man, or gay. Nureyev met Erik Bruhn, the celebrated Danish dancer, after Nureyev defected to the West in 1961. Bruhn and Nureyev became a couple and the two remained together off and on, with a very volatile relationship for 25 years, until Bruhn’s death in 1986. Nureyev’s grave is at a Russian cemetery in Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois near Paris.
Who: Alfred Corning Clark (November 14, 1844 – April 8, 1896) and Lorentz Severin Skougaard (March 10, 1887 – January 18, 1965)
Alfred Corning Clark (November 14, 1844 – April 8, 1896) was an American heir and philanthropist. His father, Edward Cabot Clark (1811–1882) was an American businessman and lawyer, founder of the Singer Sewing Machine Company, along with his business partner Isaac Merritt Singer. Together, they began investing in real estate in the 1870s. They built The Dakota. Determined to escape from his family Alfred Corning Clark went abroad and studied the piano in Milan. He confessed later to an intimate companion, that away from home he felt free “to worship at the shrine of friendship.” Among these friends, all male, was Lorentz Severin Skougaard, a young Norwegian tenor whom he met in Paris. It became an all-consuming relationship that lasted until Lorentz’s death nineteen years later. Although Alfred did the right thing by marrying and siring four sons, he did not give up the private half of his life. Summers he sent his family to the country— to a large farm he owned in Cooperstown, New York, his mother’s birthplace. While they enjoyed the fresh air, he continued his travels in Europe: France, Italy, and Norway, this time with Lorentz. And becoming bolder after his father’s death, he bought Lorentz a house in New York almost next door to the house where he lived with his wife and children. When Lorentz died he commissioned a marble memorial from George Grey Barnard, a handsome young indigent American sculptor he picked up in Paris. Brotherly Love is a highly erotic work showing two muscular athletic naked men with broad shoulders, triangular torsos, perfect buttocks, and powerful legs, groping toward each other: a perfect metaphor for Alfred and Lorentz and their love. After Alfred’s death Barnard, now rich, famous, and the toast of New York and Paris, thanks to his patron’s munificence, helped Alfred’s sons Sterling and Stephen Clark build their collections of art, now the glory of three museums: the Metropolitan and the Modern in New York, and the Sterling and Francine Clark in Williamstown, Massachusetts.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Carson McCullers House is a historic home located at South Nyack in Rockland County, New York.
Address: 131 S Broadway, Nyack, NY 10960, USA (41.08598, -73.91912)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 06000562, 2006
Place
It is a two-story Second Empire style residence constructed in 1880 and modified with subsequent interior and exterior modifications largely in the Colonial Revival spirit about 1910. It is a frame structure built originally as parsonage, three bays wide and four bays deep. It features a one-story verandah, a slate-covered mansard roof, and an interesting multi-story tower projection crowned by a bell-cast roof. It was home to noted author Carson McCullers from 1945 to 1967.
Life
Who: Carson McCullers (February 19, 1917 – September 29, 1967)
After separating from Reeves McCullers, Carson McCullers moved to New York to live with George Davis, the editor of Harper’s Bazaar. She became a member of February House, an art commune in Brooklyn. Among her friends were W.H. Auden, Benjamin Britten, Gypsy Rose Lee and the writer couple Paul Bowles and Jane Bowles. After WWII McCullers lived mostly in Paris. Her close friends during these years included Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams. In 1945 Carson and Reeves McCullers remarried. Three years later while severely depressed she attempted suicide. In 1953 Reeves tried to convince her to commit suicide with him, but she fled and Reeves killed himself in their Paris hotel with an overdose of sleeping pills. Her bittersweet play, “The Square Root of Wonderful” (1957), drew upon these traumatic experiences. McCullers dictated her unfinished autobiography, “Illumination and Night Glare” (1999), during the final months of her life. McCullers suffered throughout her life from several illnesses and from alcoholism. She had rheumatic fever at the age of 15 and suffered from strokes that began in her youth. By the age of 31 her left side was entirely paralyzed. She lived the last twenty years of her life in Nyack, New York, where she died on September 29, 1967, at the age of 50 after a brain hemorrhage; she was buried in Oak Hill Cemetery (140 N Highland Ave, Nyack, NY 10960).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Elizabeth Carter was an English poet, classicist, writer and translator, and a member of the Bluestocking Circle around Elizabeth Montagu.
Born: December 16, 1717, Deal, United Kingdom
Died: February 19, 1806, London, United Kingdom
Lived: 20 Clarges Street, W1J
Buried: Grosvenor Chapel, Mayfair, City of Westminster, Greater London, England, Plot: unmarked
Find A Grave Memorial# 22149933

Elizabeth Carter was an English poet, classicist, writer and translator, and a member of the Bluestocking Circle. Catherine Talbot was an English author. February 1741 saw the beginning of her lifelong friendship with Elizabeth Carter. The two women carried on a lively and copious correspondence. During the whole period of her residence with Thomas Secker, a protégé of Talbot’s father, Catherine Talbot was Secker's almoner. In 1760, accompanied by Elizabeth Carter, she went to Bristol for her health. Secker died in 1768, leaving to Mrs. Talbot and her daughter £13,000 in the public funds. The women moved from Lambeth Palace to Lower Grosvenor Street. There Catherine died of cancer on January 9, 1770, aged 48. Several poems were written in her praise. At her daughter's death in 1770, Mrs. Talbot put her daughter's manuscripts into Elizabeth Carter's hand, leaving their publication to her discretion.
Together from 1741 to 1770: 29 years.
Elizabeth Carter (December 16, 1717 – February 19, 1806)
Catherine Talbot (May 1721 – January 9, 1770)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Elizabeth Carter was renowned during a long span of the later XVIII century as a scholar and translator from several languages and the most seriously learned among the Bluestockings. Her English version of Epictetus was still current into the XX century. She was also a poet and a delightful letter-writer. She died on February 19, 1806, at her regular winter lodgings in 20 Clarges Street, W1J.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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In Grosvenor Chapel (24 S Audley Street, W1K), is buried Elizabeth Carter. A poet and translator, one of the most learned Englishwoman of her time, she studied astronomy and ancient history, learnt Latin, French, Hebrew, Italian and Spanish, played both the spinet and the flute. She was a friend of Samuel Johnson and many other eminent men, as well as being a close confidant of Elizabeth Montagu, Hannah More, Hester Chapone, and several other members of the Bluestocking circle. She had a special friendship with Catherine Talbot, of whom published a book of poems once she died from cancer in 1770.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Lived: 1817 Stark Ave, Columbus, GA 31906, USA (32.48004, -84.95821)
Buried: Parkhill Cemetery, Columbus, Muscogee County, Georgia, USA, Plot: Magnolia Garden
Buried alongside: Glesca Marshall
Find A Grave Memorial# 92371316

Alla Nazimova was an American film and theater actress, a screenwriter, and film producer. Between the years of 1917 and 1922, Nazimova wielded considerable influence and power in Hollywood. Nazimova helped start the careers of both Rudolph Valentino's wives, Jean Acker and Natacha Rambova. Nazimova is confirmed to have been romantically involved with actress Eva Le Gallienne, director Dorothy Arzner, writer Mercedes de Acosta, and Oscar Wilde's niece, Dolly Wilde. Bridget Bate Tichenor (an intimate of George Platt Lynes, she married Jonathan Tichenor, brother of Platt Lynes’ lover George, who was killed during the WWII), a Magic Realist artist and Surrealist painter, was also rumored to be one of Nazimova's favored lovers. According to Tichenor, their intimate relationship angered Nazimova's longtime companion, Glesca Marshall. Nazimova lived with Glesca Marshall from 1929 until her death in 1945 at the Garden of Allah Hotel on Sunset Boulevard near the Sunset Strip in Hollywood. Glesca was also the longtime companion of Emily Woodruff, theatrical benefactor and main patron of the Springer Opera House in Columbus, Georgia. Glesca and Emily are both buried at Parkhill Cemetery, Columbus, Georgia, in the Magnolia Garden.
Together from 1929 to 1945: 16 years.
Alla Nazimova (June 3, 1879 – July 13, 1945)
Catherine Glesca Marshall (September 19, 1906 – August 21, 1987)
Emily Woodruff (February 19, 1913 – February 21, 1994)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Glesca Marshall was the longtime companion of Emily Woodruff, theatrical benefactor and main patron of the Springer Opera House in Columbus, Georgia. Emily was married to Hume Cronyn, though they never lived together and Emily insisted the marriage remain a secret.
Address: 1817 Stark Ave, Columbus, GA 31906, USA (32.48004, -84.95821)
Type: Private Property
Place
James Waldo Woodruff was a pioneer of river development in the Chattahoochee Valley and a leading businessman and financier in Columbus for more than half a century. J.W. Woodruff was known as “Mr. River” for most of his life. He is buried at Parkhill Cemetery near his daughter Emily and Emily’s long-time companion, Glesca Marshall. An engineer, and an intrepid visionary, Mr. Woodruff was probably the staunchest pioneer of the development of the Chattahoochee River for power and navigation. He devoted a great deal of his busy life to this favorite dream and he lived long enough to see dock construction here begin and his dream well on its way to coming true. It was only fitting, therefore, that the first dam to be constructed in the three rivers development plan should bear his name. The Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam was dedicated on Mar. 22, 1957. It was built at a cost of $46,380,000 and stands where the Flint and Chattahoochee rivers united to form the Apalachicola. Woodruff married the former Miss Ethel Illges Oct 7, 1908, the wedding being held at the Illges family home on Second Avenue. Their family home was at 1817 Stark Ave, Columbus.
Life
Who: Emily Woodruff (February 19, 1913 – February 21, 1994) and Glesca Marshall (September 19, 1906 – August 21, 1987)
Glesca Marshall was an actress and theatrical benefactor who was known primarily as the most enduring lover of Alla Nazimova, silent screen actress and a legend of her time. Glesca met Nazimova when both were cast in a production at the Civic Repertory Theater. Glesca later lived with Nazimova at the Garden of Allah Hotel on Sunset Boulevard near the Sunset Strip in Hollywood. In the silent film era, the hotel had been an estate that was Nazimova’s home. Glesca lived there in a villa on the grounds until Nazimova’s death in 1945. Glesca Marshall and Emily Woodruff are buried side by side at Parkhill Cemetery (4161 Macon Rd, Columbus, GA 31907), Plot: Magnolia Garden.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Francis Otto Matthiessen was an educator, scholar and literary critic influential in the fields of American literature and American studies.
Born: February 19, 1902, Pasadena, California, United States
Died: April 1, 1950, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Education: Yale University
Harvard University
University of Oxford
Polytechnic School
Hackley School
Lived: Eliot House, Harvard University, 101 Dunster St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37024, -71.12097)
Hotel Manger, North Station
Cheney House, Old Ferry Ln, Kittery, ME 03904, USA (43.08426, -70.72264)
Buried: Springfield Cemetery, Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 7024168
Partner: Russell Cheney
People also search for: Henry James, Kenneth Ballard Murdock, K. B. Murdock, Herman Melville

Russell Cheney was an American painter. Cheney had a twenty-year love affair with English Literature Professor F.O. Matthiessen, an authority on American Literature, who taught at Yale and Harvard and who was also a Yale graduate, like Cheney, and became a member of Skull & Bones in 1923. Matthiessen was twenty years Russell's junior. Like Matthiessen's family, Cheney's was prominent in business, being among America's leading silk producers. In planning to spend his life with Cheney, Matthiessen went as far as asking his cohort in the Yale secret society Skull and Bones to approve of their partnership. Throughout his teaching career at Harvard, Matthiessen maintained a residence in either Cambridge or Boston. However, the couple often retreated to their shared cottage in Kittery, Maine. Their letters are collected into Rat & the Devil: Journal Letters of F.O. Matthiessen and Russell Cheney. Cheney’s nickname, Rat, and Matthiessen’s, Devil, came into use at Yale. Matthiessen’s contributions to the Harvard University community have been memorialized in several ways, including a recently endowed visiting professorship.
Together from 1925 to 1945: 20 years.
Francis Otto Matthiessen (February 19, 1902 - April 1, 1950)
Russell Cheney (October 16, 1881 - July 12, 1945)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Throughout his teaching career at Harvard, F.O. Matthiessen maintained a residence in either Cambridge or Boston. However, Matthiessen with his long-term companion Russell Cheney often retreated to their shared cottage in Kittery, Maine.
Address: Old Ferry Ln, Kittery, ME 03904, USA (43.08426, -70.72264)
Type: Private Property
Place
Russell Cheney was a Seacoast summer visitor, sharing a Kittery Point, Maine cottage with his partner, the well-know author F.O. Matthiessen from 1927 until Cheney’s death in 1945. They bought an old house there in 1930, and added a studio on the grounds. In 1928, Kittery newspaperman Horace Mitchell Jr. interviewed Cheney for the Portland Sunday Transcript. "I like Kittery Point," Cheney told him. "It’s a swell little town." Richard Hyde is the present owner of the Cheney house and studio on Old Ferry Lane in Kittery. He remembers being in charge of the artist’s many cats when he was a boy. Hyde was paid ten cents per night to keep a cat named Pretzel in the house and five cents for one named Baby. "If they got out -- there was a fine of twenty cents," Heard recalls.
Life
Who: Francis Otto Matthiessen (February 19, 1902 – April 1, 1950) and Russell Cheney (October 16, 1881 – July 12, 1945)
Russell Cheney was a painter. He graduated from Yale University in 1904, where he was a member of the Skull and Bones secret society. Cheney studied painting at the Art Students League of New York and was its acting president in 1909-10. He held his first New York exhibition in Babcock Galleries 1922. His portrait of Professor Candle hung in the Paris Salon in 1909 and his work has been represented in many museums including the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and the San Francisco Museum of Art. Cheney illustrated F.O. Matthiessen’s book “Sarah Orne Jewett” (1929), on the writer of the same name. A catalogue of Cheney’s paintings was published in 1922. Cheney was a member of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, and San Francisco Art Society. He was the longtime partner and lover of author F. O. Matthiessen, who was also a Yale graduate and became a member of Skull & Bones in 1923. Matthiessen was twenty years Russell’s junior. Cheney had three brothers Knight Dexter Cheney, Philip Cheney, and Thomas Langdon Cheney, who were also members of Skull and Bones. In 1945, Cheney died of a heart attack in Kittery. His funeral was in Manchester, and he is buried in the Cheney Cemetery, off East Center Street. His remaining paintings were disposed off by his partner F.O. Mathiesson. A collection of them was displayed at the old Cheney Office Building on Hartford Road, and relatives could pick what they wanted to take home.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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F.O. Matthiessen was the first Senior Tutor at Eliot House, one of Harvard College’s undergraduate residential houses.
Address: 101 Dunster St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37024, -71.12097)
Type: Student facility (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 617-495-2275
Place
F.O. Matthiessen’s contribution to the critical celebration of XIX century American literature is considered formative and enduring. Along with several other scholars, he is regarded as a contributor to the creation of American studies as a recognized academic discipline. His stature and legacy as a member of the Harvard community has been memorialized in several ways by the university. More than sixty years after his death, his suite at Eliot House remains preserved as the F. O. Matthiessen Room, housing personal manuscripts and 1700 volumes of his library available for scholarly research by permission. Also, Eliot House hosts an annual Matthiessen Dinner with a guest speaker. In 2009 Harvard established an endowed chair in LGBT studies called the F. O. Matthiessen Visiting Professorship of Gender and Sexuality. Believing the post to be "the first professorship of its kind in the country," Harvard President Drew Faust called it “an important milestone.” It is funded by a $1.5 million gift from the members and supporters of the Harvard Gay & Lesbian Caucus. In the spring of 2013 Henry D. Abelove was the first scholar to hold the Matthiessen Chair. The second scholar appointed to the Chair for the spring of 2014 was Gayle Rubin. Several generations after Matthiessen’s passing, this visiting professorship reaffirms the university’s appreciation for his continuing legacy as a storied scholar and teacher. Notable former resident of the Eliot House include Leonard Bernstein. In 1951, roommates of A-12 included Paul Matisse, grandson of French impressionist Henri Matisse, Stephen Joyce, grandson of novelist James Joyce, and Sadruddin Aga Khan, lineal descendant of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. This caused master John Finley to brag to the New York Times, "where else would you find, in one room, the grandson of Matisse, the grandson of Joyce, and the great-great-great-great-grandson of God?"
Notable queer alumni and faculty at Harvard University:
• Henry Adams (1838-1918), after his graduation from Harvard University in 1858, embarked on a grand tour of Europe, during which he also attended lectures in civil law at the University of Berlin. He was initiated into the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity as honorary member at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Harris J. Ryan, a judge for the exhibit on electrical engineering. Through that organization, he was a member of the Irving Literary Society. In 1870, Adams was appointed professor of medieval history at Harvard, a position he held until his early retirement in 1877 at 39. As an academic historian, Adams is considered to have been the first (in 1874–1876) to conduct historical seminar work in the United States. Among his students was Henry Cabot Lodge, who worked closely with Adams as a graduate student. On June 27, 1872, Clover Hooper and he were married in Beverly, Massachusetts, and spent their honeymoon in Europe, much of it with Charles Milnes Gaskell at Wenlock Abbey in Shropshire, England. Upon their return, he went back to his position at Harvard, and their home at 91 Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, became a gathering place for a lively circle of intellectuals. Adams was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1875.
• Horatio Alger (1832-1899) passed the Harvard entrance examinations in July, 1848, and was admitted to the class of 1852. Alger's classmate Joseph Hodges Choate described Harvard at this time as "provincial and local because its scope and outlook hardly extended beyond the boundaries of New England; besides which it was very denominational, being held exclusively in the hands of Unitarians". Alger flowered in the highly disciplined and regimented Harvard environment, winning scholastic prizes and prestigious awards. His genteel poverty and less-than-aristocratic heritage, however, barred him from membership in the Hasty Pudding Club and the Porcellian Club. He was chosen Class Odist and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa Society honors in 1852, eighth in a class of 88. He is buried in the family plot at Glenwood Cemetery, Natick, MA 01760.
• Josep Alsop (1910-1989) graduated from the Groton School, a private boarding school in Groton, Massachusetts, in 1928, and from Harvard University in 1932. He is buried in the family mausoleum at Indian Hill Cemetery (383 Washington St, Middletown, CT 06457).
• A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1893 to 1898, graduating with a master's degree in 1895 and a doctorate in 1900. He was instructor and assistant professor of economics at Harvard University from 1900 to 1909.
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) studied English Literature at Harvard, graduating summa cum laude in 1921. His writing career began when Van Wyck Brooks, the Harvard teacher he most admired, invited him to write for The Freeman while he was still an undergraduate. After a short period teaching at the high school level, Arvin joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist.
• John Ashbery (born 1927) graduated in 1949 with an A.B., cum laude, was a member of the Harvard Advocate, the university's literary magazine, and the Signet Society.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959) attended from 1911 to 1912, leaving school without graduating.
• Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957) entered Harvard College in the Class of 1922. He interrupted his undergraduate career to work in Egypt and the Sudan (1922-1923) with the Harvard University/Boston Museum of Fine Arts archaeological expedition under George A. Reisner, then the leading American Egyptologist. After taking his degree in 1924, he became a graduate student in Harvard's fine arts department, where he served for three years as chief graduate assistant to Edward W. Forbes, Director of the Fogg Art Museum.
• Maud Babcock (1867-1954) was studying and teaching at Harvard University when she met noted Utahn and daughter of Brigham Young, Susa Young Gates, who, impressed by Babcock's work as a summer course instructor in physical culture, convinced her to move to Salt Lake City. She established UU's first physical training curriculum, of which speech and dramatics were part for several years.
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University. During his tenure at boarding school and university, Beebe was known for his numerous pranks. One of his more outrageous stunts included an attempt at festooning J. P. Morgan's yacht Corsair III with toilet paper from a chartered airplane. His pranks were not without consequence and he proudly noted that he had the sole distinction of having been expelled from both Harvard and Yale, at the insistence, respectively, of the president and dean of each. Beebe earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard in 1926, only to be expelled during graduate school. During and immediately after obtaining his degree from Harvard, Beebe published several books of poetry, but eventually found his true calling in journalism.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990) completed his studies in 1939, graduating with a B.A. cum laude
• Lem Billings (1916-1981) attended Harvard Business School from 1946 to 1948 and earned an MBA.
• John Boswell (1947-1994) received his doctorate in 1975.
• Roger Brown (1925-1997) started his career in 1952 as an instructor and then assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1957 he left Harvard for an associate professorship at MIT, and became a full professor of psychology there in 1960. In 1962, he returned to Harvard as a full professor, and served as chair of the Department of Social Relations from 1967 to 1970. From 1974 until his retirement in 1994, he held the title of John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William James.
• John Horne Burns (1916–1953) was the author of three novels. The first, “The Gallery” (1947), is his best known work, which was very well received when published and has been reissued several times. Burns was educated by the Sisters of Notre Dame at St. Augustine's School and then Phillips Academy, where he pursued music. He attended Harvard, where he became fluent in French, German, and Italian and wrote the book for a student musical comedy in 1936. In 1937 he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in English magna cum laude and became a teacher at the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut. Burns wrote several novels while at Harvard and at Loomis, none of which he published. Gore Vidal reported a conversation he had with Burns following “The Gallery”'s success: “Burns was a difficult man who drank too much, loved music, detested all other writers, wanted to be great.... He was also certain that to be a great writer it was necessary to be homosexual. When I disagreed, he named a half dozen celebrated contemporaries. "A Pleiad," he roared delightedly, "of pederasts!" But what about Faulkner?, I asked, and Hemingway? He was disdainful. Who said they were any good?” He died in Florence from a cerebral hemorrhage on August 11, 1953. He was buried in the family plot in Holyhood Cemetery (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467). Ernest Hemingway later sketched Burns' brief life as a writer: "There was a fellow who wrote a fine book and then a stinking book about a prep school and then just blew himself up."
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) graduated in 1936.
• Witter Bynner (1881–1968) was the first member of his class invited to join the student literary magazine, The Advocate. He was also published in another of Harvard's literary journals, The Harvard Monthly. He graduated with honors in 1902. His first book of poems, “An Ode to Harvard” (later changed to “Young Harvard”), came out in 1907. In 1911 he was the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa Poet.
• Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) began studying at Harvard University in 1894 and left after two years to become an artist.
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) entered in 1925, to pursue a masters in English.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) accepted an appointment at Harvard University in 1954 as the second person to hold the Zimurray Chair at Radcliffe College. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1955. She was the first woman tenured in Harvard's Anthropology Department and the second woman tenured in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), educated at Radcliffe College, became department chairman of child and maternal health at Harvard School of Public Health in 1956.
• Kenward Elmslie (born 1929) earned a BA at Harvard University before moving back to New York City, where he became a central figure in the New York School.
• William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952) received his Bachelor of Arts in 1886. While studying at Harvard, he and classmates began The Harvard Monthly. After his graduation and first trip to Europe in 1888, he spent several years working as a journalist in the Boston Area. In 1890, four years after his graduation from Harvard, Fullerton moved to France to begin work for The Times office in Paris.
• Henry Geldzahler (1935–1994) left graduate school in 1960 to join the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
• Julian Wood Glass, Jr, (1910-1992) attended Oklahoma schools and was graduated from Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) was an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. She was one of the first Woman of Colour/Interracial women to have a play publicly performed. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller. During the summers, Grimké frequently took classes at Harvard University, where her father had attended law school. He was the second African American to have graduated from Harvard Law School.
• Alice Hamilton (1869–1970) was hired in 1919 as assistant professor in a new Department of Industrial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, making her the first woman appointed to the faculty there in any field. Her appointment was hailed by the New York Tribune with the headline: "A Woman on Harvard Faculty—The Last Citadel Has Fallen—The Sex Has Come Into Its Own". Her own comment was "Yes, I am the first woman on the Harvard faculty—but not the first one who should have been appointed!" Hamilton still faced discrimination as a woman, and was excluded from social activities and ceremonies.
• Andrew Holleran (born 1944), pseudonym of Eric Garber, novelist, essayist, and short story writer, graduated from Harvard College in 1965.
• Henry James (1843–1916) attended Harvard Law School in 1862, but realized that he was not interested in studying law. He pursued his interest in literature and associated with authors and critics William Dean Howells and Charles Eliot Norton in Boston and Cambridge, formed lifelong friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., the future Supreme Court Justice, and with James and Annie Fields, his first professional mentors.
• Philip Johnson (1906–2005), student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) graduated with both a master's degree (1949) and doctorate (1956) in astronomy.
• Helen Keller (1880–1968) entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College, where she lived in Briggs Hall, South House.
• John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) graduated from Harvard University in June 1940.
• Alfred Kinsey (1804-1956) continued his graduate studies at Harvard University's Bussey Institute, which had one of the most highly regarded biology programs in the United States. It was there that Kinsey studied applied biology under William Morton Wheeler, a scientist who made outstanding contributions to entomology. Under Wheeler, Kinsey worked almost completely autonomously, which suited both men quite well. Kinsey chose to do his doctoral thesis on gall wasps, and began zealously collecting samples of the species. Kinsey was granted a Sc.D. degree in 1919 by Harvard University, and published several papers in 1920 under the auspices of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, introducing the gall wasp to the scientific community and describing its phylogeny. Of the more than 18 million insects in the museum's collection, some 5 million are gall wasps collected by Kinsey.
• Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) attended Harvard, where his father, the vice-president of Filene's Department Store, had also attended, graduating in 1930. In 1927, while still an undergraduate at Harvard, Kirstein was annoyed that the literary magazine The Harvard Advocate would not accept his work. With a friend Varian Fry, who met his wife Eileen through Lincoln's sister Mina, he convinced his father to finance their own literary quarterly, the Hound & Horn.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) graduated from Harvard University in 1907 with degrees in English and philosophy, and was honored as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and recipient of the prestigious Bowdoin Prize. After graduation, he was the first African-American selected as a Rhodes Scholar (and the last to be selected until 1960). At that time, Rhodes selectors did not meet candidates in person, but there is evidence that at least some selectors knew he was African-American.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) read Environmental Studies at the University of Manitoba, Landscape Architecture at Harvard University and completed his PhD in Historical Geography at University College, London. He lectures widely on landscape history and design both in Britain and abroad, is a lecturer on the MA course in Historical and Sustainable Architecture at New York University, and contributes regularly to a range of publications.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) completed his M.A. in 1926 and Ph.D. degree in 1927. He returned to Harvard to begin a distinguished teaching career.
• Michael McDowell (1950-1999) received a B.A. and an M.A. from Harvard College and a Ph.D in English from Brandeis University in 1978 based on a dissertation entitled "American Attitudes Toward Death, 1825-1865".
• Henry Plumer McIlhenny (1910–1986) he was graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Fine Arts in 1933. During his years at Harvard, Paul J. Sachs influenced his future collecting.
• Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930), American archeologist, artifact collector, tile-maker, and designer, attended Harvard University between 1875 and 1879, obtaining a liberal arts degree.
• Francis Davis Millet (1848–1912) graduated with a Master of Arts degree. A bronze bust in Harvard University's Widener Library also memorializes Millet.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) graduated from Harvard University in 1916. He taught English literature at the University of Wisconsin. He resigned his position for political reasons, frustrated that he was forced to give a “politician’s son who should have been flunked” passing grades. Mitchell enlisted in the army, serving in France until he was discharged as a private two years later. In 1922, following two years’ study at the University of Montpellier and Jesus College, Cambridge, he returned to the States and lived with his elderly aunt in New York. Mitchell privately studied foreign language and literature, focusing on French and Greek, before returning to Harvard and graduating with a Ph.D. in Literature in 1933.
• Frank O’Hara (1926–1966) attended with the funding made available to veterans. Published poems in the Harvard Advocate. He graduated in 1950 with a degree in English.
• Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006) studied with Walter Piston; Aaron Copland, Archibald T. Davison, and A. Tillman Merritt were also among his teachers. He completed a bachelor's degree in 1943 and a master's in 1944. He taught at various times at Simmons College (1953–1954), Boston University (1953–1954), and Harvard University (1957–1958). Among Pinkham's notable students were the jazz musician and composer Gigi Gryce (1925–1983) and the composer Mark DeVoto.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) enrolled in Harvard Law School in 1913. At the suggestion of the dean of the law school, switched to Harvard's music faculty, where he studied harmony and counterpoint with Pietro Yon.
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), after graduating from high school, gained her college diploma at Radcliffe College, where she focused primarily on poetry and learning writing craft, encountering no women teachers at all. In 1951, her last year at college, Rich's first collection of poetry, “A Change of World,2 was selected by the senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1953, Rich married Alfred Haskell Conrad, an economics professor at Harvard University she met as an undergraduate. She said of the match: "I married in part because I knew no better way to disconnect from my first family. I wanted what I saw as a full woman's life, whatever was possible." They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts and had three sons.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) earned his bachelor's degree in architecture at Auburn University (then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute) in 1940 and then moved on to the Harvard Graduate School of Design to study with Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius. After three years, he left to serve in the Navy for another three years, returning to Harvard to receive his master's in 1947
• Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895) graduated at Harvard College in 1844; overseer of Harvard University for 18 years.
• George Santayana (1863–1952) lived in Hollis Hall as a student. He was founder and president of the Philosophical Club, a member of the literary society known as the O.K., an editor and cartoonist for The Harvard Lampoon, and co-founder of the literary journal The Harvard Monthly. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1886, Santayana studied for two years in Berlin. He then returned to Harvard to write his dissertation on Hermann Lotze and teach philosophy, becoming part of the Golden Age of the Harvard philosophy department.
• Laurence Senelick (born 1942) holds a Ph.D. from Harvard. He is Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) attended Harvard University for graduate school, initially studying literature with Perry Miller and Harry Levin before moving into philosophy and theology under Paul Tillich, Jacob Taubes, Raphael Demos and Morton White. After completing her Master of Arts in philosophy, she began doctoral research into metaphysics, ethics, Greek philosophy and Continental philosophy and theology at Harvard. The philosopher Herbert Marcuse lived with Sontag and her husband Philip Rieff for a year while working on his 1955 book “Eros and Civilization.”
• Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880-1955) was educated at the University of California, Berkeley and later transferred to Radcliffe College to receive her A.B. degree. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1902.
• Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) attended Radcliffe College, then an annex of Harvard University, from 1893 to 1897.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989) entered thanks to a loan from Dr. Fred M. Smith, the president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and father of Alice Smith.
• George Tooker (1920-2011) graduated from Harvard University with an English degree in 1942 and enlisted in the Officer Candidates School (United States Marine Corps), but was discharged for medical reasons.
• Prescott Townsend (1894–1973) graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape (1938), emigrated to America, at the invitation of Walter Gropius, to teach at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. From 1938 to 1943 Tunnard taught at Harvard.
• Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (1859–1927) graduated from Harvard in 1881; he began studying law in 1883, and opened a law office specializing in international law in Washington, D.C. in 1885.
• Ned Warren (1860–1928) received his B.A. in 1883.
• Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), M.A. from Radcliffe College.
Life
Who: Francis Otto Matthiessen (February 19, 1902 – April 1, 1950)
F.O. Matthiessen was an educator, scholar and literary critic influential in the fields of American literature and American studies. His best known work, “American Renaissance: Art and Expression in the Age of Emerson and Whitman,” celebrated the achievements of several XIX century American authors and had a profound impact on a generation of scholars. Matthiessen was well known for his support of liberal causes and progressive politics. Matthiessen was known to his friends as “Matty.” As a gay man in the 1930s and 1940s, he chose to remain in the closet throughout his professional career, if not in his personal life – although traces of homoerotic concern are apparent in his writings. In 2009, a statement from Harvard University said that Matthiessen "stands out as an unusual example of a gay man who lived his sexuality as an “open secret” in the mid-XX century." He had a two decade long romantic relationship with the painter Russell Cheney, twenty years his senior. Like Matthiessen’s family, Cheney’s was prominent in business, being among America’s leading silk producers. In planning to spend his life with Cheney, Matthiessen went as far as asking his cohort in the Yale secret society Skull and Bones to approve of their partnership. With Cheney having encouraged Matthiessen’s interest in Whitman, it has been argued that “American Renaissance” was "the ultimate expression of Matthiessen’s love for Cheney and a secret celebration of the gay artist." Throughout his teaching career at Harvard, Matthiessen maintained a residence in either Cambridge or Boston. However, the couple often retreated to their shared cottage in Kittery, Maine. Russell Cheney died in July 1945. Matthiessen had been hospitalized once for a nervous breakdown in 1938-1939. He continued to be deeply affected by Russell Cheney’s death. Commentators have speculated on the impact of the escalating Red Scare on Matthiessen’s state of mind. Matthiessen’s personal story, academic contributions, political activism and early death had a lasting impact on a circle of scholars and writers. Their sense of loss and struggle to understand Matthiessen’s suicide can be found in two novels with central figures inspired by Matthiessen, May Sarton’s 1955 novel, “Faithful are the Wounds” and Mark Merlis’s 1994 novel “American Studies.” Matthiessen was buried at Springfield Cemetery in Springfield, Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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F.O. Matthiessen committed suicide by jumping off a 12th floor window of the Hotel Manger at North Station, in 1950. In a note left in the hotel room, Matthiessen wrote, "I am depressed over world conditions. I am a Christian and a Socialist. I am against any order which interferes with that objective." The Hotel Manger became the Hotel Madison in 1958 when purchased by the Boston & Maine Railroad. By the early 1970s, however, the Madison’s splendor had faded and its doors closed in 1976. The building was demolished in 1983.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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At Springfield Cemetery (171 Maple St, Springfield, MA 01105) is buried Francis Otto Matthiessen (1902-1950), educator, scholar and literary critic influential in the fields of American literature and American studies.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Cù Huy Cận was a Vietnamese poet. He was a close friend of Xuân Diệu, another famous poet. His first collection of poems, Sacred Fire, was published in 1938. His son is Cù Huy Hà Vũ, legal scholar and dissident.
Born: May 31, 1919, Hương Sơn District, Vietnam
Died: February 19, 2005, Hanoi, Vietnam
Find A Grave Memorial# 161890036
Children: Cù Huy Hà Vũ

Ngô Xuân Diệu was a prominent Vietnamese poet. A colossal figure in modern Vietnamese literature, he wrote about 450 poems (largely in posthumous manuscripts) especially love poems, several short stories, and many notes, essays, and literary criticisms. Although well known for his love poems, he was married for only six months without consummating the marriage before divorcing from his wife and died a bachelor. Many people believe that he was homosexual along with his lifelong friend the famous poet Huy Cận, as shown through his many poems about love dedicated to (and apparently addressed to) various men. These poems include Tình trai (Man's Love, about the love affair between the French poets Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine) and Em đi (You leave, a heartfelt poem dedicated to a younger man with whom the poet shared a house for several years). For two years (1938-1940), Xuân Diệu was Huy Cận's roommate at the College of Agriculture in Hanoi, from which he received his engineering degree in agricultural science in 1943.
They met in 1938 and remained friends until Xuân Diệu’s death in 1985: 47 years.
Cù Huy Cận (May 31, 1919 - February 19, 2005)
Ngô Xuân Diệu (February 2, 1916 – December 18, 1985)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Jay Bell is an American writer best known as the author of the Something Like series which includes Something Like Summer which is being adapted into a feature film by Blue Seraph Productions under the direction of J. T.
Born: February 19, 1977 (age 39), Merriam, Kansas, United States
Anniversary: March 1, 2000
Married: September 27, 2003

Jay Bell never gave much thought to Germany until he met a handsome foreign exchange student. At that moment, beer and pretzels became the most important thing in the world. After moving to Germany and getting married, Jay found himself desperate to communicate the feelings of alienation, adventure, and love that surrounded this decision, and has been putting pen to paper ever since. Something like Summer is one of Amazon's selections for Best Gay Books of 2011, a Lambda Literary Awards finalist, and soon to be a movie from the makers of Judas Kiss. Kamikaze Boys is a winner in the 25th annual Lambda Literary Awards for gay romance, and winner of two Goodreads M/M Romance Member's Choice awards. Jay’s husband, Andreas, designs all covers of Jay’s books.
Together since 2000: 15 years.
Andreas Bell (born June 11, 1974)
Jay Bell (born February 19, 1977)
Anniversary: March 1, 2000
Married: September 27, 2003
Andreas and I met at a bar—an environment neither one of us is particularly fond of. I was drawn in by his adorable speech impediment, which turned out to be a German accent. As soon as we realized there was chemistry, we made plans to meet again that weekend and went our separate ways. Our first real date was wonderful and took place on a surprisingly warm day for early March. I drove him out to a lake, we strolled around the woods talking, and we even stopped by a ranch to say “hi” to a horse. We spent the entire day together, and much of the evening. What I remember most was laughing a lot, and how intelligent and kind this person seemed to be. All these years later, and that first impression has proven correct. Andreas is an incredible man, and I love him with all of my heart. -Jay Bell



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Jackie Curtis was an American actress, writer, singer and Warhol Superstar.
Born: February 19, 1947, New York City, New York, United States
Died: May 15, 1985, New York City, New York, United States
Lived: Louis N. Jaffe Art Theater Building, 181-189 Second Ave., NYC, NY
Buried: Rose Hills Memorial Park, Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New York, USA, Plot: Woodlawn, Plot 14, Gr. 292
Find A Grave Memorial# 7202853
Parents: Jenevive Uglialoro, John Holder, Sr.
Siblings: Timothy Holder

Built in 1925-26, Louis N. Jaffe Art Theater Building (181-189 Second Ave., NYC, NY) was a Yiddish theater through 1945. Between 1945 and 1953, the Mafia-controlled 181 Club, one of the most luxurious gay and lesbian clubs in the country, occupied the downstairs of the building. From 1953 through 1961, the Phoenix Theater occupied the building, featuring GLBT performers like Montgomery Clift and Roddy McDowell. The front offices were converted into apartments, which housed gay residents including Jackie Curtis (drag performer in Andy Warhol films), photographer Peter Hujar, and artist David Wojnarowicz.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Jackie Curtis (1947–1985) was an American actress, writer, singer and Warhol Superstar. She was born John Curtis Holder, Jr. in New York City. "Jackie Curtis is not a drag queen. Jackie is an artist. A pioneer without a frontier", Andy Warhol said of his associate. In the 1980s drug addiction had taken control of her life, eventually leading to her death by heroin overdose at the age of 38. She is buried at Rose Hills Memorial Park (101 Mill St, Putnam Valley, NY 10579).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Marcel Moore, born Suzanne Alberte Malherbe, was a French illustrator, designer, and photographer. She, along with her romantic and creative partner Claude Cahun, was a surrealist writer and photographer.
Born: July 19, 1892, Nantes, France
Died: February 19, 1972, Jersey
Lived: St. Brelade’s Bay Hotel, La Route de la Baie, St Brelade, Jersey CI. JE3 8EF, UK (49.18539, -2.20132)
Buried: St Brelade, Rue de la Baie, at the western end of St Brelade's Bay, Jersey, Channel Islands, JE3 8EP
Buried alongside: Claude Cahun
Find A Grave Memorial# 100891884
Period: Surrealism

Claude Cahun was a French artist, photographer and writer. Their work was both political and personal, and often undermined traditional concepts of gender roles. Claude was the niece of an avant-garde writer Marcel Schwob and the great-niece of Orientalist David Léon Cahun. They began making photographic self-portraits as early as 1912, when they were 18 years old, and they continued taking images of themself through the 1930s. Around 1919, they changed their name to Claude Cahun, after having previously used the names Claude Courlis (after the curlew) and Daniel Douglas (after Lord Alfred Douglas). During the early 20s, they settled in Paris with their lifelong partner and stepsibling Suzanne Malherbe, whom they met at the lycée (high school). For the rest of their lives together, Cahun and Malherbe collaborated on various written works, sculptures, photomontages and collages. They befriended Henri Michaux, Pierre Morhange and Robert Desnos. Around 1922 Claude and Malherbe began holding artists' salons at their home. Among the regulars who would attend were artists Henri Michaux and André Breton and literary entrepreneurs Adrienne Monnier and Sylvia Beach. Claude and Suzanne are buried together at St Brelade's Church in the island of Jersey.
Together from 1909 to 1954: 45 years.
Lucy Renee Mathilde Schwob aka Claude Cahun (October 25, 1894 – December 8, 1954)
Suzanne Malherbe aka Marcel Moore (July 19, 1892 - February 19, 1972)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore had a long association with Jersey, having spent many childhood holidays in the Island. They usually stayed at St Brelade’s Bay Hotel and became friends with the owners, the Colley family
Address: La Route de la Baie, St Brelade, Jersey CI. JE3 8EF, UK (49.18539, -2.20132)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1534 746141
Place
In the late XIX century the St. Brelade’s Bay Hotel was hardly more than a pub owned by a local brewery. It was situated where the Cocktail Bar is now. Apart from the parish church, the only houses in the bay at that time were four farms, some fishermen’s cottages and the Martello Tower. Sarah Jennings, a publican by trade, became the license holder in 1877. Her daughter, Ellen, took over the tenancy in 1880 and in 1884 married Alan Harden an “ambitious commercial traveller.” Over the following years they had three daughters, Helen, May and Eve. Alan Harden was successful, he considerably enlarged the premises, doubling the bedroom capacity. The room rate at that time was seven shillings and sixpence for full board, with free use of a bathing machine; a lobster lunch was one shilling and sixpence. In 1917 Mr. Harden asked the brewery to sell him the freehold, but they refused. He immediately bought a plot of land right next door and built the granite building at the west end of the Hotel and threatened to open a rival establishment.In 1919 the brewery reluctantly sold the freehold to him and the next door property was turned into self contained flats. Alan Harden died in 1924 and the license was inherited by Helen Colley, his widowed eldest daughter. During her time in charge, the two buildings were joined together and considerable improvements were made to the interior including, amongst other things, “Electric light throughout.” Then, and earlier, a large proportion of the vegetables used in the Hotel were grown in what is now the gardens. Three “côtils” of Jersey Royals on the hillside at the back, tomatoes and cucumbers in the greenhouses, vegetables where the pool bar and tennis court are now, cherry and pear trees where the swimming pool is situated and an apple orchard on the car park. Helen Colley retired in 1933 and her only son Bob took over the reins; the Germans invaded Jersey on July the 1st 1940 and he escaped to England on one of the last steamers. His mother and his aunts remained on the island throughout the occupation. The Hotel was taken over by unwelcome visitors and was used as a “Soldatenheim” a place for rest and recreation away from the front line. Jersey was a prestigious part of Hitler’s “Atlantic Wall ” and amongst the numerous defensive/aggressive constructions built by slave labour on the island were the sea wall stretching the length of the bay and, beneath the terrace at the front of the Hotel an air-raid shelter, now used as a holding tank for rainwater that falls upon the Hotel. In May 1945 Bob Colley returned to Jersey, with his new wife, Audrey, and his stepson. The Hotel was in an appalling condition after the four years of the Occupation and it took some years to be up and running properly again. Tourism in Jersey started to boom in the late nineteen fifties and during this period the other hotels in the bay were built. Bob Colley made some massive changes to the premises, all the bedrooms were made en-suite, the swimming pool was built along with the pool bar and grill and a new floor was added. Bob Colley died in 1965 and for the next twenty five years the Hotel was run by his step son Digby, who returned his shares to the family in 1990. Robert and Mandy Colley then ran the hotel until 2009 the fifth generation of the family to run the hotel. In Nov. 2009, the hotel was sold to Jayne Best, daughter of Wigan Athletic Chairman Dave Whelan. In the following years the hotel underwent major refurbishments and expansion with the addition of the DW Health Club which opened in Jan. 2012. Under the guidance of Jayne the hotel re-established itself at the forefront of Jersey hotels and has become one of the leading hotels within the Channel Islands. In 2013 following Wigan’s historic FA Cup win, the Whelan family brought the trophy to the hotel where it was displayed within the Bay Restaurant and the Health Club for local and guests to view. During the FA Cups visit it also went to three schools in the local area of the hotel in order to promote the development through sport.
Life
Who: Lucy Renee Mathilde Schwob (October 25, 1894 – December 8, 1954) aka Claude Cahun and Suzanne Alberte Malherbe (July 19, 1892 – February 19, 1972) aka Marcel Moore
In 1937 Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore purchased La Rocquaise, a house just opposite the hotel, and moved there permanently in 1938. The garden, the house and the area around the bay were favourite settings for Cahun’s work. While living in Jersey they were generally known by their real names and gained a reputation for strange behaviour, such as taking their cat for a walk on a lead and wearing trousers. They remained here throughout the occupation, carrying out subversive resistance activities for which they were arrested and imprisoned. Claude Cahun was a French artist, photographer and writer. Her work was both political and personal, and often undermined traditional concepts of gender roles. Though Cahun’s writings suggested she identified as agender, most academic writings use feminine pronouns when discussing her and her work, as there is little documentation that gender neutral pronouns were used or preferred by the artist. In 1929 Cahun translated Havelock Ellis’ theories on the third gender. Around 1919, she changed her name to Claude Cahun, after having previously used the names Claude Courlis (after the curlew) and Daniel Douglas (after Lord Alfred Douglas.) During the early 20s, she settled in Paris with her lifelong partner and step-sibling Suzanne Malherbe. For the rest of their lives together, Cahun and Malherbe (who adopted the name "Marcel Moore") collaborated on various written works, sculptures, photomontages and collages. The two published articles and novels, notably in the periodical "Mercure de France,” and befriended Henri Michaux, Pierre Morhange and Robert Desnos. Around 1922 Claude and Malherbe began holding artists’ salons at their home. Among the regulars who would attend were artists Henri Michaux and André Breton and literary entrepreneurs Sylvia Beach and Adrienne Monnier. In 1937 Cahun and Malherbe settled in Jersey. Following the fall of France and the German occupation of Jersey and the other Channel Islands, they became active as resistance workers and propagandists. Fervently against war, the two worked extensively in producing anti-German fliers. Many were snippets from English-to-German translations of BBC reports on the Nazis’ crimes and insolence, which were pasted together to create rhythmic poems and harsh criticism. The couple then dressed up and attended many German military events in Jersey, strategically placing them in soldier’s pockets, on their chairs, etc. Also, they inconspicuously crumpled up and threw their fliers into cars and windows. In many ways, Cahun and Malherbe’s resistance efforts were not only political but artistic actions, using their creative talents to manipulate and undermine the authority which they despised. In many ways, Cahun’s life’s work was focused on undermining a certain authority, however her specific resistance fighting targeted a physically dangerous threat. In 1944 she was arrested and sentenced to death, but the sentences were never carried out. They were saved by the Liberation of Jersey in 1945, but their home and property had been confiscated and much of their art destroyed by the Germans. However, Cahun’s health never recovered from her treatment in jail, and she died in 1954. She is buried at St Brelade (Rue de la Baie, at the western end of St Brelade's Bay, Jersey, Channel Islands, JE3 8EP). Moore relocated to a smaller home, Carola in Beaumont. Moore committed suicide in 1972. She was buried with her partner Claude Cahun in St Brelade’s Church.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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