Feb. 20th, 2017

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Robert Tobias "Bobbie" Andrews was a British stage actor. He also briefly appeared in films.
Born: February 20, 1895, London, United Kingdom
Died: 1976, Maidenhead, United Kingdom
Lived: 67 Egerton Gardens, Chelsea, SW3
37 St Mary's Mansions, St Mary's Terrace, W2
Redroofs, School Ln, Littlewick Green, Maidenhead, Berkshire, SL6 3QY, UK (51.51071, -0.79085)
Find A Grave Memorial# 101146344
Movies: The Man from Colorado, The Burgomaster of Stilemonde, The Walking Dead

Bobbie Andrews was a British stage actor. Ivor Novello was a Welsh composer and actor who became one of the most popular British entertainers of the first half of the 20th century. Novello and Andrews were at the very hub of London's theatrical gay society, dubbed "the Ivor/Noël naughty set (after Ivor Novello and Noël Coward)" by Cecil Beaton in his diaries. Novello had his first stage success with Theodore & Co in 1916, a production by George Grossmith, Jr. and Edward Laurillard with a score composed by Novello and the young Jerome Kern. In the same year, Novello contributed to André Charlot's revue See-Saw. In 1917, he wrote for another Grossmith and Laurillard production, the operette Arlette. In the same year, he was introduced him to the actor Bobbie Andrews, who became Novello's life partner. Andrews introduced Novello to the young Noël Coward. Coward, six years Novello's junior, was deeply envious of Novello's effortless glamour. He wrote, "I just felt suddenly conscious of the long way I had to go before I could break into the magic atmosphere in which he moved and breathed with such nonchalance".
Together from 1916 to 1951: 35 years.
Robert Tobias "Bobbie" Andrews (February 20, 1895 – 1976)
David Ivor Davies aka Ivor Novello (January 15, 1893 – March 6, 1951)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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In the 1930s, Bobbie Andrews, partner of Ivor Novello, lived at 67 Egerton Gardens, Chelsea, SW3.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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In 1956 Bobbie Andrews, Ivor Novello’s lifelong companion, lived at 37 St Mary's Mansions, St Mary's Terrace, W2.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The British film company Gainsborough Pictures offered Ivor Novello a lucrative contract, which enabled him to buy a country house in Littlewick Green, near Maidenhead. He renamed the property Redroofs, and he entertained there famously and with little regard for convention.
Address: School Ln, Littlewick Green, Maidenhead, Berkshire, SL6 3QY, UK (51.51071, -0.79085)
Type: Student Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1628 822982
Place
The village of Littlewick Green is set just off the main Bath Road two miles west of Maidenhead and has a certain charm, with many of its cottages and houses set around a sizeable green with the school and parish church completing the picture. Also here is “Redroofs,” the former home of Ivor Novello, where many of his most famous works were composed. The village pub, the Cricketers, overlooks the green. The village hall was built in 1911 and has an unusual balcony facing the green where the cricket teams watch matches and keep the score on the scoreboard. The church was completed in 1893 and was built mainly to provide a burial ground and to make unnecessary the long walk to White Waltham in whose civil parish the village lies.
Life
Who: David Ivor Davies (January 15, 1893 – March 6, 1951) aka Ivor Novello and Robert Tobias "Bobbie" Andrews (February 20, 1895 – 1976)
Cecil Beaton, noting the frequent homosexual excesses at Redroofs, coined the phrase, "the Ivor/Noel naughty set.” Noel Coward had by now caught Novello up professionally, despite a joint disaster when Novello starred in Coward’s play “Sirocco” in 1927, which was a débâcle, and closed within a month of opening. In 1928 Novello starred in the silent adaptation of Coward’s much more successful “The Vortex,” and made his last silent film, “A South Sea Bubble.” During the late 1920s, Novello was the most popular male star in British films. Novello died on March 6, 1951. Bobbie Andrews died in 1976 at Redroofs. Novello’s memory is promoted by The Ivor Novello Appreciation Bureau, which holds annual events around Britain, including an annual pilgrimage to Redroofs each June. Redroofs was sold after Novello’s death and is now a theatre training school.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Douglas Cooper, who also published as Douglas Lord was a British art historian, art critic and art collector. He mainly collected Cubist works.
Born: February 20, 1911, London, United Kingdom
Died: April 1, 1984, London, United Kingdom
Education: Sorbonne
Lived: Château de Castille, Chemin du Château, 30210 Argilliers, France (43.97475, 4.49919)
Find A Grave Memorial# 176225732
People also search for: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Tomas Main Ridas, Georges Braque

After WWII, Douglas Cooper returned to England, but could not settle in his native country and moved to southern France, where in 1950 he bought the Château de Castille near Avignon.
Address: Chemin du Château, 30210 Argilliers, France (43.97475, 4.49919)
Type: Private Property
Place
The lordship of Argilliers became the Barony of Castile in 1748. In 1773 the barony was inherited by Gabriel-Joseph de Froment d’Argilliers (1747-1826). Baron de Castille redesigned the old castle of the XVII century in 1785. The baron was arrested in 1794. The castle was plundered. The old castle was a rectangular building flanked by round towers. The baron added columns. The castle was preceded by colonnades which probably the baron wanted to remind the St. Peter's Square of Bernini. The works lasted until 1815. The Baron died in 1826. Since then, some of the additions disappeared. After the death of Baron, indifference was to cause the ruin of the garden and its additions. The castle was bought in 1924 by Paul Grousset from Mr. Seguin, heir of the barons of Castile. The castle and the colonnade were registered with the additional inventory of historic monuments in 1927. The owner was concerned about the cost of maintenance. In 1929, the Minister of Education and Fine Arts was alerted that some of the additions were sold to an American. Paul Grousset wrote to the State that he wanted to sell part of the Castle’s elements and if the state did not buy them, he was to continue to sell the additions before their total ruin. The castle was bought in 1950 by Douglas Cooper to put in his collection of modern art. The collection disappeared in 1977. Several restoration campaigns were undertaken from 1962. The facade, roof, common, the "ancient in dining room" and the colonnade were classified Historical Monuments in November 4, 1983. Château de Castille near Avignon was a suitable place to show Douglas Cooper’s impressive art collection, which he continued to expand with newer artists like Klee and Miró. During the following years, art historians, collectors, dealers and artists flocked to his home which had become something like an epicenter of Cubism, very much to his pride. Léger and Picasso were regular guests at the castle; the latter even became a substantial part of its life. Cooper regarded Picasso as the only genius of the 20th century and he became a substantial promoter of the artist. Picasso tried several times to induce Cooper to sell his castle to him; however, he would not agree and finally in 1958 recommended to Picasso the acquisition of Château of Vauvenargues.
Life
Who: (Arthur William) Douglas Cooper (February 20, 1911 – April 1, 1984) aka Douglas Lord
Douglas Cooper was a British art historian, art critic and art collector. He mainly collected Cubist works. In 1950, he became acquainted with art historian John Richardson, sharing his life with him for the next 10 years. John Richardson moved to southern France (Provence) in 1952, as Cooper acquired Château de Castille in the vicinity of Avignon and transformed the run-down castle into a private museum of early Cubism. Cooper had been at home in the Paris art scene before WWII and had been active in the art business as well; by building his own collection, he also met many artists personally and introduced them to his friends. Richardson and Cooper became close friends of Picasso, Fernand Léger and Nicolas de Staël as well. At that time Richardson developed an interest in Picasso's portraits and contemplated creating a publication; more than 20 years later, these plans expanded into Richardson's four-part Picasso biography “A Life of Picasso.” In 1960, Richardson left Cooper and moved to New York City. Towards his life's end, Cooper was honoured by being appointed the first foreign patron of the Museo del Prado in Madrid, which made him very proud. In gratitude, he donated his best Gris to the Prado, Portrait of the Artist's Wife from 1916, and a cubist Still Life with Pigeons by Picasso. His only other donation went to the Kunstmuseum Basel; the Tate Gallery didn't receive anything. Cooper died on April 1, 1984 (Fools' Day), perhaps completely fitting, as he predicted. He left an incomplete catalogue raisonné of Paul Gauguin and his art collection to his adopted son William McCarty Cooper (having adopted him according to French law, in order that nobody else would inherit anything, in particular not his family). His written legacy is kept at the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Elisar von Kupffer was a Baltic German artist, anthologist, poet, historian, translator, and playwright. He used the pseudonym 'Elisarion' for much of his writing. He studied at St. Petersburg and then Berlin.
Born: February 20, 1872, Tallinn, Estonia
Died: October 31, 1942, Minusio, Switzerland
Lived: Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion, Minusio (6648)
Buried: Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion, Minusio (6648)
Buried alongside: Eduard von Mayer
Find A Grave Memorial# 176225946

Around 1900, many neo-religious groups expressed their desire for a new beginning in mostly utopian architectural plans. Apart from serving as visualisations of a disengagement from institutionalised churches, these designs were also intended to turn new devotional rituals into a collective experience. Although many designs for temples emerged, only three were implemented and have survived until today: Rudolf Steiner’s Goetheanum in Dornach, the Bossard Art Centre near Jeesteburg – and the Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion in Minusio.
Address: Via Rinaldo Simen 3, 6648 Minusio, Switzerland (46.17375, 8.8105)
Type: Administrative Building (open to public)
Place
After the original plans to build a “sacred castle” to Clarism in Eisenach failed in 1925, the Sanctuarium was built in Minusio in 1926 and extended by a rotunda in 1939. The building’s façade features skilful references to temple designs of the day, and to Italian baptistery architecture of the Renaissance, but also to the palace architecture of Palermo. The visit to the Sanctuarium was planned as a pilgrimage with the railway station as the starting point. The cultic structure that determined the further progression first became apparent in the entrance area inside the building. This order primarily reflected aspects of the Claristic faith. In analogy to contemporary Percival productions, visitors were guided through a confined “tomb bridge” into the light-flooded last building where “Die Klarwelt der Seligen” (The Clear World of the Blissful) awaited them. In his will (1960), Eduard von Mayer left the Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion and all its contents to the Canton of Ticino and the property to the municipality of Minusio on condition that the gardens should be made accessible to the public. It was not until 1968, after the canton had initially rejected the donation that the community decided to accept this gift. The material that is necessary for a better understanding of the pictorial and philosophical oeuvre was to be kept in a cupboard on the ground floor. The paintings, the urns with Elisàr von Kupffer and Eduard von Mayer’s ashes, and family heirlooms were to remain in the building. Furthermore, the gardens were to be maintained. Today the men’s legacy is distributed across different places in the community. Most of the surviving paintings, fragments of the former library, and the literary remains can be found in a room of the former sacred building. The inventory in its entirety has yet to be undertaken. Thanks to Harald Szeemann, it was possible to save the monumental cyclorama “Die Klarwelt der Seligen (The Clear World of the Blissful)” from destruction. Two decades ago, it was installed at Monte Verità where it can be visited under provisional circumstances. The Centro Culturale Elisarion opened in 1981. The institution’s programme is dedicated to cultural projects in the community of Minusio.
Life
Who: Elisar von Kupffer (February 20, 1872 – October 31, 1942)
Elisar von Kupffer was a Baltic German artist, anthologist, poet, historian, translator, and playwright. He used the pseudonym 'Elisarion' for much of his writing. At the age of nineteen, Eilsàr was sent to the German St. Anna School in Saint Petersburg where he concluded his schooling. In the nearby village of Levashovo he met Eduard von Mayer who, like Agnes von Hoyningen-Huene, a girl of the same age, was to become an important friend, and later on, also his life partner. He studied at St. Petersburg and then Berlin. After travels in Italy from 1902 to 1915, he established himself as a fine-art painter and muralist in Locarno, Switzerland, with his partner the historian and philosopher Eduard von Mayer. From 1925 to 1929 they transformed their Minusio villa (at the Lake Maggiore) into an opulent collection of art, the 'Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion'. From 1981 this has been a Museum dedicated to von Kupffer's work. The couple were at the heart of a religious movement called the Klarismus (in English: 'Clarity'). In 1899/1900 Adolf Brand published von Kupffer's influential anthology of homoerotic literature, “Lieblingminne und Freundesliebe in der Weltliteratur” in Berlin. The anthology was reprinted in 1995. The anthology was researched and created, in part, as a protest against the imprisonment of Oscar Wilde in England. His work was also published and reviewed in the gay magazine Akademos published by Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen. He was also a photographer, making photographic studies of boys for use in the creation of his paintings, but more often his own rejuvenated form can be seen as a subject of his art works. Eduard von Mayer was born in Analowo near Saint Petersburg as the seventh child of Charlotte von Mayer and the physician Dr. Karl von Mayer, founder of the protestant hospital of Saint Petersburg. The von Mayer family was of German descent and belonged to the Ukrainian aristocracy. On 15 August 1891 — by this time he had already finished school — he became acquainted with Elisàr von Kupffer in the garden of his parents’ villa. Elisàr later described him as “completely wound up in his feelings, very hospitable, but unapproachable. It was this acquaintance that finally helped Eduard von Mayer to distance himself from his pietistic upbringing and to pursue his interests in theatre and fine arts. From 1897 onwards, the events in his life coincided almost completely with those in Elisàr von Kupffer’s life. Together they developed and corroborated in the theoretical writings on Clarism. In spite of — or in his opinion — because of his highly developed intellect, Eduard decided to defer to Elisarion’s work and to withdraw his authorship. “That which I came to understand and herewith affirm” he wrote “is the fruit of life from Elisarion’s tree.” Eduard von Mayer spent the years after Elisarion’s death in 1942 documenting and securing their communal achievements. During four years of work, he not only assessed the library of the Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion, but also created an inventory of the surviving letters, sketches, drawings, plans, and paintings which included 2400 items.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Baron Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen was a French novelist and poet. His life forms the basis of a fictionalised biography by Roger Peyrefitte.
Born: February 20, 1880, Paris, France
Died: November 5, 1923, Capri
Lived: Villa Lysis, Via Lo Capo, 80073 Capri, Italy (40.55916, 14.25972)
Buried: Protestant Cemetery, Capri, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 58117754
Books: Messes Noires- Lord Lyllian
People also search for: Nino Cesarini, R. P. Coppini, R. Nieri

Baron Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen was a novelist and poet of the early 20th century; his fame is based on a mid-century fictionalized biography by Roger Peyrefitte. In 1903, a scandal involving Parisian students made him persona non grata in the salons of Paris and dashed his marriage plans, after which he took up residence in Capri with his longtime lover, Nino Cesarini. He became one of the many "characters" of the island in the interwar years, featuring in novels by Compton MacKenzie and others. His house was christened Villa Lysis (later sometimes referred to as Villa Fersen) in reference to Plato's Socratic dialogue Lysis discussing friendship (or, according to modern notions, homosexual love). Villa Fersen remains one of Capri's tourist attractions. Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen died in 1923 —allegedly by suicide achieved through drinking a cocktail of champagne and cocaine. His ashes are conserved in the non-Catholic cemetery of Capri. Cesarini returned to Rome.
Together from 1903 to 1923: 20 years.
Baron Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen (February 20, 1880 - November 5, 1923)
Nino Cesarini (September 29, 1889 – October 25, 1943)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Villa Lysis (initially, La Gloriette; today, Villa Fersen) is a villa on Capri built by industrialist and poet Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen. "Dedicated to the youth of love" (dédiée à la jeunesse d’amour), it was Fersen’s self-chosen exile from France after a sex scandal involving Parisian schoolboys and nude (or nearly nude) tableaux vivants.
Address: Via Lo Capo, 80073 Capri, Italy (40.55916, 14.25972)
Type: Museun (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 10.00-18.00
Phone: +39 0818386111
Place
Built in 1905
Fersen purchased the 12,000 square metres (130,000 sq ft) land in 1904 for 15,000 lire. The real designer of the Villa is unknown. A recent analysis of letters of Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen to his friend, the artist Edouard Chimot, shows that Chimot, who, since 1907, due to a trial following an accident in the building site, was said to be the designer, is not. The house was described in detail by Roger Peyrefitte in his novel “L’Exilé de Capri” (1959), a fictionalized account of Adelswärd-Fersen’s years on Capri together with his lover Nino Cesarini. Architecturally, the house is mainly Art Nouveau with Neoclassical elements; the style might be called "Neoclassical decadent." The well-known Latin inscription above the front steps (AMORI ET DOLORI SACRVM, "a shrine to love and sorrow") highlights Fersen’s Romantic view of himself. "Lysis" is a reference to the Socratic dialogue Lysis discussing friendship, and by our modern notion, homosexual love. In the atrium a marble stairway, with wrought iron balustrade, leads to the first floor where there are bedrooms with panoramic terraces, and a dining room. Fersen’s large room was on the upper floor, facing East, with three windows overlooking the Gulf of Naples and three towards Mount Tiberio. Nino also had a room on the upper floor. On the ground floor there is a lounge decorated with blue majolica and white ceramic, facing out over the Gulf of Naples. In the basement, there is a room for smoking opium, also known as the Chinese room. The large garden is connected to the villa by a flight of steps which leads to a portico with ionic columns. The ruins of Villa Jovis, one of Tiberius’ twelve villas on Capri, are a few hundred meters to the east-southeast of Villa Lysis.
Life
Who: Baron Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen (February 20, 1880 – November 5, 1923)
Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen became addicted to opium on a trip to Ceylon during construction of the house (Peyrefitte relates that a worker was killed during construction, and Fersen therefore decided to travel until the anger of the locals at him had subsided), and after WWI he started using cocaine. He eventually committed suicide in 1923 by ingesting an overdose of cocaine. His ashes are conserved in the non-Catholic cemetery of Capri. After Fersen’s death, the villa was left first to his sister, Germaine, but with the usufruct to Nino Cesarini. Cesarini sold the rights for 200 000 lire to Germaine and went to live in Rome. Germaine later gave the villa to her daughter, the Countess of Castelbianco. With the last of the maintenance work done in 1934, the house was essentially in ruins by the 1980s. In 1985, Villa Lysis passed into possession of the Italian state. The building was restored in the 1990s by the Lysis Funds Association (founded in 1986) and the Municipality of Capri. The Tuscan architect, Marcello Quiriconi, supervised the work. Since the restoration, Villa Lysis has been open to tourists. It is also available to rent for parties and dinners and cultural events have taken place there, such as an exhibition of photographs by Wilhelm von Gloeden in 2009. In Mar. 2010, the villa was put up for sale, listed as being 450 square metres (4,800 sq ft) with a 12,000 square metres (130,000 sq ft) garden.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Cimitero acattolico di Capri is a non-Catholic cemetery on the island of Capri. Established in 1878 by Englishman George Hayward, it contains 204 graves from a total of 21 different nations.
Address: Via Marina Grande, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.55153, 14.23452)
Type: Cimetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 081 838 6111
Place
Most of the people buried in the cemetery are of English,. German, Russian or American nationality. Aside from Protestants, also buried in the cemetery are people professing the Catholic religion (such as Anglicans, Jews, Orthodox). Notable interments include French Baron Jacques d'Adelsward-Fersen, Lucio Amelio, Günter Ammon, Gracie Fields, Norman Douglas and Jakob Johann von Uexküll. After WWII, the cemetery saw a period of great neglect, which ended in 1986 when the Municipality of Capri ensured the preservation and restoration of the cemetery graves.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero acattolico di Capri:
• Jacques d'Adelsward-Fersen (1880-1923), French novelist and poet. His life forms the basis of a fictionalised biography by Roger Peyrefitte.
• Norman Douglas (December 8, 1868-February 7, 1952), British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. His travel books such as his 1915 Old Calabria were also appreciated for the quality of their writing.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Roy Marcus Cohn was an American attorney who became famous during Senator Joseph McCarthy's investigations into Communist activity in the United States during the Second Red Scare.
Born: February 20, 1927, The Bronx, New York City, New York, United States
Died: August 2, 1986, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
Education: Columbia University
Horace Mann School
Ethical Culture Fieldston School
Buried: Union Field Cemetery, Ridgewood, Queens County, New York, USA, Plot: Small private family mausoleum, GPS (lat/lon): 40.69271, -73.88904
Find A Grave Memorial# 21562
Political party: Democratic Party
Books: How to Stand Up for Your Rights and Win!, Roy Cohn Autobiography, McCarthy
Parents: Dora Marcus, Albert C. Cohn

Roy Cohn (1927-1986) was an American attorney who became famous during Senator Joseph McCarthy's investigations into Communist activity in the United States during the Second Red Scare. He is buried at Union Field Cemetery (82-11 Cypress Avenue, Ridgewood, NY 11385) in a small private family mausoleum.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp KG KCMG CB KStJ PC, styled Viscount Elmley until 1891, was a British Liberal politician.
Born: February 20, 1872, London, United Kingdom
Died: November 14, 1938, New York City, New York, United States
Education: University of Oxford
Lived: Walmer Castle, Walmer, Deal, Kent CT14 7LJ, UK (51.20058, 1.40201)
Madresfield Court, Madresfield, Malvern, Worcestershire WR13 5AJ, UK (52.12549, -2.2808)
Buried: St Mary, Madresfield Village, Madresfield, Worcestershire, WR13 5AA
Find A Grave Memorial# 83725459
Spouse: Lettice Grosvenor (m. 1902)
Party: Liberal Party
Succeeded by: Alfred Emmott, 1st Baron Emmott
Children: Lady Mary Lygon

Hugh Patrick Lygon was the second son of William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp, and is often believed to be the inspiration for Lord Sebastian Flyte in Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited. He was a friend of Waugh's at Oxford (A. L. Rowse believed the two to be lovers), where both were members of the Hypocrites' Club. He was educated at Eton and Pembroke College, Oxford. After leaving Oxford he worked in a bank in Paris before working in the City. Lygon died in Germany where he was on a motoring tour with his friend, the artist Henry Winch, son of Lady Newborough. Lygon was standing in the road to ask the way and fell backwards, hitting his head on a stone. He died later due to a fractured skull, having spent four days in a hospital in Rothenburg ob der Tauber. Evelyn Waugh was an English writer of novels, biographies, and travel books; and also was a prolific journalist and reviewer. His best-known works include the early satires Decline and Fall (1928) and A Handful of Dust (1934), the novel Brideshead Revisited (1945), and the Second World War trilogy Sword of Honour (1952–61). Hugh’s father, William Lygon, was outed as homosexual in 1931 and went into exile. Evelyn’s brother, Alec Waugh, like his father, had gone to school at Sherborne, however, in 1915, Alec was asked to leave, after a homosexual relationship came to light. He departed for military training and, while waiting for his commission to be confirmed, wrote a novel of school life, The Loom of Youth. The novel alluded to homosexual friendships in Sherborne and caused a public sensation.
Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh (October 28, 1903 – April 10, 1966)
Hugh Patrick Lygon (November 2, 1904 – August 19, 1936)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Walmer Castle is an artillery fort originally constructed by Henry VIII in Walmer, Kent, between 1539 and 1540.
Address: Walmer, Deal, Kent CT14 7LJ, UK (51.20058, 1.40201)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Place
Walmer Castle formed part of the King's Device programme to protect against invasion from France and the Holy Roman Empire, and defended the strategically important Downs anchorage off the English coast. Comprising a keep and four circular bastions, the moated stone castle covered 0.61 acres (0.25 ha) and had 39 firing positions on the upper levels for artillery. It cost the Crown a total of £27,092 to build the three castles of Walmer, Sandown, and Deal, which lay adjacent to one another along the coast and were connected by earthwork defences. The original invasion threat passed, but during the Second English Civil War of 1648–49, Walmer was seized by pro-Royalist insurgents and was only retaken by Parliamentary forces after several months' fighting. In the XVIII century, Walmer became the official residence of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports and was gradually modified from a military fortification into a private residence. Various Prime Ministers and prominent politicians were appointed as Lord Warden, including William Pitt, the Duke of Wellington and Lord Granville, who adapted parts of the Tudor castle as living spaces and constructed extensive gardens around the property. By 1904, the War Office agreed that Walmer had no remaining military utility and it passed to the Ministry of Works. Successive Lord Wardens continued to use the property but it was also opened to the public. Walmer was no longer considered a particularly comfortable or modern residence, however, and Lord Curzon blamed the poor condition of the castle for his wife's death in 1906. Lord Wardens since the Second World War have included Winston Churchill, Robert Menzies and Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, but they have made only intermittent use of Walmer Castle. In the XXI century, Walmer Castle is run as a tourist attraction by English Heritage. The interior of the castle displays a range of historical objects and pictures associated with the property and its Lord Wardens, protected since the XIX century by special legislation. The grounds include the Queen Mother's Garden, designed by Penelope Hobhouse as a 95th birthday gift for Elizabeth in 1997.
Life
Who: William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp KG KCMG CB KStJ PC (February 20, 1872 – November 14, 1938)
William Lygon, the Earl Beauchamp, became the Lord Warden in 1913, building a Roman Catholic chapel at the castle and holding large parties there each summer. His children later commented that they found the castle was chilly and cramped. The Prime Minister, Asquith, was invited by Beauchamp to use the castle during the WWI as a weekend retreat, as it had good communication links with the front line in France. Asquith's wife, Margot, was not initially impressed by Walmer, noting in her diary that while it was "very distinguished" and had "great charm", it was "terribly exposed" with "cold... noisy corridors and small rooms"; she later came to like the castle and noted that she was sad to finally leave it. Lygon had sexual relations with men, which was illegal in England during this period. Rumours spread about the parties that he had held at Walmer Castle after the war, where, according to the historian Richard Davenport-Hines, he had "behaved indiscreetly with young men". The King was informed about his lifestyle and Lygon fled the country in 1931, resigning the appointment of Lord Warden the following year.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Madresfield Court, near the village centre, has been the ancestral home for several centuries of the Lygon family, whose eldest sons took the title of Earl Beauchamp from 1815 until 1979, when the last Earl died. Distinguished collections of furniture, art, and porcelain are housed at Madresfield, which was rated by Sir Simon Jenkins among the 50 best in his book on 1,000 historic houses. The house is managed by the Elmley Foundation, a British registered charity.
Address: Madresfield, Malvern, Worcestershire WR13 5AJ, UK (52.12549, -2.2808)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 153385 (Grade I, 1968)
Place
The original Great Hall, built in the XII century, stands at the core of this building. In 1593 Madresfield Court was rebuilt, replacing a XV century medieval building. It was again remodelled in the XIX century to resemble a moated Elizabethan house, with the result that it contains 136 rooms. The chapel was designed by the architect Philip Charles Hardwick and sumptuously decorated in the Arts and Crafts style by Birmingham Group artists including Henry Payne, William Bidlake and Charles March Gere. Madresfield was the home of the 7th Earl Beauchamp. Evelyn Waugh was a frequent guest to the house and is said by Chips Channon in his diary to have based the Flyte family in “Brideshead Revisited” on the Lygons. In Jan. 2006, documents revealed by the National Archives showed that emergency plans were made to evacuate Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret of the British Royal Family to Madresfield in the event of a successful German invasion following the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940. Five years later, Worcestershire County Council’s Historic, Environment and Archaeology Service showed that the 1940 plan was simply part of pre-existing 1938 invasion contingency plans. In the event of an invasion breaking out of a likely lodgement in Kent and threatening London, the whole UK government would move to Worcestershire with the Royal family residing at Madresfield. Before her death in 1989, Countess Beauchamp, the widow of William Lygon, 8th Earl Beauchamp, the last Earl Beauchamp, endowed the Elmley Foundation to ensure the Court’s many generations of tradition as a patron of the arts in Herefordshire and Worcestershire. Madresfield Court has never been sold or bought in all its long history, instead simply remaining in the hands of the Lygon family. Madresfield Court is currently the home of Rosalind, Lady Morrison, niece of the 8th and last Earl Beauchamp. A variety of apple, first cultivated at the house, and a variety of black table grape, are named Madresfield Court. The house can be visited by appointment only, between April and July each year.
Life
Who: William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp KG KCMG CB KStJ PC (February 20, 1872 – November 14, 1938) and Hugh Patrick Lyon (November 2, 1904 – April 19, 1936)
William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp, styled Viscount Elmley until 1891, was a British Liberal politician. He was Governor of New South Wales between 1899 and 1901, a member of the Liberal administrations of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman and H. H. Asquith between 1905 and 1915 and leader of the Liberal Party in the House of Lords between 1924 and 1931. When political enemies threatened to make public his homosexuality he resigned from office to go into exile. Lord Beauchamp is generally supposed to have been the model for Lord Marchmain in Evelyn Waugh’s novel, “Brideshead Revisited.” Although Beauchamp’s homosexuality was an open secret in parts of high society and one that his political opponents had refrained from using against him despite its illegality, Lady Beauchamp was oblivious to it and professed a confusion as to what homosexuality was when it was revealed. He had numerous affairs at Madresfield and Walmer Castle, with his partners ranging from servants to socialites, including local men. In 1930, while on a trip to Australia, it became common knowledge in London society that one of the men escorting him, Robert Bernays, a member of the Liberal Party, was a lover. It was reported to King George V and Queen Mary by his Tory brother-in-law, the Duke of Westminster, who hoped to ruin the Liberal Party through Beauchamp, as well as Beauchamp personally due his private dislike of Beauchamp. Homosexuality was a criminal offence at the time, and the King was horrified, rumoured to have said, "I thought men like that shot themselves.” The King had a personal interest in the case, as his sons Henry and George had visited Madresfield in the past. George was then in a relationship with Beauchamp’s daughter Mary, which was cut off by her father’s outing. After sufficient evidence had been gathered by the Duke, Beauchamp was made an offer to separate from his wife Lettice (without a divorce), retire on a pretence and then leave the country. Beauchamp refused, and, shortly afterwards, the Countess Beauchamp obtained a divorce. There was no public scandal, but Lord Beauchamp resigned all his offices except that of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports and went into exile on the continent (fearing arrest if he did not), briefly contemplating suicide. On 26 July, 1902, Lord Beauchamp had married Lady Lettice Grosvenor, daughter of Victor Grosvenor, Earl Grosvenor, and Lady Sibell Lumley, and granddaughter of the 1st Duke of Westminster. They had three sons and four daughters: William Lygon, 8th Earl Beauchamp (1903–1979), the last Earl Beauchamp. His widow, Mona, née Else Schiewe, died 1989; Hon. Hugh Patrick Lygon (1904–1936), said to be the model for Sebastian in Brideshead Revisited; Lady Lettice Lygon (1906–1973) who married 1930 (div. 1958) Sir Richard Charles Geers Cotterell, 5th Bt. (1907–1978); Lady Sibell Lygon (1907–2005) who married Feb. 11, 1939 (bigamously) and 1949 (legally) Michael Rowley (d. 1952), stepson of her maternal uncle the 2nd Duke of Westminster; Lady Mary Lygon (1910–1982) who married 1937 (div) HH Prince Vsevolod Ivanovich of Russia; Lady Dorothy Lygon (1912–2001) who married 1985 (sep) Robert Heber-Percy (d. 1987) of Faringdon, Berkshire; Hon. Richard Edward Lygon (1916–1970) who married 1939 Patricia Janet Norman; their younger daughter Rosalind Lygon, now Lady Morrison (b. 1946), inherited Madresfield Court in 1979. Lady Beauchamp died in 1936, aged 59, estranged from all her children except her youngest child. Lord Beauchamp died of cancer in New York City, aged 66. He was succeeded in the earldom by his eldest son, William. Of the Earl’s seven children, all but the second son Hugh (who was homosexual) married, but only two left issue. Both father and son are buried at St Mary (Madresfield Village, Madresfield, Worcestershire, WR13 5AA).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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