Feb. 22nd, 2017

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Andy Warhol was an American artist who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture, and advertising that flourished by the 1960s.
Born: August 6, 1928, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: February 22, 1987, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Schenley High School
Carnegie Mellon University
Lived: 242 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74651, -73.97963)
13 E 87th St, New York, NY, USA (40.78177, -73.95884)
158 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74684, -73.98409)
57 E 66th St, New York, NY 10065, USA (40.76781, -73.96725)
1342 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.78164, -73.95428)
33 Union Square E, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.73551, -73.98985) [Decker Building, 03001179, 2003]
860 Broadway, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.73715, -73.99002)
22 E 33rd St, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74728, -73.98391)
Buried: Saint John the Baptist Byzantine Catholic Cemetery, Bethel Park, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 1459
Movies: Chelsea Girls, Blow Job, Sleep, Empire, more
Periods: Modern art, Pop art

Andy Warhol was an artist who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture, and advertisement that flourished by the 1960s.
Addresses:
242 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74651, -73.97963)
13 E 87th St, New York, NY, USA (40.78177, -73.95884)
158 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74684, -73.98409)
57 E 66th St, New York, NY 10065, USA (40.76781, -73.96725)
1342 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.78164, -73.95428)
33 Union Square E, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.73551, -73.98985) [Decker Building, 03001179, 2003]
860 Broadway, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.73715, -73.99002)
22 E 33rd St, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74728, -73.98391)
Place
- In the summer of 1953 Andy Warhol and his mother moved into a floor-through apartment in a four story building at 242 Lexington Avenue. According to Warhol biographers, David Bourdon and Victor Bockris, Warhol subleased the apartment from another ex-classmate at Carnegie Tech., Leonard Kessler.
- No. 13 E. 87th St was the first studio outside his home, rented in 1963. Warhol subleased part of an old firehouse near his home, Hook & Ladder Co., that the tenant was leasing from the City of New York.
- 158 Madison Avenue was Warhol’s last personal studio.
- Andy Warhol bought 57 E 66th St, a brownstone, in 1974 for $310,000. He lived here until his death in 1987.
Andy Warhol Factory locations:
• 1342 Lexington Ave: The first Factory in 1960. This was his home and studio and the first Factory location. “The town house bought by shoe ads,” Andy’s friend Emile de Antonio called it, and it was true: everything Andy owned was paid for with a ceaseless flow of hundred-dollar drawings of shoes, hats, scarves, perfumes, handbags, and other ladies accessories... In 1960, Andy would gross $70,000, his best year yet, and when 1342 Lexington had come up for sale he was easily able to put down $30,000, almost half of the building’s price..."
• 231 E 47th St: The Silver Factory, from 1963 to 1967, the building no longer exists.
• 33 Union Square E: The White Factory, from 1967 to 1973, Decker Building.
• 860 Broadway, from 1973 to 1984, the building has now been completely remodeled.
• 22 E 33rd St: from 1984 to 1987, the building no longer exists.
Life
Who: Andy Warhol (August 6, 1928 – February 22, 1987)
Interviewed in 1980, Andy Warhol indicated that he was still a virgin—biographer Bob Colacello who was present at the interview felt it was probably true and that what little sex he had was probably “a mixture of voyeurism and masturbation—to use his [Andy’s] word abstract.” Warhol’s assertion of virginity would seem to be contradicted by his hospital treatment in 1960 for condylomata, a sexually transmitted disease. It has also been contradicted by his lovers, including Warhol muse BillyBoy who has said they had sex to orgasm: “When he wasn’t being Andy Warhol and when you were just alone with him he was an incredibly generous and very kind person. What seduced me was the Andy Warhol who I saw alone. In fact when I was with him in public he kind of got on my nerves… I’d say: “You’re just obnoxious, I can’t bear you.”” Asked if Warhol was only a voyeur, Billy Name also denied it, saying: "He was the essence of sexuality. It permeated everything. Andy exuded it, along with his great artistic creativity… It brought a joy to the whole art world in New York. But his personality was so vulnerable that it became a defense to put up the blank front." Warhol’s lovers included John Giorno, Billy Name, Charles Lisanby, Jon Gould. His boyfriend of 12 years was Jed Johnson, whom he met in 1968, and who later achieved fame as an interior designer. The first works that Warhol submitted to a fine art gallery, homoerotic drawings of male nudes, were rejected for being too openly gay.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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At St. John the Baptist Byzantine Catholic Cemetery (1066 Connor Rd, Bethel Park, PA 15102) is buried Andy Warhol (1928-1987).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Angela Baddeley, CBE was an English stage and television actress, best-remembered for her role as household cook Mrs. Bridges in the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs. Her stage career lasted more than six decades.
Born: July 4, 1904, West Ham, London, United Kingdom
Died: February 22, 1976, Grayshott, United Kingdom
Lived: 64 Pretoria Road, West Ham, London
4 Holmbush Road, Putney
Buried: St Mary's, Mill Green, Station Road, Wargrave, Berkshire, RG10 8EU
Find A Grave Memorial# 41541832
Children: Juliet Shaw
Spouse: Glen Byam Shaw (m. 1929–1976), Stephen Thomas (m. 1921)

Glen Byam Shaw was an English actor and theatre director, known for his dramatic productions in the 1950s and his operatic productions in the 1960s and later. In the 1920s and 1930s Byam Shaw was a successful actor, both in romantic leads and in character parts. He worked frequently with his old friend Sir John Gielgud. Actress Constance Collier was impressed by Byam Shaw and used her influence to gain him roles. She introduced him to Ivor Novello, then a leading figure in London theatre. This drew him into contact with the poet Siegfried Sassoon, a friend of Collier; he and Byam Shaw became close. Their friendship lasted for the rest of Sassoon's life, although they ceased to be partners quite quickly; Sassoon became involved with Stephen Tennant, and Byam Shaw fell in love with an actress, Angela Baddeley. Their 1929 marriage, which lasted until her death in 1976, was, Denison writes, "a supremely happy one, both domestically and professionally”. Angela Baddeley was an English stage and television actress, best remembered for her role as "Mrs. Bridges" in the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs. They are interred together at St Mary's Church, Wargrave, Berkshire.
Together from 1929 to 1976: 47 years.
Angela Baddeley, CBE (July 4, 1904 – February 22, 1976)
Glencairn Alexander "Glen" Byam Shaw, CBE (December 13, 1904 – April 29, 1986)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Angela Baddeley (1904-1976), actress, was born on July 4, 1904 at 64 Pretoria Road, West Ham, London, one of the four daughters of William Herman Clinton-Baddeley, journalist, and his wife, Louise Rosalie Bourdin. She was a descendant of Sir Henry Clinton, the British general.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Actress Constance Collier directed Ivor Novello and Glen Byam Shaw in the play “Down Hill” in 1926. This drew Byam Shaw into contact with the poet Siegfried Sassoon, a friend of Collier; he and Byam Shaw became close. Their friendship lasted for the rest of Sassoon's life, although they ceased to be partners quite quickly; Sassoon became involved with Stephen Tennant, and Byam Shaw fell in love with an actress, Angela Baddeley. They married in 1929 and lived from 1930 to 1956 at 4 Holmbush Road, Putney.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Glen Byam Shaw (1904–1986) was an English actor and theatre director, known for his dramatic productions in the 1950s and his operatic productions in the 1960s and later. Byam Shaw fell in love with an actress, Angela Baddeley. They married in 1929. The marriage, which lasted until her death in 1976, was, Denison writes, "a supremely happy one, both domestically and professionally"; the couple had a son and a daughter. They are interred side by side at Wargrave St Mary's (Mill Green, Station Road, Wargrave, Berkshire, RG10 8EU).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Christopher Bram is an American author. Bram grew up in Virginia Beach, Virginia, where he was a paperboy and an Eagle Scout. He graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1974. He moved to New York City in 1978.
Born: February 22, 1952, Buffalo, New York, United States
Education: College of William & Mary
Movies: Gods and Monsters, Queer City, Dangerous Music
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts, US & Canada, Lambda Literary Award for Gay Fiction
Nominations: Lambda Literary Award for Gay Men's Mystery, more
Anniversary: October 1979

Christopher Bram is an American author. In 2012, he published Eminent Outlaws: much of the literary history Bram recounts takes place in New York City, where Bram - a native of Virginia - has lived since 1978. Unsurprisingly, a large proportion of that history centers on Greenwich Village, where Bram lives with his partner, filmmaker Draper Shreeve. “We met in a bar talking about movies in 1979 - we are still talking about movies.” Bram has also written two shorts directed by Draper Shreeve. Bram’s 1995 novel Father of Frankenstein, about film director James Whale, was made into the 1998 movie Gods and Monsters starring Ian McKellen, Lynn Redgrave, and Brendan Fraser. The film was written and directed by Bill Condon who won an Academy Award for the adapted screenplay. Shreeve has made several documentaries, including Kids of Penzance, about a high school production of Gilbert and Sullivan, and Queer City, about LGBT lives in New York.
Together since 1979: 36 years.
Christopher Bram (born February 22, 1952)
Draper Shreeve (born May 5, 1954)
Anniversary: October 1979
We met at Julius', a New York gay bar, on a Friday night in October 1979. I was standing by the cigarette machine, Draper by the jukebox. He smiled and I walked over. When he told me his name, I said, "Oh. You're from the South." I am from the South myself and was hoping to meet someone more exotic. Then we started talking about movies. We had both seen the new Bertolucci film, Luna, and we knew it was bad but we admitted we had enjoyed it. We moved from the bar to a diner, where we talked about politics. Then we went uptown to my place, where we stopped talking. The next morning we went for a long walk around Columbia University and talked about our families. We have been talking about movies, politics, and our families ever since, along with books, art, music, friends, and everything else under the sun. We have not run out of words or news or thoughts to share with each other. -Christopher Bram



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Julius (159 West 10th Street at Waverly Place), is a tavern in Manhattan's Greenwich Village. It is often called the oldest continuously operating gay bar in New York City; however, its management was actively unwilling to operate as such and harassed gay customers until 1966. On April 21, 1966 members of the New York Chapter of the Mattachine Society staged a "Sip-In" at the bar which was to change the legal landscape. Dick Leitsch, the society's president, John Timmons and Craig Rodwell planned to draw attention to the practice by identifying themselves as homosexuals before ordering a drink in order to bring court scrutiny to the regulation. The three were going to read from Mattachine stationary "We are homosexuals. We are orderly, we intend to remain orderly, and we are asking for service." Newspaper articles on the wall of Julius indicate it was the favorite bar of Tennessee Williams, Truman Capote and Rudolf Nureyev. In 2016 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cosmé McMoon was a Mexican-American pianist and composer, best known as the accompanist to notably tone-deaf soprano Florence Foster Jenkins.
Born: February 22, 1901, Mapimí, Durango, Mexico
Died: August 22, 1980, New York City, New York, United States
Buried: Sunset Memorial Park, San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 45333475
Genre: Classical

At the turn of the XX-century the blocks between Fifth and Sixth Avenues in midtown saw the advent of high-end residential hotels and exclusive clubs as once-fashionable residences one-by-one were demolished or converted for business purposes. One of the first, the Royalton Hotel for well-heeled bachelors, was erected in 1898 spanning the block from 44th to 45th Streets.
Address: 44 W 45th St, New York, NY 10036, USA (40.7561, -73.98168)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Place
In 1901 A. G. Hyde sold four lots on 45th Street, Nos. 44 through 50, and a single lot on 44th Street next to the New York Yacht Club. On July 24, 1901 The New York Times reported that “The site will be improved with a twelve-story apartment hotel.” By August of the following year the Seymour Hotel was nearly ready for occupancy. Built by developers Irons & Todd, it was touted as “fireproof” and “positively exclusive.” Unlike the Royalton or the Hotel Mansfield which would open on West 44th Street a year later in 1903 the new Seymour was not intended just for bachelors; but was marketed to well-to-do families. M.F. Miller was the President of the Iroquois Hotel at No. 49 West 44th Street and his brother, J.C. Miller, was its Secretary and Treasurer. On August 16, 1902 they added the Seymour to their responsibilities, leasing the new hotel from Irons & Todd for 21 years at a gross rental of $1,395,900. On October 1 the Seymour Apartment Hotel opened its doors to its new residents. The Beaux Arts building was constructed of red brick with limestone trim, sitting on a two-story rusticated limestone base. The main 45th Street entrance was framed in a dramatic limestone portico above a set of three stone steps. The white stone quoins and bandcourses contrasted with the red brick and a sumptuous balcony stretched the wide of the structure at the 10th floor. On the narrow 44th Street side, the skinny building did its best to keep up. It mimicked the rusticated base and even the balcony; yet the strange proportions resulted in a gawky, cartoonish structure. Residents were offered apartments from two to “five or more” rooms with yearly leases. The magnificent dining room offered both “Restaurant a la Carte” or “Table d’Hote.” Guests were promised that the hotel was planned “for the comfort of its guests, luxurious and artistic in its appointments.” The once-magnificent midtown hotels suffered in the latter part of the XX century as new, modern hotels and apartment buildings left them dowdy and somewhat seedy. On January 19, 1981 New York Magazine remarked about the Seymour Hotel. “An AAA sign hangs out front, and, inside, the dim lobby and corridors—with the obligatory red carpet—give off a sense of better days gone by…Not as Spartan or desperate as some, it’s just…cheerless; call it a 4 on the Depression Scale.” While some of the old hotels—like the Royalton—were reclaimed with multi-million dollar makeovers; it was not to be for the Seymour Hotel. In 2000 it was demolished, replaced with the soaring 30-story Sofitel which, almost ironically, has its main entrance at the skinny little plot on West 44th Street.
Life
Who: Robert Emmett "Bobby" Harron (April 12, 1893 – September 5, 1920) and Narcissa Florence Foster Jenkins (July 19, 1868 – November 26, 1944)
Robert Harron was an American motion picture actor of the early silent film era. Although he acted in over 200 films, he is known for his roles in the D.W. Griffith directed films “The Birth of a Nation” (1915) and “Intolerance” (1916). Born in New York City, Harron was second oldest child of nine siblings in a poor, working-class Irish Catholic family. Harron's younger siblings John (nicknamed "Johnnie"), Mary and Charles also became actors while one of his younger sisters, Tessie, worked as an extra in silent films. Charles was killed in a car accident in December 1915. Tessie died of Spanish influenza in 1918 while Harron's brother John died of spinal meningitis in 1939. Harron attended the Saint John Parochial School in Greenwich Village. At the age of fourteen, he found work as an errand boy at American Biograph Studios. In addition to cleaning duties, Harron also appeared as an extra in a few shorts for Biograph. Within a year of working for Biograph, Harron was noticed by newly hired director D.W. Griffith. In September 1920, Harron traveled from Los Angeles to New York by train to support Lillian Gish at the film premiere of her film “Way Down East.” He checked into the Hotel Seymour on September 1. He was sharing the hotel room with screenwriter and director Victor Heerman. After the premiere, Harron was alone in his hotel room when a gun in his possession discharged and wounded him. According to published reports, Harron had the gun in a trunk along with other possessions. As he took some clothes out of the trunk, the gun fell to the floor, discharged and hit him in the chest, puncturing his lung. He called the hotel desk for assistance and was still conscious when the hotel manager came to his room. Not realizing he was seriously wounded, Harron joked with the manager that he was in a "devil of a fix" having shot himself. He initially refused to let the manager call an ambulance, only wanting to be examined by a local physician. After a physician could not be found, Harron agreed to allow the manager to call an ambulance. Harron was taken to Bellevue Hospital Center. Shortly after the shooting, rumors arose that Harron had intentionally shot himself. There was speculation that Harron was despondent over being passed over for the leading role in “Way Down East” (Richard Barthelmess was cast in the lead role). Several of Harron's friends rejected the suicide theory. Harron's friend Victor Heerman, with whom he often went on double dates and was staying with Harron in the Hotel Seymour, later said that he went to see Harron after the shooting and Harron denied that he intentionally shot himself. There were also rumors that Harron had attempted suicide over the breakup of his relationship with Dorothy Gish. Victor Heerman said that Harron was a teetotaler and a virgin because he was a devout Catholic, and for those reasons Heerman rejected claims that Harron had killed himself. Miriam Cooper and Lillian Gish agreed, largely because he was his family's major source of income and he was about to start filming with Elmer Clifton. Harron also told his friend, a priest, that he did not attempt suicide. Friends who visited Harron in the hospital were optimistic about his recovery as he appeared to be on the mend. However, on September 5, four days after he was shot, Harron died of his wound. He is interred at Calvary Cemetery (4902 Laurel Hill Blvd, Woodside, NY 11377). Critic Richard Schickel believes he was gay and shot himself out of stress from having to hide this. Also Florence Foster Jenkins was living at The Seymour Hotel. nkins was an American socialite and amateur soprano who was known and mocked for her flamboyant performance costumes and notably poor singing ability. The historian Stephen Pile ranked her "the world's worst opera singer". "No one, before or since," he wrote, "has succeeded in liberating themselves quite so completely from the shackles of musical notation." Despite (or perhaps because of) her technical incompetence, she became a prominent musical cult figure in New York City during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. Cole Porter, Gian Carlo Menotti, Lily Pons, Sir Thomas Beecham, and other celebrities were fans. Enrico Caruso is said to have "regarded her with affection and respect". The poet William Meredith wrote that what Jenkins provided "... was never exactly an aesthetic experience, or only to the degree that an early Christian among the lions provided aesthetic experience; it was chiefly immolatory, and Madame Jenkins was always eaten, in the end.” At the age of 76, Jenkins finally yielded to public demand and booked Carnegie Hall (152 W 57th St, New York, NY 10019) for a general-admission performance on October 25, 1944. Tickets for the event sold out weeks in advance; the demand was such that an estimated 2,000 people were turned away at the door. Numerous celebrities attended, including Cole Porter, Marge Champion, Gian Carlo Menotti, Kitty Carlisle, Tallula Bankhead, Daniel Pinkham, Lily Pons with her husband, Andre Kostelanetz, who composed a song for the recital. McMoon later recalled an "especially noteworthy" moment: "[When she sang] 'If my silhouette does not convince you yet/My figure surely will' [from Adele's aria in Die Fledermaus], she put her hands righteously to her hips and went into a circular dance that was the most ludicrous thing I have ever seen. And created a pandemonium in the place. One famous actress had to be carried out of her box because she became so hysterical." Five days after the concert, Jenkins suffered a heart attack while shopping at G. Schirmer's music store, and died a month later on November 26, 1944, at her Manhattan residence, the Hotel Seymour. She was buried next to her father in the family crypt at Hollenback Cemetery (540 N River St, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702), Plot: Foster Family Mausoleum. Cosmé McMoon (born Cosmé McMunn; February 22, 1901 – August 22, 1980) was a Mexican-American pianist and composer, best known as the accompanist to Florence Foster Jenkins. McMoon never ended up making a career in music after Jenkins' death in 1944, and instead took an interest in bodybuilding and judging bodybuilding contests. He resided in New York City until shortly before his death in August 1980. He was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and moved back to San Antonio, where he was buried at Sunset Memorial Park (San Antonio, TX 78218). He never married or had any children and is rumoured to be gay.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Edna St. Vincent Millay was an American poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism.
Born: February 22, 1892, Rockland, Maine, United States
Died: October 19, 1950, Austerlitz, New York, United States
Education: Vassar College
Lived: Ragged Island, Harpswell, Maine
75½ Bedford St, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73138, -74.00499)
Steepletop, 440 E Hill Rd, Austerlitz, NY 12017, USA (42.32114, -73.44319)
Whitehall (52 High St, Camden, ME 04843)
200 Broadway, Rockland, ME 04841
Buried: Steepletop Cemetery, Austerlitz, Columbia County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 713
Siblings: Norma Millay Ellis, Kathleen Millay
Movies: Hitler's Madman

Edna St. Vincent Millay was a lyrical poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was known for her feminist activism and her many love affairs. Counted among her close friends were Witter Bynner, Arthur Davison Ficke, and Susan Glaspell, as well as Floyd Dell and Edmund Wilson, both of whom proposed marriage to her and were refused. While playing the lead in her own The Princess Marries the Page at Vassar, she was approached by the British actress Edith Wynne Matthison, who, excited by the performance, came backstage to kiss Millay and invite her to her summer home. Millay felt great passion in the kiss and the two exchanged letters, providing one of her few known straightforward pronouncements of lesbian love: "You wrote me a beautiful letter,--I wonder if you meant it to be as beautiful as it was.--I think you did; for somehow I know that your feeling for me, however slight it is, is of the nature of love. . . . When you tell me to come, I will come, by the next train, just as I am. This is not meekness, be assured; I do not come naturally by meekness; know that it is a proud surrender to You.” Another of Edna’s lovers was Thelma Wood, who later became Djuna Barnes’ lover.
Edith Wynne Matthison (November 23, 1875 – September 23, 1955)
Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950) was born at 200 Broadway, Rockland, ME 04841, to Cora Lounella Buzelle, a nurse, and Henry Tolman Millay, a schoolteacher who would later become a superintendent of schools. Her middle name derives from St. Vincent's Hospital in New York, where her uncle's life had been saved just before her birth. The family's house was "between the mountains and the sea where baskets of apples and drying herbs on the porch mingled their scents with those of the neighboring pine woods."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1901, a young widow, who had spent her honeymoon in Camden, purchased an 1834 Sea Captains house. The first of only six owners, she took in a handful of summer guests for income, and then added rooms each year until she operated Whitehall (52 High St, Camden, ME 04843), one of only five hotels in Camden Maine at the start of the century. Whitehall, sometimes called Whitehall Hotel, later became the Whitehall Inn. In 2015, new owners have returned the property to its original and classic name -- Whitehall. It was the summer home for the elite of Camden's summer visitors. Guests would arrive by train with maids or by chauffeur driven cars. Royalty, titans of industry and celebrities, both famous and infamous, made Whitehall a part of their summer schedule. The inn has welcomed a king, a U.S. President and other political notables, many fabled screen stars and sports heroes. And the guest list includes a supermodel, a legendary TV anchorman, and a world-renowned singer-songwriter. Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950) used to work at this tourists’ inn during the busy summer season. In 1912, “Vincent,” as she preferred to be called, did her first public reading here for guests and employees at the inn’s end-of-summer party. The first lines of the poem she read, “Renascence,” described the view of the Maine countryside from nearby Mount Battie, which Vincent loved to climb. “All I could see from where I stood,” the poem began, “was three long mountains and a wood.” A professor, who was vacationing at Whitehall, was so impressed by Vincent’s poem that he arranged to have one of his wealthy friends pay for the girl to study at Vassar College.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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75½ Bedford St is a building in the Greenwich Village area of New York City that is only 9 feet 6 inches (2.9 meters) wide. It is considered to be the narrowest house in New York. Its past tenants have included Edna St. Vincent Millay, Ann McGovern, cartoonist William Steig and anthropologist Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901 - November 15, 1978). It is sometimes referred to as the Millay House, indicated by a New York City Landmark plaque on the outside of the house.
Address: 75½ Bedford St, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73138, -74.00499)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1873
The three-story house is located at 75½ Bedford St., off Seventh Ave. between Commerce and Moore Streets, in the West Greenwich Village section of Manhattan. On the inside, the house measures 8 ft. 7 in. wide; at its narrowest, it is only 2 ft. wide. There is a shared garden in the rear of the house. The archives of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation states that the house was constructed in 1873 during a smallpox epidemic, for Horatio Gomez, trustee of the Hettie Hendricks-Gomez Estate, on what was the former carriage entranceway for the adjacent property, which includes the 1799 house at 77 Bedford St., built by Joshua Isaacs, the oldest house in Greenwich Village. However, the house may have been constructed earlier, as the style that appears in a 1922 photograph at the New-York Historical Society is typical of the 1850’s Italianate architecture common in the area at the time. In 1923, the house was leased by a consortium of artists who used it for actors working at the Cherry Lane Theater. Cary Grant and John Barrymore stayed at the house while performing at the Cherry Lane during this time. Edna St. Vincent Millay, the Pulitzer Prize winning poet and her new husband, coffee importer Eugen Jan Boissevain, lived in the house from 1923 to 1924. They hired Ferdinand Savignano to renovate the house, who added a skylight, transformed the top floor into a studio for Millay and added a Dutch-inspired front gabled façade for her husband. Later occupants included cartoonist William Steig, and his sister-in-law, anthropologist Margaret Mead. The current owner is George Gund IV (son of sports entrepreneur George Gund III), who purchased the house for $3.25 million in June 2013. “A centrally placed spiral staircase dominates all three floors and bisects the space into two distinct living areas. The narrow steps call for expert sideways navigational skills. Under the stairwell on the first floor is a tiny utility closet, the only closed storage space in the house. All three floors have fireplaces.” The house has two bathrooms, and its galley kitchen comes with a microwave built into the base of the winding staircase that rises to the upper floors.
Life
Who: Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950)
Edna St. Vincent Millay was a poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism. She used the pseudonym Nancy Boyd for her prose work. The poet Richard Wilbur asserted, "She wrote some of the best sonnets of the century." Millay was openly bisexual. Counted among her close friends were the writers Witter Bynner, Arthur Davison Ficke, and Susan Glaspell, as well as Floyd Dell and the critic Edmund Wilson, both of whom proposed marriage to her and were refused. In January 1921, she went to Paris, where she met and befriended the sculptor Thelma Wood. In 1923 she married 43-year-old Eugen Jan Boissevain (1880–1949), the widower of the labor lawyer and war correspondent Inez Milholland, a political icon Millay had met during her time at Vassar. Boissevain died in 1949 of lung cancer, and Millay lived alone for the last year of her life.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Steepletop, also known as the Edna St. Vincent Millay House, was the farmhouse home of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Edna St. Vincent Millay and her husband Eugene Jan Boissevain, in Austerlitz, New York. Her former home and gardens are maintained by the Edna St. Vincent Millay Society. The Millay Colony for the Arts, founded in 1973 by Norma Millay Ellis, sister of the poet, is also located at Steepletop.
Address: 440 E Hill Rd, Austerlitz, NY 12017, USA (42.32114, -73.44319)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 518-392-3362
National Register of Historic Places: 71000534, 1971. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The name Steepletop comes from a pink, conical wildflower that grows there. The Society opened the house for tours in 2010. The guest house is believed to have been built in the late XVIII century, considerably predating the main house, which is believed to have been built around 1870. Millay and Boissevain bought the property, which had been a 635-acre (257 ha) blueberry farm and moved in in 1925, after the period in which critics and scholars generally believe she had done her best work. She continued to write since the rural setting provided sufficient distance from the outside world, and the couple lived there except for periods of travel. After WWII, in the late 1940s, she left Steepletop less frequently. Boissevain died in 1949, making her even more reclusive in the year before she was found dead at the foot of the stairway in the main house. The fall was the proximate cause of death, but what led to it is unknown. Her sister Norma and her husband, painter Charles Ellis, moved in afterwards. In 1973, they established Millay Colony for the Arts on the seven acres (2.8 ha) around the guest house and barn. After her husband’s death in 1976, Norma continued to manage the colony program until her death in 1986. During that time, in 1980, she renovated the barn into housing for visiting artists. In 1997 a disabled-accessible main building was built on colony property. The colony continues to offer one-month residencies to writers, visual artists and composers from the U.S. and other countries. The Edna St. Vincent Millay Society remains in charge of the main house, the outbuildings around it and the grounds as a whole. It operates the property as a historic house museum dedicated to Millay and has spent much effort on restoring the house and grounds.
Life
Who: Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950)
On the grounds of Steepletop, Boissevain and Millay built a barn (from a Sears Roebuck kit), and then a writing cabin and a tennis court. Millay grew her own vegetables in a small garden. The couple later bought Ragged Island in Casco Bay, Maine, as a summer retreat. Edna St. Vincent Millay died at her home on October 19, 1950 and is buried at Steepletop: the path rises through hardwood forest to the poet's grave, in a small clearing with a bench that invites contemplation. It's a short walk, maybe a half-mile from the country road high on the Taconic Ridge. In 2003 the Friends of the Millay Society built the Millay Poetry Trail along the dirt road leading to her grave and those of several family members. The trail is open to the public and posted with her nature poetry along the shaded route.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Ragged Island (Harpswell, Maine) is a privately owned island in Harpswell, Cumberland County, Maine, which is geographically within Casco Bay in the Gulf of Maine. It is notable as having been the summer home of poet Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950) and husband Eugen Jan Boissevain from 1933 until her death in 1950. Whatever the history of the island's name, at least one 1790 maritime chart identifies it simply as Cold Arse. 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Elizabeth Bowen, CBE was an Irish novelist and short story writer.
Born: June 7, 1899, Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Died: February 22, 1973, London, United Kingdom
Education: Downe House School
Lived: White Lodge, Headington House Lodge, Old High St, Oxford, OX3 9HN, UK (51.76127, -1.21159)
2 Clarence Terrace, Marylebone, London NW1 4RD, UK (51.52501, -0.15946)
Bowen's Court, Farahy, Co. Cork, Ireland (52.23727, -8.45635)
Buried: Farahy Church Cemetery (North Cork), Farahy, County Cork, Ireland
Find A Grave Memorial# 13718039
Movies: The Last September

In 1923 Elizabeth Bowen married Alan Charles Cameron. and when he was appointed Secretary to the City of Oxford Education Committee in 1925, they moved to Waldencote in the Croft in Old Headington. The house was originally the Coach House for Headington Lodge, and has now reverted to that name.
Address: Headington House Lodge, Old High St, Oxford, OX3 9HN, UK (51.76127, -1.21159)
Type: Private Property
Place
White Lodge in Osler Road is the south wing of the mansion that was known as Headington Lodge. The main part of the mansion to the north is now known as Sandy Lodge. In the late XVIII century the brewer Edward Tawney (1735–1800) built a “gentleman’s farmhouse” in the Croft (Osler Road did not exist until 1802.) On his death in 1800 he left that farmhouse to his cousin’s daughter, Mrs Ann Wharton (née Tawney), with instructions that it should go to her eldest son Theophilus Wharton after her death. Theophilus Wharton inherited his mother’s farmhouse on her death in 1824, and lived in the farmhouse with his brother Bryan (1782–1839.) Neither of the brothers married, and they converted the farmhouse into the regency villa it is today. It was originally known as Headington Lodge, and its main entrance was in Osler Road, where its own little lodge (or gatehouse) still stands to the south, beside Cuckoo Lane. The present house called Greenways is in part of what was Wharton’s garden. Its former lodge is now 38 Osler Road. On the death of Theophilus Wharton in 1831 Headington Lodge passed to his nephew (and Ann Wharton’s grandson), Mark Theophilus Morrell. On his death in 1842 it passed to his cousin, Charles Tawney. Charles (1780–1853) was a partner in the Hall & Tawney Brewery and had been Mayor of Oxford in 1837 and 1840. His town home was Brewery House in Paradise Street, Oxford, but he must have used this as his country retreat, as the Headington Rent-Book for Dec. 1850 shows him as both owner and occupier at this time. Its rateable value was then £58, and its estimated extent just over 5 acres. Charles Tawney died in 1853 and his wife in 1854, and their children, Henry Copland Tawney and Mrs Elizabeth Copland Fisher inherited the house. Between 1861 and 1902 Headington Lodge was let out to various people: Mrs Williams (1861), the Misses Hillderson (1863), John Martin, a retired storekeeper from Portsmouth Dockyard (1871), George Crunwell (1875–6), Colonel (later Major General) John Desborough (while he rebuilt The Priory, 1877–1883), Frederick Evans (1890–95), and Mrs Burch (1896–7.) In 1881 the mansion was bought and then rented out by William Wootten-Wootten of Headington House. His widow gave it to their son Montague on his marriage in 1888, but initially he continued to live in St Giles. By the time of the 1901 census the whole house had become known as White Lodge rather than Headington Lodge, and Montague Wootten is listed there at the age of 48 with his wife Mary and three-year-old son Kenneth, looked after by six indoor servants, with his gardener living in the lodge. Eight years later, in 1909, Montague Wootten committed suicide in the house as a result of financial problems: he was a partner of Parsons, Thomson & Co. (Barclays) at the Old Bank in Oxford’s High Street. The house was leased by a Mrs Newall or Newhall from 1910 to 1914. The next lessee, Miss MacGregor, founded Headington School in this house. It was opened by the Bishop of Liverpool in 1915 with ten boarders and eight day-girls. By 1918 the school had transferred to Brookside. In 1920 The Lodge was bought from Montague Wootten-Wootten’s estate by Edwin J. Hall, who lived in Clifton House on the London Road and built the cinema in New High Street in his garden. Hall divided it into the two separate houses it is today, naming them White Lodge and Sandy Lodge, and let them out to Walter Smith and Raymond Holmes respectively. The novelist Elizabeth Bowen lived at White Lodge from 1960 to 1965.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bowen, CBE (June 7, 1899 – February 22, 1973)
Elizabeth Bowen’s marriage to Cameron (which survived until his death 22 years later) was apparently not consummated, and early in 1933 Elizabeth fell in love with Humphry House. She had an affair with him that continued after his marriage in Dec. 1933, and his wife, Madeleine House, came with her baby to stay with Elizabeth Bowen at Waldencote in the spring of 1935. Later in 1935 Elizabeth Bowen left Waldencote and moved to London with her husband, who had been appointed Secretary to the Central Council for Schools Broadcasting. In 1952 (after more books and more affairs), Elizabeth Bowen moved with her husband to Bowen’s Court (the house in Cork that Elizabeth had inherited back in 1930 on the death of her father); and in August that year her husband died there. In 1959 she was forced to sell Bowen’s Court, which was demolished in 1960. Elizabeth Bowen returned to Old Headington in 1960, and for the next five years lived at White Lodge, where she is listed in Kelly’s Directory simply as “Mrs A. Cameron.” She was President of the Old Headington branch of the Women’s Institute from 1961 to 1964. Elizabeth Bowen moved to Hythe in 1965. She died of lung cancer in University College Hospital on February 22, 1973. She was buried with her husband in Cork.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 1–7 Clarence Terrace, Elizabeth Bowen (1899–1973), "Writer lived here 1935–1952"
Address: 2 Clarence Terrace, Marylebone, London NW1 4RD, UK (51.52501, -0.15946)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 209191 (Grade I, 1970)
Place
Clarence Terrace overlooks Regent’s Park in Marylebone, City of Westminster, London. This terrace is the smallest in the park. This row of terraced houses is named after William IV. It was designed by Decimus Burton. It is composed of three sections, a centre and two wings, of the Corinthian order, connected by two colonnades of the Ilyssus Ionic order. The elevation is divided into three stories; namely, a rusticated entrance, which serves as a basement to the others, a Corinthian order embellishing the drawing room and chamber stories. There is also a well proportioned entablature.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bowen, CBE (June 7, 1899 – February 22, 1973)
Elizabeth Bowen was an Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer. In 1923 she married Alan Cameron, an educational administrator who subsequently worked for the BBC. The marriage has been described as "a sexless but contented union." The marriage was reportedly never consummated. She had various extra-marital relationships, including one with Charles Ritchie, a Canadian diplomat seven years her junior, which lasted over thirty years. She also had an affair with the Irish writer Seán Ó Faoláin and a relationship with the American poet May Sarton. Bowen and her husband first lived near Oxford, where they socialized with Maurice Bowra, John Buchan and Susan Buchan, and where she wrote her early novels, including “The Last September” (1929.) Following the publication of “To the North” (1932) they moved to 2 Clarence Terrace, Regent’s Park, London, where she wrote “The House in Paris” (1935) and “The Death of the Heart” (1938.) In 1937, she became a member of the Irish Academy of Letters. In 1977, Victoria Glendinning published the first biography on Elizabeth Bowen. In 2009, Glendinning published a book about the relationship between Charles Ritchie and Bowen, based on his diaries and her letters to him. In 2012, English Heritage marked Bowen’s Regent’s Park home at Clarence Terrace with a blue plaque. A blue plaque was also unveiled October 19, 2014 to mark Bowen’s residence at the Coach House, The Croft, Headington from 1925-35.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Bowen's Court was a historic country house near Kildorrery in County Cork, Ireland.
Address: Farahy, Co. Cork, Ireland (52.23727, -8.45635)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in the 1770s
Bowen’s Court was located in the townland of Farahy near Kildorrery in North Cork. The house was built by Henry Cole Bowen. The house was the seat of the Bowen family until 1959 when it was sold by the author Elizabeth Bowen. Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to it as Faraghy, the seat of Mr. Cole Bowen. It was held in fee by Mrs. Eliza Bowen at the time of Griffith’s Valuation, when it was valued at £75. (“House: Bowen’s Court” Landed Estates Database). The house was demolished in 1961. All that remains today is the walls of the 2.5 acre garden. Elizabeth Bowen re-used descriptions of the house in her novels. For example, the house in “The Last September” is directly modelled on Bowen’s Court. Bowen wrote a history of the house, entitled “Bowen's Court,” in 1942.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bowen, CBE (June 7, 1899 – February 22, 1973)
Elizabeth Dorothea Cole Bowen was born on June 7, 1899 at 15 Herbert Place in Dublin and baptised in the nearby St Stephen's Church on Upper Mount Street. Her parents, Henry Charles Cole Bowen and Florence (née Colley) Bowen later brought her to Bowen's Court at Farahy, near Kildorrery, County Cork, where she spent her summers. She mixed with the Bloomsbury Group, becoming good friends with Rose Macaulay who helped her seek out a publisher for her first book, a collection of short stories entitled Encounters (1923). In 1930 Bowen became the first (and only) woman to inherit Bowen's Court, but remained based in England, making frequent visits to Ireland. Her husband, Alan Cameron, retired in 1952 and they settled in Bowen’s Court, where Cameron died a few months later. Many writers visited her at Bowen's Court from 1930 onwards, including Virginia Woolf, Eudora Welty, Carson McCullers, Iris Murdoch, and the historian Veronica Wedgwood. For years Bowen struggled to keep the house going, lecturing in the United States to earn money. In 1957 her portrait was painted at Bowen's Court by her friend, painter Patrick Hennessy. She travelled to Italy in 1958 to research and prepare “A Time in Rome” (1960), but by the following year Bowen was forced to sell her beloved Bowen's Court, which was demolished in 1961. After spending some years without a permanent home, Bowen finally settled at "Carbery", Church Hill, Hythe, in 1965. In 1972 Bowen developed lung cancer. She died in University College Hospital on February 22, 1973, aged 73. She is buried with her husband in Farahy, County Cork churchyard, close to the gates of Bowen's Court, where there is a memorial plaque to the author at the entrance to St Colman's Church, where a commemoration of her life is held annually.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Glenway Wescott was an American poet, novelist and essayist. A figure of the American expatriate literary community in Paris during the 1920s Wescott was openly gay.
Born: April 11, 1901, Kewaskum, Wisconsin, United States
Died: February 22, 1987, Rosemont, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, New Jersey, United States
Education: University of Chicago
Lived: 410 Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
215 E. 79 St.
Stone-blossom, Clinton, NJ 08809, USA (40.65216, -74.92672)
Haymeadows, Wescott Preserve, Raven Rock Rosemont Rd, Stockton, NJ 08559, USA (40.4265, -75.01584)
Buried: in the small farmer's graveyard hidden behind a rock wall and trees at the farm at Haymeadows (New Jersey) (ashes)
Buried alongside: Monroe Wheeler
Find A Grave Memorial# 13740685
Movies: Apartment in Athens
Siblings: Lloyd Wescott

Glenway Wescott was an American novelist and an important figure in the American expatriate literary community in Paris during the 1920s. Upon receiving a small printing press as a gift from his father, Monroe Wheeler began producing chapbooks of poetry under the imprint, Manikin Press. One of his first works was The Bitterns, a collection of poems by Wescott, whom he had met at the University of Chicago in 1919 and who would become Wheeler's long-time companion. 1927 brought a new challenge to their pairing: George Platt Lynes fell passionately in love with the strikingly good-looking Wheeler. Wheeler, for his part, was entranced by Lynes's "full, luscious mouth and his wasp like waist." The ménage a trois ended in February 1943 when Lynes moved out of the apartment that the three men shared, thus bringing to a close one of the longer chapters that supplemented the sixty-plus years relationship between Wescott and Wheeler. Lynes would eventually succumb to cancer in 1955 at the age of 48. Wheeler died in 1988 at the age of 89, 18 months after the death of Wescott.
Together from 1919 to 1987: 68 years.
Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987)
Monroe Wheeler (February 13, 1899 - August 14, 1988)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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tag=elimyrevandra-20
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In 1936 Lloyd Wescott purchased a 1,000-acre (4.0 km2) dairy farm along the Mulhocaway Creek in Union Township near Clinton in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Mulhocaway Farm, as it was known, became the headquarters for the Artificial Breeding Association, a pioneer in the artificial insemination of dairy cows. Glenway Wescott along with Monroe Wheeler and George Platt Lynes took over one of the farmhand houses and called it Stone-Blossom. In the 1950s, Mulhocaway Farm was acquired by the State of New Jersey under eminent domain in order to create the Spruce Run Reservoir.
Address: Clinton, NJ 08809, USA (40.65216, -74.92672)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Clinton Historic District (Roughly, along Center, W. Main, Main, E. Main, Halstead, Water, Leigh (Library) and Lower Center Sts.), 95001101, 1995
Place
Clinton is a town in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, located on the South Branch of the Raritan River. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town’s population was 2,719, reflecting an increase of 87 (+3.3%) from the 2,632 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 578 (+28.1%) from the 2,054 counted in the 1990 Census. When the Clinton post office was established in 1829, it was named for DeWitt Clinton, Governor of New York and the primary impetus behind the then-newly completed Erie Canal. Clinton was incorporated as a town by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 5, 1865, within portions of Clinton, Franklin and Union Townships. Clinton gained full independence from its three parent townships in 1895. The town is perhaps best known for its two mills which sit on opposite banks of the South Branch Raritan River. The Red Mill, with its historic village, dates back to 1810 with the development of a mill for wool processing. Across the river sits the Stone Mill, home of the Hunterdon Art Museum for Contemporary Craft and Design, located in a former gristmill that had been reconstructed in 1836 and operated continuously until 1936. In 1952, a group of local residents conceived of a plan to convert the historic building into an art museum, which is still in operation today.
Life
Who: Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987), Monroe Wheeler (1899-1988) and George Platt Lynes (April 15, 1907 – December 6, 1955)
The Elizabethtown Water Company of New Jersey was first drawn to the idea of building a reservoir at the confluence of Spruce Run and Mulhockaway Creek just before 1929. Land speculators bought almost 2,100 acres in anticipation of selling it to the water company, but the Great Depression waylaid everybody’s plans. The state acquired 1,500 acres to build a game preserve, and in 1936, the remaining 600 acres went to Lloyd Wescott and his wife Barbara for $70 an acre. After they moved into their red clapboard farmhouse, the Wescotts restored the old farm buildings and built new metal barns. Farm tenants lived close to each of three complexes of cow barns. Lloyd’s brother, Glenway Wescott, parents and other relatives lived in other separate homes on the property, which he called Mulhocaway Farm (intentionally spelled differently from the name of the creek.) The Westcotts intended to breed healthy livestock, and when the Hunterdon County Board of Agriculture was introduced to the concept of artificial breeding of dairy cattle, Lloyd proposed to construct housing for Guernsey bulls. The farm’s facility became the first artificial insemination station in the country. The old colonial house was refurnished by the Wescotts and given the romantic name Stone-blossom by Glenway Wescott. George Platt Lynes wrote to Katherine Anne Porter in 1938: “You would never know Stone-blossom. There is an acre of lawn, and a little newly-planted flower garden, and there are new stone walls and new trees. Why aren’t you here?” The three men were to remain together in New York and at Stone-blossom until 1943, when George ended his relationship with Monroe Wheeler and moved out. In 1956, the State of New Jersey revived the plan for a reservoir in the fertile valley. The Westcotts negotiated a selling price and relocated to another farm in Delaware Township in 1959, considering the move a blessing since the structures and equipment had become obsolete. Theirs was the only farm to be inundated by water from Spruce Run Creek.


Conversation Piece (Monroe Wheeler, Glenway Wescott and George Platt Lynes). Paul Cadmus Stone Blossom in the background

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Immediately after the death of her father, Alice Delamar rented a house on Park Avenue 270.
Address: Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
Type: Private Property
Place
Park Avenue is a wide New York City boulevard which carries north and southbound traffic in the borough of Manhattan, and is also a wide one-way pair in the Bronx. For most of the road’s length in Manhattan, it runs parallel to Madison Avenue to the west and Lexington Avenue to the east. Park Avenue’s entire length was formerly called Fourth Avenue; the title still applies below 14th Street. Meanwhile, the section between 14th and 17th Street is called Union Square East, and between 17th and 32nd Streets, the name Park Avenue South is used. In the Bronx, Park Avenue runs in several segments between the Major Deegan Expressway and Fordham Road.
Notable queer residents at Park Avenue:
- No. 270: real estate titan Dr. Charles V. Paterno formed the Vanderbilt Av. Realty Corp. and commissioned the architectural firm of Warren & Wetmore to design a massive U-shaped neo-Renaissance building. Paterno envisioned two distinct sections—the mansion-like apartments that took the address 270 Park Avenue, and the apartment hotel that used the name Hotel Marguery. The residents would share a 70 by 275 foot garden with a private drive. As the restrained brick and stone structure rose, Manhattan millionaires rushed to take apartments. Construction was completed, as predicted, in the fall of 1917, at a cost of around $8 million, exclusive of the land. Twelve stories tall, there were 20 acres of floor space divided into 108 apartments. Deemed the “largest apartment building in the world,” a Dec. 1917 advertisement counted “1,536 living rooms; 1,476 closets; 100 kitchens; 100 sculleries.” Potential residents could choose apartments of 6 to 10 rooms with three or four baths, at an annual rent of $4000 to $6500. Larger apartments, from 12 to 19 rooms with four to six baths, would cost $7000 to $15000. The highest rent would be equivalent to about $23,000 per month in 2015. The moneyed residents could enjoy the convenience of the downstairs restaurant, run by the Ritz-Carlton restaurant. Rudolph Guglielmi had a spacious apartment in the building in Nov. 1925 when he applied for United States citizenship. Better known to American audiences by his screen name, Rudolph Valentino, the movie star had to dodge a battery of questions. His failure to do military service during the war was brought up—he explained it was due to “a slight defect in the vision of his left eye.” The Italian Government had listed him “as a slacker.” The New York Times reported that “it was discovered to be an error which was later corrected.” Then there was the question about why Valentine’s wife, Winifred, was living on 96th Street and not in the Park Avenue apartment. “Mrs. Valentino said that the only issue between her husband and herself was that he wished her to give up all business and settle down into home life, and this she would not do.” The 1920s saw the comings and goings of other internationally-known names. In 1926 Queen Marie of Romania stayed briefly in the apartment of Ira Norris; and a year later Charles Lindbergh’s family, including his mother, stayed at No. 270 Park Avenue following his triumphant June 1927 return from Europe. Acclaimed stage actress Gertrude Lawrence (rumoured to be the lover of Daphne du Marier) took an apartment in 1929. No. 270 Park Avenue occupied the entire block between Madison Avenue and 47th and 48th Street. The 12-storey complex containing 108 suites in two separate sections, which were connected by the architects by two triumphal arches over the Vander Bild Avenue. Alice DeLamar rented the largest apartment. The apartment building stood near the Delamar Mansion, which had to be sold. An American magazine, the St. Louis Star “told” the adventures of Prince Carol of Romania (future Carol II of Romania, son of Marie of Romania) overcome by love for the fair miss De la Mar, offering his heart and his titles, but without achieving the desired result. Miss De la Mar told in a few words: “I did not want to marry the prince because I didn’t love him. I own $10 million and if I want to marry then I do not wish to give up my freedom to marry without love." The prince wrote: "The American press blew the rumor that I came to America to find a rich woman. The Daily News even picked a few candidates ahead of me: Miss Millicent Rogers, Miss Abby Rockefeller and Miss Alice Lamar." King Carol II ruled from 1930 to 1940. Carol is more known for his amorous adventures than for his way of ruling: in it, he does not seem to have excelled. In 1920 Alice Delamar moved into a beautiful house on Sunset Boulevard in Palm Beach. The inherited house of Pembroke was sold a few years later. The auction took place on August 16, 1924 in the Great Reception Hall of Pembroke. On June 24, 1947 plans were filed by architects Harrison & Abramovitz for the more than $21 million Time Life Building. The Hotel Marguery, once the largest apartment building in the world, and its astonishingly colorful history, was soon bulldozed. In 1971, Alice wrote that the complex has long been demolished. Today the site is occupied by the JP Morgan Chase Tower, constructed in 1960 and designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
- No. 410: Monroe Wheeler and Glenway Wescott’s latest apartment was in a very grand building at 410 Park Avenue, and they gave a large party for their friend. Maugham enjoyed the gathering, but when their upstairs neighbour Marlene Dietrich appeared, he felt upstaged and left. By the late 40s, Monroe Wheeler was a high profile New Yorker. His full-page portrait appeared in the Nov. 1948 issue of Vogue. At his parties at 410 Park Avenue were such celebrities as Cecil Beaton, Francis Bacon, Ben Shahn, Gore Vidal, and Christopher Isherwood. Among the regulars were Paul Cadmus, Marianne Moore, Katherine Anne Porter, Pavel Tchelitchew and Charles Henri Ford, Diana and Reed Vreeland, Joseph Campbell, the Kirsteins, E.E. Cummings, Brooke Astor, Philip Johnson, and others. Wheeler’s most amusing annual guests were Osbert and Edith Sitwell, the brother and sister poet famous for their double wit and set-up dry humor. In 1958 Monroe Wheeler learned that the grand old building at 410 Park Avenue would be demolished and replaced by a office tower. He found a small apartment at 215 E. 79 St. in a tall pale-blond brick building called the Thornely. They lived there for two years.
- No. 465, The Ritz Tower: Built in 1925 as the city’s most elegant apartment hotel, The Ritz Tower today remains one of Manhattan’s most luxurious and sought-after residential cooperatives noted for its spacious and elegant apartments, each one unique. Greta Garbo lived here for a time in the 40s. Most happy about this move was probably Mercedes de Acosta, who had an apartment at 471 Park Avenue, from where she could see Garbo's north facing rooms. Mercedes told the story that during the wartime, when people were not allowed to show light at night “we gave each other signs with candles. Why we were not arrested for this offence is still today a riddle to me.” In 1951 Garbo moved from the Ritz into a suite with four rooms located on the seventeenth floor of The Hampshire House at 150 Central Park South.
- No. 530: In 1950, Alice DeLamar’s address is still a house in New York at 530 Park Avenue. This 19-story, white-brick apartment building at 530 Park Avenue on the southwest corner at 61st Street next to the Regency Hotel was erected in 1940 and designed by George F. Pelham Jr., who also designed 41, 50, 785, 1130 and 1150 Park Avenue and 1056 Fifth Avenue. It was bought in 2007 for about $211 million by Blackrock Realty Advisors which then sold it to Aby Rosen, the owner of the Seagrams Building and Lever House on Park Avenue who converted the rental building to a condominium with 116 apartments in 2013. Handel Architects LLP was architect and William T. Georgis was interior designer for the conversion.
- No. 564: The second clubhouse of the Colony Club, was commissioned in 1913 and constructed from 1914 to 1916. It was designed by Delano & Aldrich in the Neo-Georgian style, with interiors designed by Elsie de Wolfe. See Colony Club.
- No. 570: On April 24, 1947, Willa Cather died of a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 73 in her home at 570 Park Avenue in Manhattan.
- No. 695, 10065: Hunter College is an American public university and one of the constituent organizations of the City University of New York, located in the Lenox Hill neighborhood of Manhattan's Upper East Side. The college grants undergraduate and graduate degrees in over one-hundred fields of study across five schools. Hunter College also administers Hunter College High School and Hunter College Elementary School. Founded in 1870, originally as a women's college, Hunter is one of the oldest public colleges in the United States. The college assumed the location of its main campus on Park Avenue in 1873. Hunter began admitting men into its freshman class in 1964. In 1943 Eleanor Roosevelt dedicated the former home of herself and Franklin Delano Roosevelt to the college, which reopened in 2010 as the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Audre Lorde (1934-1992); Pauli Murray (1910–1985).
- No. 882-884: Ogden Codman, Jr. collaborated with Edith Wharton on the redesign of her townhouse at 882-884 Park Avenue, now demolished.
- No. 993: From the 1940s to the mid 1970s Marlene Dietrich kept, and often resided in apartment 12E, a four room apartment in this building. She relocated to New York to be close to her daughter Maria Riva and her grandchildren. 993 Park Avenue went co-op in the late fifties and Dietrich bought an apartment in the building. The full service, thirteen storey Italianite block had been built in the teens by Bing & Bing. Dietrich decorated her modest apartment (a two bed / two bath unit of 1600 square feet), in a mixture of styles: Louis XIV furniture was offset against glizy mirrored walls befitting a movie star. When she wasn’t travelling the world with her spectacular one-woman show, Dietrich divided her time between her New York home and a Paris rental on the Avenue Montaigne. Visting Dietrich in Paris in the late 70s, her friend Leo Lerman noted "the podge of the [Parisian] flat, which I find touching and that Gray [Foy] says is so unlike her New York controlled elegance. I like both and find both very much the way she is." After a stage fall in Australia in 1975 Dietrich went into semi-retirement in Paris, becoming increasingly reclusive. Her grandson, J. Michael Riva lived at the Park Avenue apartment during the early 80s with his then-fiance, Jamie Lee Curtis, when the latter was filming "Trading Places" (1983.) Dietrich died in 1992. Her heirs sold the apartment in 1998 for $615.000. 993 Park Ave #12E reappeared on the market in 2010. The refurbished unit was listed by Sotheby’s Real Estate for $ 2.250.000.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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In 1959 the Wescotts moved to a 147-acre (0.59 km2) farm further south from Clinton in Hunterdon County, near the community of Rosemont in Delaware Township. The farm had been previously owned by big band leader Paul Whiteman. Glenway Wescott moved into a two-story stone house on the property, dubbed Haymeadows. In 1987, Wescott died of a stroke at his home in Rosemont.
Address: Wescott Preserve, Raven Rock Rosemont Rd, Stockton, NJ 08559, USA (40.4265, -75.01584)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Place
Rosemont is an unincorporated community located within Delaware Township in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Located at the top of a small hill, the center of the community is along Kingwood Stockton Road (County Route 519) near its intersections with Raven Rock Rosemont Road and Rosemont Ringoes Road (CR 604.) Farmland and residences make up the surrounding area while the center of the settlement includes residences, a post office, and an antique shop. Wescott Preserve is named after Lloyd Wescott (1907-1990), an agriculturalist and philanthropist who was the founder and first chairman of the Hunterdon Medical Center. Wescott and his wife Barbara purchased this farm in 1959, and raised dairy cows. In 1966, they donated 15 acres of land to the county for open space, which became Hunterdon’s first county park. The park even predates the Division, which was established in 1973. The Wescotts donated an additional 65 acres to the county four years later. In 2006, 102 acres of mature woodlands and meadows along the Lockatong Creek were added through the generous efforts of the Peters family, the Hunterdon Land Trust Alliance, and the county. Also on the property is a former one-room schoolhouse. Built out of stone in 1861, it was known as the John Reading School or District Schoolhouse #97. Wescott Farm is one-of-a-kind farmhouse apartment located on a working grass-fed cattle and sheep farm. Original XVIII century farmhouse on a 200+ acre working farm. The farmhouse has a porch that overlooks a sculpted kitchen garden and the Delaware river in the distance. The original floor boards of the farmhouse stretch throughout the apartment and other details like moldings and exposed beams make the spaces explode with charm. The historic farmhouse has been used over the centuries by famous writers (Glenway Wescott) and musicians (Paul Whiteman.) There is cooking school located downstairs from the farm stay apartment with classes and dinners available some days and evenings.
Life
Who: Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987) and Monroe Wheeler (1899-1988)
While Monroe Wheeler was on a long museum trip to Japan and France, Lloyd Wescott found a farm that was for sale by bandleader Paul Whiteman. Glenway Wescott wrote to his mother, who was making her last visit to Wisconsin, “Lloyd has come to an agreement with Mr. Whiteman. The lawyers are drawing up the papers.” He expressed regret to Bernardine Szold: “Now the last season of our beloved valley… For me it will take all that time to prepare to move – twenty years of these attics and archives… Monroe’s as well, very massive now that he has moved from 410 Park Avenue into a small flat.” But after seeing the new farm, he praised Lloyd to William Maxwell: “My brother has bought another farm between Rosemont and Stockton in Delaware township, and is letting me have the handsomest old stone house on it. So, beyond the ordeal of moving, my way of life will not be greatly changed. My good fortune puts me to shame.” Glenway gave the name Haymeadows to the stone house and grounds being refurbished for himself and Wheeler. John Connolly drove Glenway to the property and remembered, “When I first saw it, there was a farm worker named Leroy living there with a house full of kids.” When he died, Glenway Wescot was cremated and his ashes buried in the small farmer's graveyard hidden behind a rock wall and trees at the farm at Haymeadows. In the same graveyard was buried Monroe Wheeler one year later.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Karla Jay is a distinguished professor emerita at Pace University, where she taught English and directed the women's and gender studies program between 1974 and 2009. A pioneer in the field of lesbian and gay studies, she is widely published.
Born: February 22, 1947, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Barnard College
Berkeley Carroll School
Awards: Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Studies
Nominations: Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Biography/Autobiography, more
People also search for: Allen Young, Joanne Glasgow, Mark Degli Antoni

Barnard College is a private women’s liberal arts college in the United States and one of the Seven Sisters. Founded in 1889, it has been affiliated with Columbia University since 1900.
Address: 3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027, USA (40.8091, -73.96393)
Type: Student facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 212-854-5262
Place
Barnard’s 4-acre (1.6 ha) campus stretches along Broadway between 116th and 120th Streets in the Morningside Heights neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan, in New York City. It is directly across Broadway from Columbia’s campus and near several other academic institutions and has been used by Barnard since 1898. Columbia College, Columbia University admitted only men for undergraduate study for 229 years. Barnard College was founded to provide an undergraduate education for women comparable to that of Columbia and other Ivy League schools. The college was named after Frederick Augustus Porter Barnard, an educator and mathematician, who served as the tenth president of Columbia from 1864 to 1889. He advocated equal educational privileges for men and women, preferably in a coeducational setting, and began proposing in 1879 that Columbia admit women. The board of trustees repeatedly rejected Barnard’s suggestion, but in 1883 agreed to create a detailed syllabus of study for women. While they could not attend Columbia classes, those who passed examinations based on the syllabus would receive a degree. The first such woman graduate received her bachelor’s degree in 1887. A former student of the program, Annie Nathan Meyer, and other prominent New York women persuaded the board in 1889 to create a women’s college connected to Columbia. Barnard College’s original 1889 home was a rented brownstone at 343 Madison Avenue, where a faculty of six offered instruction to 14 students in the School of Arts, as well as to 22 "specials,” who lacked the entrance requirements in Greek and so enrolled in science. When Columbia University announced in 1892 its impending move to Morningside Heights, Barnard built a new campus on 119th-120th Streets with gifts from Mary E. Brinckerhoff, Elizabeth Milbank Anderson and Martha T. Fiske. Milbank, Brinckerhoff, and Fiske Halls, built in 1897–1898, were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003. Ella Weed supervised the college in its first four years; Emily James Smith succeeded her as Barnard’s first dean. As the college grew it needed additional space, and in 1903 it received the three blocks south of 119th Street from Anderson who had purchased a former portion of the Bloomingdale Asylum site from the New York Hospital. By the mid-XX century Barnard had succeeded in its original goal of providing an elite education to women. Between 1920 and 1974, only the much larger Hunter College and University of California, Berkeley produced more women graduates who later received doctorate degrees. Students’ Hall, now known as Barnard Hall, was built in 1916. Brooks and Hewitt Halls were built in 1906–1907 and 1926–1927, respectively. They were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003. Jessica Garretson Finch is credited with coining the phrase, "current events," while teaching at Barnard College in the 1890s.
Notable queer alumni and faculty at Barnard:
• Ruth Benedict (1887-1948) taught her first anthropology course at Barnard college in 1922. In 1931 she was appointed Assistant Professor in Anthropology, something that seemed impossible until her divorce from Stanley Benedict that same year.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) spent a year studying library science at the New York Public Library and then attended Barnard College, graduating with a B.A. in history in 1927. She earned an M.A. in history from Columbia University in 1928. Encouraged by an anthropology course taught by Ruth Benedict and Franz Boas at Columbia, DuBois moved to California to study anthropology with Native American specialists Alfred L. Kroeber and Robert Lowie. She received her Ph.D. in anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley in 1932.
• Virginia Gildersleeve (1877-1965) attended as a member of the Seven Sisters affiliated with Columbia University. She completed her studies in 1899 and received a fellowship to undertake research for her MA in medieval history at Columbia University. She taught English part-time at Barnard for several years. She declined a full-time position and took a leave of absence to undertake her Ph.D. in English and comparative literature at Columbia for three years. When she completed her studies in 1908 she was appointed a lecturer in English in 1908 by Barnard and Columbia; by 1910 she had become an assistant professor and in 1911 was made dean of Barnard College a position she maintained until 1947.
• Patricia Highsmith (1921–1995) graduated from Barnard College in 1942, where she studied English composition, playwriting, and the short story. After graduating from college, she applied without success for work at such magazines as Harper's Bazaar, Vogue, The New Yorker, Mademoiselle, and Good Housekeeping, offering "impressive" recommendations from "highly placed" professionals.
• Karla Jay (born 1947) majored in French and graduated in 1968 after having taken part in the student demonstrations at Columbia University.
• Ellen Kushner (born 1955)
• Esther Lape (1881-1981), a graduate of Wellesley College, taught English at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, the University of Arizona, and Barnard College in New York City. Her life-partner was the scholar and lawyer, Elizabeth Fisher Read, who was Eleanor Roosevelt's personal attorney and financial advisor.
• Margaret Mead (1901-1978) earned her bachelor's degree at Barnard College and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University.
• Elizabeth Reynard (1897-1962), professor
Notable queer alumni and faculty at Columbia:
• John Ashbery (born 1927) studied briefly at New York University, and received an M.A. from Columbia in 1951.
• Ruth Benedict (1887–1948) entered graduate studies at Columbia University in 1919, where she studied under Franz Boas. She received her Ph.D and joined the faculty in 1923. Margaret Mead, with whom she may have shared a romantic relationship, and Marvin Opler, were among her students and colleagues. In 1936, she was appointed an associate professor at Columbia University. However, by then, Benedict had already assisted in the training and guidance of several Columbia students of anthropology.
• Roy Cohn (1927-1986), after attending Horace Mann School and the Fieldston School, and completing studies at Columbia College in 1946, graduated from Columbia Law School at the age of 20. He had to wait until his 21st birthday to be admitted to the bar, and used his family connections to obtain a position in the office of United States Attorney Irving Saypol in Manhattan the day he was admitted.
• Harold Clurman (1901-1980) attended Columbia and, at the age of twenty, moved to France to study at the University of Paris.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) earned an M.A. in history from Columbia University in 1928. Encouraged by an anthropology course taught by Ruth Benedict and Franz Boas at Columbia, DuBois moved to California to study anthropology with Native American specialists Alfred L. Kroeber and Robert Lowie.
• Fred Ebb (1928–2004) earned his master's degree in English.
• Erna Fergusson (1888-1964) completed her Masters in History from Columbia University.
• Gray Foy (1922-2012) worked in a Lockheed aircraft plant in California during WWII. He later attended Southern Methodist University before moving to New York, where he studied art at Columbia. He found critical success while he was still a student. In an article about Foy’s work in 1948, The New York Herald Tribune described him as “a superb craftsman, a young person who will someday be reckoned with in the field of modern art.” That year, Gray Foy met Leo Lerman at a party at Lerman’s home. On arriving, Foy had an augury of their luminous future together: When he knocked on the door, it was answered by Marlene Dietrich. Though Foy had several well-reviewed gallery shows, created book jackets and classical-album covers and won a 1961 Guggenheim Fellowship for his drawing, his role as helpmeet to the far more gregarious Lerman — it was Foy who shopped, cooked and otherwise arranged their days — gradually eclipsed his art.
• Allen Ginsberg (1926–1997) entered on a scholarship from the Young Men's Hebrew Association of Paterson. In 1945, he joined the Merchant Marines to earn money to continue his education. While at Columbia, Ginsberg contributed to the Columbia Review literary journal, the Jester humor magazine, won the Woodberry Poetry Prize, served as president of the Philolexian Society (literary and debate group), and joined Boar's Head Society (poetry society).
• Brad Gooch (born 1952) graduated with a bachelors in 1973 and a doctorate in 1986.
• Lillian Hellman (1905-1984) studied for two years at New York University and then took several courses at Columbia University. Institutions that awarded Hellman honorary degrees include Brandeis University (1955), Wheaton College (1960), Mt. Holyoke College (1966), Smith College (1974), Yale University (1974), and Columbia University (1976).
• Patricia Highsmith (1921–1995) was educated at the Julia Richmond High School in Manhattan and then at Columbia University, where she earned her B.A. in 1942.
• Langston Hughes (1902–1967) and his father came to a compromise: Hughes would study engineering, so long as he could attend Columbia. While at Columbia in 1921, Hughes managed to maintain a B+ grade average. He left in 1922 because of racial prejudice.
• Richard Isay (1934–2012) was a professor of psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College and a faculty member of the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research.
• Ned Jennings (1898-1929), after a brief stint at the College of Charleston, attended Columbia University and earned a degree, but he left for a year to study drama, costume, and stage design at the Drama Department of Carnegie Institute of Technology. He became a curator at the Charleston Museum creating his march of civilization dioramas.
• Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) 's athletic skills earned him scholarship offers from Boston College, Notre Dame, and Columbia University. Kerouac broke a leg playing football during his freshman season, and during an abbreviated sophomore year he argued constantly with coach Lou Little, who kept him benched. While at Columbia, Kerouac wrote several sports articles for the student newspaper, the Columbia Daily Spectator, and joined the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. When his football career at Columbia ended, Kerouac dropped out of the university.
• Audre Lorde (1934-1992) was a graduate of Columbia University and Hunter College, where she later held the prestigious post of Thomas Hunter Chair of Literature.
• Stephen McCauley (born 1955) worked as a travel agent for many years before moving to Brooklyn in the 1980s. There he attended adult learning centers to take some writing classes before enrolling in Columbia University's writing program.
• Carson McCullers (1917-1967) attended night classes at Columbia University and studied creative writing under the Texas writer Dorothy Scarborough and with Sylvia Chatfield Bates at Washington Square College of New York University.
• Margaret Mead (1901-1978) studied with professor Franz Boas and Dr. Ruth Benedict at Columbia University before earning her master's degree in 1924. Mead set out in 1925 to do fieldwork in Samoa. In 1926, she joined the American Museum of Natural History, New York City, as assistant curator. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1929. She taught at The New School and Columbia University, where she was an adjunct professor from 1954 to 1978 and was a professor of anthropology and chair of the Division of Social Sciences at Fordham University's Lincoln Center campus from 1968 to 1970, founding their anthropology department.
• Herman Melville (1819–1891) transferred to Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School, enrolling in the English Department in 1829.
• Amaza Lee Meredith (1895-1984) moved to Brooklyn in 1926 where she attended the Teacher's College of Columbia University.
• Billy Merrell (born 1982) studied writing and journalism at Douglas Anderson School of the Arts and the University of Florida before receiving his MFA in Poetry from Columbia University.
• Rhoda Bubendey Metraux (1914–2003), was a prominent anthropologist in the area of cross-cultural studies, specializing in Haitian voodoo and the Iatmul people of the middle Sepik River in Papua New Guinea.
• John Spofford Morgan (1917-2015) received a master’s degree in International Affairs from Columbia University in 1947.
• John W. Mulligan (1774-1862), son of Hercules and Elizabeth Saunders Mulligan. Married c.1790-1795 to Elizabeth Winter of Louisville, KY. Graduate of Columbia College. Admitted an attorney in the Supreme Court of the State May 4, 1795; had a large practice; was a prominent, public-spirited and popular man; Assistant Alderman for the Third Ward 1806-1809; Surrogate of the County in 1810. One of his daughters married the Rev. John Henry Hill, who settled in Athens, Greece as a Missionary. Mulligan later went to Greece, serving as U.S. Consul at Athens for many years. Baron Steuben, whose secretary he had been, died in 1794, leaving a will containing the clause: “To John W. Mulligan I bequeath the whole of my library, maps and charts and the sum of two thousand five hundred dollars to complete it.”
• Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986) attended Teachers College of Columbia University from 1914–15, where she took classes from Dow, who greatly influenced O'Keeffe's thinking about the process of making art. She served as a teaching assistant to Bement during the summers from 1913–16 and taught at Columbia College, Columbia, South Carolina in late 1915, where she completed a series of highly innovative charcoal abstractions. After further course work at Columbia in early 1916 and summer teaching for Bement, she took a job as head of the art department at West Texas State Normal College.
• Peter Orlovsky (1933-2010) was drafted into the United States Army for the Korean War at the age of 19. Army psychiatrists ordered his transfer off the front to work as a medic in a San Francisco hospital. He later went to Columbia University. He met Ginsberg while working as a model for the painter Robert La Vigne in San Francisco in December 1954. Prior to meeting Ginsberg, Orlovsky had made no deliberate attempts at becoming a poet.
• Anthony Perkins (1932-1992) attended Brooks School, Browne & Nichols School, Columbia University and Rollins College, having moved to Boston in 1942.
• Josephine Pinckney (1895-1957) attended Ashley Hall School and established a literary magazine there, graduating in 1912. She then attended college at the College of Charleston, Radcliffe College, and Columbia University, and held an honorary degree from the College of Charleston, given 1935.
• Caroline Pratt (1867-1954), after graduating high school on June 24, 1886, spent a year caring for her sick father at home. In the fall of 1887 she was asked to accept a position teaching first grade in the village school, Fayetteville. She held this job until the fall semester of 1892, at which point she moved to New York City and enrolled in Teachers College at Columbia University. Although she began by studying kindergarten, she turned her attention toward earning a certificate from the Manual Training Shop, eventually earning a bachelor of pedagogy and a position teaching manual training to future teachers at the Philadelphia Normal School in 1894.
• Paul Robeson (1898–1976) received his LL.B. from Columbia Law School, while playing in the National Football League (NFL). At Columbia, he sang and acted in off-campus productions.
• Douglas Sadownick (born 1959) is a gay American writer, activist, professor and pyschotherapist. He attended Columbia College for his B.A., New York University for his graduate work in English, and the graduate program in clinical psychology at Antioch University for a Master's of Arts in Clinical Psychology. He received his Ph.D. from Pacifica Graduate Institute in Clinical Psychology in 2006.
• Lucy Diggs Slowe (1885–1937), after graduation at Howard University (she was one of the nine original founders of the sorority Alpha Kappa Alpha in 1908), returned to Baltimore to teach English in high school. During the summers, she started studying at Columbia University in New York, where she earned her Masters of Arts degree in 1915. Slowe continued working as an educator in Baltimore for several years, then she returned to Washington, DC to teach.
• Robert Spitzer (1932–2015) was a psychiatrist and professor of psychiatry at Columbia University. He was a major force in the development of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). His most lasting success may have been his successful effort, in 1973, to stop treating homosexuality as an illness.
• John William Sterling (1844-1918) graduated from Columbia Law School as the valedictorian of the class of 1867 and was admitted to the bar in that year. He obtained an M.A. degree in 1874. He became a corporate lawyer in New York City, and helped found the law firm of Shearman & Sterling in 1871, a firm that represented Jay Gould, Henry Ford, the Rockefeller family, and Standard Oil.
• Mabel Vernon (1883-1975) went to Columbia University where she earned a master's degree in political science in 1924.
• Frederick L- Whitam (1933–2009) was an American sociologist who studied homosexuality from a cross-cultural perspective. Scholar Paul Vasey described Whitam as "an essentialist during a time of rampant social constructionism." Whitam was born in Natchez, Mississippi. He studied at Millsaps College, University of Chicago, Columbia University, and Indiana University, where he received a master's degree, followed by a Ph.D. in 1965.
Life
Who: Virginia Crocheron Gildersleeve (October 3, 1877 – July 7, 1965) and LTC Elizabeth Reynard (1897-1962)
Virginia Gildersleeve was an academic, the long-time Dean of Barnard College, and the sole female US delegate to the April 1945 San Francisco United Nations Conference on International Organization, which negotiated the UN Charter and created the United Nations. Gildersleeve was born in New York City, she attended the Brearley School and following her graduation in 1895 went on to attend Barnard College, a member of the Seven Sisters affiliated with Columbia University. She completed her studies in 1899 and received a fellowship to undertake research for her MA in medieval history at Columbia University. She taught English part-time at Barnard for several years. She declined a full-time position and took a leave of absence to undertake her Ph.D. in English and comparative literature at Columbia for three years. When she completed her studies in 1908 she was appointed a lecturer in English in 1908 by Barnard and Columbia; by 1910 she had become an assistant professor and in 1911 was made dean of Barnard College. In 1918 Gildersleeve, Caroline Spurgeon and Rose Sidgwick met while the two English women were on an academic exchange to the United States. They discussed founding an international association of university women, and in 1919 founded the International Federation of University Women. Gildersleeve shared an "intimate" relationship with the British Spurgeon, with whom she annually shared a rental summer home. Following WWI she became interested in international politics. She campaigned for Al Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt. During WWII she chaired the Advisory Council of the navy’s women’s unit, the WAVES and following the war she was appointed to the United Nations Charter Committee. She was involved in the reconstruction of higher education in Japan. For this work she received France’s Legion of Honor. In her 1954 memoir, Gildersleeve poignantly protested the "particularly cruel and unwholesome discrimination against unmarried women," like herself, who chose to spend their lives living with other women. She attributed this trend to "the less responsible psychologists and psychiatrists of the day," who voiced "disrespect for spinsters in the teaching profession as “inhibited” and “frustrated.”" Gildersleeve never identified herself as a lesbian, preferring instead the adjective "celibate." For several decades she lived with companion Professor Caroline Spurgeon. Later she lived with Barnard English Professor Elizabeth Reynard. Reynard was the first woman to be appointed lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve. Reynard and Gildersleeve are buried together at Saint Matthew’s Episcopal Churchyard, Bedford, New York.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Mary Elizabeth Mohl or Mary Elizabeth Clarke was a British writer who was known as a salon hostess in Paris. She was known by her nickname of "Clarkey". She was admired for her independence and conversation.
Born: February 22, 1793, Westminster, United Kingdom
Died: May 15, 1883
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
Find A Grave Memorial# 85340044

Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.
Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on May 21, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”
Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942), buried together.
• Jean Börlin (1893-1930) was a Swedish dancer and choreographer born in Härnösand. He worked with Michel Fokine, who was his teacher in Stockholm. Jean Borlin was a principal dancer of the Royal Swedish Ballet when Rolf de Mare brought him to Paris in in 1920 as first dancer and choreographer of the Ballets Suedois at the Theatre de Champs-Elysees. According to Paul Colin, de Mare “was very rich” and he had brought the Swedish Ballet to Paris “especially to show his young lover, Jean Borlin.” The Stockholm press derided de Mare's sexual orientation. In contrast, open-minded Paris welcomed the Ballets Suedois. One wonders what might have happened if de Mare had not disbanded the company in 1925, reportedly because its recent performances had disappointed him. But he had a new lover. Borlin's last years were melancholy. By 1925, he was exhausted: he had choreographed all 23 ballets in his company's repertory and danced in each of its 900 performances -- a grueling schedule that led him to alcohol and drugs. In 1930, he opened a school in New York but died of heart failure shortly thereafter. He was only 37. He was buried at his own wish in the cemetery of Pére Lachaise in Paris in January l931. A stricken de Mare founded Les Archives Internationales de Danse, in his memory.
• Jean Jacques Régis de Cambacérès (1753-1824) 1st Duke of Parma, later 1st Duke of Cambacérès, was a French lawyer and statesman during the French Revolution and the First Empire, best remembered as the author of the Napoleonic Code, which still forms the basis of French civil law and inspired civil law in many countries. The common belief that Cambacérès is responsible for decriminalizing homosexuality in France is in error. Cambacérès was not responsible for ending the legal prosecution of homosexuals. He did play a key role in drafting the Code Napoléon, but this was a civil law code. He had nothing to do with the Penal Code of 1810, which covered sexual crimes. Before the French Revolution, sodomy had been a capital crime under royal legislation. The penalty was burning at the stake. Very few men, however, were ever actually prosecuted and executed for consensual sodomy (no more than five in the entire XVIII century). Sodomites arrested by the police were more usually released with a warning or held in prison for (at most) a few weeks or months. The National Constituent Assembly abolished the law against sodomy when it revised French criminal law in 1791 and got rid of a variety of offenses inspired by religion, including blasphemy. Cambacérès was a homosexual, his sexual orientation was well-known, and he does not seem to have made any effort to conceal it. He remained unmarried, and kept to the company of other bachelors. Napoleon is recorded as making a number of jokes on the subject. Robert Badinter once mentioned in a speech to the French National Assembly, during debates on reforming the homosexual age of consent, that Cambacérès was known in the gardens of the Palais-Royal as "tante Turlurette".
• Elsie de Wolfe, Lady Mendl (1859/1865–1950) died in Versailles, at 84. Cremated, her ashes were placed in a common grave, the lease expired, in Pere Lachaise Cemetery.
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Loie Fuller (1862–1928) was an American dancer who was a pioneer of both modern dance and theatrical lighting techniques. Fuller supported other pioneering performers, such as fellow United States-born dancer Isadora Duncan. Fuller helped Duncan ignite her European career in 1902 by sponsoring independent concerts in Vienna and Budapest. She was cremated and her ashes are interred in the columbarium at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Her sister, Mollie Fuller, had a long career as an actress and vaudeville performer.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Eileen Gray (1878–1976) was an Irish furniture designer and architect and a pioneer of the Modern Movement in architecture. Gray was bisexual. She mixed in the lesbian circles of the time, being associated with Romaine Brooks, Gabrielle Bloch, Loie Fuller, the singer Damia and Natalie Barney. Gray's intermittent relationship with Damia (or Marie-Louise Damien) ended in 1938, after which they never saw each other again, although both lived into their nineties in the same city. Damia died at La Celle-Saint-Cloud, a western suburb of Paris, and was interred in the Cimetière de Pantin (163 Avenue Jean Jaurès, 93500 Aubervilliers). Today, she is considered to be the third greatest singer of chansons réalistes, after Edith Piaf and Barbara.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Guy Hocquenghem (1946–1988) (Plot: Division 87 (columbarium), urn 407) was a French writer, philosopher, and queer theorist. Hocquenghem was the first gay man to be a member of the Front Homosexuel d'Action Révolutionnaire (FHAR), originally formed by lesbian separatists who split from the Mouvement Homophile de France in 1971. Hocquenghem died of AIDS related complications on 28 August 1988, aged 41.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Marie Laurencin (1883-1956) was a French painter and printmaker. She became an important figure in the Parisian avant-garde as a member of the Cubists associated with the Section d'Or. She became romantically involved with the poet Guillaume Apollinaire, and has often been identified as his muse. In addition, Laurencin had important connections to the salon of the American expatriate and famed lesbian writer Natalie Clifford Barney. She had heterosexual and lesbian affairs. During WWI, Laurencin left France for exile in Spain with her German-born husband, Baron Otto von Waëtjen, since through her marriage she had automatically lost her French citizenship. The couple subsequently lived together briefly in Düsseldorf. After they divorced in 1920, she returned to Paris, where she achieved financial success as an artist until the economic depression of the 1930s. During the 1930s she worked as an art instructor at a private school. She lived in Paris until her death.
• Jean Le Bitoux (1948-2010) was a French journalist and gay activist. He was the founder of “Gai pied,” the first mainstream gay magazine in France (its name was found by philosopher Michel Foucault). He was a campaigner for Holocaust remembrance of homosexual victims. By 1978, he ran for the National Assembly as a "homosexual candidate" alongside Guy Hocquenghem; they lost the election. In 1994, Le Bitoux co-authored the memoir of Pierre Seel, a French homosexual who was deported by the Nazis for being gay.
• Mary Elizabeth Clarke Mohl (1793–1883) was a British writer who was known as a salon hostess in Paris. She was known by her nickname of "Clarkey". She was admired for her independence and conversation. She eventually married the orientalist Julius von Mohl. She was an ardent Francophile, a feminist, and a close friend of Florence Nightingale. She wrote about her interest in the history of women's rights. She was buried with her husband, Julius von Mohl, at Père Lachaise Cemetery (56th division).
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Anna, Comtesse Mathieu de Noailles (1876–), Romanian-French writer. She died in 1933 in Paris, aged 56, and was interred in the Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Francis Poulenc (1899–1963) was a French composer and pianist. The biographer Richard D. E. Burton comments that, in the late 1920s, Poulenc might have seemed to be in an enviable position: professionally successful and independently well-off, having inherited a substantial fortune from his father. He bought a large country house, Le Grande Coteau (Chemin Francis Poulenc, 37210 Noizay), 140 miles (230 km) south-west of Paris, where he retreated to compose in peaceful surroundings. Yet he was troubled, struggling to come to terms with his sexuality, which was predominantly gay. His first serious affair was with the painter Richard Chanlaire, to whom he sent a copy of the Concert champêtre score inscribed, "You have changed my life, you are the sunshine of my thirty years, a reason for living and working". Nevertheless, while this affair was in progress Poulenc proposed marriage to his friend Raymonde Linossier. As she was not only well aware of his homosexuality but was also romantically attached elsewhere, she refused him, and their relationship became strained. He suffered the first of many periods of depression, which affected his ability to compose, and he was devastated in January 1930, when Linossier died suddenly at the age of 32. On her death he wrote, "All my youth departs with her, all that part of my life that belonged only to her. I sob ... I am now twenty years older". His affair with Chanlaire petered out in 1931, though they remained lifelong friends. On 30 January 1963, at his flat opposite the Jardin du Luxembourg, Poulenc suffered a fatal heart attack. His funeral was at the nearby church of Saint-Sulpice. In compliance with his wishes, none of his music was performed; Marcel Dupré played works by Bach on the grand organ of the church. Poulenc was buried at Père Lachaise Cemetery, alongside his family.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Raymond Radiguet (1903–1923) was a French novelist and poet whose two novels were noted for their explicit themes, and unique style and tone. In early 1923, Radiguet published his first and most famous novel, “Le Diable au corps” (The Devil in the Flesh). The story of a young married woman who has an affair with a sixteen-year-old boy while her husband is away fighting at the front provoked scandal in a country that had just been through WWI. Though Radiguet denied it, it was established later that the story was in large part autobiographical. He associated himself with the Modernist set, befriending Picasso, Max Jacob, Jean Hugo, Juan Gris and especially Jean Cocteau, who became his mentor. Radiguet also had several well-documented relationships with women. An anecdote told by Ernest Hemingway has an enraged Cocteau charging Radiguet (known in the Parisian literary circles as "Monsieur Bébé" – Mister Baby) with decadence for his tryst with a model: "Bébé est vicieuse. Il aime les femmes." ("Baby is depraved. He likes women.") Radiguet, Hemingway implies, employed his sexuality to advance his career, being a writer "who knew how to make his career not only with his pen but with his pencil." Aldous Huxley is quoted as declaring that Radiguet had attained the literary control that others required a long career to reach. On December 12, 1923, Radiguet died at age 20 in Paris of typhoid fever, which he contracted after a trip he took with Cocteau. Cocteau, in an interview with The Paris Review stated that Radiguet had told him three days prior to his death that, "In three days, I am going to be shot by the soldiers of God." In reaction to this death Francis Poulenc wrote, "For two days I was unable to do anything, I was so stunned". In her 1932 memoir, “Laughing Torso,” British artist Nina Hamnett describes Radiguet's funeral: "The church was crowded with people. In the pew in front of us was the negro band from the Boeuf sur le Toit. Picasso was there, Brâncuși and so many celebrated people that I cannot remember their names. Radiguet's death was a terrible shock to everyone. Coco Chanel, the celebrated dressmaker, arranged the funeral. It was most wonderfully done. Cocteau was too ill to come." ... "Cocteau was terribly upset and could not see anyone for weeks afterwards.”
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) was a French actress.
• Oscar Wilde’s tomb in Père Lachaise was designed by sculptor Sir Jacob Epstein, at the request of Robert Ross (1869-1918), who also asked for a small compartment to be made for his own ashes. Ross's ashes were transferred to the tomb in 1950.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. They are buried together.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. The modernist angel depicted as a relief on the tomb was originally complete with male genitals. They were broken off as obscene and kept as a paperweight by a succession of Père Lachaise Cemetery keepers. Their current whereabouts are unknown. In the summer of 2000, intermedia artist Leon Johnson performed a 40 minute ceremony entitled Re-membering Wilde in which a commissioned silver prosthesis was installed to replace the vandalised genitals.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Mary Rozet Smith was a Chicago-born US philanthropist who was one of the trustees and benefactors of Hull House. She was the companion of activist Jane Addams for over thirty years.
Born: December 23, 1868, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Died: February 22, 1934
Lived: Yule Craig, Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, Hancock County, Maine, USA (44.38761, -68.20391)
Buried: Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 151456530

Jane Addams was a pioneer settlement social worker, public philosopher, sociologist, author, and leader in women's suffrage and world peace. She revolutionized American social reform by founding Hull House, an institution Addams established in a poor neighborhood of Chicago to provide services for recent immigrants. Addams later became the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Her closest adult companion and friend was wealthy philanthropist Mary Rozet Smith, who supported Addams's work at Hull House, and with whom she shared a romantic friendship. They always slept in the same room and the same bed, and when they traveled Jane even wired ahead to be sure they would get a hotel room with a double bed. It was said that, "Mary Smith became and always remained the highest and clearest note in the music that was Jane Addams' personal life". Together they owned a summerhouse in Bar Harbor, Maine. When apart, they would write to each other at least once a day - sometimes twice. Addams would write to Smith, "I miss you dreadfully and am yours 'til death". The letters also show that the women saw themselves as a married couple: "There is reason in the habit of married folks keeping together", Addams wrote to Smith.
Together from 1893 to 1934: 41 years.
Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935)
Mary Rozet Smith (December 23, 1868 - 1934)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Located in the Near West Side of Chicago, Illinois, in the XIX century Hull House opened its doors to recently arrived European immigrants.
Address: 800 S Halsted St, Chicago, IL 60607, USA (41.87162, -87.64743)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10.00-16.00, Sunday 12.00-16.00
Phone: +1 (312) 413-5353
National Register of Historic Places: 66000315, 1966. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Hull House was a settlement house in the United States that was co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr. By 1911, Hull House had grown to 13 buildings. In 1912 the Hull House complex was completed with the addition of a summer camp, the Bowen Country Club. With its innovative social, educational, and artistic programs, Hull House became the standard bearer for the movement that had grown, by 1920, to almost 500 settlement houses nationally. The Hull mansion and several subsequent acquisitions were continuously renovated to accommodate the changing demands of the association. The original building and one additional building (which has been moved 200 yards (182.9 m)) survive today. On June 12, 1974, the Hull House building was designated a Chicago Landmark. The Hull House Association ceased operations in Jan. 2012, but the Hull mansion remains open as a museum.
Life
Who: Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) and Ellen Gates Starr (March 19, 1859 – February 10, 1940)
Ellen Gates Starr taught for ten years in Chicago before joining Addams in 1888 for a tour of Europe. While in London, they were inspired by the success of the English Settlement movement and became determined to establish a similar social settlement in Chicago. They returned to Chicago and co-founded Hull House as a kindergarten and then a day nursery, an infancy care centre, and a center for continuing education for adults. Lillian Faderman argues that Starr was Addams’ "first serious attachment.” The friendship between the two lasted many years, and the two became domestic partners. Addams wrote to Starr, "Let’s love each other through thick and thin and work out a salvation.” The director of the Hull-House Museum at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Lisa Lee, has argued that the relationship was a lesbian one. Victoria Bissell Brown agrees that the two can be regarded as lesbians if they are seen as "women loving women,” although we do not necessarily have any evidence for genital sexual contact. The intensity of the relationship dwindled when Addams met Mary Rozet Smith, and the two women subsequently set up home together. Ellen died in 1940 and is buried at Convent of the Holy Child, Suffern, NY.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Bar Harbor is a town on Mount Desert Island in Hancock County, Maine. As of the 2010 census, its population is 5,235.
Address: Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, Hancock County, Maine, USA (44.38761, -68.20391)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: West Street Historic District (West St. between Billings Ave. and Eden St.), 80000226, 1980, & Harbor Lane--Eden Street Historic District (Portions of Harbor Ln. and Eden St.), 09000550, 2009
Place
Louise DeKoven Bowen, Mrs. J.T. Bowen of Chicago, friend and patroness of Jane Addams, built his summer home, Baymeath, at Bar Harbor in 1896. Baymeath was a southern colonial house four miles from Bar Harbor Village. It was situated on a hillside from which a series of terraces led down to the bay. One of these, formerly a tennis court, was a formal garden enclosed by vine-covered stone walls on two sides and high fences with actinidia on the other two. Beyond the house, another lattice-enclosed garden stood with a rose bed. Climbing roses covered all the fences. Another rose arbor led into the woods where lupine, day lilies, and wild roses grew. From all these gardens, a wide view of Frenchman’s Bay added contrast to the color of the northern flowers. The house was razed in 1979. Near Baymeath, on Lookout Point in Hull’s Cove, was a cottage called Yule Craig, designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston for the son of Senator Yulee of Florida. In 1904, the house was purchased by Mrs. Bowen’s friend, Jane Addams. A half mile path connected Baymeath and Yule Craig, and there was much visiting back and forth, as Mrs. Bowen was one of the chief supporters of Jane Addams’s Hull House Settlement in Chicago, and donor of the Bowen Country Club. Miss Addams once famously said that she could raise more money in a single month in Bar Harbor than all the rest of the year back home in Chicago. Jane Addams sold the house in 1932 to Harry Hill Thorndikes, which renamed it Thorncraig. Mrs. Thorndike’s sister, Miss Belle Gurnee, owned the property between Yule Craig and Baymeath, a large chalet built in Switzerland and imported to her property on Lookout Point. Thorncraig was inherited by the Thorndike’s son, Augustus Gurnee Thorndike, and was later purchased by John J. Emery. Emery’s aunt was married to Benjamin Moore, brother-in-law of Mrs. Moore who later owned Baymeath. Thorncraig proved to have notoriously irresolvable plumbing troubles, and was demolished in the early 1980’s. Another famous queer resident at Bar Harbor was Natalie Clifford Barney. Alice Pike Barney (1857-1931) was an artist, actor, playwright, and socialite. The daughter of Cincinnati millionaire and patron of the arts Samuel Napthali Pike, Alice was born into a life of privilege. She married Albert Clifford Barney, son of a wealthy manufacturer of railway cars, prior to her twentieth birthday. The Barney’s had two daughters, Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972) and Laura Clifford Barney (1879-1974.) The family split their time between New York City and Paris, France, until 1900, when they purchased a home in Washington, DC. Well aware of the steamy summers of the eastern United States, the Barney’s would vacation in Bar Harbor, Maine, and in 1888, commissioned a "summer cottage" in Bar Harbor they named "Ban-y-Bryn." Designed by Architect S. V. Stratton, Ban-y-Bryn was built on a steep bluff, with the front of the cottage facing the rustic Maine landscape. The rear of the home, with its prominent turret and several grand porches, overlooked Frenchman’s Bay. Rising to four stories, the home consisted of 27 rooms, including seven bedrooms, five bathrooms, five fireplaces, a large stable, seven servants’ bedrooms, and additional servants’ facilities. The top floor was reserved as studio space for Ms. Barney and her artistic pursuits. Ban-y-Bryn’s exterior was constructed of granite. The interior featured exotic hardwoods and materials, and was furnished with antiques acquired by the Barney’s during their global travels. Ban-y-Bryn was one of their many luxuries; interest in the home began to fade as their respective pursuits and tastes evolved over time. The Barney’s sold their marvelous summer dwelling in 1930. Sadly, Ban-y-Bryn was one of 67 summer cottages incinerated in the Bar Harbor fire of October 1947.
Life
Who: Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) and Mary Rozet Smith (1868-1934)
Mary Rozet Smith was a Chicago-born US philanthropist who was one of the trustees and benefactors of Hull House. She was the companion of activist Jane Addams for over thirty years. Smith provided the financing for the Hull House Music School and donated the school’s organ as a memorial to her mother. There has been much speculation of Addams and Smith’s life and relationship. Many of their letters were burned by Addams, but Addams referred to their relationship as a "marriage.” They traveled together, co-owned a home in Maine, and were committed to each other. In 1895, after Addams had suffered from a bout with typhoid fever, she went abroad with Smith, traveling to London. There, they visited several settlement houses, including Oxford House, Browning House, Bermondsey Settlement and others. They proceeded on to Moscow and met Tolstoy, then traveled through southern Russia, into Poland and Germany, before returning to Chicago. Early in 1934, Addams had a heart attack and Smith nursed her at her home, neglecting her own illness. Smith succumbed to pneumonia, fell into a coma and then died on February 22, 1934. Addams was considered too ill to descend the stairs to attend Smith’s memorial service, which she could hear from her second-floor room. Addams died on May 21, 1935.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Graceland Cemetery is a large Victorian era cemetery located in the north side community area of Uptown, in the city of Chicago, Illinois. Established in 1860, its main entrance is at the intersection of Clark Street and Irving Park Road. The Sheridan stop on the Red Line is the nearest CTA "L" station.
Address: 4001 N Clark St, Chicago, IL 60613, USA (41.95483, -87.66188)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 773-525-1105
National Register of Historic Places: 00001628, 2001
Place
In the XIX century, a train to the north suburbs occupied the eastern edge of the cemetery where the "L" now rides. The line was also used to carry mourners to funerals, in specially rented funeral cars, requiring an entry on the east wall, now closed. At that point, the cemetery would have been well outside the city limits of Chicago. After the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, Lincoln Park which had been the city's cemetery, was deconsecrated and some of the bodies moved here. The edge of the pond around Daniel Burnham's burial island was once lined with broken headstones and coping transported from Lincoln Park. Lincoln Park then became a recreational area, with a single mausoleum remaining, the "Couch tomb", containing the remains of Ira Couch. The Couch Tomb is probably the oldest extant structure in the City, everything else having been destroyed by the Great Chicago Fire. The cemetery is typical of those that reflect Queen Victoria's reconception of the early XIX century "graveyard". Instead of poorly maintained headstones, and bodies buried on top of each other, on an ungenerous parcel of land, the cemetery became a pastoral landscaped park dotted with memorial markers, with room left over for picnics, a common usage of cemeteries. The landscape architecture for Graceland was designed by Ossian Cole Simonds. The cemetery's walls are topped off with wrought iron spear point fencing. Many of the cemetery's tombs are of great architectural or artistic interest, including the Getty Tomb, the Martin Ryerson Mausoleum (both designed by architect Louis Sullivan, who is also buried here), and the Schoenhofen Pyramid Mausoleum. The industrialist George Pullman was buried at night, in a lead-lined coffin within an elaborately reinforced steel-and-concrete vault, to prevent his body from being exhumed and desecrated by labor activists. Along with its other famous burials the cemetery is notable for two statues by sculptor Lorado Taft, Eternal Silence for the Graves family plot and The Crusader that marks Victor Lawson's final resting place. The cemetery is also the final resting place of several victims of the tragic Iroquois Theater fire in which more than 600 people died.
Notable queer burials at Graceland Cemetery:
• Louise DeKoven Bowen (1859–1953) was an American philanthropist, civic leader, social reformer, and suffragist. Assisting Jane Addams, Bowen became an officer and trustee of the Hull House.
• James Deering (November 12, 1859 – September 21, 1925) was an industrial executive in the family Deering Harvester Company and subsequent International Harvester, a socialite, and an antiquities collector. He is known for his landmark Vizcaya estate, where he was an early XX-century resident on Biscayne Bay in the present day Coconut Grove district of Miami, Florida.
• Mary Rozet Smith (1868-1934) was a Chicago-born US philanthropist who was one of the trustees and benefactors of Hull House. She was the companion of activist Jane Addams for over thirty years. Smith provided the financing for the Hull House Music School and donated the school's organ as a memorial to her mother. She was active in several social betterment societies in Chicago at the turn of the XX century.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Sara Josephine Baker was an American physician notable for making contributions to public health, especially in the immigrant communities of New York City.
Born: November 15, 1873, Poughkeepsie, New York, United States
Died: February 22, 1945, Princeton, New Jersey, United States
Education: New York University
Lived: Trevenna Farm, 208 Orchard Rd, Montgomery, NJ 08558, USA (40.42026, -74.66956)
Buried: Poughkeepsie Rural Cemetery, Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 139844697
Known for: Public health
Books: Fighting for Life, more

Sara Josephine Baker was an American physician notable for contributing to public health system. Ida Alexa Ross Wylie, better known as I.A.R. Wylie, was an Australian-British-American novelist, screenwriter, magazine writer and poet. She is probably best known as the author of the novel that became the basis of the film Keeper of the Flame (1942), directed by George Cukor and starring Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn. More than 30 of her works were made into films between 1915 and 1953. Sara Josephine Baker wrote very little about her personal life; however, she spent much of the later part of her life with Wylie, who self-identified as a 'woman-oriented woman'. When Baker retired in 1923, she started to run their household while writing her autobiography. In 1935, Baker and Wylie decided to move to Princeton, New Jersey, together with their friend Louise Pearce. While Baker and Pearce left little documentation of their personal lives, Wylie was open about her orientation, although she did not identify either Baker or Pearce in her writings.
Together from 1920 to 1945: 25 years.
Ida Alexa Ross “I.A.R.” Wylie (March 16, 1885 -17, 1912 – August 24, 1987)
Sara Josephine Baker (November 15, 1873 - February 22, 1945)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Trevenna Farm, 11.85 Acres In Montgomery Twp, was last sold in 2013
Address: 208 Orchard Rd, Montgomery, NJ 08558, USA (40.42026, -74.66956)
Type: Private Property
Place
The history of Trevenna Farm is a fascinating tale of a modest country dwelling dating to 1727 evolving into a refined 4U-bedroom home that graciously welcomes gatherings and personal pursuits without losing its pre-revolutionary ambiance. 11.85 acres in Montgomery Township include a pond, extra garage and barn surrounded by deep lawns. An early XIX century expansion added generous formal rooms and a center hall, now joined by a light-filled family room and well-planned kitchen wing. Skillman is named after the Skillman family. The first Skillmans were Dutch, but lived in England before moving to Brooklyn in 1664, according to family accounts. In 1729, Thomas Skillman ventured westward, buying some 500 acres (2.0 km2) of farmland on the Millstone River, near the village of Rocky Hill, for his sons, Jan and Isaac. That purchase was the Skillman family's entry into Montgomery. The Skillman area got its name when the railroads arrived in the 1870s, according to the Skillman family. Joseph A. Skillman, was a teamster who owned "wild Missouri mules," according to family accounts. When railroad workers were trying to lay tracks, their horses got bogged down in thick, clay mud, and Joseph A. Skillman came to the rescue with his mules. Railroad officials also socialized at the home of another Skillman nearby, and the new train station was named for the family. A post office opened in the station and a small village, with a hay press, feed store and hardware store, sprouted around it. It took the Skillman name, too. (While the train station is gone, remnants of the village still exist at the spot where Camp Meeting Avenue and Skillman Road meet. A clay and sculpting supply business occupies some of the buildings.) Also in Skillman was the sprawling New Jersey Village for Epileptics, a 250-acre (1.0 km2) complex opened around 1900 that had its own dairy, laundry, and movie theater. Visitors would arrive by train. Skillman was a busy little country place. There were 1,637 residents in Montgomery in 1910, compared with more than 23,000 now, according to Census data. The community now has more traffic, fewer farms and more houses (specifically developments). In 2011, Montgomery Township sold what remained of the North Princeton Developmental Center (also known as Skillman Village) to Somerset County in order for the village to be demolished.



Life
Who: Ida Alexa Ross Wylie (March 16, 1885 – November 4, 1959), aka I. A. R. Wylie, Louise Pearce (March 5, 1885 – August 10, 1959) & Sara Josephine Baker (November 15, 1873 – February 22, 1945)
Sara Josephine Baker was an American physician notable for making contributions to public health, especially in the immigrant communities of New York City. Not much is known about Baker's personal life because she is said to "have destroyed all her personal papers." However, she spent much of the later part of her life with Ida Alexa Ross Wylie, a novelist, essayist, and Hollywood scriptwriter from Australia who identified as a "woman-oriented woman." When Baker retired in 1923, she started to run their household while writing her autobiography, “Fighting For Life.” In 1935 and four years before her autobiography was published, Baker and Wylie decided to move to Princeton, New Jersey, with their friend Louise Pearce. They lived there together until Baker died in 1945, followed by Pearce, and then later Wylie who died on November 4, 1959 at the age of 74. Ida Alexa Ross Wylie was an Australian-British-American novelist, screenwriter, short story writer, and poet who was honored by the journalistic and literary establishments of her time, and was known around the world. Between 1915 and 1953, more than thirty of her novels and stories were adapted into films, including “Keeper of the Flame” (1942), which was directed by George Cukor and starred Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. Louise Pearce was an American pathologist at the Rockefeller Institute who helped develop a treatment for African sleeping sickness (trypanosomiasis). The three women were members of Heterodoxy, a feminist biweekly luncheon discussion club, of which many members were lesbian or bisexual. After Baker's death in 1945, Wylie and Pearce continued living at Trevenna Farm until both died in 1959. Her home was described as a "most delightful and interesting place to live and study. Her shelves were crowded with many old editions of medical treasures, the latest scientific literature and the latest works on international questions. She had a wonderful collection of Chinese carvings and porcelains." Ida Alexa Ross Wylie and Dr Louise Pearce are buried at Henry Skillman Burying Ground (Orchard Rd, Trevenna Farms in Rocky Hill, Montgomery Twp., Somerset, NJ) alongside Sarah Wylie, I.A.R. Wylie's bull terrier, died in 1943.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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