Feb. 25th, 2017

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Arthur Lett-Haines, known as Lett Haines, was a British painter and sculptor who experimented in many different media, though he generally characterised himself as "an English surrealist".
Born: November 2, 1894, Paddington, London, United Kingdom
Died: February 25, 1978
Lived: Corfe, Taunton, Somerset TA3
Benton End House, Benton Street, Hadleigh, Suffolk IP7 5JR, UK (52.03691, 0.95912)
The Pound, Hadleigh Road, Higham, Suffolk CO7 6LE, UK(51.99071, 0.95763)
32 Great Ormond St, London WC1N, UK (51.52201, -0.11983)
9 Walterton Rd, London W9 3PE, UK (51.5253, -0.20009)
Buried: Friars Road Cemetery, Hadleigh, Babergh District, Suffolk, England
Buried alongside: Cedric Morris
Find A Grave Memorial# 161188757

Arthur Lett-Haines was a British painter and sculptor who experimented in many different media, though he characterized himself as "an English surrealist". He was part of a London artistic circle, which included D.H. Lawrence, the Sitwells (Dame Edith Sitwell and Sir Osbert Sitwell) and Wyndham Lewis. Sir Cedric Morris was a British artist, art teacher and plantsman. As an artist, he is best known for his portraits, flower paintings and landscapes. In 1916, Lett-Haines married Gertrude Aimee Lincoln at Hailsham, but he met the painter Cedric Morris in 1918. Morris and Lett Haines fell in love and began a lifetime relationship, and shortly afterwards Morris moved in with Haines and his wife, Aimee. The trio planned to go to America, but in the event, Aimee Lett-Haines left on her own, and the two men moved to Cornwall. This relationship lasted some 60 years, despite its open nature that included attachments on both sides such as Haines' affair with the artist and author Kathleen Hale. In 1937, Morris and Haines founded the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing at Dedham. The school closed when Haines died in 1978, though Morris continued to live at Benton End until his death in 1984.
Together from 1918 to 1978: 60 years.
Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Arthur Lett Haines was born at 9 Walterton Road, Paddington, London on November 2, 1894
Address: 9 Walterton Rd, London W9 3PE, UK (51.5253, -0.20009)
Type: Private Property
Place
A Victorian conversion, divided in flats. Walterton Road is a quiet and popular residential street located within close proximity of the extensive amenities in Queens Park, Maida Vale and Notting Hill. Transport links including Westbourne Park (Hammersmith & City Line), Queens Park, Maida Vale and Warwick Avenue (Bakerloo Line.)
Life
Who: Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
During WWI Arthur Lett-Haines served in the British Army and after the war he involved himself with the artistic set which included E. McKnight Kauffer, John Middleton Murry, the Sitwells, Wyndham Lewis, Katharine Mansfield and D. H. Lawrence about which time he hyphenated his name to Lett-Haines. In 1916 Lett-Haines married at Hailsham, Sussex, Gertrude Aimee Lincoln, but in 1918 he met painter Cedric Morris, who moved in with them; the following year his wife Aimee, departed for America while Morris and Lett-Haines, although a stormy partnership, lived together as lovers for some sixty years. After initially living at Newlyn, in 1920 they moved to Paris becoming part of an expatriate artistic community that included Juan Gris, Fernard Léger, Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Nancy Cunard and Ernest Hemingway. They briefly returned to London in 1926, before moving to Suffolk in 1929. Lett-Haines largely subordinating his own artistic career to promote that of his partner Cedric, despite its open nature that included attachments on both sides such as Lett-Haines’s affair with the artist and author Kathleen Hale (1898-2000.) Like his friend John Middleton Murry (1889-1957), Haines gave his students freedom to develop along independent lines and Haines himself was a less consistent painter than Morris and his work had a strong linear element. Operating on a live-in basis that mingled artistic development with a social circle, its pupils included Lucian Freud, Bettina Shaw-Lawrence, David Kentish, Maggi Hambling, David Carr, Joan Warburton and Glyn Morgan. The school he founded, Benton End, closed when Haines died on February 25, 1978, although Morris continued to live at Benton End until his death in 1984.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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After staying with his sister Nancy Morris in Corfe (Taunton, Somerset TA3), Cedric Morris (December 11, 1889 –February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines found a studio in London at Great Ormond Street to which they moved in 1927. 



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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At the time of the Armistice with Germany in Nov. 1918 Cedric Morris was in London, where he met the painter Arthur Lett-Haines.
Address: 32 Great Ormond St, London WC1N, UK (51.52201, -0.11983)
Type: Private Property
Place
Cedric Morris settled in London in 1927, with a big studio at 32, Great Ormond Street, which soon became a gathering place for most of his contemporaries. Upon his arrival Roger Fry, whom he had known in Paris, elected him to the London Group and took two of his canvasses for the International Exhibition at Buenos Aires. Later, Ben Nicholson elected him to the 7 & 5 Society. He continued to exhibit with these groups for several years. In May 1927, he had his first One Man Show at Messrs. Arthur Tooth and Sons, which was a phenomenal success and thereafter has held exhibitions with West End dealers at intervals of two or three years. He has also had exhibitions at the Hague and in New York, and has been an international exhibitor at Brussells, Buenos Aires, Venice, Chicago, Pittsburg, and San Francisco. There are samples of his work in most of the important public galleries. The success of his first exhibition at Messrs. Tooth enabled him to fulfill a long defined project of painting in Wales and much of his work is of Welsh landscapes. He initiated the Welsh Contemporary Art Exhibitions in 1935, from which sprang the Welsh Contemporary Art Society.
Life
Who: Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
Sir Cedric Morris was a British artist, art teacher and plantsman. He was born in Swansea in South Wales, but worked mainly in East Anglia. As an artist he is best known for his portraits, flower paintings and landscapes. Morris went to Zennor in Cornwall, where he studied plants and painted water colours. At the time of the Armistice with Germany in Nov. 1918 he was in London, when he met the painter Arthur Lett-Haines. Morris and Lett-Haines fell in love and began a life-time relationship, and shortly afterwards Morris moved in with Lett-Haines and his second wife, Aimee. The trio planned to go to America, but in the event Aimee Lett-Haines left on her own, and the two men moved to Cornwall. They converted a row of cottages at Newlyn into a larger house and stayed there until the end of 1920, when they moved to Paris. This relationship lasted some 60 years, despite its open nature that included attachments on both sides such as Haines’ affair with the artist and author Kathleen Hale. Paris was their base for the next five years, when they travelled extensively in Europe. Morris also studied at the Academies Moderne and La Grande Chaumiere. Morris had successful exhibitions in London in 1924 and 1926, and later in that year they settled back in Britain. After staying with his sister Nancy Morris in Corfe, Morris and Haines found a studio in London at Great Ormond Street to which they moved in 1927. Morris became a member of the London Artists Association and the Seven and Five Society, for which he was proposed by Winifred Nicholson and seconded by Ben Nicholson. He became especially friendly with the painter Christopher Wood, and renewed friendship with Frances Hodgkins. At the end of the 1920s Morris became involved with much commercial work designing textiles for Cresta Silks with Paul Nash and posters for Shell and B. P.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Cedric Morris chose the country life to pursue his passion for horticulture. Early in 1929 Morris and his companion, Arthur Lett-Haines, took the lease of Pound Farm, Higham, Suffolk, and in February 1930 they gave up the London studio.
Address: Hadleigh Road, Higham, Suffolk CO7 6LE, UK(51.99071, 0.95763)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 277246 (Grade II, 1955)
Place
The Pound is a XVI-XVII century house with XIX century wing to left and XX century alterations. Timber-framed, rendered with red brick stack, XIX century wing red brick with some dark brick headers. Plain tile roof. Single-storey and attic range with gabled jettied cross wing at left. 2-storey brick addition. Half-glazed door to cross wing, jettied 1st floor. 3-light XX century casement, bargeboards to gable. 24-pane fixed window with single opening light to hall, end of beam protrudes at floor level. XX century casements and further door to right. 2 gabled dormers with XX century windows. Small XX century ridge stack to right and sawtooth stack between cross wing and hall. Brick range 3-light windows under segmental arches, 2 replaced 16-pane sashes in flush architraves above. Pair of large gabled wall dormers to rear hall range. XX century extension under pent roof. Interior: hall, somewhat rebuilt inglenook. Chamfered beam and exposed joists.
Life
Who: Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
In 1932 the owner of Pound Farm, Vivien Gribble, who was for a while his student, died and left it to Cedric Morris. Morris had resigned from the Seven and Five Society in 1930 and he resigned from the London Artist’s Association in 1933. There were many visitors at Pound Farm, including Frances Hodgkins, Barbara Hepworth and John Skeaping. Joan Warburton who was a student described Pound Farm as a paradise, mainly because of the spectacular gardens which Morris developed. She was also impressed by their spectacular parties. Morris often went painting in his native South Wales, and in 1935 at the time of the Depression was moved by the plight of the people of South Wales Valleys. He initiated a major touring exhibition of Welsh art in 1935, and was a regular teacher at Mary Horsfall’s Art’s centre at Merthyr Tydfil. In 1935 he painted two large flower murals on board the liner Queen Mary. In late 1937 Morris and Haines joined the Hadleigh Labour Party after attending a meeting addressed by Professor Catlin.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Benton End House was originally a large medieval farmhouse. From 1940 it was the home of Sir Cedric Morris, artist and plantsman, who formed the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing there. Students included Lucian Freud and Maggi Hambling.
Address: Benton Street, Hadleigh, Suffolk IP7 5JR, UK (52.03691, 0.95912)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 277783 (Grade II, 1950)
Place
Built from the XVI century, Design by Sir Peter Cheyney
XVI century and later, 2 storeys and attics, timber framed and plastered, roofs tiled. Front wings extend North and South, and wing at back extends East. The front has been largely altered and includes XVIII century features. There are 3 gabled attic dormers. 3 window range, flush frame, sash. Upper storey projects. Large, shouldered, chimney at either end. The central doorcase has flat hood on scroll brackets. At North end of front is an octagonal brick pier with pointed cap. The East wing has a brick gable with octagonal flank piers, coping and chimney stack with 2 octagonal shafts (moulded bases.) The timber framing is exposed and there is some brick nogging.
Life
Who: Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
Cedric Morris and Lett-Haines opened the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing at Dedham in April 1937. Within a year they had 60 students. Lucian Freud was one of his most noted students. In 1939 the building at Dedham was destroyed by fire with several of Morris’s paintings also destroyed. By the end of the year the school was re-established at Benton End. Benton End was a rambling “Suffolk Pink” farmhouse on the outskirts of Hadleigh, set in 3 or 4 acres (1.6 ha) of orchard. Morris was intolerant of cruelty to animals and at Benton End had a running feud with a local gamekeeper who shot cats and dogs - until the latter tripped over his shotgun and killed himself. In addition to running the school, Morris indulged his passion for plants. He grew about 1,000 new Iris seedlings each year and opened Benton End to display his collection. He produced at least 90 named varieties, 45 of which were registered with the American Iris Society. Some were sold commercially and exhibited at the Chelsea Flower Show. Many of his named varieties carried the prefix "Benton,” including “Benton Menace” named after his cats, and “Benton Rubeo,” named for his pet macaw. He also used to walk the fields and hedgerows searching for softer colour variants of poppies. Morris’s work as a horticulturalist resulted in a number of plants being names after him. Morris bred birds as a hobby and his knowledge and understanding of them may have contributed to his ability to paint them. In his “Peregrin Falcons” (1942), the birds are presented in a slightly formalised and simplified manner. His intention, he explained, was to "provoke a lively sympathy with the mood of the birds which ornithological exactitude may tend to destroy." In 1947 the Morris baronetcy came to his father from a distant cousin three months before his death and Cedric Morris succeeded his father in the same year to become the 9th Baronet Morris. He became a lecturer at the Royal College of Art in 1950. From about 1975 Morris virtually gave up painting because of failing eyesight. The school closed when Haines died in 1978, though Morris continued to live at Benton End until his death. Cedric Morris died on February 8, 1982. His former pupil, Maggi Hambling visited him on the day before his death and afterwards drew a portrait of him. His grave in Hadleigh cemetery is marked by a Welsh slate headstone cut by Donald Simpson.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lived: 89 East Bay Street, Charleston
141-145 Church Street, Charleston
Buried: Bonaventure Cemetery, Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia, USA
Buried alongside: Harry Hervey
Find A Grave Memorial# 122346904

Today 89 East Bay Street is one the series of homes in the colorfully named Rainbow Row, which has no particular reference to the rainbow flag or other gay icons, although the area does have a gay history. Perhaps the most colorful presence here was Harry Hervey (1900-1951). Born in Texas and mostly associated with Savannah, GA, Hervey was a world traveler, novelist and film writer, famous mostly for his story for the classic film “Shanghai Express.” Hervey lived in Charleston in the mid-1920s openly with his lover Carleton Hildreth and wrote at least two of his books here, and used Charleston as decadent jazz age setting for his novel, “Red Ending.” Although he used coded language in some of his book to cloak a homoerotic meaning and subtext, he was often more explicit than many other closeted writers of his day. When it became known in Charleston that he was gay, he suffered for it, though he never seemed to care. Hervey bought this house and hoped to live in it, but lost it in the Depression and died broke.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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141-145 Church Street were renovated as apartments and artist studios/shops in the 1920s. Often called “Pirate Houses,” they once were adorned with an anchor and a small metal sign created by Charleston gay artist Ned Jennings. Another gay man who lived here was author, explorer and adventurer Harry Hervey (1900-1951) who shared the premises in the late 1920s with his lover Carleton Hildreth. Hervey was one of the few “out” gay people in Charleston in this era; and he and his work suffered for it. One of his plays based in an all-male prison in North Africa was considered too homoerotic to be produced on Broadway. Hervey rewrote it as a novel, “The Iron Widow,” which was published in 1931, after he and Hildreth had left Charleston.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Historic Savannah hotels began with the original DeSoto Hotel. Still rich in history and culture, the newly-renovated Hilton Savannah DeSoto Hotel is situated downtown in the heart of Savannah's Historic District.
Address: 15 E Liberty, Savannah, GA 31401, USA (32.07415, -81.09289)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 912-232-9000
Place
Built in 1890
Built on the site of Oglethorpe's Barracks, the original DeSoto hotel was Savannah's haven of hospitality and gathering place for celebrities, dignitaries, and presidents. Setting the bar for Savannah's tradition of gracious service, Hilton Savannah DeSoto continues as one of the Savannah Historic District's landmark hotels, providing an unmatched atmosphere for leisure and business travelers. Original crystal chandeliers shine brilliantly over the grand lobby of this iconic Savannah hotel.
Life
Who: Harry Clay Hervey (November 5, 1900 – August 13, 1951) and Carleton Hildreth (February 25, 1908 - March 12, 1977)
Harry Hervey was born in Beaumont, Texas, but was educated in Savannah, Georgia and Tennessee. He started writing at about age eight and sold his first work to H. L. Mencken at the age of sixteen. He spent much of his life at Savannah’s old Desoto Hotel, as his mother was in charge of housekeeping from 1923 to 1957. Hervey has traveled widely in Asia, Africa and the South Pacific. He authored twelve noels and numerous short stories ad screenplays. Harry Hervey was a life-long bachelor and died at the age of fifty in New York. Carleton Hildreth lived in Savannah, Georgia. He was an actor, writer, researcher, and copy editor, eventually working as proofreader for the Savannah Morning News. It was sometime during the 1920s that Hildreth met Harry Hervey. At the time, Hervey was living in Savannah with his mother, Jane Davis Hervey. For approximately thirty years, until Hervey's death in 1951, Hildreth and Hervey lived together as companions and collaborators working on a number of artistic projects. Hildreth helped type and research many of Hervey's novels and travel books, co-wrote plays and screenplays with him, and acted in at least one of their productions on Broadway. Hildreth accompanied Hervey to Southeast Asia and the Orient in the mid 1920s, and later spent time with him in Hollywood, California, where Hervey was employed as a successful screenwriter. After Hervey's death, Hildreth remained in Savannah working as a proofreader. Harry Hervey and Carleton Hildreth are buried next to Hervey’s mother, Jane Louise Davis, in Bonaventure Cemetery (330 Bonaventure Rd, Savannah, GA 31404). “Even in his wildest moments, Hervey caught something true that those of us more than twice his age can only bow before." Pico Iyer.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Born: February 25, 1926, Passaic, New Jersey, United States
Died: May 15, 2007, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Find A Grave Memorial# 161891002
Books: Desperate necessity
People also search for: Maurice Sendak, Jonathan Weinberg, Sadie Schindler, Philip Sendak

Maurice Sendak was an American illustrator and writer of children's books. He was best known for his book Where the Wild Things Are, first published in 1963. Sendak mentioned in a September 2008 article in The New York Times that he was gay and had lived with his partner, psychoanalyst Dr. Eugene Glynn, for 50 years before Glynn's death in May 2007. Revealing that he never told his parents, he said, "All I wanted was to be straight so my parents could be happy. They never, never, never knew." Other writers before (e.g., Tony Kushner in 2003) had mentioned Sendak’s relationship with Glynn and Glynn's 2007 death notice had identified Sendak as his "partner of fifty years". Sendak donated $1 million to the Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services in memory of Glynn.
Together from 1957 to 2007: 50 years.
Eugene Glynn (1926 - May 15, 2007)
Maurice Sendak (June 10, 1928 – May 8, 2012)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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James Coco was an American character actor. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for Only When I Laugh.
Born: March 21, 1930, New York City, New York, United States
Died: February 25, 1987, New York City, New York, United States
Lived: 45 Christopher St, New York, NY 10014
Buried: Saint Gertrudes Roman Catholic Cemetery, Colonia, Middlesex County, New Jersey, USA, Plot: Section 29, Lot 660, GPS (lat/lon): 40.5961, -74.3068
Find A Grave Memorial# 6780261
Books: The James Coco Diet
TV shows: St. Elsewhere, Calucci's Department, The Dumplings
Parents: Feliche Coco, Ida Detestes Coco

45 Christopher Street is a residential building facing south onto Christopher Park in the Greenwich Village Historic District on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City. Opened on July 17, 1931, the construction of the Art Deco building started in 1929. James Coco (1930-1987), actor, lived at 45 Christopher Street with his long time lover Jack. Coco's first modern collaboration with playwright Terrence McNally was a 1968 off Broadway double-bill of the one-act plays “Sweet Eros” and “Witness.” Coco died in 1987 and is buried at St Gertrude Cemetery (53 Inman Ave, Colonia, NJ 07067).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III was an American playwright. Along with Eugene O'Neill and Arthur Miller he is considered among the three foremost playwrights in 20th-century American drama.
Born: March 26, 1911, Columbus, Mississippi, United States
Died: February 25, 1983, New York City, New York, United States
Education: University of Missouri
University of Iowa
The New School
Washington University in St. Louis
Actors Studio
Lived: The Atlantic House, 4-6 Masonic Place, Provincetown, MA
Hotel Chelsea
Algonquin Hotel, 59 W 44th St, New York, NY 10036
1431 Duncan St, Key West, FL 33040, USA (24.55577, -81.7866)
Hotel Elysée, 56- 60 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.7599, -73.9732)
Buried: Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum, Saint Louis, St. Louis City, Missouri, USA, Plot: Section 15A, GPS (lat/lon): 38.70297, -90.23692
Find A Grave Memorial# 1111
Books: Memoirs, One arm, The theatre of Tennessee Williams, more
Movies: A Streetcar Named Desire, Baby Doll, The Fugitive Kind, more

Tennessee Williams was an American playwright, author of many stage classics. On a 1945 visit to Taos, New Mexico, Williams met Pancho Rodríguez y González. They lived and traveled together until late 1947 when Williams ended the affair. Rodríguez and Williams remained friends, however, and were in contact as late as the 1970s. Williams met Frank Merlo, a navy veteran, and former lover of the lyricist John Latouche, in Provincetown during the summer of 1947 where they spent a night together in the dunes. In the early autumn of 1948, Williams accidentally ran again into Merlo in New York City, and by October, they were living together. Merlo began the process of weaning the playwright off a toxic dependence on drugs and casual sex. They remained together until Merlo died of lung cancer in 1963.
Together from 1947 to 1963: 16 years.
Frank Phillip Merlo (1921 – September 21, 1963)
Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III (March 26, 1911 - February 25, 1983)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The Atlantic House (4-6 Masonic Place, Provincetown, MA) was built by Provincetown's first postmaster, Daniel Pease, in 1798. It has served as a tavern since, gaining it's current name, the Atlantic House, in 1871. Many of America's most noted writers, including Eugene O'Neill and Tennessee Williams, were patrons of The Atlantic House in the 1920s. It became truly gay-friendly in the early 1950s, and has continued as a gay bar since.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Tennessee Williams visited and lived in Key West from 1941 until his death in 1983. It is believed that he wrote the final draft of “A Street Car Named Desire” while staying at the La Concha Hotel (430 Duval St, Key West, FL 33040) in 1947. He established residence here in 1949 and in 1950 bought the house at 1431 Duncan Street that was his home for 34 years. He was part of the literary movement that resulted in Key West and the Florida Keys being recognized as the cultural and historical location it is today.
Address: 1431 Duncan St, Key West, FL 33040, USA (24.55577, -81.7866)
Type: Private Property
Place
Populated in the early XX century by an eclectic mix of fishermen, spongers, rum runners, and cigar makers, the tiny island of Key West was more Caribbean than American. Over 100 miles from mainland Florida and the southernmost point in the United States, Key West has attracted numerous artists and writers, including Ernest Hemingway, Wallace Stevens, Ralph Ellison, Elizabeth Bishop, Tennessee Williams, Robert Frost, and James Merrill, with its remote location, tropical setting, and wild spirit. Near Solares Hill, the island’s highest point at sixteen feet above sea level, is Windsor Lane Compound, established in 1976. The assortment of restored shacks, shanties, and cottages, were once winter homes for writers such as Richard Wilbur, John Ciardi, John Hersey, and Ralph Ellison. On William Street is a Greek Revival house and writing studio once owned by Shel Silverstein. Heritage House Museum (410 Caroline St, Key West, FL 33040) was once the home of Jessie Porter, a fifth-generation “conch," or Key Wester. Originally built in 1830, Porter purchased the run-down Colonial home in 1930 and lovingly restored it. Her exotic garden became the center of Key West society, and artists and writers frequently gathered there, including Wallace Stevens, Archibald MacLeish, and Thornton Wilder. An old friend of Porter, Robert Frost spent many winters in her garden cottage. Another frequent visitor, Wallace Stevens once wrote in a letter that Key West “is the real thing... the sweetest doing nothing contrived.” Though good friends with Hemingway, one rainy night outside of Sloppy Joe’s bar, the two got into an infamous brawl in which Stevens broke his hand on Hemingway’s jaw.
Life
Who: Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983)
Tennessee Williams first came to Key West at age thirty, in 1941. After living in a boarding house, he bought a clapboard Bahamian cottage on the outside of town, at 1431 Duncan Street, where he created a compound with a guest cottage, swimming pool, and one-room writing studio he called the “Mad House.” Among the writers and artists that Williams met while living in Key West was Elizabeth Bishop.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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On a 1945 visit to Taos, New Mexico, Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) met Pancho Rodríguez y González, a hotel clerk of Mexican heritage. Rodríguez was, by all accounts, a loving and loyal companion. However, he was also prone to jealous rages and excessive drinking, and so the relationship was a tempestuous one. Nevertheless, in February 1946 Rodríguez left New Mexico to join Williams in his New Orleans apartment. In the summer of 1946, they were renting a “wind-battered, gray two-storied house” at 31 Pine St, Nantucket, MA 02554. Williams had been ailing on and off all year and was having difficulty with the play he was trying to write, which was then called “Chart of Anatomy.” They lived and traveled together until late 1947 when Williams ended the affair. Rodríguez and Williams remained friends, however, and were in contact as late as the 1970s.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Hotel Chelsea – also called the Chelsea Hotel, or simply the Chelsea – is a historic New York City hotel and landmark, known primarily for the notability of its residents over the years.
Address: 222 W 23rd St, New York, NY 10011, USA (40.74431, -73.9969)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone:+1 616-918-8770
National Register of Historic Places: 77000958, 1977
Place
Built between 1883 and 1885, Design by Hubert, Pirsson & Company (Philip Gengembre Hubert (1830-1911) and James W. Pirrson (1833-1888))
Opened for initial occupation in 1884, the twelve-story red-brick building that is now the Hotel Chelsea was one of the city’s first private apartment cooperatives. It was designed in a style that has been described variously as Queen Anne Revival and Victorian Gothic. Among its distinctive features are the delicate, flower-ornamented iron balconies on its facade, which were constructed by J.B. and J.M. Cornell and its grand staircase, which extends upward twelve floors. Generally, this staircase is only accessible to registered guests, although the hotel does offer monthly tours to others. At the time of its construction, the building was the tallest in New York. Hubert and Pirsson had created a "Hubert Home Club" in 1880 for "The Rembrandt,” a six-story building on West 57th Street intended as housing for artists. This early cooperative building had rental units to help defray costs, and also provided servants as part of the building staff. The success of this model led to other "Hubert Home Clubs,” and the Chelsea was one of them. Initially successful, its surrounding neighborhood constituted the center of New York’s theater district. However within a few years the combination of economic stresses, the suspicions of New York’s middle class about apartment living, the opening up of Upper Manhattan and the plentiful supply of houses there, and the relocation of the city’s theater district, bankrupted the Chelsea. In 1905, the building reopened as a hotel, which was later managed by Knott Hotels and resident manager A.R. Walty. After the hotel went bankrupt, it was purchased in 1939 by Joseph Gross, Julius Krauss, and David Bard, and these partners managed the hotel together until the early 1970s. With the passing of Joseph Gross and Julius Krauss, the management fell to Stanley Bard, David Bard’s son. On 18 June, 2007, the hotel’s board of directors ousted Bard as the hotel’s manager. Dr. Marlene Krauss, the daughter of Julius Krauss, and David Elder, the grandson of Joseph Gross and the son of playwright and screenwriter Lonne Elder III, replaced Stanley Bard with the management company BD Hotels NY; that firm has since been terminated as well. In May, 2011, the hotel was sold to real estate developer Joseph Chetrit for US$80 million. As of August 1, 2011, the hotel stopped taking reservations for guests in order to begin renovations, but long-time residents remain in the building, some of them protected by state rent regulations. The renovations prompted complaints by the remaining tenants of health hazards caused by the construction. These were investigated by the city’s Building Department, which found no major violations. In Nov. 2011, the management ordered all of the hotel’s many artworks taken off the walls, supposedly for their protection and cataloging, a move which some tenants interpreted as a step towards forcing them out as well. In 2013, Ed Scheetz became the Chelsea Hotel’s new owner after buying back five properties from Joseph Chetrit, his partner in King & Grove Hotels, and David Bistricer. Hotel Chelsea is now managed by Chelsea Hotels, formerly King & Grove Hotels. Restoration and renovation is underway and Hotel Chelsea plans to reopen in 2016.
Notable queer resident at Hotel Chelsea:
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997), novelist, short story writer, satirist, essayist, painter, and spoken word performer. A primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodernist author who wrote in the paranoid fiction genre, he is considered to be "one of the most politically trenchant, culturally influential, and innovative artists of the XX century.”
• Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008) wrote “2001: A Space Odyssey” while staying at the Chelsea.
• Quentin Crisp (1908-1999), writer and raconteur. His first stay in the Hotel Chelsea coincided with a fire, a robbery, and the death of Nancy Spungen.
• Musician, gay civil rights icon and Stonewall veteran Stormé DeLarverie (1920-2014) resided at the hotel for several decades.
• Poets Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) and Gregory Corso (1930-2001) chose it as a place for philosophical and artistic exchange.
• Brad Gooch (born 1952), writer. His 2015 memoir “Smash Cut” recounts life in 1970s and 1980s New York City, including the time Gooch spent as a fashion model, life with his then-boyfriend filmmaker Howard Brookner, living in the famous Chelsea Hotel and the first decade of the AIDS crisis.
• Herbert Huncke (1915-1996), writer and poet. In his last few years, he lived in room 828, where his rent came from financial support from Jerry Garcia of The Grateful Dead, whom Huncke never met. Herbert Huncke died in 1996 at age 81.
• Iggy Pop (born 1947), singer-songwriter, musician and actor. Pop’s career received a boost from his relationship with David Bowie when Bowie decided in 1972 to produce an album with Pop in England.
• Charles R. Jackson (1903-1968), author of “The Lost Weekend,” committed suicide in his room on September 21, 1968.
• Jasper Johns (born 1930), painter and printmaker. In 1954, after returning to New York, Johns met Robert Rauschenberg and they became long-term lovers. For a time they lived in the same building as Rachel Rosenthal. In the same period he was strongly influenced by the gay couple Merce Cunningham (a choreographer) and John Cage (a composer.)
• Jack Kerouac (1922-1969), who wrote “On the Road” there.
• Lance Loud (1951-2001), television personality, magazine columnist and new wave rock-n-roll performer. Loud is best known for his 1973 appearance in “An American Family,” a pioneer reality television series that featured his coming out, leading to his status as an icon in the gay community.
• Robert Mapplethorpe (1946-1989), photographer, known for his sensitive yet blunt treatment of controversial subject-mater in the large-scale, highly stylized black and white medium of photography. The homoeroticism of this work fuelled a national debate over the public funding of controversial artwork.
• Larry Rivers (1923-2002), artist, musician, filmmaker and occasional actor. Poet Jeni Olin was his companion. Rivers also sustained a relationship with poet Frank O’Hara in the late 1950s and delivered the eulogy at O’Hara’s funeral in 1966.
• Patti Smith (born 1946), singer-songwriter, poet and visual artist. On November 17, 2010, she won the National Book Award for her memoir “Just Kids.” The book fulfilled a promise she had made to her former long-time roommate and partner, Robert Mapplethorpe.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989), composer and critic. In 1925 in Paris, he cemented his relationship with painter Maurice Grosser (1903-1986), who was to become his life partner and frequent collaborator. He and Grosser lived at Hotel Chelsea, where he presided over a largely gay salon that attracted many of the leading figures in music and art and theather, including Leonard Bernstein, Tennessee Williams, and many others. Virgil Thomson died on September 30, 1989, in his suite at the Hotel Chelsea in Manhattan, aged 92.
• Gore Vidal (1925-2012), writer and a public intellectual known for his patrician manner, epigrammatic wit, and polished style of writing.
• Rufus Wainwright (born 1973), lived in the Chelsea Hotel in New York City for six months, during which he wrote most of his second album.
• Tennessee Williams (1911-1983), playwright and author of many stage classics. Along with Eugene O’Neill and Arthur Miller he is considered among the three foremost playwrights in XX century American drama.
• Hotel Chelsea is often associated with the Warhol superstars, as Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey directed “Chelsea Girls” (1966), a film about his Factory regulars and their lives at the hotel. Chelsea residents from the Warhol scene included Edie Sedgwick, Viva, Ultra Violet, Mary Woronov, Holly Woodlawn, Andrea Feldman, Nico, Paul America, René Ricard, and Brigid Berlin.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The San Remo Cafe was a bar at 93 MacDougal Street at the corner of Bleecker Street. It was a hangout for Bohemians and writers such as James Agee, W. H. Auden, Tennessee Williams, James Baldwin, William S. Burroughs, Gregory Corso, Miles Davis, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O'Hara, Jack Kerouac, Jackson Pollock, William Styron, Dylan Thomas, Gore Vidal, Judith Malina and many others. It opened in 1925 closed in 1967. Jack Kerouac described the bar's crowd in his novel “The Subterraneans”: “Hip without being slick, intelligent without being corny, they are intellectual as hell and know all about Pound without being pretentious or saying too much about it. They are very quiet, they are very Christlike.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Julius (159 West 10th Street at Waverly Place), is a tavern in Manhattan's Greenwich Village. It is often called the oldest continuously operating gay bar in New York City; however, its management was actively unwilling to operate as such and harassed gay customers until 1966. On April 21, 1966 members of the New York Chapter of the Mattachine Society staged a "Sip-In" at the bar which was to change the legal landscape. Dick Leitsch, the society's president, John Timmons and Craig Rodwell planned to draw attention to the practice by identifying themselves as homosexuals before ordering a drink in order to bring court scrutiny to the regulation. The three were going to read from Mattachine stationary "We are homosexuals. We are orderly, we intend to remain orderly, and we are asking for service." Newspaper articles on the wall of Julius indicate it was the favorite bar of Tennessee Williams, Truman Capote and Rudolf Nureyev. In 2016 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Hotel Elysée is a New York City hotel situated on 60 East 54th Street between Madison and Park avenues. The hotel was founded in 1926 as a European-style hotel for the carriage trade by Swiss-born Max Haering,
Address: 56- 60 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.7599, -73.9732)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 212-753-1066
Place
New York’s leading hatcheck concessionaire, Mayer Quain, purchased the hotel out of bankruptcy in 1937. After the War, his children eclectically designed every room so that no two rooms were alike. In lieu of traditional numbers, the rooms were named to reflect their personality, such as the "Sayonara" suite assigned to Marlon Brando after his starring role in “Teahouse of the August Moon.” Tennessee Williams lived in the hotel for fifteen years and died in the "Sunset" suite. Columnist Jimmy Breslin, who regards the Elysée as "a great hotel, a genuine New York landmark," succeeded Ruark as the hotel’s unofficial chronicler. Upon Tennessee Williams’s death at the Elysée in Feb. 1983, Breslin recalled the story of a transient guest who called the front desk at 5:00 am complaining that someone in the next suite was keeping her awake by typing all night. "They knew right away who the culprit was, but they couldn’t very well ask Mr. Williams to stop playwriting, so we simply moved the guest to another room." In Nov. 1948, Tallulah Bankhead celebrated President Harry S. Truman’s stunning victory over Thomas E. Dewey by throwing a noisy party at the hotel that ran non-stop for five days and nights. The Elysée is known for the Monkey Bar, a piano bar just off the lobby. Opened in the 1940s, it became known to the cognoscenti as "the place to go where jokes die," especially off-color jokes and double-entendre songs spun by such performers as Johnny Payne (1934-1964), Marion Page (1950-1965) and Mel Martin (1945-1983.) Johnny Andrews played the piano at cocktail hour for over 50 years (1936-1990.) Starting out as just another dimly lit hotel piano bar with mirrored paneling, the tiny room was expanded in the early 1950s when the mirrors were replaced by wraparound hand-painted mural by caricaturist Charlie Vella. Eight more monkeys were added to the bar mural in 1984 by artist Diana Voyentzie "to remind customers of their behaviour." In 1995, when the bar was redesigned by the architect David Rockwell, all of the monkeys were unified by Voyentzie with more monkeys and palm trees and foliage. The monkeys in the mural depict decidedly human features riding elephants, crouching under a Christmas tree, mixing up banana daiquiris for tough-looking monkey-like customers, etc. In successive years, other artists have added to the tableau.
Life
Who: Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983)
From 1948 to the early 50s, Tennessee Williams lived in New York City at 235 E 58th St; in 1965 he was at 15 W 72nd St; in 1978 at Manhattan Plaza (400 W 43rd St); last NY address was Hotel Elysee (56-60 E 54th St), where he died. In New York Tennessee Williams joined a gay social circle which included fellow writer and close friend Donald Windham (1920–2010) and his then partner Fred Melton. In the summer of 1940 Williams initiated an affair with Kip Kiernan (1918–1944), a young Canadian dancer he met in Provincetown, Massachusetts. When Kiernan left him to marry a woman he was distraught, and Kiernan’s death four years later at 26 delivered another heavy blow. On a 1945 visit to Taos, New Mexico, Williams met Pancho Rodríguez y González, a hotel clerk of Mexican heritage. Rodríguez was, by all accounts, a loving and loyal companion. However, he was also prone to jealous rages and excessive drinking, and so the relationship was a tempestuous one. Nevertheless, in Feb. 1946 Rodríguez left New Mexico to join Williams in his New Orleans apartment. They lived and traveled together until late 1947 when Williams ended the affair. Rodríguez and Williams remained friends, however, and were in contact as late as the 1970s. Williams spent the spring and summer of 1948 in Rome in the company of a teenaged Italian boy, called "Rafaello" in Williams’ “Memoirs,” to whom he provided financial assistance for several years afterwards, a situation which planted the seed of Williams’ first novel, “The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone.” When he returned to New York that spring, he met and fell in love with Frank Merlo (1922–1963), an occasional actor of Sicilian heritage who had served in the U.S. Navy in WWII. This one enduring romantic relationship of Williams’ life lasted 14 years until infidelities and drug abuse on both sides ended it. Merlo, who became Williams’ personal secretary, taking on most of the details of their domestic life, provided a period of happiness and stability as well as a balance to the playwright’s frequent bouts with depression and the fear that, like his sister Rose, he would fall into insanity. Their years together, in an apartment in Manhattan and a modest house in Key West, Florida, were Williams’ happiest and most productive. Shortly after their breakup, Merlo was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer and Williams returned to take care of him until his death on September 20, 1963. As he had feared, in the years following Merlo’s death Williams was plunged into a period of nearly catatonic depression and increasing drug use resulting in several hospitalizations and commitments to mental health facilities. On February 25, 1983, Williams was found dead in his suite at the Elysée Hotel in New York at age 71. Williams had long told his friends he wanted to be buried at sea at approximately the same place as Hart Crane, a poet he considered to be one of his most significant influences. Contrary to his expressed wishes, but at his brother Dakin Williams’ insistence, Williams was interred in Calvary Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Kate Chopin is buried at Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum (5239 W Florissant Ave, St. Louis, MO 6311), where you can also find the burial place of Tennesse Williams (his family, against his last wishes, buried him in St. Louis), and of author William S. Burroughs of the Beat Generation, at the nearby Bellefontaine Cemetery (4947 W Florissant Ave, St. Louis, MO 63115).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Violet Oakley was the first American woman to receive a public mural commission. During the first quarter of the twentieth century, she was renowned as a pathbreaker in mural decoration, a field that had been exclusively practiced by men.
Born: June 10, 1874, New Jersey, United States
Died: February 25, 1961, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Art Students League of New York
Drexel University
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
Lived: Plashbourne Estate, 51 Carlton Rd, Yonkers, NY 10708, USA (40.93906, -73.84728)
Cogslea, 627 St Georges Rd, Philadelphia, PA 19119, USA (40.05254, -75.20455)
Buried: Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA, Plot: Section 163, Lot 14788
Find A Grave Memorial# 10067778
Period: Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
Books: Samuel F.B. Morse: A Dramatic Outline of the Life of the Father of Telegraphy & the Founder of the National Academy of Design, more

Violet Oakley and her friends, the artists Elizabeth Shippen Green and Jessie Willcox Smith, all former students of Howard Pyle, were named the Red Rose girls by him. The three illustrators received the "Red Rose Girls" nickname while they lived together in the Red Rose Inn in Villanova, Pennsylvania from 1899 to 1901. They later lived, along with Henrietta Cozens, in a home in the Mt. Airy neighborhood of Philadelphia that they named Cogslea after their four surnames (Cozens, Oakley, Green and Smith).
Address: 627 St Georges Rd, Philadelphia, PA 19119, USA (40.05254, -75.20455)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 77001188, 1977
Place
In 1996, Violet Oakley was elected to the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame, the last of the “Red Rose Girls” to be inducted, but one of only ten women in the hall. Her home and studio at Yonkers, New York, where she resided intermittently between 1912 and 1915 is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Plashbourne Estate. Oakley was a member of Philadelphia's The Plastic Club, an organization established to promote "Art for art's sake". Other members included Elenore Abbott, Jessie Willcox Smith, and Elizabeth Shippen Green. Many of the women who founded the organization had been students of Howard Pyle. It was founded to provide a means to encourage one another professionally and create opportunities to sell their works of art. On June 14, 2014, Miss Oakley was featured in the first gay-themed tour of Green-Wood Cemetery, where she is interred in the Oakley family plot, Section 63, Lot 14788.
Life
Who: Violet Oakley (June 10, 1874 – February 25, 1961)
Violet Oakley was the first American woman to receive a public mural commission. During the first quarter of the XX century, she was renowned as a pathbreaker in mural decoration, a field that had been exclusively practiced by men. Oakley excelled at murals and stained glass designs that addressed themes from history and literature in Renaissance-revival styles. Elizabeth Shippen Green (September 1, 1871 – 1954) was an American illustrator. She illustrated children's books and worked for many years for Harper's Magazine. In 1911, at the age of forty, Green married Huger Elliott, an architecture professor, after a five-year engagement, and moved away from Cogslea. Green continued to work through the 1920s and illustrated a nonsense verse alphabet with her husband. Green died May 29, 1954 and is buried at The University of the South (735 University Ave, Sewanee, TN 37383). Jessie Willcox Smith (September 6, 1863 – May 3, 1935) was one of the most prominent female illustrators in the United States during the Golden Age of American illustration. She was a prolific contributor to respected books and magazines during the late XIX and early XX centuries. She illustrated stories and articles for clients such as Century, Collier's, Leslie's Weekly, Harper's, McClure's, Scribners, and the Ladies' Home Journal. She had an ongoing relationship with Good Housekeeping, including the long-running Mother Goose series of illustrations and creating all the covers from 1915 to 1933. Among the more than 60 books that Smith illustrated were Louisa May Alcott's “Little Women” and “An Old-Fashioned Girl,” Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's “Evangeline,” and Robert Louis Stevenson's “A Child's Garden of Verses.” Henrietta Cozens (1862-1940), served as the "wife" of the household. As the women's fame grew, the press lauded their accomplished Boston marriage. But when Green married at 39 after a seven-year engagement, Oakley's devastation created a scandal and severed the group's artistic partnership.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Violet Oakley’s home and studio at Yonkers, New York, where she resided intermittently between 1912 and 1915.
Address: 51 Carlton Rd, Yonkers, NY 10708, USA (40.93906, -73.84728)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 07000777, 2007.
Place
Built in 1911, Design by Carrère and Hastings (John Merven Carrère (1858-1911) and Thomas Hastings (1860-1929))
Plashbourne Estate is a historic estate located in the Lawrence Park West section of Yonkers, Westchester County, New York. It was built for artist Violet Oakley in the Tudor Revival style. It is a 2 1⁄2-story stone building with an irregular compound plan and cross-gabled roofline. After 1915, it became the home of Anna Lawrence Bisland (1872–1950), third daughter of William Van Duzer Lawrence, who resided there until her death. Grayson L. Kirk (1903–1997) resided at Plashbourne Estate from 1973 until his death.
Life
Who: Violet Oakley (June 10, 1874 – February 25, 1961)
As educational opportunities were made more available in the XIX century, women artists became part of professional enterprises, including founding their own art associations. Artwork made by women was considered to be inferior, and to help overcome that stereotype women became "increasingly vocal and confident" in promoting women's work, and thus became part of the emerging image of the educated, modern and freer "New Woman". Artists "played crucial roles in representing the New Woman, both by drawing images of the icon and exemplyfying this emerging type through their own lives." In the late XIX century and early XX century about 88% of the subscribers of 11,000 magazines and periodicals were women. As women entered the artist community, publishers hired women to create illustrations that depict the world through a woman's perspective. Other successful illustrators other than Violet Oakley were Jennie Augusta Brownscombe, Jessie Wilcox Smith, Rose O'Neill, and Elizabeth Shippen Green.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Kings County, New York.
Address: 500 25th St, Brooklyn, NY 11232, USA (40.65901, -73.99569)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 7.45-17.00
National Register of Historic Places: 97000228, 1977 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Located in Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn, it lies several blocks southwest of Prospect Park, between Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, Borough Park, Kensington, and Sunset Park. Paul Goldberger in The New York Times, wrote that it was said "it is the ambition of the New Yorker to live upon the Fifth Avenue, to take his airings in the Park, and to sleep with his fathers in Green-Wood.” The Pierrepont papers deposited at the Brooklyn Historical Society contain material about the organizing of Green-Wood Cemetery.
Notable queer burials at Green-Wood Cemetery:
• Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988), was one of the most important artists of the XX century. In 2006, Equality Forum featured Jean-Michel Basquiat during LGBT history month.
• Henry Ward Beecher (1813–1887), was a Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer, and speaker, known for his support of the abolition of slavery.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990), was a composer, conductor, author, music lecturer, and pianist. In a book released in October, 2013, “The Leonard Bernstein Letters,” his wife reveals his homosexuality.
• Elizabeth M. Cushier (died 1931). Doctors Emily Blackwell (1826-1910) and Elizabeth Cushier had a Boston Marriage. Blackwell co-founded the New York Infirmary for Women and Children (1857) and its Women's Medical College. Cushier was professor of medicine at the college and Blackwell's life-partner for twenty-eight years. About the relationship, Dr. Cushier wrote, “Thus the years happily passed” until in 1910 “a sad blow came in the death of Dr. Blackwell, making an irreparable beak in my life.” Dr. Blackwell is buried at Chilmark Cemetery, Massachusetts.
• Mary Elisabeth Dreier (September 26, 1875- August 15, 1963), was a New York social reformer along with her sister Margaret. Two other sisters, Dorothea and Katherine, were painters. She never married, but shared a home with fellow reformer Frances Kellor (buried alongside her). After Kellor’s death, Dreier lived alone for the rest of her life until dying in 1963, at her summer home in Bar Harbor, Maine.
• Fred Ebb (1928–2004), was a musical theatre lyricist who had many successful collaborations with composer John Kander. Ebb is interred in a mausoleum with Edwin “Eddie” Aldridge (1929–1997) and Martin Cohen (1926–1995) on the banks of Sylvan Water. In addition to the names and dates of each man, the phrase, “Together Forever” is also chiseled on the front of the mausoleum.
• Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829–1869), was a composer and pianist, best known as a virtuoso performer of his own romantic piano works.
• Richard Isay (1934–2012), was a psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, author and gay activist. Isay is considered a pioneer who changed the way that psychoanalysts view homosexuality.
• Paul Jabara (1948–1992), was an actor, singer, and songwriter. Paul Jabara died from AIDS complications after a long illness in Los Angeles, California.
• Frances Alice Kellor (October 20, 1873 – January 4, 1952), shared a home with fellow reformer Mary Dreier from 1905 until her death in 1952. Kellor was an American social reformer and chief investigator for the Bureau of Industries and Immigration of New York State in 1910-13, who specialized in the study of immigrants to the United States and women.
• Violet Oakley (1874–1961), was the first American woman to receive a public mural commission. Oakley and her friends, the artists Elizabeth Shippen Green and Jessie Willcox Smith, all former students of Howard Pyle, were named the Red Rose girls by him.
• Emma Stebbins (1815–1882), was among the first notable American woman sculptors, companion to actress Charlotte Cushman.
• Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933), artist. His daughter, Dorothy Trimble Tiffany (1891–1979), as Dorothy Burlingham, became a noted psychoanalyst and lifelong friend and partner of Anna Freud.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
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Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

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