Mar. 21st, 2017

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Joan Ann Werner Laurie was an English book and magazine editor.
Born: 1920
Died: 1964
Lived: 35 Carlyle Square, SW3
7 Clareville Grove, SW7
Buried: Golders Green Crematorium, Golders Green, London Borough of Barnet, Greater London, England (cremated)
Find A Grave Memorial# 173517450
Spouse: Paul Seyler
Parents: Thomas Werner Laurie
People also search for: Nancy Spain, Thomas Werner Laurie, Norah Smiles

Cemetery: Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.

Address: 60 Hoop Ln, London NW11 7NL, UK (51.57687, -0.19413)
Phone: +44 20 8455 2374
English Heritage Building ID: 199262 (Grade II, 1993)

Place
The land for the crematorium was purchased in 1900, costing £6,000, and the crematorium was opened in 1902 by Sir Henry Thompson. The crematorium, the Philipson Family mausoleum, designed by Edwin Lutyens, the wall, along with memorials and gates, the Martin Smith Mausoleum, and Into The Silent Land statue are all Grade II listed buildings. The gardens are included in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. Golders Green Crematorium, as it is usually called, is in Hoop Lane, off Finchley Road, Golders Green, London NW11, ten minutes’ walk from Golders Green tube station. It is directly opposite the Golders Green Jewish Cemetery (Golders Green is an area with a large Jewish population.) The crematorium is secular, accepts all faiths and non-believers; clients may arrange their own type of service or remembrance event and choose whatever music they wish. A map of the Gardens of Remembrance and some information on persons cremated here is available from the office. The staff are very helpful in finding a specific location. The columbaria are now locked, although they can still be visited (if accompanied.) There is also a tea room.

Notable queer burials at Golders Green Crematorium:
• Richard Addinsell (1904-1977), was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film “Dangerous Moonlight” (also known under the later title “Suicide Squadron”). Addinsell retired from public life in the 1960s, gradually becoming estranged from his close friends. He was, for many years, the companion of the fashion designer Victor Stiebel, who died in 1976.
• Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932), Scholar and advocate of a league of nations. He was the third of the five children of Lowes Cato Dickinson (1819-1908) and his wife, Margaret Ellen (d. 1882), daughter of William Smith Williams.
• Edith Ellis (1861-1916), psychologist. She was noted for her novels and memoirs.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), psychologist. He and his wife, Edith Ellis, were psychologists and writers. He wrote the controversial "Studies in the Psychology of Sex," which was banned as obscene.
• Anna Freud (1895-1982) and Dorothy Burlingham (1891-1979), next to each other and to others in the Freud family, including Sigmund Freud.
• Kenneth Halliwell (1926-1967), British actor and writer. He was the mentor, partner, and the eventual murderer of playwright Joe Orton. Their ashes were mingled and scattered in the same garden.
• Leslie Poles Hartley (1895–1972), known as L. P. Hartley, was a British novelist and short story writer. Until his death in 1972, Hartley lived alone but for a household of servants, in London, Salisbury and at a home on the Avon, near Bath. Between the wars, Venice was a favoured and frequent destination.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), actor, writer and lyricist. His ashes are buried beneath a lilac tree which has a plaque enscribed "Ivor Novello 6th March 1951 ‘Till you are home once more’.” He has also a memorial inside the St. Paul's Cathedral (New Change, London, London, EC4M 9AD)
• Norman O'Neill (1875-1934), British composer and conductor. His studies were facilitated by Eric Stenbock, with whom it is said he had a relationship. He married Adine Berthe Maria Ruckert (1875-1947) on 2 July 1899 in Paris, France. Adine was a celebrated pianist and music teacher in her own right. When he died in 1934 he was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, London, as was Adine on her death in 1947. There is a plaque there in memory to both of them.
• Joe Orton (1933-1967), playwright. Orton and his lover, Kenneth Halliwell, moved at 25 Noël Road, Islington, in 1959, at a time when the area was far from fashionable. Eight years later, Halliwell killed himself after murdering Orton.

Cremated here but ashes taken elsewhere:
• Sir Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), 1st Earl of Bewdley, K.G., P.C. was the leading Conservative politician between the two world wars and was Prime Minister for three terms (1923-4, 1924-29 and 1935-37). Ashes removed to Worcester Cathedral.
• Roger Fry (1866-1934), English artist and critic, a member of the Bloomsbury group. He had an affair with Vanessa Bell, and when she left him, he was heartbroken. Only in 1924 he found happiness with Helen Anrep, a former wife of the Russian-born mosaicist, Boris Anrep. His ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel, Cambridge, in a casket decorated by Vanessa Bell.
• In his later years Lord Ronald Gower had been a crusader for cremation, and after his death on March 9, 1916 his body was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were interred at Rusthall, Kent, on 14 March 1916.
• John Inman (1935-2007), actor, star of “Are You Being Served?,” location of ashes unknown.
• Joan Werner Laurie (1920–1964) was an English book and magazine editor. She met journalist and broadcaster Nancy Spain (1917-1964) in 1950 and they became life partners. Joan and Nancy lived openly together with their sons, and later the couple provided a home to Windmill Theatre owner and rally driver Sheila van Damm. She was learning to fly when she died, with Nancy Spain and four others, when the Piper Apache aeroplane crashed near Aintree racecourse on the way to the 1964 Grand National. She was cremated with Spain at Golders Green Crematorium, London. Nancy Spain is buried with her father at Holy Trinity (A68 four miles north of Otterburn, Horsley, Northumberland, NE19 1RU). The relationship between Werner Laurie and Spain is described in Rose Collis' biography of Nancy Spain, published in 1997.
• Charles Ricketts (1866-1931) was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were to be scattered to the four winds in Richmond Park.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: Nancy Spain (1917-1964), journalist, novelist, and television personality, shared a home with publisher Joan (Jonnie) Werner Laurie at 35 Carlyle Square, Chelsea, London SW3 6HA, from 1951 to 1953, and 7 Clareville Grove, Kensington, London SW7 5AU, from 1953 to 1955.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Karl Soehnlein better known by his literary name K. M. Soehnlein is an American writer who wrote the novels The World of Normal Boys and You Can Say You Knew Me When. He was also part of the band The Cubby Creatures.
Born: New Jersey, United States
Education: San Francisco State University
Awards: Lambda Literary Award for Gay Fiction
Married: March 21, 2009
September 30, 2013

Karl Manfred Soehnlein better known by his literary name K. M. Soehnlein is an American writer, most famous for his novels The World of Normal Boys and You Can Say You Knew Me When. His most recent novel is Robin and Ruby. He was also a musician playing the clarinet for six years as part of the band The Cubby Creatures. He lives in San Francisco's SoMa district with his partner Kevin Clarke, a performer and member of the Berkeley-based Shotgun Players. Clarke is also a freelance graphic design consultant. They met in 1999 when they were living around the corner from each other in the Mission district of San Francisco. Their first encounter was at a cafe. Clarke said he attempted to start a conversation, but admitted, “My opening gambit was a miserable failure.” Karl said that Kevin “asked if my name was Darren, so I assumed he thought I was someone else.” About a week later, Kevin spotted Karl at a neighborhood laundry. "I caught him alone, folding a yellow T-shirt,” Kevin said. “He flashed me a let’s-try-that-again grin.” They married on March 21, 2009, at the Lodge at the Regency Center in San Francisco, surrounded by family and friends. They were legally married on September 30, 2013 -- after the Supreme Court struck down Prop 8.

Together since 1999: 16 years.
Karl Manfred "K.M." Soehnlein & Kevin Clarke
Married: March 21, 2009 / September 30, 2013

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
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Lilyan Tashman was an American vaudeville, Broadway, and film actress. Tashman was best known for her supporting roles as tongue-in-cheek villainesses and the vindictive "other woman."
Born: October 23, 1896, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: March 21, 1934, New York City, New York, United States
Lived: Lilowe, 718 North Linden Dr, Beverly Hills
Buried: Washington Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA, Plot: Palestine Lodge, 71, I.O.S.B. se
Find A Grave Memorial# 6343126
Spouse: Edmund Lowe (m. 1925–1934), Al Lee (m. 1914–1921)
Parents: Maurice Tashman, Rose Tashman
Siblings: Hattie Tashman, Jennie Tashman
Married: September 21, 1925

Lilyan Tashman was a Brooklyn-born Jewish American vaudeville, Broadway, and film actress. Tashman was a lesbian and had numerous backstage same-sex liaisons as a New York City chorine and actress. From 1928 to 1932, she was Greta Garbo’s lover. However, Tashman was a fiercely jealous person and had frequent altercations with her lovers. By November 1932, Garbo's patience had worn thin and she ended the relationship, leaving Tashman devastated. In 1925, Tashman married openly gay actor and longtime friend Edmund Lowe, presumably to present a heterosexual façade to the world. The two became the darlings of Hollywood reporters and were touted in fan magazines as having "the ideal marriage". The couple entertained lavishly at "Lilowe", their Beverly Hills home, and weekly parties became full-blown orgies with A-list celebrities seeking invitations. Tashman died from cancer at Doctor's Hospital in New York City on March 21, 1934. Her last film, Frankie and Johnny, was released posthumously.

Together from 1925 to 1934: 9 years.
Edmund Dantes Lowe (March 3, 1890 – April 21, 1971)
Lilyan Tashman (October 23, 1896 – March 21, 1934)
Married: September 21, 1925

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
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Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: Lilyan Tashman (1896-1934) and Edmund Lowe (1890-1971) married on September 1, 1925. “We were two people who had reached the years of mental discretion,” she later wrote, “who knew exactly what we were doing with our lives and why.” The two quickly became one of the most popular and social active couples in filmdom. Lilyan and Edmund gave pool parties, beach parties, and cocktail parties that were famous for their chic and wit. Their ultra-modern, red-and-white Beverly Hills home, coyly dubbed “Lilowe” (718 North Linden Dr, Beverly Hills, CA 90210) became known to fan throughout the world via magazine layouts.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
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Cemetery: At Washington Cemetery (5400 Bay Pkwy, Brooklyn, NY 11230) is buried Lilyan Tashman (1896-1934), American vaudeville, Broadway, and film actress. On September 21, 1925, Tashman, who was lesbian, married longtime friend Edmund Lowe, an actor, who was gay. The two became the darlings of Hollywood reporters and were touted in fan magazines as having "the ideal marriage". The couple entertained lavishly at "Lilowe", their Beverly Hills home, and weekly parties invitations. Tashman died of cancer at Doctor's Hospital in New York City on March 21, 1934 at the age of 37.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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Matthew Montgomery is an American actor, producer and writer born in Houston, Texas. Since his début in Gone, But Not Forgotten, he has specialized in independent movies with LGBT themes.
Born: March 16, 1978, Houston, Texas, United States
Education: University of Southern California
Spouse: Steve Callahan (m. 2015)
Anniversary: March 21, 2008
Married: March 21, 2015

After winning Best Supporting Actor at the Tampa International Gay Film Festival for the film Nine Lives, Steve Callahan has become a regular on the gay film circuit. He starred in East Side Story, winner of the 2009 GLAAD Award. Matthew Montgomery (born Matthew Robert Ramírez) is an American actor, producer and writer born in Corpus Christi, Texas. Since his début in Gone, But Not Forgotten, he has specialized in independent movies with LGBT themes. Steve Callahan and Matthew Montgomery met working as actors in the film Pornography: A Thriller. They had one scene together in the movie, but ending up talking all night on set. They went on their first date on March 21, 2008 and have been together since. They are currently engaged. Matt and Steve live in Los Angeles with their dog Dude.

Together since 2008: 7 years.
Matthew Montgomery (born March 16, 1978)
Steve Callahan (born August 8, 1967)
Anniversary: March 21, 2008 / Married: March 21, 2015

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Maurice Talvande, Count de Mauny Talvande, was a French-born naturalised British landscaper, furniture-maker, and self-inventor, who is best known as the owner and recreator of Taprobane Island, in Sri Lanka.
Born: 1866
Died: November 1941
Lived: Taprobane Island (81700)
Buried: St Mary's Burial Grounds, Jaffna, Northern, Sri Lanka
Find A Grave Memorial# 176273134

House: Count de Mauny of Talvande, whose actual name was Maurice Maria Talvande (1866-1941), was born in Le Mans. His father was Felix Talvande. He adopted the prefix of "Count de Mauny" from his mother, Mme Marguerite de Mauny Talvande, and the suffix of "Talvande" from his father, Felix Talvande, who was a bank manager in provincial France. His father died in 1901, in or near Nantes and his mother died in 1907 in Pontvallain. His mother, whose full name was, Margeurite Adelaide Louise Froger de Mauny was born in 1842. Her parents were Alexandre Jacques Eduard Froger de Mauny and Henriette Martin Lavallee. His father, Felix Talvande was born in 1832 and his parents married in Le mans on June 8, 1862. Maurice was born four years later in Le Mans where his father was then employed as a bank manager of the Le Mans branch of Banque de France until 1866. After 1868 Felix worked as a banker at Portet-Lavigierie et Talvande which became the Bank Talvande in 1882 until it and Talvande himself were made bankrupt in 1889. Marguerite applied for legal separation from Felix in 1890 and thereafter resided with her mother at Domaine du Bourg in 72510 Pontvallain, which had been in the possession and ownership of the de Mauny family since 1859. On the death of his mother, Maurice inherited Domaine du Bourg, the family home, which he then sold and shared the proceeds of 17000 francs with his brother Roger and sister Suzanne-Marie. Roger had a son named Albert Talvande.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906692
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House: In 1952, Paul Bowles bought the tiny island of Taprobane, off the coast of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka.) There he wrote much of his novel “The Spider’s House,” returning to Tangier in the warmer months. He returned to Sri Lanka most winters.

Address: Weligama By Pass Rd, Weligama 81700, Sri Lanka (5.96775, 80.42573)

Place
Taprobane Island is a rocky private island with one villa, located just off the southern coast of Sri Lanka opposite the village of Weligama. The island was named after the old Greek word for Sri Lanka. The island was previously owned by (self-titled) Count Maurice Maria de Mauny Talvande who fell in love with Weligama Bay. It was he who had the villa built on this tiny island. The islet passed on to the American author and composer Paul Bowles and then the Sri Lankan born former UN Chief Prosecutor Sir Desmond Lorenz de Silva before it came to the ownership of the Australian businessman Geoffrey Dobbs. Notable people who stayed on Taprobane include Dutch author Peter ten Hoopen, who spent a month there in 1984 during civil unrest on the mainland, as well as Kylie Minogue, who composed a song about the island inspired by her stay titled "Taprobane (Extraordinary Day.”) It had inspired Jason Kouchak to compose "Dark Island" in his 1999 album Watercolours.

Life
Who: Maurice Talvande, Count de Mauny Talvande (March 21, 1866 – November 27, 1941)
Maurice Talvande attended St Mary's College at Hales Place in Canterbury, which was run by French Jesuit Priests, during the period 1883-1884. His brother Roger also attended St Mary's College and stayed on for a longer period from 1883-1888. Maurice, subsequently, went to Saint-Cyr Military College which was also influenced by the Jesuit Order. Despite the basic French environment that he was surrounded by, Maurice probably learned his English too while he was under their tutorship. His close friendship with George Byng, brother of Lady Mary, whom he first met at St Mary's College in Canterbury, may have given him the opportunity to meet Mary, in the first place, and then develop into a relationship that ended in marriage to her. After completing his education, it is reported that, he travelled widely in America for several years. He is reported to have sailed from Le Havre and arrived in New York, in the US, on November 19, 1894 on board the 9,000 ton SS La Touraine., being in transit to Boston, in a journey that lasted about seven days. Count Maurice Maria de Mauny Talvande married Lady Mary Elizabeth Agnes Bynge, daughter of the fourth Earl of Strafford, enry William John Byng, on June 24, 1898. The wedding was a great social occasion and attended by the Princess of Wales, Princess Christian and Prince and Princess Saxe-Weimer. His mother Mme de Mauny Talvande and brother Roger de Mauny Talvande also attended. His father, Felix Talvande, was not present. The bridegroom was 32 and the bride was 33 years old at the timeof their marriage. The newly wed De Mauny's settled down in 1898 at the famous Azay-le-Rideau castle, whose long and memorable history goes bact to the reign of Francois I in the XVI century. From Azay, Maurice and Mary moved to Cannes where their son Victor Alexander Christian henry George was born on April 19 1899. From here they moved briefly to San Remo and then returned to England. On their return from France in 1900 the de Mauny family moved to an old Queen Anne house called "Terrick House", near Ellesbrough in Buckimhamshire. A daughter, Alexandra Mary, was born here on July 19 1904. Maurice is reported to have written three books, "The Peace of Suffering 1914-1918", "Gardening in Ceylon", "The Gardens of Taprobane". Maurice was a great traveller. It is believed that he visited Ceylon for extended periods of a time a year or two after 1910. William Warren has suggested in "Tropical Asian Style", that de Mauny was first invited to Ceylon in 1912 by Sir Thomas Lipton, the tea magnate. Warren has conjectured that it was some “great personal disaster” that drove de Mauny to Ceylon. It is possible that both his diminishing financial status and also his many marital problems he was facing may have been the reasons for his move eastwards.de Mauny travelled several times between Hampshire and Ceylon soon after his bankruptcy problems. His skills as an expert gardener and furniture maker in Ceylon, and, later on Journalism, may have provided him with the necessary finances to supplekent his travel and living. There are accounts from people who knew him in Ceylon that he also used to receive remittances from overseas which probably could have beensent by his wife, Mary, from time to time for his upkeep and living. It is reported that he also ran a furniture factory and workshop in Colombo. A number of de Mauny furniture pieces have survived in the hands of private owners. They are now highly valued and cherished in Sri Lanka. He started the "Weligama Local Industrues" in 1925 which as he claimed gave employment to over 200 carpenters, carvers and inlayers. By 1930, the enterprise suffered at the hands of the Depression and had to be halted until better times. It was restarted in 1936. The craftsmanship was most admirable and the designs were very much French styles of that time. Ferguson's Ceylon Directory for 1920-21 shows that his address was “Ascot,” Albert Crescent, Cinnamon Gardens, Colombo 7, a very elite and high-society area of Colombo. His son, Victor, is also listed as living there. It was in September 1927 that he saw for the first time, and quite by chance, a place that was to become his final home. At the center of the arc of the Bay of Weligama, in the southern tip of Ceylon, “a red granite rock, covered with palms and jungle shrub, rising from the Indian Ocean - an emerald in a setting of pink corral” was where he finally chose to build andlive his eternal dream of peace and tranquility close to nature that he loved so much. He swam across the narrow straight and saw an admirable view as he reached the plateau of the rock. "There was nothing", he recalled some ten years later, "between me and the South Pole". Having located and identified his magical island, which was only a few acres in area, de Mauny then set upon the task of building it into his future home that he had been dreaming of for so many years. The foundation stone of the house was laid on February 1, 1927 and thus initiated the beginning of what was to become a famous and much visited site by many distinguished persons. The seeds of "The Gardens of Taprobane" had been planted. The island was named "Taprobane" based on the ancient name for Ceylon given by the Greeks and also because it suited its pear-shape outline more like a mini Ceylon itself. The local name, by tradition, for the sland was "Galduwa" meaning "Rock Islan" in Sinalese. It is conjectured that the island may have been a art of the mainland in ancient tmes as it is not shown in maps of the Portuguese Colonial era. The name Taprobane is also considered to have been originated from the sanskrit "Tamba Vanna" meaning "copper colored" as a reference to the many famous golden beaches of Ceylon. The house was built on a 135 feet square area with a broad terrace surrounding it. It was octagonal in shape spanninga surface of 25 by 25 yards. This gave the resident and eight faced view of the outsde world with the north side facing towards the mainland and the south facing Antarctica in the South Pole. The central hall was called the "Hall of Lotus" and was also octagonal in shape measuring 26 by 26 feet. A 30 foot high dome lined with eight panels of inlaid wood was located in the center of he hall. The panels were dyed with an opaque gold and blue color and bore designs of Lotus buds and flowers. The dome was supported by eight square pilars of Wedgewood-blue, 24 feet tall. On either side of these were two light columns, 12 feet tall, making sixteen in all, terracotta with gilded capitals. They supported a white stone traverse that connected the pillars in an arch that was 12 foot span. This was hung with curtains of soft blue silk with a deep brocaded border of art noveau design at the bottom colored black and gold on cream. The rooms converged on the hall through eight arches. A Sigiriya frescoe styled border ran along the stone white walls. The whole scheme was engulfed in a golden hue by light entering through Venetian blinds created out of amber colored glass. The furniture within was made by local craftsmen using some of the rarest woods of Ceylon. They were mainly of French style although here were any pieces that belonged to the Dutch designs too. A carpet of Maidenhair ferns and a light bronze creeper with clumps of Eucharist Lilies adorned the hall. From the north-east terrace here was a splendid view of the shoreline, the forest of coconut palms fringing the Bay of Weligama, and the copper colored sands clustered with boats on a pea-green sea. Through the entrances of iron gates, with their design of brass-headed peacocks with prussian blue eyes one could see he openness and vastness of the mighty Indian Ocean sprawling through time. The Count was residing at Weligama in 1931. His son, Victor Alexander, was then residing at "Boxmead", Turret Road (now renamed to Dharmapala Mawatha and running from Kollupitiya junction in Colombo 3 all the way down to Liptons Circus in Colombo 7, bounding one of the most prestigious residential areas of Colombo), Colombo 7. Victor was employed at the Rosehough Tea Company, first as an Assistant and then as an under-manager. It is also reported in the Fergusons Directory that he held the position of Second Lieutenant in the Royal Navy. he went on to become a Commander in the Royal Navy in WW II, wher he was awarded the DFC. He eventually went on to become the Chairman of Rosehough until he resigned in the early 1970's. Local records in Sri Lanka show that the island was actually purchased by de Mauny for a sum of Rs 250 in 1925 in the name of his son Victor Alexander. It remained in his ownership until it was sold by public auction, in 1942, for Rs 12,000. The Count encouraged people to visit is island. His historical visitors book was filled with names of Kings, Princes, Dukes, Duchesses, Aristocrats, Prime Ministers, and other famous personalities from across the blue marble. Count Maurice de Mauny Talvande died on November 27, 1941 while at the Chelvarayan Estate, Navatkuli, in the northern city of Jaffna in Ceylon. Hs remains were buried at St Mary's Burial Grounds in Jaffna. Maurice's son Victor passed away in 1978 and his daughter Alexandra died in 1989. They were both chidlless. De Mauny's island was a very famous destination for many notables from different nations. The island was sold by public auction in 1942 after having been neglected ad in a state of derelict for many years. In 1957 Paul Bowles wrote an article about finding and living on a tiny tropical island in the Indian Ocean – Taprobane – only one hundred yards off the coast of Weligama, near Galle, in southern Ceylon (now Sri Lanka.) He first became intrigued by Taprobane island in 1949 when he saw photographs of it during a stay at Wilton House, the magnificent ancestral home of his friend from Tangier, David Herbert. The Herbert family had stayed on the island in the mid-1930s. Bowles first visited Ceylon in 1950 and two years later, when Taprobane was put up for sale, he bought the island with some of the proceeds from his second book “The Delicate Prey and Other Stories.” Paul Bowles wrote the final chapters of “The Spider’s House” while living on Taprobane. Bowles sold the island n 1956 to the Irish writer Shaun Mandy. For several years, since 1964, the island was in the ownership of of the de Silva whose senior member was Desmond de Silva QC, the very distinguished British barristor. The island was then on a long lease to to the very successful Hong Kong business tycoon Geofrey Dobbs. It may be interesting to note that the wife of Desmond de Silva is Princess Katharina of Yugoslavia. The author Robin Maugham, who visited the Island as a young man, and in the mid-1970s, considered the unique beauty and harmony of the villa had become compromised after de Mauny's death by partitioning and the loss of his furniture and fittings, and that the area itself had been despoiled by the construction of a new road along the mainland beach. Since then, and particularly after the 2004 tsunami, significant development of the adjoining mainland village has occurred.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544068435 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544068433
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6980677
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Sir Michael Scudamore Redgrave CBE was an British stage and film actor, director, manager and author.
Born: March 20, 1908, Bristol, United Kingdom
Died: March 21, 1985, Denham, United Kingdom
Education: University of Cambridge
Clifton College
Lived: Bedford House, Chiswick Mall, Chiswick, London W4 2PJ, UK
3 Hans Crescent, SW1X
Buried: St Paul Churchyard, Covent Garden, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England
Find A Grave Memorial# 6942760
Height: 1.9 m
Spouse: Rachel Kempson (m. 1935–1985)
Grandchildren: Natasha Richardson, Joely Richardson, more

Sir Michael Redgrave was an English stage and film actor, director, manager and author. During the filming of Fritz Lang's Secret Beyond the Door (1948), Redgrave met Bob Mitchell. They became lovers, Mitchell set up house close to the Redgraves, and he became a surrogate "uncle" to Redgrave's children (then aged 11, 9 and 5), who adored him. Mitchell later had children of his own, including a son he named Michael. Fred Sadoff, an actor/director who became Redgrave’s assistant and shared his lodgings in New York and London, followed Mitchell. A card was found among Redgrave's effects after his death. The card was signed "Tommy, Liverpool, January 1940", and on it were the words (quoted from W.H. Auden): "The world is love. Surely one fearless kiss would cure the million fevers". Rachel Kempson recounted that, when she proposed to him, Redgrave said that there were "difficulties to do with his nature, and that he felt he ought not to marry". She said that she understood, it did not matter and that she loved him. To this, Redgrave replied, "Very well. If you're sure, we will".

Together from 1948 to 1956: 8 years.
Bob Mitchell
Sir Michael Scudamore Redgrave, CBE (March 20, 1908 – March 21, 1985)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Fred Sadoff was an American film, stage and television actor. In 1956, he became personal assistant to Michael Redgrave who starred in and directed a production of The Sleeping Prince. Lynn Redgrave said years later in a filmed documentary: "Bob Mitchell and Fred Sadoff were brought in as part of the family, but we didn't know just how much family they really were." There seems to be only one extant written reference to Fred by a Redgrave - when Rachel, writing to Michael, described Fred "tout court" as "your lover." "Some people thought he used my father," Corin said, "and in a way he did. But I think he got no more from their relationship than he gave. Though he could never replace Bob in my father's life, he gave a great deal, [and he was] indomitably cheerful, funny and loyal after a fashion.” Eventually returning to the United States, Sadoff found success as an actor in The Poseidon Adventure in 1972 when he was cast as Linarcos, the company representative who ordered Captain Harrison (Leslie Nielsen) full ahead. He also acted in other films, including Papillon and The Terminal Man in 1974. Fred Sadoff died of AIDS on May 6, 1994 in his home in Los Angeles, California at age 67.

Together from 1956 to (before) 1972: 16 years.
Fred Sadoff (October 21, 1926 — May 6, 1994)
Sir Michael Redgrave (March 20, 1908 - March 21, 1985)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Clifton College (32 College Rd, Bristol, City of Bristol BS8 3JH) is a co-educational independent school in the suburb of Clifton in the port city of Bristol in South West England, founded in 1862. In its early years it was notable (compared with most Public Schools of the time) for emphasising science rather than classics in the curriculum, and for being less concerned with social elitism, e.g. by admitting day-boys on equal terms and providing a dedicated boarding house for Jewish boys. Having linked its General Studies classes with Badminton School since 1972, it admitted girls to the Sixth Form in 1987 and is now fully coeducational. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Horatio Brown (1854-1926), Robert Smythe Hichens (1864-1950), Roger Fry (1866-1934), L. P. Hartley (1895-1972), Michael Redgrave (1908-1985).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: The University of Cambridge (informally Cambridge University or simply Cambridge, 4 Mill Ln, Cambridge CB2 1RZ) is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and given royal charter status by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university. The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford after a dispute with the townspeople. The two ancient universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge".

Notable queer alumni and faculty at University of Cambridge:
• Charles Robert Ashbee (1863–1942) was born in 1863 in Isleworth, the son of businessman and erotic bibliophile Henry Spencer Ashbee. His Jewish mother developed suffragette views, and his well-educated sisters were progressive as well. Ashbee went to Wellington College and read history at King's College, from 1883 to 1886, and studied under the architect George Frederick Bodley. His papers and journals are at King's College.
• Anthony Bacon (1558–1601) and Francis Bacon (1561-1626) enrolled in Trinity College in April 1573, where they lived in the household of the Master of Trinity College, John Whitgift.
• Philip Bainbridge (1891-1918), a graduate of Eton and Trinity College, was killed in action at the Battle of Épehy on September 18, 1918, six weeks before his friend Wilfred Owen.
• Thomas Baines (1622–1680) studied at Christ's College, under the tuition of Henry More, and took the degree of B.A. in 1642, and M.A. in 1649. An accident brought him under the notice of John Finch, then at the same college, and from this time they became inseparable friends.
• William John Bankes (1786–1855) was educated at Westminster School and continued his studies at Trinity College, where he received his BA in 1808 and his MA in 1811. Lord Byron, a fellow student at Trinity College, became Bankes' lifelong friend.
• Cecil Beaton (1904-1980) attended Harrow School, and then, despite having little or no interest in academia, moved on to St John's College, and studied history, art and architecture. Beaton continued his photography, and through his university contacts managed to get a portrait depicting the Duchess of Malfi published in Vogue. It was actually George "Dadie" Rylands – "a slightly out-of-focus snapshot of him as Webster's Duchess of Malfi standing in the sub-aqueous light outside the men's lavatory of the ADC Theatre at Cambridge." Beaton left Cambridge without a degree in 1925.
• A.C. Benson (1862-1925) was educated at Temple Grove School, Eton, and King's College. From 1885 to 1903 he taught at Eton, returning to Cambridge to lecture in English literature for Magdalene College. From 1915 to 1925, he was the 28th Master of Magdalene. From 1906, he was a governor of Gresham's School. He is buried at the Ascension Burial Ground (Cambridge CB3 0EA). His cousin James Bethune-Baker is also buried there.
• Anthony Blunt (1907-1983) won a scholarship in mathematics to Trinity College. At that time, scholars in Cambridge University could not earn a degree in less than three years, and hence Blunt spent four years at Trinity and switched to Modern Languages, eventually graduating in 1930 with a first class degree. He taught French at Cambridge and became a Fellow of Trinity College in 1932. Like Guy Burgess, Blunt was known to be homosexual, which was a criminal activity at that time in Britain. Both were members of the Cambridge Apostles (also known as the Conversazione Society), a clandestine Cambridge discussion group of 12 undergraduates, mostly from Trinity and King's Colleges who considered themselves to be the brightest minds in the university. Many were homosexual and Marxist at that time. Amongst other members, also later accused of being part of the Cambridge spy ring, were the American Michael Whitney Straight and Victor Rothschild who later worked for MI5. Rothschild gave Blunt £100 to purchase “Eliezar and Rebecca” by Nicolas Poussin. The painting was sold by Blunt's executors in 1985 for £100,000 and is now in the Fitzwilliam Museum.
• Philip Brett (1937-2002) received his academic degrees from King's College. He was a distinguished professor of musicology, accomplished keyboard player, author and authority on music of the Elizabethan period. He spent his entire teaching career in the University of California system: at Berkeley from 1966 to 1991, at Riverside from 1991 to 2001, and at UCLA for one year. From 1976 onward, Philip produced a steady series of influential articles and books exploring the implications of gay and lesbian sexuality in music. Some of these works included, “Queering the Pitch: The New Gay and Lesbian Musicology” (1994), “Cruising the Performative: Interventions into the Representation of Ethnicity, Nationality, and Sexuality” (1995), and “Decomposition: Post-Disciplinary Performance” (2000). In appreciation of his extraordinary achievement as scholar, teacher and organizer, the Gay and Lesbian Study Group of the American Musicology Society, created the Philip Brett Award in 1996. They give the award each year to honor exceptional musicological work in the field of GLBT studies. For his specialization of early music he received the Noah Greenberg Award in 1980 and a Grammy nomination in 1991. He died of cancer just one day shy of his 65th birthday. He is survived by his registered domestic/life partner of 28 years, Professor George Haggerty, Chair of the Department of English at University of California, Riverside. Professor Brett is buried at St Faith’s Crematorium (75 Manor Rd, Horsham St Faith, Norwich NR10 3LF), Plot: Memorial Garden at Horsham.
• Reginald Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher (1852-1930), known as Regy, was the son of William Baliol Brett, 1st Viscount Esher and Eugénie Mayer. Born in London, Esher remembered sitting on the lap of an old man who had played violin for Marie Antoinette, and was educated at Eton and Trinity College. At Cambridge, Brett was profoundly influenced by William Harcourt the radical lawyer, politician and Professor of International Law. Harcourt controlled Brett's rooms, and lifestyle at Cambridge. Brett was admitted to the Society of Apostles, dedicated to emergent philosophies of European atheism; their number included the aristocratic literati of liberalism Frank, Gerald and Eustace Balfour, Frederick and Arthur Myers, Hallam and Lionel Tennyson, Edmund Gurney, S H and J G Butcher.
• Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), while travelling in Europe, prepared a thesis, entitled "John Webster and the Elizabethan Drama", which won him a scholarship to King's College, where he became a member of the Cambridge Apostles, was elected as President of the Cambridge University Fabian Society, helped found the Marlowe Society drama club and acted in plays including the Cambridge Greek Play. Brooke made friends among the Bloomsbury group of writers, some of whom admired his talent while others were more impressed by his good looks. Virginia Woolf boasted to Vita Sackville-West of once going skinny-dipping with Brooke in a moonlit pool when they were in Cambridge together.
• Oscar Browning (1837-1923) was educated at King's College, where he became fellow and tutor, graduating fourth in the classical tripos of 1860, and where he was inducted into the exclusive Cambridge Apostles, a debating society for the Cambridge elite. After being a master at Eton College for 15 years until he was dismissed in 1857, Browning returned to King's College, where he took up a life fellowship and achieved a reputation as a wit, becoming universally known as "O.B.". He travelled to India at George Curzon's invitation after the latter had become Viceroy. In 1876 he resumed residence at Cambridge, where he became university lecturer in history. He soon became a prominent figure in college and university life, encouraging especially the study of political science and modern political history, the extension of university teaching and the movement for the training of teachers. Browning served as principal of the Cambridge University Day Training College (1891–1909), treasurer of the Cambridge Union Society (1881–1902), founding treasurer of the Cambridge University Liberal Club (1885–1908), and president of the Cambridge Footlights (1890–1895).
• Guy Burgess (1911-1963) attended Trinity College. He joined the conservative Pitt Club but was also recruited into the Cambridge Apostles, a secret, elite debating society at the University, whose members at the time were largely Marxist and included Anthony Blunt. Burgess, together with Blunt, Maclean and Philby, was recruited by the Comintern.
• Samuel Butler (1835-1902) went up to St John's College in 1854, where he obtained a first in Classics in 1858. Tthe graduate society of St John's is named the Samuel Butler Room (SBR) in his honour.
• George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron (1788–1824) went up to Trinity College, where he met and formed a close friendship with the younger John Edleston. About his "protégé" he wrote, "He has been my almost constant associate since October, 1805, when I entered Trinity College. His voice first attracted my attention, his countenance fixed it, and his manners attached me to him for ever." In his memory Byron composed “Thyrza,” a series of elegies. Edleston gave Byron a ring which Byron was wearing when he died. In later years he described the affair as "a violent, though pure love and passion". Also while at Cambridge he formed lifelong friendships with men such as John Cam Hobhouse and Francis Hodgson, a Fellow at King's College, with whom he corresponded on literary and other matters until the end of his life.
• Edward Carpenter (1844-1929)’s academic ability appeared relatively late in his youth, but was sufficient enough to earn him a place at Trinity Hall. Whilst there he began to explore his feelings for men. One of the most notable examples of this is his close friendship with Edward Anthony Beck (later Master of Trinity Hall), which, according to Carpenter, had "a touch of romance". Beck eventually ended their friendship, causing Carpenter great emotional heartache. Carpenter graduated as 10th Wrangler in 1868.
• Graham Chapman (1941-1989) began to study medicine at Emmanuel College in 1959. He joined the Cambridge Footlights, where he first began writing with John Cleese. Following graduation, Chapman joined the Footlights show "Cambridge Circus" and toured New Zealand, deferring his medical studies for a year. After the tour, he continued his studies at St Bartholomew's Medical College, but became torn between whether to pursue a career in medicine or acting. His brother John later said, "He wasn't ever driven to go into medicine ... it wasn't his life's ambition."
• Ralph Chubb (1892-1960) was born in Harpenden, Hertfordshire. His family moved to the historic town of St Albans before his first birthday. Chubb attended St Albans School and Selwyn College before becoming an officer in the WWI. He served with distinction but developed neurasthenia, and he was invalided out in 1918.
• William Johnson Cory (1823-1892) studied at King's College, where he gained the chancellor's medal for an English poem on Plato in 1843, and the Craven Scholarship in 1844.
• Aleister Crowley (1875-1947) began a three-year course at Trinity College, in October, 1895 where he was entered for the Moral Science Tripos studying philosophy. With approval from his personal tutor, he changed to English literature, which was not then part of the curriculum offered. Crowley spent much of his time at university engaged in his pastimes, becoming president of the chess club and practising the game for two hours a day; he briefly considered a professional career as a chess player. Crowley also embraced his love of literature and poetry, particularly the works of Richard Francis Burton and Percy Bysshe Shelley. Many of his own poems appeared in student publications such as The Granta, Cambridge Magazine, and Cantab. At Cambridge, Crowley maintained a vigorous sex life, largely with female prostitutes, from one of whom he caught syphilis, but eventually he took part in same-sex activities, despite their illegality. In October, 1897, Crowley met Herbert Charles Pollitt, president of the Cambridge University Footlights Dramatic Club, and the two entered into a relationship. They broke apart because Pollitt did not share Crowley's increasing interest in Western esotericism, a breakup that Crowley would regret for many years. In Julym 1898, he left Cambridge, not having taken any degree at all despite a "first class" showing in his 1897 exams and consistent "second class honours" results before that.
• Edward Joseph Dent (1876–1957) was educated at Eton and King's College, where he sat the Classical Tripos in 1898. He was elected a Fellow of the college in March 1902 having distinguished himself in music both as researcher and a composer. Dent was Professor of Music at Cambridge University from 1926 to 1941.
• A.E. “Tony” Dyson (1928–2002) was a British literary critic, university lecturer, educational activist and gay rights campaigner. Educated at Pembroke College, his academic career began in 1955 when he was appointed Assistant Lecturer in English Literature at the University of North Wales, Bangor. From there, he went to the University of East Anglia where he was later appointed Reader. He took early retirement in the 1980s. Dyson single-handedly took the initiative in forming the Homosexual Law Reform Society (HLRS) in May 1958.
• John Finch (1626–1682) studied with Henry More at Christ's College, and there met his lifelong companion Sir Thomas Baines. Sir John Finch died of pleurisy in Florence, Italy in 1682, is buried in Christ's College and commemorated with Baines, who had died in Constantinople, with an elaborate monument. Their portraits by Florentine artist Carlo Dolci hang in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.
• Ronald Firbank (1886-1926) was an innovative British novelist. His eight short novels, partly inspired by the London aesthetes of the 1890s, especially Oscar Wilde, consist largely of dialogue, with references to religion, social-climbing, and sexuality. At the age of ten Firbank went briefly to Uppingham School (September, 1900 to April, 1901) and then on to Trinity Hall. His rooms were the most aesthetic and elegant in the college. In 1909 he left Cambridge without taking a degree.
• John Fletcher (1579–1625) appeared to have entered Corpus Christi College, in 1591, at the age of eleven. It is not certain that he took a degree, but evidence suggests that he was preparing for a career in the church. Little is known about his time at college, but he evidently followed the same path previously trodden by the University wits before him, from Cambridge to the burgeoning commercial theatre of London.
• Dr Charles Edward Foister FRSE (1903-1989) was a British botanist and plant pathologist. He was Director of Scottish Agricultural Scientific Services in Edinburgh from 1957. He was born in Cambridge, the son of Frederick W Foister and his wife Esther Elizabeth Smith. He was educated locally and won a place at Cambridge University graduating BA in 1925. He continued as a postgraduate taking a Diploma in Agricultural Science (1927). He later received a doctorate (PhD) from Edinburgh University. He never married and was presumed homosexual.
• E.M. Forster (1879–1970)
• Roger Fry (1866-1934) was educated at Clifton College and King's College, where he was a member of the Cambridge Apostles. In 1933, he was appointed the Slade Professor at Cambridge, a position that Fry had much desired. Fry died very unexpectedly after a fall at his home in London. His death caused great sorrow among the members of the Bloomsbury Group, who loved him for his generosity and warmth. Vanessa Bell decorated his casket before his ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel in Cambridge.
• Stephen Fry (born 1957) secured a place at Queens' College. At Cambridge, Fry joined the Cambridge Footlights, appeared on University Challenge, and read for a degree in English literature, graduating with upper second-class honours. Fry also met his future comedy collaborator Hugh Laurie at Cambridge and starred alongside him in the Footlights Club.
• Geoffrey Gorer (1905–1985) was educated at Charterhouse and at Jesus College.
• John Gostlin (c. 1566–1626)
• Ronald Gower (1845-1916) was educated at Eton and at Trinity College.
• Thomas Gray (1716-1771) went up to Peterhouse in 1734. Gray began seriously writing poems in 1742, mainly after his close friend Richard West died. He moved to Cambridge and began a self-imposed programme of literary study, becoming one of the most learned men of his time, though he claimed to be lazy by inclination. Gray was a brilliant bookworm, a quiet, abstracted, dreaming scholar, often afraid of the shadows of his own fame. He became a Fellow first of Peterhouse, and later of Pembroke College. Gray moved to Pembroke after the students at Peterhouse played a prank on him. Gray spent most of his life as a scholar in Cambridge, and only later in his life did he begin traveling again.
• Fulke Greville (1554-1628) enrolled at Jesus College, in 1568.
• Antony Grey (1927-2010), after attending Norwood College in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, and Millfield School in Somerset, read history at Magdalene College.
• Thom Gunn (1929-2004) attended University College School in Hampstead, London, then spent two years in the British national service and six months in Paris. Later, he studied English literature at Trinity College, graduated in 1953, and published his first collection of verse, “Fighting Terms,” the following year. Among several critics who praised the work, John Press wrote, "This is one of the few volumes of postwar verse that all serious readers of poetry need to possess and to study." He met his future lifelong live-in American lover Mike Kitay in Cambridge in 1952, and followed him to America in 1954 and to San Francisco a few years later. The domestic arrangements were hardly disturbed when Bill Schuessler, a friend of Thom’s, fell in love with Mike, moved in with them, and stayed 35 years. In 2004, he died of acute polysubstance abuse, including methamphetamine, at his home in the Haight Ashbury neighbourhood in San Francisco, where he had lived since 1960.
• G.H. Hardy (1877–1947) was awarded a scholarship to Winchester College for his mathematical work. In 1896 he entered Trinity College. After only two years of preparation under his coach, Robert Alfred Herman, Hardy was fourth in the Mathematics Tripos examination. Years later, he sought to abolish the Tripos system, as he felt that it was becoming more an end in itself than a means to an end. While at university, Hardy joined the Cambridge Apostles, an elite, intellectual secret society. In 1919 he left Cambridge to take the Savilian Chair of Geometry (and thus become a Fellow of New College) at Oxford in the aftermath of the Bertrand Russell affair during WWI. Hardy spent the academic year 1928–1929 at Princeton in an academic exchange with Oswald Veblen, who spent the year at Oxford. Hardy gave the Josiah Willards Gibbs lecture for 1928. Hardy left Oxford and returned to Cambridge in 1931, where he was Sadleirian Professor until 1942. Hardy is a major character in David Leavitt's fictive biography, “The Indian Clerk” (2007), which depicts his Cambridge years and his relationship with John Edensor Littlewood and Ramanujan.
• Walter Burton Harris (1866-1933) was educated at Harrow School and (briefly) at Cambridge University and had already managed to travel around the world by the age of 18.
• Gerald Heard (1889-1971) found respite from bullying he endured at Sherborne School when he matriculated at Gonville and Caius College, in 1908, where he graduated with a Second-Class B.A. in History in 1911. Heard entered university expecting to become a clergyman like his grandfather, father, and eldest brother Alexander, but changed his mind along the way. He studied history under the Caius medievalist Z.N. Brooke (1883–1946), who used a “scientific” or critical approach to sources, and he later described himself as having a “German-Cambridge mind,” though he also regarded himself as an academic failure. Heard acquired an Idealist outlook, and sought to integrate history, religion, and the social, physical, and biological sciences. This Idealism came at least in part from Heard’s politics tutor, the Platonist Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862–1932), who viewed the scientific spirit as threatening. Dickinson’s Platonism embodied the intellectual and social atmosphere of Edwardian Cambridge with its mysticism and its high esteem for “passionate friendship between men.”
• Norman Hartnell (1901-1979), educated at Mill Hill School, became an undergraduate of Magdalene College and read Modern Languages.
• Arthur Hobhouse (1886-1965) was educated at Eton College, St Andrews University and Trinity College, where he graduated in Natural Sciences. At Cambridge, he was a Cambridge Apostle and a member of the Cambridge University Liberal Club, becoming Secretary in 1906 and was also the lover of John Maynard Keynes and Duncan Grant.
• A.E. Housman (1859-1936) took the Kennedy Professorship of Latin at Trinity College in 1911, and remained for the rest of his life.
• Christopher Isherwood (1904-1986) deliberately failed his tripos and left Corpus Christi College without a degree in 1925.
• George Cecil Ives (1867-1950) was educated at home and at Magdalene College, where he started to amass 45 volumes of scrapbooks (between 1892 and 1949). These scrapbooks consist of clippings on topics such as murders, punishments, freaks, theories of crime and punishment, transvestism, psychology of gender, homosexuality, cricket scores, and letters he wrote to newspapers. His interest in cricket led him to play a single first-class cricket match for the Marylebone Cricket Club in 1902.
• Henry Festing Jones (1851-1928), English lawyer, author and composer. After graduating from Cambridge with a B.A. in 1873, he was articled to a solicitor, and qualified fully in 1876. On January 10, 1876, he made the acquaintance of Samuel Butler through another Cambridge man, and thereafter their friendship became close.
• John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) left Eton for King's College in 1902, after receiving a scholarship to read mathematics. Alfred Marshall begged Keynes to become an economist, although Keynes's own inclinations drew him towards philosophy – especially the ethical system of G. E. Moore. Keynes joined the Pitt Club and was an active member of the semi-secretive Cambridge Apostles society, a debating club largely reserved for the brightest students. Like many members, Keynes retained a bond to the club after graduating and continued to attend occasional meetings throughout his life. Before leaving Cambridge, Keynes became the President of the Cambridge Union Society and Cambridge University Liberal Club.
• Thomas Legge (1535–1607)
• John Lehmann (1907-1987) studied history and modern languages at Trinity College. There his close friendship with Julian Bell, nephew of Virginia Woolf, plunged him into the Bloomsbury circle. By 1931 he was working at the Hogarth Press, owned by Woolf and her husband, Leonard. Hogarth Press published his first volume of poems, “A Garden Revisited” (1931).
• Amy Levy (1861-1889) was sent to Brighton and Hove High School in 1876 and later studied at Newnham College. Levy was the first Jewish student at Newnham when she arrived in 1879 but left before her final year without taking her exams. She was a British essayist, poet, and novelist best remembered for her literary gifts; her experience as the first Jewish woman at Cambridge University and as a pioneering woman student at Newnham College; her feminist positions; her friendships with others living what came later to be called a "new woman" life, some of whom were lesbians; and her relationships with both women and men in literary and politically activist circles in London during the 1880s.
• Christopher Lloyd (1921–2006) attended King's College, where he read modern languages before entering the Army during WWII.
• Donald Maclean (1913-1983) won a place at Trinity Hall, arriving in 1931 to read modern languages. Even before the end of his first year he began to throw off parental restraints and engage openly in communist agitprop. He also played rugby for his college through the winter of 1932-33. Eventually his ambitions would lead to him joining the Communist Party. In his final years Maclean had become a campus figure with most knowing he was a communist. In the winter of 1933-34 he wrote a book review for Cambridge Left, to which other leading communists contributed, such as John Cornford, Charles Madge and the Irish scientist, J.D. Bernal. In 1934 he became the editor of the Silver Crescent, the Trinity Hall students' magazine. In his last year, 1934, he became an agent of the NKVD, being recruited by Theodore "Teddy" Maly. He graduated with a First in Modern Languages and slowly abandoned his earlier ideas of teaching English in the Soviet Union. After spending a year preparing for the Civil Service Examinations, Maclean passed with first class honors.
• George Mallory (1886-1924) entered Magdalene College in October 1905, to study history. There he became good friends with members of the future Bloomsbury Group including James Strachey, Lytton Strachey, Rupert Brooke, John Maynard Keynes, and Duncan Grant, who took several portraits of Mallory. Mallory was a keen oarsman, rowing for his college while at Cambridge. In 1923, he took a job as lecturer with the Cambridge University Extramural Studies Department. He was given temporary leave so that he could join the 1924 Everest attempt.
• Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) attended The King's School in Canterbury and Corpus Christi College, where he studied on a scholarship and received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1584. Marlowe is often alleged to have been a government spy (Park Honan's 2005 biography even had "Spy" in its title). The author Charles Nicholl speculates this was the case and suggests that Marlowe's recruitment took place when he was at Cambridge.
• Edward Marsh (1872-1953) was educated at Westminster School, London, and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied classics under Arthur Woollgar Verrall. He was a Cambridge Apostle.
• Ian McKellen (born 1939) won a scholarship to St Catharine's College when he was 18 years old, where he read English literature. While at Cambridge McKellen was a member of the Marlowe Society, appearing in “Henry IV” (as Shallow) alongside Trevor Nunn and Derek Jacobi (March 1959), “Cymbeline” (as Posthumus, opposite Margaret Drabble as Imogen) and “Doctor Faustus.” McKellen was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Letters by Cambridge University on June 18, 2014.
• Louis Mountbatten (1900-1979) attended Christ's College for two terms, starting in October 1919, where he studied engineering in a programme that was specially designed for ex-servicemen. He was elected for a term to the Standing Committee of the Cambridge Union Society, and was suspected of sympathy for the Labour Party, then emerging as a potential party of government for the first time.
• Isaac Newton (1642–1727) was a fellow of Trinity College and the second Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge. He was a devout but unorthodox Christian, and, unusually for a member of the Cambridge faculty of the day, he refused to take holy orders in the Church of England, perhaps because he privately rejected the doctrine of the Trinity.
• Brian Paddick, Baron Paddick (born 1958) went on to take a Master of Business Administration (MBA) at Warwick Business School, University of Warwick (1989–1990) on police scholarships and a postgraduate Diploma in Policing and Applied Criminology at Fitzwilliam College.
• Frances Partridge (1900–2004) was educated at Bedales School and Newnham College.
• Kim Philby (1912-1988) won a scholarship to Trinity College, where he read History and Economics. He graduated in 1933 with a 2:1 degree in Economics. Upon Philby's graduation, Maurice Dobb, a fellow of King's College, and tutor in Economics, introduced him to the World Federation for the Relief of the Victims of German Fascism in Paris. The organization was one of several fronts operated by German Communist Willi Münzenberg, a member of the Reichstag who had fled to France in 1933.
• Herbert Pollitt (1871-1942) studied at Trinity College, from 1889, graduating with a BA in 1892 and a MA in 1896. He failed to qualify as a doctor.
• Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887–1920) departed from Madras aboard the S.S. Nevasa on 17 March 1914.[82] When he disembarked in London on 14 April, E.H. Neville was waiting for him with a car. Four days later, Neville took him to his house on Chesterton Road in Cambridge. Ramanujan immediately began his work with Littlewood and Hardy. After six weeks, Ramanujan moved out of Neville's house and took up residence on Whewell's Court, a five-minute walk from G.H. Hardy's room.
• Michael Redgrave (1908-1985) studied at Clifton College and Magdalene College.
• Robbie Ross (1869–1918) was accepted at King's College in 1888, where he became a victim of bullying, probably because of his sexuality, which he made no secret of, and perhaps also his outspoken journalism in the university paper. Ross caught pneumonia after a dunking in a fountain by a number of students who had, according to Ross, the full support of a professor, Arthur Augustus Tilley. After recovering, he fought for an apology from his fellow students, which he received, but he also sought the dismissal of Tilley. The college refused to punish Tilley and Ross dropped out. Soon after that, he chose to "come out" to his family. Ross found work as a journalist and critic, but he did not escape scandal. He is believed to have become Oscar Wilde's first male lover in 1886, even before he went to Cambridge.
• Victor Rothschild, 3rd Baron Rothschild (1910-1990) read Physiology, French and English at Trinity College. While at Cambridge Rothschild was said to have a playboy lifestyle, enjoying waterskiing in Monaco, driving fast cars, collecting art and rare books and playing first-class cricket for the University and Northamptonshire. Rothschild joined the Cambridge Apostles, a secret intellectual society at the University. The society was essentially a discussion group. Meetings were held once a week, traditionally on Saturday evenings, during which one member gave a prepared talk on a topic, which was later thrown open for discussion. The society was at that time predominantly Marxist, though Rothschild stated that he "was mildly left-wing but never a Marxist". He became friends with Guy Burgess, Anthony Blunt and Kim Philby; later exposed as members of the Cambridge Spy Ring.
• George “Dadie” Rylands (1902–1999) was a British literary scholar and theatre director. Educated at Eton College and King's College, he was a Fellow of King's from 1927 until his death. As well as being one of the world's leading Shakespeare scholars, he was actively involved in the theatre. He directed and acted in many productions for the Marlowe Society, and was Chairman of the Cambridge Arts Theatre from 1946 to 1982. Rylands' 1939 Shakespeare anthology “Ages of Man” was the basis of John Gielgud's one-man show of the same title. Though Rylands specialised in directing university productions at Cambridge, he also directed Gielgud in professional productions of “The Duchess of Malfi” and “Hamlet” in London in 1945. Parodying a popular song, Maurice Bowra described the situation of many King’s men as being that of “Yes, sir, that’s my Dadie. I’m your Dadie now.” Rylands became a friend for life. Two years before his death, Bowra received a letter from Rylands “This is really a farewell in case I am stabbed during the Rio carnival, and to say I love you very much, and shall be for ever and ever grateful for all you have done to educate me."
• George Santayana (1863-1952) studied at King's College from 1896 to 1897.
• Siegfried Sassoon (1886–1967) was educated at the New Beacon School, Sevenoaks, Kent; at Marlborough College, Marlborough, Wiltshire (where he was a member of Cotton House), and at Clare College, where from 1905 to 1907 he read history. He went down from Cambridge without a degree and spent the next few years hunting, playing cricket and writing verse: some he published privately.
• Michael Schofield (1919-2014) obtained a degree in Psychology at Cambridge University, spent the war years as a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force, and then studied at Harvard Business School. During this time, he identified as homosexual and decided to make an original study of the social aspects of homosexuality.
• Sir John Tresidder Sheppard, MBE (1881–1968) was an eminent classicist and the first non-Etonian to become the Provost of King's College. John Sheppard was educated at Dulwich College. He went up to King's College, where he studied Classics and won the Porson Prize. He was a lecturer in classics at King's College from 1908–1933 and was provost from 1933–1954. During WWII he performed intelligence work, for which he was appointed MBE; he was knighted in 1950 for his services to Greek. During his long career he translated many famous Greek classics, and published several books on the subject. He was openly homosexual.
• Francis Skinner (1912–1941) was a friend, collaborator, and lover of the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. While studying mathematics at Cambridge in 1930, Skinner fell under Wittgenstein's influence and "became utterly, uncritically, and almost obsessively devoted to Wittgenstein.". Their relationship was characterized by Skinner's eagerness to please Wittgenstein and conform to his opinions. In 1934, the two made plans to emigrate to the Soviet Union and become manual labourers, but Wittgenstein visited the country briefly and realised the plan was not feasible - the Soviet Union might have allowed Wittgenstein to immigrate as a teacher, but not as a manual labourer. Skinner graduated with a degree in Mathematics from Cambridge in 1933 and was awarded a postgraduate fellowship. For three years he used his fellowship assisting Wittgenstein in preparing a book on philosophy and mathematics (never published). During the academic year 1934-5 Wittgenstein dictated to Skinner and Alice Ambrose the text of the Brown Book. However, Wittgenstein's hostility towards academia resulted in Skinner's withdrawal from university, first to become a gardener, and later a mechanic (much to the dismay of Skinner's family). In the late 1930s though, Wittgenstein grew increasingly distant, until Skinner's death from polio in 1941.
• Walter John Herbert Sprott, known to friends as ‘Sebastian’ Sprott, and also known as Jack Sprott (1897–1971), was a British psychologist and writer. He was educated at Felsted School and Clare College, where he became a member of the Cambridge Apostles. He was romantically involved with the economist John Maynard Keynes, who was at the time also seeing the ballerina Lydia Lopokova. Sprott's affair with Keynes ended after Keynes married Lopokova. After a job as a demonstrator at the Psychological Laboratory in Cambridge, he moved to the University of Nottingham, where he eventually became professor of philosophy.
• Norman St John-Stevas (1929-2012) was educated at St Joseph's Salesian School, Burwash, East Sussex, and then at the Catholic school, Ratcliffe College, Leicester. Afterwards he was for six months enrolled at the English College, Rome, a seminary for the Roman Catholic priesthood but found he had no vocation. He remained a lifelong Catholic, however. He then read law at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. As an undergraduate, he lived at St Edmund's House (now St Edmund's College) and served as President of the Cambridge Union in 1950. He graduated with first class honours and won the Whitlock Prize. He was Master of Emmanuel College from 1991 to 1996.
• Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh (1769-1822) attended St. John's College (1786–87), where he applied himself with greater diligence than expected from an aristocrat and obtained first class in his last examinations. He left Cambridge due to an extended illness, and after returning to Ireland did not pursue further formal education.
• Victor Stiebel (1907-1976) arrived in Britain in 1924 to study architecture at Jesus College.
• Mervyn Stockwood (1913-1995) was the Anglican Bishop of Southwark from 1959 to 1980. He was educated at The Downs School and Kelly College; in 1931 he entered Christ's College, and graduated in 1934. Having studied for the Anglican ministry at Westcott House theological college in Cambridge, he was ordained deacon in 1936, priest in 1937. In 1955 he was appointed Vicar of Great St Mary's, Cambridge where his preaching drew large congregations of undergraduates, gaining him a national reputation. In 1959, at the suggestion of Geoffrey Fisher, Harold Macmillan appointed Stockwood to the diocese of Southwark. He was liberal in his view of the morality of homosexual relationships, favoured homosexual law reform, and included homosexual couples among the guests at his dinner parties. On at least one occasion he blessed a homosexual relationship, but Stockwood himself was celibate.
• Alix Strachey (1892–1973) was educated in England at Bedales School, the Slade School of Fine Art, and Newnham College, where she read modern languages. In 1915 she moved in with her brother in his flat in Bloomsbury and became a member of the Bloomsbury Group, where she met James Strachey, then the assistant editor of The Spectator. They moved in together in 1919 and married in 1920. Soon afterwards they moved to Vienna, where James, an admirer of Freud, began a psychoanalysis with him.
• James Strachey (1887–1967) was educated at Hillbrow preparatory school in Rugby and at Trinity College, where he took over the rooms used by his older brother Lytton Strachey, and was known as "the Little Strachey"; Lytton was now "the Great Strachey". At Cambridge, Strachey fell deeply in love with the poet Rupert Brooke, who did not return his affections. He was himself pursued by mountaineer George Mallory—conceding to his sexual advances—by Harry Norton, and by economist John Maynard Keynes, with whom he also had an affair. His love of Brooke was a constant, however, until the latter's death in 1915, which left Strachey "shattered".
• Lytton Strachey (1880-1932) was admitted as a Pensioner at Trinity College, on September 30, 1899. He became an Exhibitioner in 1900 and a Scholar in 1902. He won the Chancellor's Medal for English Verse in 1902 and was given a B.A. degree after he had won a second class in the History Tripos in June 1903. He did not, however, take leave of Trinity, but remained until October 1905, to work on a thesis that he hoped would gain him a Fellowship. Strachey's years at Cambridge were happy and productive. Among the freshmen at Trinity there were three with whom Strachey soon became closely associated: Clive Bell, Leonard Woolf and Saxon Sydney-Turner. With another undergraduate, A. J. Robertson, these students formed a group called the Midnight Society, which, in the opinion of Clive Bell, was the source of the Bloomsbury Group. Other close friends at Cambridge were Thoby Stephen and his sisters Vanessa and Virginia Stephen. Strachey also belonged to the Conversazione Society, the Cambridge Apostles to which Tennyson, Hallam, Maurice, and Sterling had once belonged. Strachey also became acquainted with other men who greatly influenced him, including G. Lowes Dickinson, John Maynard Keynes, Walter Lamb (brother of the painter Henry Lamb), George Mallory, Bertrand Russell and G. E. Moore.
• Michael Whitney Straight (1916–2004) became a Communist Party member while a student at the University of Cambridge in the mid-1930s, and a part of an intellectual secret society known as the Cambridge Apostles. Straight worked for the Soviet Union as part of a spy ring whose members included Donald Maclean, Guy Burgess, Kim Philby and KGB recruiter Anthony Blunt, who had briefly been Straight's lover. A document from Soviet archives of a report that Blunt made in 1943 to the KGB states, "As you already know the actual recruits whom I took were Michael Straight".
• Howard Sturgis (1855-1920) was born in London to a rich and well-connected New England merchant family. Russell Sturgis, Howard’s father, was a partner at Barings Bank in London, where he and his wife, Julia, were noted figures in society, entertaining such guests as Henry Adams, William Makepeace Thackeray, and Henry James, who became an intimate friend and mentor to Howard. Sturgis was a delicate child, closely attached to his mother, and fond of such girlish hobbies as needlepoint and knitting, which he continued to practice throughout his life. He attended Eton and Cambridge, and, after the death of his parents, purchased a house in the country, Queen’s Acre, called Qu’acre, where Howdie (as Sturgis was known to his intimates) and his presumed lover William Haynes-Smith (called “the Babe”) frequently and happily entertained a wide circle of friends, among them James and Edith Wharton.
• Alan Turing (1912-1954) studied as an undergraduate from 1931 to 1934 at King's College, whence he gained first-class honours in mathematics. In 1935, at the age of 22, he was elected a fellow of King's. The computer room at King's College, Alan Turing's alma mater, is called the Turing Room.
• George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592–1628). During his short tenure as Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, he had initiated the purchase of Thomas van Erpe's collection of oriental books and manuscripts on its behalf, although his widow only transferred it to Cambridge University Library after his death. With it came the first book in Chinese to be added to the Library's collections.
• Horace Walpole (1717-1797) received early education in Bexley. He was also educated at Eton College and King's College. At Cambridge Walpole came under the influence of Conyers Middleton, an unorthodox theologian. Walpole came to accept the sceptical nature of Middleton's attitude to some essential Christian doctrines for the rest of his life, including a hatred of superstition and bigotry. Walpole ceased to reside at Cambridge at the end of 1738 and left without taking a degree.
• Hugh Walpole (1884–1941) studied history at Emmanuel College from 1903 to 1906. While there he had his first work published, the critical essay "Two Meredithian Heroes", which was printed in the college magazine in autumn 1905. As an undergraduate he met and fell under the spell of A.C. Benson, formerly a greatly loved master at Eton, and by this time a don at Magdalene College. On graduation from Cambridge in 1906 he took a post as a lay missioner at the Mersey Mission to Seamen in Liverpool.
• Anthony Watson-Gandy (1919-1952) was the son of Major William Donald Paul Watson-Gandy and Annis Vere Gandy. He died at age 32, unmarried. He was educated at Westminster School, King's College and Sorbonne University. He fought in the WWII and gained the rank of Flying Officer in the service of the Royal Air Force.
• Patrick White (1912-1990) lived in England from 1932 to 1935, studying French and German literature at King's College. His homosexuality took a toll on his first term academic performance, in part because he developed a romantic attraction to a young man who had come to King's College to become an Anglican priest. White dared not speak of his feelings for fear of losing the friendship and, like many other gay men of that period, he feared that his sexuality would doom him to a lonely life. Then, one night, the student priest, after an awkward liaison with two women, admitted to White that women meant nothing to him sexually. That became White's first love affair. During White's time at Cambridge he published a collection of poetry entitled “The Ploughman and Other Poems,” and wrote a play named “Bread and Butter Women,” which was later performed by an amateur group (which included his sister Suzanne) at the tiny Bryant's Playhouse in Sydney.
• Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) moved to Cambridge in 1911, met Bertrand Russell, and became the Master’s most favored student. He was admitted as a member of Trinity College and elected, somewhat reluctantly, an Apostle. It amused Lytton Strachey to call him behind his back “Herr Sinckel-Winckel” and the “Witter-Gitter Man.” He taught at the University of Cambridge from 1929 to 1947. He had romantic relations with both men and women. He is generally believed to have fallen in love with at least three men: David Hume Pinsent in 1912, Francis Skinner in 1930, and Ben Richards in the late 1940s. He later revealed that, as a teenager in Vienna, he had had an affair with a woman. Additionally, in the 1920s Wittgenstein became infatuated with a young Swiss woman, Marguerite Respinger, modelling a sculpture of her and proposing marriage, albeit on condition that they did not have children. Ben Richards was at Wittgenstein’s bedside when he died. He is buried at the Ascension Burial Ground (Cambridge CB3 0EA), formerly the burial ground for the parish of St Giles and St Peter's. It includes the graves and memorials of many University of Cambridge academics and non-conformists of the XIX and early XX century. The cemetery encapsulates a century-and-a-half of the University's modern history, with 83 people with Oxford Dictionary of National Biography biographies.
• Christopher Wood (1900-1976) attended Cambridge but never graduated. He was the loved of Gerald Heard. Heard’s personal interest in psychology received encouragement from W.J.H. “Jack” Sprott, a lecturer in the subject at Nottingham University and a Cambridge friend of Christopher Wood’s. Sprott, also known as “Sebastian,” read and commented on most of his early manuscripts.
• Leonard Woolf (1880-1969) won a classical scholarship to Trinity College in 1899, where he was elected to the Cambridge Apostles. Other members included Lytton Strachey, John Maynard Keynes, GE Moore and EM Forster. Thoby Stephen, Virginia Stephen's brother, was friendly with the Apostles, though not a member himself. Woolf was awarded his BA in 1902, but stayed for another year to study for the Civil Service examinations.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Bedford House (Chiswick Mall, Chiswick, London W4 2PJ) was built together with its neighbour, Eynham House, in the mid-XVII century as a single building by Edward Russell, second son of the 4th Earl of Bedford of Corney House. In 1665, it was bought by Thomas Plukenett, whose daughter, Grace, married her neighbour in Woodroffe House and subsequently inherited the whole group of properties up to Chiswick Lane. The building was given a Georgian style pediment and fenestration in the XVIII century and it may then have been divided into the two dwellings. By 1829, the tenant of Bedford House was the first John Sich, owner of the Lamb brewery. The 1901 the red-brick tower of this now defunct brewery can be seen standing at the top of Church Street. Members of the family lived on here until 1920, and in other houses such as Eynham House and Norfolk House along the Mall. Mabel Sich married Frederick William Tuke, whose family ran the mental asylum and lived in Thames View House. The Sich family were active members of the Chiswick community and benefactors of St Nicholas’ church, assisting with its rebuilding in the XIX century. Warwick Draper (barrister and “William Morris socialist”) lived here in the early 1920s, during which time he wrote his important history of Chiswick. Sadly, in 1926 he fell to his death from a balcony whilst inspecting a chimney fire. In 1928 the house was bought by the Canadian Sir Arthur Ellis, Physician to the London Hospital. He sold it in 1945 to the actor Sir Michael Redgrave (1908-1985), who lived here with his family until 1954, when Sir Arthur Ellis bought it back again.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: 3 Hans Crescent, SW1X 0LN, was a handsome brick building in the ornate style called Pont Street Dutch. The actor Michael Redgrave (1908-1985) lived on the third floor with his wife Rachel Kempson and teenage children Vanessa, Lynn, and Corin, from 1956 to 1977. The building faced the back entrance to Harrod’s Department Store.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Church: St Paul's Church, also commonly known as the Actors' Church, is a church designed by Inigo Jones as part of a commission for the 4th Earl of Bedford in 1631 to create "houses and buildings fitt for the habitacons of Gentlemen and men of ability" in Covent Garden, London. As well as being the parish church of Covent Garden, the church gained its nickname by a long association with the theatre community.

Address: Covent Garden, Westminster, London WC2N 6ET, UK (51.51157, -0.12365)
Phone: +44 20 7836 5221
Website: www.actorschurch.org
English Heritage Building ID: 208625 (Grade I, 1958)

Place
St Paul's connection with the theatre began as early as 1663 with the establishment of the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, and was further assured in 1723 with the opening of Covent Garden Theatre, now the Royal Opera House. On 9 May 1662, Samuel Pepys noted in his diary the first "Italian puppet play" under the portico — the first recorded performance of "Punch and Judy", a fact commemorated by the annual MayFayre service in May. The portico of St Paul's was the setting for the first scene of Shaw's “Pygmalion,” the play that was later adapted as “My Fair Lady.” Since 2007 St Paul's has been home to its own in-house professional theatre company, Iris Theatre, originally created to mount a production of T.S. Eliot’s “Murder in the Cathedral.” It gained full charitable status in October 2009.

Notable queer burials at St Paul Churchyard:
• Samuel Butler (1835-1902), iconoclastic Victorian-era English author who published a variety of works. Butler never married, and although he did for years make regular visits to a woman, Lucie Dumas, he also "had a predilection for intense male friendships, which is reflected in several of his works.”
• Robert Carr (1587-1645), 1st Earl of Somerset, Court favourite of James I until he was disgraced by his involvement of the poisoning of Sir Thomas Overbury.
• Noël Coward (1899-1973), memorial.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), memorial.
• Terence Rattigan (1911-1977), memorial.
• Sir Michael Redgrave (1908-1985), English stage and film actor, director, manager and author. Corin Redgrave helped his father in the writing of his last autobiography. During one of Corin's visits to his father, the latter said, "There is something I ought to tell you". Then, after a very long pause, "I am, to say the least of it, bisexual". During the filming of Fritz Lang's Secret “Beyond the Door” (1948), Redgrave met Bob Michell. They became lovers, Michell set up house close to the Redgraves, and he became a surrogate "uncle" to Redgrave's children (then aged 11, 9 and 5), who adored him. Michell later had children of his own, including a son he named Michael. Michell was followed by Fred Sadoff, an actor/director who became Redgrave's assistant and shared his lodgings in New York and London. A card was found among Redgrave's effects after his death. The card was signed "Tommy, Liverpool, January 1940", and on it were the words (quoted from W.H. Auden): "The word is love. Surely one fearless kiss would cure the million fevers".
• Dame Ellen Terry, GBE (1847-1928), English stage actress who became the leading Shakespearean actress in Britain. Her daughter, Edith Craig (1869-1947) was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women's suffrage movement in England.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period.
Born: March 21, 1839, Toropets, Russia
Died: March 28, 1881, Saint Petersburg, Russia
Buried: Alexander Nevsky Monastery, Saint Petersburg, Saint Petersburg Federal City, Russia
Find A Grave Memorial# 1513
Nationality: Russian
Movies: Boris Godunov
Libretti: Boris Godunov, Khovanshchina, The Fair at Sorochyntsi, Salammbô, Zhenitba

Modest Mussorgsky was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period. He strove to achieve a uniquely Russian musical identity, often in deliberate defiance of the established conventions of Western music. Mussorgsky is best known today for his popular piano composition Pictures at an Exhibition: the Russian composer drew inspiration for the piece from an exhibit of watercolors by his friend, artist Victor Hartmann. When Hartmann died in 1874, the grief-stricken Mussorgsky exclaimed, "What a terrible blow! Why should a dog, a horse, a rat live on - and creatures like Hartmann die!" The composition is best known through an orchestral arrangement by Maurice Ravel. Viktor Hartmann was a Russian architect and painter. He was associated with the Abramtsevo Colony, purchased and preserved beginning of 1870 by Savva Mamontov, and the Russian Revival. Vladimir Stasov had introduced him to the circle of Mily Balakirev in 1870 and he had been a close friend of the composer Modest Mussorgsky.

They met in 1870 and remained friends until Hartmann’s death in 1873: 3 years.
Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (March 21, 1839 – March 28, 1881)
Viktor Alexandrovich Hartmann (May 5, 1834 - August 4, 1873)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Church: Saint Alexander Nevsky Monastery (1-y pr-d, Sankt-Peterburg, Russia, 196642) was founded by Peter I of Russia in 1710 at the eastern end of the Nevsky Prospekt in Saint Petersburg supposing that that was the site of the Neva Battle in 1240 when Alexander Nevsky, a prince, defeated the Swedes; however, the battle actually took place about 12 miles (19 km) away from that site. The monastery grounds contain two baroque churches, designed by father and son Trezzini and built from 1717–1722 and 1742–1750, respectively; a majestic Neoclassical cathedral, built in 1778–1790 to a design by Ivan Starov and consecrated to the Holy Trinity; and numerous structures of lesser importance. It also contains the Lazarev and Tikhvin Cemeteries. Notable queer burials: Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881) and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Nancy Brooker Spain was a prominent English broadcaster and journalist. She was a columnist for the Daily Express, She magazine, and the News of the World in the 1950s and 1960s.
Born: September 13, 1917, Jesmond, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
Died: March 21, 1964, Aintree, United Kingdom
Education: Roedean School
Lived: 35 Carlyle Square, SW3
7 Clareville Grove, SW7
Buried: Holy Trinity Church, Horsley, Northumberland Unitary Authority, Northumberland, England, Plot: Cremated remains
Find A Grave Memorial# 109735781
Parents: Norah Smiles
Partner: Joan Werner Laurie
Battles and wars: World War II
Books: Poison for Teacher: A New Entertainment, more


House: Nancy Spain (1917-1964), journalist, novelist, and television personality, shared a home with publisher Joan (Jonnie) Werner Laurie at 35 Carlyle Square, Chelsea, London SW3 6HA, from 1951 to 1953, and 7 Clareville Grove, Kensington, London SW7 5AU, from 1953 to 1955.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Cemetery: Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.

Address: 60 Hoop Ln, London NW11 7NL, UK (51.57687, -0.19413)
Phone: +44 20 8455 2374
English Heritage Building ID: 199262 (Grade II, 1993)

Place
The land for the crematorium was purchased in 1900, costing £6,000, and the crematorium was opened in 1902 by Sir Henry Thompson. The crematorium, the Philipson Family mausoleum, designed by Edwin Lutyens, the wall, along with memorials and gates, the Martin Smith Mausoleum, and Into The Silent Land statue are all Grade II listed buildings. The gardens are included in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. Golders Green Crematorium, as it is usually called, is in Hoop Lane, off Finchley Road, Golders Green, London NW11, ten minutes’ walk from Golders Green tube station. It is directly opposite the Golders Green Jewish Cemetery (Golders Green is an area with a large Jewish population.) The crematorium is secular, accepts all faiths and non-believers; clients may arrange their own type of service or remembrance event and choose whatever music they wish. A map of the Gardens of Remembrance and some information on persons cremated here is available from the office. The staff are very helpful in finding a specific location. The columbaria are now locked, although they can still be visited (if accompanied.) There is also a tea room.

Notable queer burials at Golders Green Crematorium:
• Richard Addinsell (1904-1977), was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film “Dangerous Moonlight” (also known under the later title “Suicide Squadron”). Addinsell retired from public life in the 1960s, gradually becoming estranged from his close friends. He was, for many years, the companion of the fashion designer Victor Stiebel, who died in 1976.
• Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932), Scholar and advocate of a league of nations. He was the third of the five children of Lowes Cato Dickinson (1819-1908) and his wife, Margaret Ellen (d. 1882), daughter of William Smith Williams.
• Edith Ellis (1861-1916), psychologist. She was noted for her novels and memoirs.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), psychologist. He and his wife, Edith Ellis, were psychologists and writers. He wrote the controversial "Studies in the Psychology of Sex," which was banned as obscene.
• Anna Freud (1895-1982) and Dorothy Burlingham (1891-1979), next to each other and to others in the Freud family, including Sigmund Freud.
• Kenneth Halliwell (1926-1967), British actor and writer. He was the mentor, partner, and the eventual murderer of playwright Joe Orton. Their ashes were mingled and scattered in the same garden.
• Leslie Poles Hartley (1895–1972), known as L. P. Hartley, was a British novelist and short story writer. Until his death in 1972, Hartley lived alone but for a household of servants, in London, Salisbury and at a home on the Avon, near Bath. Between the wars, Venice was a favoured and frequent destination.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), actor, writer and lyricist. His ashes are buried beneath a lilac tree which has a plaque enscribed "Ivor Novello 6th March 1951 ‘Till you are home once more’.” He has also a memorial inside the St. Paul's Cathedral (New Change, London, London, EC4M 9AD)
• Norman O'Neill (1875-1934), British composer and conductor. His studies were facilitated by Eric Stenbock, with whom it is said he had a relationship. He married Adine Berthe Maria Ruckert (1875-1947) on 2 July 1899 in Paris, France. Adine was a celebrated pianist and music teacher in her own right. When he died in 1934 he was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, London, as was Adine on her death in 1947. There is a plaque there in memory to both of them.
• Joe Orton (1933-1967), playwright. Orton and his lover, Kenneth Halliwell, moved at 25 Noël Road, Islington, in 1959, at a time when the area was far from fashionable. Eight years later, Halliwell killed himself after murdering Orton.

Cremated here but ashes taken elsewhere:
• Sir Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), 1st Earl of Bewdley, K.G., P.C. was the leading Conservative politician between the two world wars and was Prime Minister for three terms (1923-4, 1924-29 and 1935-37). Ashes removed to Worcester Cathedral.
• Roger Fry (1866-1934), English artist and critic, a member of the Bloomsbury group. He had an affair with Vanessa Bell, and when she left him, he was heartbroken. Only in 1924 he found happiness with Helen Anrep, a former wife of the Russian-born mosaicist, Boris Anrep. His ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel, Cambridge, in a casket decorated by Vanessa Bell.
• In his later years Lord Ronald Gower had been a crusader for cremation, and after his death on March 9, 1916 his body was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were interred at Rusthall, Kent, on 14 March 1916.
• John Inman (1935-2007), actor, star of “Are You Being Served?,” location of ashes unknown.
• Joan Werner Laurie (1920–1964) was an English book and magazine editor. She met journalist and broadcaster Nancy Spain (1917-1964) in 1950 and they became life partners. Joan and Nancy lived openly together with their sons, and later the couple provided a home to Windmill Theatre owner and rally driver Sheila van Damm. She was learning to fly when she died, with Nancy Spain and four others, when the Piper Apache aeroplane crashed near Aintree racecourse on the way to the 1964 Grand National. She was cremated with Spain at Golders Green Crematorium, London. Nancy Spain is buried with her father at Holy Trinity (A68 four miles north of Otterburn, Horsley, Northumberland, NE19 1RU). The relationship between Werner Laurie and Spain is described in Rose Collis' biography of Nancy Spain, published in 1997.
• Charles Ricketts (1866-1931) was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were to be scattered to the four winds in Richmond Park.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Fredrick Newton Arvin was an American literary critic and academic. He achieved national recognition for his studies of individual nineteenth-century American authors.
Born: August 23, 1900, Valparaiso, Indiana, United States
Died: March 21, 1963, Northampton, Massachusetts, United States
Education: Harvard Univeristy
Buried: Old City Cemetery, Valparaiso, Porter County, Indiana, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 19602976
Employer: Smith College
Books: Longfellow: his life and work, Herman Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman
Awards: National Book Award for Nonfiction, Guggenheim Fellowship for Humanities, US & Canada

Notable queer alumni and faculty at Harvard University:
• Henry Adams (1838-1918), after his graduation from Harvard University in 1858, embarked on a grand tour of Europe, during which he also attended lectures in civil law at the University of Berlin. He was initiated into the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity as honorary member at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Harris J. Ryan, a judge for the exhibit on electrical engineering. Through that organization, he was a member of the Irving Literary Society. In 1870, Adams was appointed professor of medieval history at Harvard, a position he held until his early retirement in 1877 at 39. As an academic historian, Adams is considered to have been the first (in 1874–1876) to conduct historical seminar work in the United States. Among his students was Henry Cabot Lodge, who worked closely with Adams as a graduate student. On June 27, 1872, Clover Hooper and he were married in Beverly, Massachusetts, and spent their honeymoon in Europe, much of it with Charles Milnes Gaskell at Wenlock Abbey in Shropshire, England. Upon their return, he went back to his position at Harvard, and their home at 91 Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, became a gathering place for a lively circle of intellectuals. Adams was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1875.
• Horatio Alger (1832-1899) passed the Harvard entrance examinations in July, 1848, and was admitted to the class of 1852. Alger's classmate Joseph Hodges Choate described Harvard at this time as "provincial and local because its scope and outlook hardly extended beyond the boundaries of New England; besides which it was very denominational, being held exclusively in the hands of Unitarians". Alger flowered in the highly disciplined and regimented Harvard environment, winning scholastic prizes and prestigious awards. His genteel poverty and less-than-aristocratic heritage, however, barred him from membership in the Hasty Pudding Club and the Porcellian Club. He was chosen Class Odist and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa Society honors in 1852, eighth in a class of 88. He is buried in the family plot at Glenwood Cemetery, Natick, MA 01760.
• Josep Alsop (1910-1989) graduated from the Groton School, a private boarding school in Groton, Massachusetts, in 1928, and from Harvard University in 1932. He is buried in the family mausoleum at Indian Hill Cemetery (383 Washington St, Middletown, CT 06457).
• A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1893 to 1898, graduating with a master's degree in 1895 and a doctorate in 1900. He was instructor and assistant professor of economics at Harvard University from 1900 to 1909.
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) studied English Literature at Harvard, graduating summa cum laude in 1921. His writing career began when Van Wyck Brooks, the Harvard teacher he most admired, invited him to write for The Freeman while he was still an undergraduate. After a short period teaching at the high school level, Arvin joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist.
• John Ashbery (born 1927) graduated in 1949 with an A.B., cum laude, was a member of the Harvard Advocate, the university's literary magazine, and the Signet Society.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959) attended from 1911 to 1912, leaving school without graduating.
• Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957) entered Harvard College in the Class of 1922. He interrupted his undergraduate career to work in Egypt and the Sudan (1922-1923) with the Harvard University/Boston Museum of Fine Arts archaeological expedition under George A. Reisner, then the leading American Egyptologist. After taking his degree in 1924, he became a graduate student in Harvard's fine arts department, where he served for three years as chief graduate assistant to Edward W. Forbes, Director of the Fogg Art Museum.
• Maud Babcock (1867-1954) was studying and teaching at Harvard University when she met noted Utahn and daughter of Brigham Young, Susa Young Gates, who, impressed by Babcock's work as a summer course instructor in physical culture, convinced her to move to Salt Lake City. She established UU's first physical training curriculum, of which speech and dramatics were part for several years.
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University. During his tenure at boarding school and university, Beebe was known for his numerous pranks. One of his more outrageous stunts included an attempt at festooning J. P. Morgan's yacht Corsair III with toilet paper from a chartered airplane. His pranks were not without consequence and he proudly noted that he had the sole distinction of having been expelled from both Harvard and Yale, at the insistence, respectively, of the president and dean of each. Beebe earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard in 1926, only to be expelled during graduate school. During and immediately after obtaining his degree from Harvard, Beebe published several books of poetry, but eventually found his true calling in journalism.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990) completed his studies in 1939, graduating with a B.A. cum laude
• Lem Billings (1916-1981) attended Harvard Business School from 1946 to 1948 and earned an MBA.
• John Boswell (1947-1994) received his doctorate in 1975.
• Roger Brown (1925-1997) started his career in 1952 as an instructor and then assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1957 he left Harvard for an associate professorship at MIT, and became a full professor of psychology there in 1960. In 1962, he returned to Harvard as a full professor, and served as chair of the Department of Social Relations from 1967 to 1970. From 1974 until his retirement in 1994, he held the title of John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William James.
• John Horne Burns (1916–1953) was the author of three novels. The first, “The Gallery” (1947), is his best known work, which was very well received when published and has been reissued several times. Burns was educated by the Sisters of Notre Dame at St. Augustine's School and then Phillips Academy, where he pursued music. He attended Harvard, where he became fluent in French, German, and Italian and wrote the book for a student musical comedy in 1936. In 1937 he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in English magna cum laude and became a teacher at the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut. Burns wrote several novels while at Harvard and at Loomis, none of which he published. Gore Vidal reported a conversation he had with Burns following “The Gallery”'s success: “Burns was a difficult man who drank too much, loved music, detested all other writers, wanted to be great.... He was also certain that to be a great writer it was necessary to be homosexual. When I disagreed, he named a half dozen celebrated contemporaries. "A Pleiad," he roared delightedly, "of pederasts!" But what about Faulkner?, I asked, and Hemingway? He was disdainful. Who said they were any good?” He died in Florence from a cerebral hemorrhage on August 11, 1953. He was buried in the family plot in Holyhood Cemetery (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467). Ernest Hemingway later sketched Burns' brief life as a writer: "There was a fellow who wrote a fine book and then a stinking book about a prep school and then just blew himself up."
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) graduated in 1936.
• Witter Bynner (1881–1968) was the first member of his class invited to join the student literary magazine, The Advocate. He was also published in another of Harvard's literary journals, The Harvard Monthly. He graduated with honors in 1902. His first book of poems, “An Ode to Harvard” (later changed to “Young Harvard”), came out in 1907. In 1911 he was the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa Poet.
• Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) began studying at Harvard University in 1894 and left after two years to become an artist.
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) entered in 1925, to pursue a masters in English.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) accepted an appointment at Harvard University in 1954 as the second person to hold the Zimurray Chair at Radcliffe College. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1955. She was the first woman tenured in Harvard's Anthropology Department and the second woman tenured in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), educated at Radcliffe College, became department chairman of child and maternal health at Harvard School of Public Health in 1956.
• Kenward Elmslie (born 1929) earned a BA at Harvard University before moving back to New York City, where he became a central figure in the New York School.
• William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952) received his Bachelor of Arts in 1886. While studying at Harvard, he and classmates began The Harvard Monthly. After his graduation and first trip to Europe in 1888, he spent several years working as a journalist in the Boston Area. In 1890, four years after his graduation from Harvard, Fullerton moved to France to begin work for The Times office in Paris.
• Henry Geldzahler (1935–1994) left graduate school in 1960 to join the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
• Julian Wood Glass, Jr, (1910-1992) attended Oklahoma schools and was graduated from Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) was an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. She was one of the first Woman of Colour/Interracial women to have a play publicly performed. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller. During the summers, Grimké frequently took classes at Harvard University, where her father had attended law school. He was the second African American to have graduated from Harvard Law School.
• Alice Hamilton (1869–1970) was hired in 1919 as assistant professor in a new Department of Industrial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, making her the first woman appointed to the faculty there in any field. Her appointment was hailed by the New York Tribune with the headline: "A Woman on Harvard Faculty—The Last Citadel Has Fallen—The Sex Has Come Into Its Own". Her own comment was "Yes, I am the first woman on the Harvard faculty—but not the first one who should have been appointed!" Hamilton still faced discrimination as a woman, and was excluded from social activities and ceremonies.
• Andrew Holleran (born 1944), pseudonym of Eric Garber, novelist, essayist, and short story writer, graduated from Harvard College in 1965.
• Henry James (1843–1916) attended Harvard Law School in 1862, but realized that he was not interested in studying law. He pursued his interest in literature and associated with authors and critics William Dean Howells and Charles Eliot Norton in Boston and Cambridge, formed lifelong friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., the future Supreme Court Justice, and with James and Annie Fields, his first professional mentors.
• Philip Johnson (1906–2005), student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) graduated with both a master's degree (1949) and doctorate (1956) in astronomy.
• Helen Keller (1880–1968) entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College, where she lived in Briggs Hall, South House.
• John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) graduated from Harvard University in June 1940.
• Alfred Kinsey (1804-1956) continued his graduate studies at Harvard University's Bussey Institute, which had one of the most highly regarded biology programs in the United States. It was there that Kinsey studied applied biology under William Morton Wheeler, a scientist who made outstanding contributions to entomology. Under Wheeler, Kinsey worked almost completely autonomously, which suited both men quite well. Kinsey chose to do his doctoral thesis on gall wasps, and began zealously collecting samples of the species. Kinsey was granted a Sc.D. degree in 1919 by Harvard University, and published several papers in 1920 under the auspices of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, introducing the gall wasp to the scientific community and describing its phylogeny. Of the more than 18 million insects in the museum's collection, some 5 million are gall wasps collected by Kinsey.
• Marshall Kirk (1957-2005) was valedictorian of his high school class and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1980, majoring in psychology, and writing his honors thesis on the testing of gifted children. In 1987 Kirk partnered with Hunter Madsen (writing under the pen-name "Erastes Pill") to write an essay, "The Overhauling of Straight America." The pair developed their argument in the 1989 book "After the Ball: How America Will Conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the ’90s." The book outlined a public relations strategy for the LGBT movement.
• Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) attended Harvard, where his father, the vice-president of Filene's Department Store, had also attended, graduating in 1930. In 1927, while still an undergraduate at Harvard, Kirstein was annoyed that the literary magazine The Harvard Advocate would not accept his work. With a friend Varian Fry, who met his wife Eileen through Lincoln's sister Mina, he convinced his father to finance their own literary quarterly, the Hound & Horn.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) graduated from Harvard University in 1907 with degrees in English and philosophy, and was honored as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and recipient of the prestigious Bowdoin Prize. After graduation, he was the first African-American selected as a Rhodes Scholar (and the last to be selected until 1960). At that time, Rhodes selectors did not meet candidates in person, but there is evidence that at least some selectors knew he was African-American.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) read Environmental Studies at the University of Manitoba, Landscape Architecture at Harvard University and completed his PhD in Historical Geography at University College, London. He lectures widely on landscape history and design both in Britain and abroad, is a lecturer on the MA course in Historical and Sustainable Architecture at New York University, and contributes regularly to a range of publications.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) completed his M.A. in 1926 and Ph.D. degree in 1927. He returned to Harvard to begin a distinguished teaching career.
• Michael McDowell (1950-1999) received a B.A. and an M.A. from Harvard College and a Ph.D in English from Brandeis University in 1978 based on a dissertation entitled "American Attitudes Toward Death, 1825-1865".
• Henry Plumer McIlhenny (1910–1986) he was graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Fine Arts in 1933. During his years at Harvard, Paul J. Sachs influenced his future collecting.
• Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930), American archeologist, artifact collector, tile-maker, and designer, attended Harvard University between 1875 and 1879, obtaining a liberal arts degree.
• Francis Davis Millet (1848–1912) graduated with a Master of Arts degree. A bronze bust in Harvard University's Widener Library also memorializes Millet.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) graduated from Harvard University in 1916. He taught English literature at the University of Wisconsin. He resigned his position for political reasons, frustrated that he was forced to give a “politician’s son who should have been flunked” passing grades. Mitchell enlisted in the army, serving in France until he was discharged as a private two years later. In 1922, following two years’ study at the University of Montpellier and Jesus College, Cambridge, he returned to the States and lived with his elderly aunt in New York. Mitchell privately studied foreign language and literature, focusing on French and Greek, before returning to Harvard and graduating with a Ph.D. in Literature in 1933.
• Agnes Morgan (1879-1976) attended Radcliffe College and received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1901 and her Master of Arts in 1903. In 1904 she attended George Pierce Baker's 47 Workshop at Harvard University.
• Frank O’Hara (1926–1966) attended with the funding made available to veterans. Published poems in the Harvard Advocate. He graduated in 1950 with a degree in English.
• Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006) studied with Walter Piston; Aaron Copland, Archibald T. Davison, and A. Tillman Merritt were also among his teachers. He completed a bachelor's degree in 1943 and a master's in 1944. He taught at various times at Simmons College (1953–1954), Boston University (1953–1954), and Harvard University (1957–1958). Among Pinkham's notable students were the jazz musician and composer Gigi Gryce (1925–1983) and the composer Mark DeVoto.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) enrolled in Harvard Law School in 1913. At the suggestion of the dean of the law school, switched to Harvard's music faculty, where he studied harmony and counterpoint with Pietro Yon.
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), after graduating from high school, gained her college diploma at Radcliffe College, where she focused primarily on poetry and learning writing craft, encountering no women teachers at all. In 1951, her last year at college, Rich's first collection of poetry, “A Change of World,2 was selected by the senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1953, Rich married Alfred Haskell Conrad, an economics professor at Harvard University she met as an undergraduate. She said of the match: "I married in part because I knew no better way to disconnect from my first family. I wanted what I saw as a full woman's life, whatever was possible." They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts and had three sons.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) earned his bachelor's degree in architecture at Auburn University (then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute) in 1940 and then moved on to the Harvard Graduate School of Design to study with Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius. After three years, he left to serve in the Navy for another three years, returning to Harvard to receive his master's in 1947
• Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895) graduated at Harvard College in 1844; overseer of Harvard University for 18 years.
• George Santayana (1863–1952) lived in Hollis Hall as a student. He was founder and president of the Philosophical Club, a member of the literary society known as the O.K., an editor and cartoonist for The Harvard Lampoon, and co-founder of the literary journal The Harvard Monthly. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1886, Santayana studied for two years in Berlin. He then returned to Harvard to write his dissertation on Hermann Lotze and teach philosophy, becoming part of the Golden Age of the Harvard philosophy department.
• Laurence Senelick (born 1942) holds a Ph.D. from Harvard. He is Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) attended Harvard University for graduate school, initially studying literature with Perry Miller and Harry Levin before moving into philosophy and theology under Paul Tillich, Jacob Taubes, Raphael Demos and Morton White. After completing her Master of Arts in philosophy, she began doctoral research into metaphysics, ethics, Greek philosophy and Continental philosophy and theology at Harvard. The philosopher Herbert Marcuse lived with Sontag and her husband Philip Rieff for a year while working on his 1955 book “Eros and Civilization.”
• Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880-1955) was educated at the University of California, Berkeley and later transferred to Radcliffe College to receive her A.B. degree. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1902.
• Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) attended Radcliffe College, then an annex of Harvard University, from 1893 to 1897.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989) entered thanks to a loan from Dr. Fred M. Smith, the president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and father of Alice Smith.
• George Tooker (1920-2011) graduated from Harvard University with an English degree in 1942 and enlisted in the Officer Candidates School (United States Marine Corps), but was discharged for medical reasons.
• Prescott Townsend (1894–1973) graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape (1938), emigrated to America, at the invitation of Walter Gropius, to teach at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. From 1938 to 1943 Tunnard taught at Harvard.
• Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (1859–1927) graduated from Harvard in 1881; he began studying law in 1883, and opened a law office specializing in international law in Washington, D.C. in 1885.
• Edward Perry Warren (1860–1928) received his B.A. in 1883.
• Harry Elkins Widener (1885-1912) was the son of George and Eleanor Widener. He lived in Elkins Park, PA. Harry studied at Hill School, a private establishment in Pottstown, PA; graduating in 1903 he left to study at Harvard (graduated 1907). Harry was a noted collector of rare books, included in his collection was a Shakespeare Folio and a Gutenberg Bible. Harry developed his bibliophilic interests while in college, when he did research among early books with coloured plates illustrating costumes for a Hasty Pudding Theatrical. In the spring of 1912, he went to England to buy books (including the second edition of Bacon's Essais, 1598) and it was while returning from this visit that he lost his life along with many of the books purchased. Harry boarded the Titanic at Cherbourg with his father and mother, George Widener's valet Edwin Keeping and Mrs Widener's maid Emily Geiger. The Widener's occupied cabins C-80-82. On the night of April 14th Harry and his parents threw a party in honour of Captain Smith which was attended by some of the most wealthy passengers on board the Titanic. Later that night Harry helped his mother into boat 4 and then stood back to await his fate, at one point he was joined by William Ernest Carter who advised him to try for a boat but Harry "I'll think I'll stick to the big ship, Billy, and take a chance." A story, never confirmed by Mrs Widener, romanticizes the death of her son. He was about to step into a lifeboat that would have saved his life when he remembered a newly acquired and unique copy of Bacon's Essais and ran back to get it. After his death the librarians turned to Mrs Widener for a donation in memory of her bibliophile son. His mother gave $2,000,000 for the construction of the building that would also house her son's collection and in 1915 the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library was dedicated. Horace Trumbauer (hon. A.M. 1915) of Philadelphia designed the library building. Harvard still pays for fresh flowers to be placed under a portrait of Widener in the chapel.
• Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), M.A. from Radcliffe College.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Yaddo, Saratoga Springs (12866)

School: Yaddo was founded by Spencer and Katrina Trask as an artist colony on their estate in Saratoga Springs. LGBTQ artists and writers, including Patricia Highsmigh, Langston Hughes, Aaron Copland, and Truman Capote spent time as artists in residence at Yaddo.

Address: 312 Union Ave, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866, USA (43.06926, -73.758)
Phone: +1 518-584-0746
Website: www.yaddo.org
National Register of Historic Places: 13000282, 2013

Place
Yaddo is an artists' community located on a 400-acre (1.6 km²) estate in Saratoga Springs, New York. Its mission is "to nurture the creative process by providing an opportunity for artists to work without interruption in a supportive environment." It offers residencies to artists working in choreography, film, literature, musical composition, painting, performance art, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and video. Collectively, artists who have worked at Yaddo have won 66 Pulitzer Prizes, 27 MacArthur Fellowships, 61 National Book Awards, 24 National Book Critics Circle Awards, 108 Rome Prizes, 49 Whiting Writers' Awards, a Nobel Prize (Saul Bellow, who won the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction and Nobel Prize in Literature in 1976), and countless other honors. Yaddo is included in the Union Avenue Historic District. Entering its second century, Yaddo accepts contributions to its endowment and underwriting for specific projects to ensure that the artists' community will always be a place of inspiration. During the Centennial Gift Campaign, Yaddo received large contributions from Spencer Trask & Company and Kevin Kimberlin, the firm's current chairman. Novelist Patricia Highsmith bequeathed her entire estate, valued at $3 million, to the community.

Notable queer Alumni at Yaddo:
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) became a trustee in 1939, where he was also a frequent writer in residence. There in the summer of 1946 he met and began a two-year affair with the young Truman Capote. Newton addressed him as "Precious Spooky" in amorous letters that went on to discuss literary matters.
• James Baldwin (1924-1987)
• Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990)
• Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979)
• Truman Capote (1924-1984) was accepted in the spring of 1946. He later endorsed Patricia Highsmith as a Yaddo candidate, and she wrote “Strangers on a Train” while she was there.
• John Cheever (1912-1982) wrote to Elizabeth Ames, the director of Yaddo, in 1933: "The idea of leaving the city," he said, "has never been so distant or desirable." Ames denied his first application but offered him a place the following year. Cheever spent the summer of 1934 at Yaddo, which would serve as a second home for much of his life.
• Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
• Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) met writer Marc Brandel (the son of J.D. Beresford) during her stay in 1948 and entered into a short-lived relationship with him.
• Langston Hughes (1902-1967)
• Ned Rorem (born 1923)
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989)
• Colm Tóibín (born 1955)

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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School: Smith College is a private, independent women's liberal arts college with coed graduate and certificate programs, located in Northampton, Massachusetts. It is the largest member of the Seven Sisters. In its 2017 edition, U.S. News & World Report ranked it tied for 12th among the best National Liberal Arts Colleges.

Address: Northampton, MA 01063, USA (42.31809, -72.63723)
Phone: +1 413-584-2700
Website: www.smith.edu
Gay Village: Northampton (Hampshire County, MA 01060)

Place
Smith is also a member of the Five Colleges consortium, which allows its students to attend classes at four other Pioneer Valley institutions: Mount Holyoke College, Amherst College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The college was chartered in 1871-1891 by a bequest of Sophia Smith and opened its doors in 1875 with 14 students and six faculty. When she inherited a fortune from her father at age 65, Smith decided that leaving her inheritance to found a women's college was the best way for her to fulfill the moral obligation she expressed in her will: "I hereby make the following provisions for the establishment and maintenance of an Institution for the higher education of young women, with the design to furnish for my own sex means and facilities for education equal to those which are afforded now in our colleges to young men." The Documenting Lesbian Lives Oral History Project is a collection of life histories of women who identify as lesbian, bisexual, woman-identified-woman, queer, or who prefer not to identify with sexuality categories. The project provides a complex and nuanced collective story of American lesbian history and experience. Interviews were conducted by Smith College students in Kelly Anderson's “Documenting Lesbian Lives” course in the spring of 2010 to the present. Students were trained in both United States lesbian history and oral history techniques and protocols. Narrators include grassroots activists and political organizers, educators and academics; musicians, writers, and artists; as well as community and religious leaders. They come from a variety of class, ethnic, racial, social, and geographic backgrounds. Interviews cover childhood and growing up experiences; education and employment; activism and politics; family, identity, relationships, and community.

Notable queer alumni and faculty at Smith College:
• Alice Morgan Wright (1881-1975), a graduate of Smith College, she continued her studies in New York City. Prohibited from attending life studies at the Art Students League of New York, Wright watched local boxing and wrestling competitions in order to study the human form.
• Edith J. Goode (1881–1970), Alice Morgan Wright’s long-time companion, attended Smith College, graduating in 1904.
• Edward "Ned" Spofford (1931-2014) continued teaching literature after his termination as professor from Smith College at Stanford University. His publications include “The Social Poetry of the Georgics.”
• Elisabeth Irwin (1880–1942) attended the Packer Collegiate Institute and received her A.B. from Smith College in 1903, and her M.A. from Columbia University in 1923. She was a member of the feminist intellectual club Heterodoxy.
• Elizabeth McCausland (1899–1965) was born in Wichita, Kansas in 1899, grew up in a middle-class environment, and graduated from Smith College in 1920.
• Newton Arvin (1900–1963) joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist. He taught at Smith College for 38 years and was Mary Augusta Jordan Professor of English during the year before his retirement in 1961. He rarely left Northampton for long nor travelled far. He visited Europe only once in the summer of 1929 or 1930. He spent a year's leave of absence in the mid-1920s as the editor of “Living Age,” a weekly compendium of articles from British and American periodicals. In 1960, the office of the United States Postmaster General (then Arthur Ellsworth Summerfield) initiated a campaign against the distribution and possession of lewd materials, including soft-core homosexually-themed pictures. At the same time, local officials in Northampton were engaged in an anti-homosexual crusade. On September 2, officers of the Massachusetts State Police arrested Arvin on pornography-related charges. The police charged Arvin with "being a lewd person" and charged both him and a Smith faculty colleague, Edward Spofford, with "possession of obscene photographs." Police said Arvin led them to Spofford and that both implicated other male faculty members. Arvin, they said, admitted "displaying the photographs at his apartment and swapping them with others." Further reports specified that the pictures were of males, later revealed as issues of Grecian Guild Pictorial and Trim: Young America’s Favorite Physique Publication containing pictures of semi-nude men. Smith College suspended Arvin from teaching, but kept him on half salary until retirement age. In 2002, Smith College established the "Newton Arvin Prize in American Studies," a student award.
• Oskar Seidlin (1911–1984) was briefly employed by the emigres Thomas Mann and Erika Mann as an amanuensis before obtaining a lecturership in German language and literature at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, in 1939, and advancing to an assistant professorship in 1941. Between 1942 and 1946, he was granted an extended wartime leave from his teaching position at Smith to serve with the "Ritchie Boys" (Military Intelligence Service).
• Raymond Joel Dorius (1919–2006) left the United States after the scandal at Smith College and worked as a professor at the University of Hamburg in Germany. In 1964 he returned to the United States and taught as a professor at San Francisco State University. He died of bone marrow cancer at his home in San Francisco, California, in 2006.
• Vida Dutton Scudder (1861-1954) attended private secondary schools in Boston, and was graduated from the Boston Girl's Latin School in 1880. Scudder then entered Smith College, where she received her BA degree in 1884. She received the degree of LHD from Smith College in 1922.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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Cemetery: Newton Arvin (1900–1963) was an American literary critic and academic. He achieved national recognition for his studies of individual XIX-century American authors. After teaching at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts for 38 years, he was forced into retirement in 1960 after pleading guilty to charges stemming from the possession of pictures of semi-nude males that the law deemed pornographic. Arvin was also one of the first lovers of the author Truman Capote. Arvin was born in Valparaiso, Indiana. He died of pancreatic cancer in Northampton on March 21, 1963 and is buried at Union Street Cemetery, Valparaiso, IN 46383. Truman Capote established in his will the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism to be awarded "in honor of the critic Newton Arvin." It has been awarded annually since 1994 by the University of Iowa. It is said to be the largest annual cash prize for literary criticism in the English language.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
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Born: August 8, 1967, Livonia, Michigan, United States
Education: Ohio State University
Spouse: Matthew Montgomery (m. 2015)
People also search for: Matthew Montgomery, Rob Williams, more
Anniversary: March 21, 2008
Married: March 21, 2015

After winning Best Supporting Actor at the Tampa International Gay Film Festival for the film Nine Lives, Steve Callahan has become a regular on the gay film circuit. He starred in East Side Story, winner of the 2009 GLAAD Award. Matthew Montgomery (born Matthew Robert Ramírez) is an American actor, producer and writer born in Corpus Christi, Texas. Since his début in Gone, But Not Forgotten, he has specialized in independent movies with LGBT themes. Steve Callahan and Matthew Montgomery met working as actors in the film Pornography: A Thriller. They had one scene together in the movie, but ending up talking all night on set. They went on their first date on March 21, 2008 and have been together since. They are currently engaged. Matt and Steve live in Los Angeles with their dog Dude.

Together since 2008: 7 years.
Matthew Montgomery (born March 16, 1978)
Steve Callahan (born August 8, 1967)
Anniversary: March 21, 2008 / Married: March 21, 2015

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
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