Mar. 22nd, 2017

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Ilana Sheryl Kloss is a former professional tennis player, tennis coach, and the current commissioner of World TeamTennis, a position that she has held since 2001.
Born: March 22, 1956, Johannesburg, South Africa
Turned pro: 1973
Partner: Billie Jean King

Ilana Sheryl Kloss (born 22 March 1956) is a former professional tennis player and the commissioner of World Team Tennis. Kloss is the partner of Billie Jean King, the US tennis player. She currently resides near the Museum of Natural History in New York City. Kloss is the daughter of Ruth and Shlaim Kloss. She has a sister, Yvette Merle Blackman (née Kloss), now married to Richard Blackman with two children, Lara and Joshua Blackman. Kloss was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. Before turning professional, in 1972 she won the Wimbledon juniors singles title. In 1974 she won U.S. Open juniors singles title, and was the youngest player ever to be ranked No. 1 in South Africa. Kloss was ranked No. 1 in the world in doubles in 1976. That year, she won doubles titles at the U.S. Open, the Italian Open, the U.S. Clay Courts, the German Open, the British Hard Courts Championship, and Hilton Head, as well as the mixed doubles title at the French Open. She was ranked as high as No. 19 in the world in singles play in 1976. In 1977 she won both the German and Canadian championships, and the British clay court championship. In 1973, she won the title in Cincinnati with Pat Walkden, defeating Evonne Goolagong and Janet Young in the final. Most of her women's doubles titles were achieved with partner Linky Boshoff. After retiring, Kloss took part in the 35-and-over tour, winning the U.S. Open doubles and mixed doubles championship in 1999. In the 1970s she was 12–5 in Federation Cup matches. Kloss, who is Jewish, was inducted into the Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 2006. She also played in the Maccabiah Games in Israel. Since 2001 she has been the Chief Executive Officer & Commissioner of World Team Tennis, a coed professional tennis league.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilana_Kloss
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Jean-Baptiste Lully was an Italian-born French composer, instrumentalist, and dancer who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France. He is considered a master of the French baroque style.
Born: November 28, 1632, Florence
Died: March 22, 1687, Paris, France
Spouse: Madeleine Lambert (m. 1662–1687)
Buried: Basilica of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, Paris, France
Find A Grave Memorial# 87133521
Children: Louis Lully, Jean-Baptiste Lully fils, Jean-Louis Lully
Employer: Paris Opera Ballet

School: The Paris Opera Ballet (Place de l'Opéra, 75009) is the oldest national ballet company. Together with the Moscow Bolshoi Ballet and the London Royal Ballet it is regarded as one of the three most preeminent ballet companies in the world. The Paris Opera Ballet has always been an integral part of the Paris Opera, which was founded in 1669 as the Académie d'Opéra (Academy of Opera), although theatrical dance did not become an important component of the Paris Opera until 1673, after it was renamed the Académie Royale de Musique (Royal Academy of Music) and placed under the leadership of Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632-1687). The Paris Opera Ballet had its origins in the earlier dance institutions, traditions and practices of the court of Louis XIV. Of particular importance were the series of comédies-ballets created by Molière with, among others, the choreographers and composers Pierre Beauchamps and Jean-Baptiste Lully. In 1929, Jacques Rouché invited 24-year-old dancer Serge Lifar (1905-1986) to take over the directorship of the Paris Opéra Ballet, which had fallen into decline in the late XIX century. As ballet master from 1930 to 1944, and from 1947 to 1958, he devoted himself to the restoration of the technical level of the Opéra Ballet, returning it to its place as one of the best companies in the world. Lifar gave the company a new strength and purpose, initiating the rebirth of ballet in France, and began to create the first of many ballets for that company. During his three decades as director of the Paris Opéra Ballet, Lifar led the company through the turbulent times of World War II and the German occupation of France. Lifar brought the Paris Opéra Ballet to America and performed to full houses at the New York City Center. Audiences were enthusiastic and had great admiration for the company of dancers. In 1983, Rudolf Nureyev was appointed director of the Paris Opera Ballet, where, as well as directing, he continued to dance and to promote younger dancers. The top female ballet dancer at that time, if not of all times was Sylvie Guillem who was nominated principal dancer at the age of 19 by Rudolf Nureyev in 1984. They were a mythical dance couple. The years of Nureyev marked a golden era of the Paris Opera Ballet.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906692
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Church: Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632–1687) was an Italian-born French composer, instrumentalist, and dancer who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France. After Queen Marie-Thérèse's death in 1683 and the king's secret marriage to Mme de Maintenon, devotion came to the fore at court. The king's enthusiasm for opera dissipated; he was revolted by Lully's dissolute life and homosexual encounters. Lully died from gangrene, having struck his foot with his long conducting staff during a performance of his “Te Deum” to celebrate Louis XIV's recovery from surgery. He refused to have his leg amputated so he could still dance. This resulted in gangrene propagating through his body and ultimately infecting the greater part of his brain, causing his death. He died in Paris and was buried in the church of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires (Place des Petits Pères, 75002), where his tomb with its marble bust can still be seen. All three of his sons (Louis Lully, Jean-Baptiste Lully fils, and Jean-Louis Lully) had musical careers as successive surintendants of the King's Music.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Nona Lovell Brooks, described as a "prophet of modern mystical Christianity", was a leader in the New Thought movement and a founder of the Church of Divine Science.
Born: March 22, 1861, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
Died: March 14, 1945, Denver, Colorado, United States
Lived: First Church of Divine Science, 1400 N Williams St, Denver, CO 80218, USA (39.73874, -104.96557)
645 Lafayette Street, Denver
Buried: Fairmount Cemetery, Denver, Denver County, Colorado, USA, Plot: Blk 2
Find A Grave Memorial# 33130165
Books: Short Lessons in Divine Science, In the Light of Healing: Sermons by Nona L. Brooks, Mysteries

Church: The First Church of Divine Science in Denver is located at the northeast corner of 14th Avenue and Williams Street, just north of Cheesman Park. Now known as the Althea Center for Engaged Spirituality, the church and its Denver congregants were important in the development of Divine Science.

Address: 1400 N Williams St, Denver, CO 80218, USA (39.73874, -104.96557)
Phone: +1 303-322-7738
Website: www.altheacenter.org

Place
Founded in 1885 in San Francisco by Malinda Cramer, the Church of Divine Science moved its headquarters to Denver after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Cramer first visited Colorado in 1887 to lecture on Divine Science and found an attentive audience in Denver, particularly in the Brooks sisters of Pueblo. By 1898, Cramer’s followers founded the Colorado College of Divine Science, and a year later they founded the First Church of Divine Science in Denver. From what I have read, Divine Science has similarities to Christian Science, but more information about the faith can be found here. The First Church of Divine Science building was constructed in 1922 to accommodate the growing congregation in Denver. The church has a circular colonnade at the corner entrance, which is flanked by two wings, both with a series of columns supporting a decorative frieze. Large windows between the columns allow light into the sanctuary and offices. The church was designed by Denver society architect, Jules Jacques Benois Benedict, often known as J.J.B. Benedict. Benedict was a talented architect who also had a reputation for being moody and difficult to work with despite his creative genius. He designed numerous residences for Denver’s elite, including the (demolished) Belmar mansion for May Bonfils Berryman. He also designed commercial buildings and several structures for Denver’s city and mountain parks. According to the National Register nomination for Benedict’s completed buildings, the First Church of Divine Science was Benedict’s first church commission. The main body of the church is buff-colored stucco textured with small pebbles. This is ornamented by beautiful buff and pale-blue glazed terra cotta at the rounded colonnade and on the flanking wings. The National Register nomination refers to a 1923 article in Architectural Record noting that the congregation requested classical ornament rather than more overtly religious symbolism.

Life
Who: Nona Lovell Brooks (March 22, 1861 – March 14, 1945)
Nona L. Brooks, described as a "prophet of modern mystical Christianity", was a leader in the New Thought movement and a founder of the Church of Divine Science. Brooks was born in Louisville, Kentucky, the youngest daughter of Chauncey and Lavinia Brooks. At a fairly early age, her family moved just outside Charleston, West Virginia, where Brooks graduated from the Charleston Female Academy. Due to the collapse of her father's salt mining business, the family moved again, this time to Pueblo, Colorado where he entered the metal mining business. He died shortly after the move, when Brooks was 19. In 1890, with the aim of becoming a teacher, Brooks enrolled at Pueblo Normal School, which was followed by a one-year stay at Wellesley College. In 1887, encouraged by her sister, Althea Brooks Small, Nona Brooks attended classes taught by Kate Bingham, proponent of the New Thought philosophy. While attending these classes, Brooks "found herself healed of a persistent throat infection" and shortly thereafter Brooks and Small began to heal others. In December 1898, Brooks was ordained by Malinda Cramer as a minister in the Church of Divine Science and founded the Denver Divine Science College. Shortly thereafter, she inaugurated the Divine Science Church of Denver, holding its initial service on January 1, 1899 at the Plymouth Hotel in Denver, in the process becoming the first woman pastor in Denver. In 1902, Brooks founded Fulfillment, a Divine Science periodical. During this period, she also served on several Denver civic boards, including the Colorado State Prison Board. After World War I Brooks succeeded her sister Fannie James as head of the college and in 1922 Brooks aligned the growing Church of Divine Science with the International New Thought Alliance. In the early 1930s she moved to Australia, where she established several Divine Science organizations, returning to Chicago in 1935 and then back to Denver in 1938. Nona was described by many who knew her as warm, gentle, and "motherly", but with "a strength that came from conviction". She lived at 645 N Lafayette St, Denver, CO 80218, and is buried at Fairmount Cemetery (430 S Quebec St, Denver, CO 80247, USA).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
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Pearl M. Hart was a Chicago attorney notable for her work defending oppressed minority groups. Hart was the first woman in Chicago to be appointed Public Defender in the Morals Court.
Born: April 7, 1890, Traverse City, Michigan, United States
Died: March 22, 1975, United States of America
Education: John Marshall Law School
Lived: 2821 N Pine Grove Ave, Chicago, IL 60657, USA (41.93357, -87.64111)
Find A Grave Memorial# 101046635
Partner: Valerie Taylor (1963–1975)

School: The John Marshall Law School (315 S Plymouth Ct, Chicago, IL 60604) is a law school in Chicago, Illinois, that was founded in 1899 and accredited by the American Bar Association in 1951. The school was named for the influential XIX-century U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall. Pearl M. Hart (1890–1975), Chicago attorney notable for her work defending oppressed minority groups, was the first woman in Chicago to be appointed Public Defender in the Morals Court. Most notably, she represented children, women, immigrants, lesbians, and gay men, often without fee or for a nominal fee. She attended the John Marshall Law School and was admitted to the Illinois State Bar in 1914.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
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House: Pearl Hart, lawyer, social justice advocate, and long-time gay-rights activist lived in the Lakeview neighborhood. Pearl Hart was a founding member and board member of the National Lawyers Guild, the Committee to Defend the Foreign-Born, and the Portes Cancer Preservation Clinic.

Address: 2821 N Pine Grove Ave, Chicago, IL 60657, USA (41.93357, -87.64111)
LGBTQ-friendly Bookstore: Unabridged Books (3251 North Broadway, Chicago, IL 60657)

Life
Who: Pearl Minnie Harchovsky (April 7, 1890 - March 22, 1975) aka Pearl M. Hart and Valerie Taylor (September 7, 1913 – October 22, 1997)
Pearl M. Hart was an ardent defender of gay rights, appearing on behalf of many victims of entrapment and harassment, often without fee or for minimal fee. She worked for anti-entrapment laws and the right to privacy. She was involved in the founding and work of the present Mattachine Society as well as its predecessor and focused on the Chicago Police Department and its historic entrapment of gays. Valerie Taylor was an American author of books published in the lesbian pulp fiction genre, as well as poetry and novels after the "golden age" of lesbian pulp fiction. She was born Velma Nacella Young and also published as Nacella Young, Francine Davenport, and Velma Tate. Her publishers included Naiad Press, Banned Books, Universal, Gold Medal Books, Womanpress, Ace and Midwood-Tower. In 1965 she met Pearl Hart, another founder of Mattachine Midwest. They were together until 1975 when Hart died. Taylor lived in an apartment at 540 W Surf St, Chicago, IL 60657, around the corner from Hart, the heart of the" gay ghetto" of Chicago at that time, but close to Hart. Not being an immediate family member, Taylor was not allowed to visit Hart in the hospital as she was dying and missed being able to tell her goodbye. She had to appeal to a friend of Hart's but by the time she was able to see her, Hart was in a coma. When Pearl Hart died in February, 1975, Taylor moved to 3356 N Claremont Ave, Chicago, IL 60618, but soon after she moved again to Margaretville, New York, in October 1975 to be near friends Hank and Ada Mayer's Catskills farm. In 1979, she moved again to Tucson, initially at the guest house of La Casa Nuestra (2433 N Dodge Blvd, Tucson, AZ 85716), a private lesbian club, but then, in 1980, to 3751 E Grant Rd, Tucson, AZ 85716, where she lived until hospitalized after a fall on October 10, 1997. She died on October 22, 1997, in a Tucson hospice.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
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Stephen Joshua Sondheim is an American composer and lyricist known for more than a half-century of contributions to musical theatre.
Born: March 22, 1930, New York City, New York, United States
Education: George School
New York Military Academy
Ethical Culture Fieldston School
Williams College
Lived: 246 E. 49th St
Partner: Jeff Romley
Albums: Company (2006 Broadway revival cast), more

School: George School (1690 Newtown Langhorne Rd, Newtown, PA 18940) is a private Quaker boarding and day high school located on a rural campus near Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. George School was founded in 1891 and opened in 1893. It is named for John M. George who donated much of the money for the school. It has grown from a single building (still standing) to over 20 academic, athletic, and residential buildings. Besides the usual college preparatory courses, including an International Baccalaureate program, the school features several distinct programs deriving from its Quaker heritage. Stephen Sondheim (born 1930, class 1946), Pulitzer Prize–winning composer/lyricist, attended George School, where he wrote his first musical, “By George,” and from which he graduated in 1946. Sondheim spent several summers at Camp Androscoggin.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
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School: New York Military Academy (NYMA, 78 Academy Ave, Cornwall-On-Hudson, NY 12520) is a private boarding school in the rural village of Cornwall-on-Hudson, 60 miles (97 km) north of New York City, and one of the oldest military schools in the United States. Originally a boys' school, it became coeducational in 1975. On March 3, 2015, NYMA filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, facing serious financial difficulties from low enrollment. Instead of opening for the fall semester in September 2015, NYMA closed and was sold at auction to a group of Chinese investors who reopened the school in November. NYMA was founded in 1889 by Charles Jefferson Wright, an American Civil War veteran and former schoolteacher from New Hampshire who believed that a military structure provided the best environment for academic achievement, a philosophy to which the school still adheres. Stephen Sondheim (born 1930, class 1946), Tony, Grammy, Oscar and Pulitzer-winning composer and lyricist, attended the New York Military Academy, but did not graduate.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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School: Ethical Culture Fieldston School (ECFS, 3901 Fieldston Rd, Bronx, NY 10471), known as just Fieldston, is a private, highly selective independent school in New York City. The school is a member of the Ivy Preparatory School League. The school opened in 1878 as a free kindergarten, founded by Felix Adler at the age of 24. In 1880, elementary grades were added, and the school was then called the Workingman's School. At that time, the idea that the children of the poor should be educated was innovative. By 1890 the school's academic reputation encouraged many more wealthy parents to seek it out, and the school was expanded to accommodate the upper-class as well, and began charging tuition; in 1895 the name changed to "The Ethical Culture School", and in 1903 the New York Society for Ethical Culture became its sponsor. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Diane Arbus, photographer; Roy Cohn, attorney; Stephen Sondheim (born 1930), composer, attended the Fieldston Lower School.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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School: Williams College (880 Main St, Williamstown, MA 01267) is a highly selective private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. Currently ranked 1st place in the U.S. News & World Report's liberal arts ranking for the 14th consecutive year, Williams College is regarded as a leading institution of higher education in the United States. Forbes magazine ranked Williams the second best undergraduate institution in the United States in its 2016 publication of America's Top Colleges, and the best undergraduate institution in its 2010, 2011, 2014 and 2016 report. Colonel Ephraim Williams was an officer in the Massachusetts militia and a member of a prominent landowning family. His will included a bequest to support and maintain a free school to be established in the town of West Hoosac, Massachusetts, provided that the town change its name to Williamstown. Williams was killed at the Battle of Lake George on September 8, 1755. After Shays' Rebellion, the Williamstown Free School opened with 15 students on October 26, 1791. The first president was Ebenezer Fitch. Not long after its founding, the trustees of the school petitioned the Massachusetts legislature to convert the free school to a tuition-based college. The legislature agreed and on June 22, 1793, Williams College was chartered. It was the second college to be founded in Massachusetts. Stephen Sondheim (born 1930) attended Williams College, whose theatre program attracted him. His first teacher there was Robert Barrow: “everybody hated him because he was very dry, and I thought he was wonderful because he was very dry. And Barrow made me realize that all my romantic views of art were nonsense.” The composer told Meryle Secrest, "I just wanted to study composition, theory, and harmony without the attendant musicology that comes in graduate school. But I knew I wanted to write for the theatre, so I wanted someone who did not disdain theatre music." Barrow suggested that Sondheim study with Milton Babbitt, who Sondheim described as "a frustrated show composer" with whom he formed "a perfect combination." When he met Babbitt, he was working on a musical for Mary Martin based on the myth of Helen of Troy. Sondheim and Babbitt would meet once a week in New York City for four hours (at the time, Babbitt was teaching at Princeton University). At Williams, Sondheim wrote a musical adaption of “Beggar on Horseback” (a 1924 play by George S. Kaufman and Marc Connelly, with permission from Kaufman) which had three performances. A member of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, he graduated magna cum laude in 1950.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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House: Turtle Bay is a neighborhood in New York City, on the east side of Midtown Manhattan. It extends from either 41s or 43rd Streets to 53rd Street, and eastward from Lexington Avenue to the East River’s western branch, facing Roosevelt Island. The neighborhood is the site of the headquarters of the United Nations and the Chrysler Building. The Tudor City apartment complex is also considered to be within Turtle Bay.

Address: E 49th St, New York, NY 10017, USA
National Register of Historic Places: Turtle Bay Gardens Historic District (226-246 E. 49th St. and 227-245 E. 48th St.), 83001750, 1983

Place
An army enrollment office was established at Third Avenue and 46th Street, after the first Draft Act was passed during the American Civil War. On July 13, 1863, an angry mob burned the office to the ground and proceeded to riot through the surrounding neighborhood, destroying entire blocks. The New York Draft Riots continued for three days before army troops managed to contain the mob, which had burned and looted much of the city. After the war ended, the formerly pastoral neighborhood was developed with brownstones. By 1868 the bay had been entirely filled in by commercial overdevelopment, packed with breweries, gasworks, slaughterhouses, cattle pens, coal yards, and railroad piers. By the early XX century, Turtle Bay was "a riverside back yard" for the city, as the WPA Guide to New York City (1939) described it: "huge industrial enterprises— breweries, laundries, abattoirs, power plants— along the water front face squalid tenements not far away from new apartment dwellings attracted to the section by its river view and its central position. The numerous plants shower this district with the heaviest sootfall in the city— 150 tons to the square mile annually.” The huge Waterside Station, a power plant operated by the Consolidated Edison Company, producing 367,000 kilowatts of electricity in its coal-fired plant, marked the southern boundary of the neighborhood. There were also 18 acres (73,000 m2) of slaughterhouses along First Avenue. With an infusion of poor immigrants having had come in the later part of the XIX century, and the opening of the elevated train lines along Second and Third Avenues, the neighborhood went into decay with crumbling tenement buildings.

Notable queer residents at Turtle Bay:
• No. 109 E. 42nd St, 10017: Greta Garbo (1905-1990) and Mauritz Stiller occupied rooms at the Hotel Commodore in the first two months of their stay in America in July 1925. The Hotel Commodore (today the Grand Hyatt) was a modest place, at 42nd street, which formed a part of Grand Central Station and just a few steps away from the MGM office at Broadway.
• 525 Lexington Ave, 10017 (now the New York Marriot East Side): in 1925 Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986) and Alfred Stieglitz moved to the Shelton Hotel taking an apartment on the 30th floor of the new building. They would live here for 12 years. With a spectacular view, Georgia began to paint the city. The building was depicted in some of the works of these two legendary tenants, O’Keefe the painter and Stieglitz the photographer.
• No. 237 E. 48th St, 10017: Dorothy Thompson (1894-1961), a well-known foreign correspondent and author of "I Saw Hitler," was once married to writer Sinclair Lewis, but the great love of her life was Christa Winsloe, author of the novel upon which the classic lesbian film, "Madchen in Uniform" was based. After they broke up, Thompson lived alone in this three-story brownstone from 1941 to 1957. She spent more than $20,000 for renovations to make it, as she wrote, “the most perfect small house I have ever seen.” Thompson’s “small” home included a library with more than 3,000 books, five fireplaces, and a third-floor study for writing. In the drawing room, a wine-colored satin sofa could hold, she bragged, five of “the most distinguished bottoms in New York.” In the front door were eight painted glass panels showing Thompson in medieval attire performing various tasks – writing, lecturing, greeting guests. There was also the house’s motto: “Gallus in sterquilinio suo plurimum potest.” (“The rooster on his own dunghill is very much in charge.”)
• No. 246 E. 49th St, 10017: Stephen Sondheim (born 1930) has been a long-time resident of the Turtle Bay Gardens. Sondheim has spoken in the past of feeling like an outsider – “somebody who people want to both kiss and kill” – from quite early on in his life. He spent some 25 years – from his thirties through his fifties – in analysis, did not come out as gay until he was about 40, and did not live with a partner, a dramatist named Peter Jones, until he was 61. They separated in 1999. Since 2004 he has been in a relationship with Jeff Romley (born 1978.) In 1969, while he was playing music, he heard a knock on the door. His neighbor, Katharine Hepburn, was in "bare feet – this angry, red-faced lady" and told him "You have been keeping me awake all night!" (she was practicing for her musical debut in Coco). When Sondheim asked why she had not asked him to play for her, she said she lost his phone number. According to Sondheim, "My guess is that she wanted to stand there in her bare feet, suffering for her art".
• No. 244 E. 49 St, 10017: Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003) lived in the apartment at 244 East 49th Street in the Turtle Bay neighborhood for more than 60 years. After her death in 2003, her beloved four-story brownstone was sold sight-unseen to a fan in 2004 for $3.9 million. According to the listing for the renting, the home has been renovated, but “the original mirrored dressing room area retains the glitter.” There is a formal entry, spacious living room, a parlor floor and the master bedroom/bath on the third floor and guest bedrooms on the fourth floor. Behind the brownstone are communal gardens — Turtle Bay Gardens — which are shared by other rowhome owners on East 49th and East 48th Streets. The city honored Hepburn by renaming the nearby intersection of Second Avenue and East 49th Street “Katharine Hepburn Place.” Nearby, in the Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, is a garden dedicated to her — the Katharine Hepburn Garden – which contains 12 stepping stones inscribed with quotes by Hepburn.
• No. 211 E. 49th St, 10017: Amster Yard, located at East 49th Street between Second and Third Avenues. James Amster (1908-1986) had first set eyes on what would become Amster Yard back in 1944 when, after a dinner party, two other guests who were in real estate business took him to see some “down-in-the-heels properties,” as he called them. An old tenement, boarding house, and a carpenter’s workshop ringed a debris-filled yard. But the creative Amster immediately saw potential in the site. Within two years, on a May evening in 1946, Amster was ready to unveil his charming Amster Yard with a grand party attended by some 700 clients, friends and the press. Eugenia Sheppard, writing for the New York Herald Tribune, described her gracious and handsome host as “a man with great romantic flair” and Amster Yard as “pretty and perfect… inside and out.” It was Amster’s dream to make Amster Yard a center of the design profession, and the earliest residents of its six apartments included the Yard’s architect, Sterner, and his wife, Paula; art patron Leonard Hanna; interior designer Billy Baldwin; artist Isamu Noguchi; fahion designer Norman Norell; as well as Amster, of course. Robert Moyer, Jimmy Amster’s partner for 41 years, stayed on at Amster Yard after Amster died in 1986 moving out in 1992.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
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Books reviewed on this site were usually provided at no cost by the publisher or author. However, some books were purchased by the reviewer and not provided for free. For information on how a particular title was obtained, please contact by email the blog's owner.
Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

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