Mar. 24th, 2017

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Robert Gordon "Bob" Mackie is an American fashion designer, best known for his dressing of entertainment icons such as Joan Rivers, Cher, RuPaul, Barbara Eden, Bette Midler, Diana Ross, Judy Garland, ...
Born: March 24, 1940, Monterey Park, California, United States
Education: Chouinard Art Institute
Pasadena City College
Spouse: LuLu Porter (m. 1960–1963)
Children: Robert Gordon Mackie Jr.
Awards: Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Costumes for a Series, more
Parents: Mildred Agnes Mackie, Charles Robert Mackie

School: The Chouinard Art Institute (743 S Grand View St, Los Angeles, CA 90057) was a professional art school founded in 1921 by Nelbert Murphy Chouinard (1879–1969) in Los Angeles, California. In 1961, Walt and Roy Disney guided the merger of the Chouinard Art Institute and the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music to establish the California Institute of the Arts. The Chouinard Art Institute building is situated at 743 Grand View Street in the Westlake district of central Los Angeles. Today it is used by the Western Day Care School, a child-care center. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Bob Mackie (born 1940), Don Bachardy (born 1934), Ted Graber (1920–2000).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

School: Pasadena City College (PCC, 1570 E Colorado Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91106) is a community college located in Pasadena, California. Pasadena City College was founded in 1924 as Pasadena Junior College. From 1928 to 1953, it operated as a four-year junior college, combining the last two years of high school with the first two years of college. In 1954, Pasadena Junior College merged with another junior college, John Muir College, to become Pasadena City College. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Dustin Lance Black (born 1974), Oscar-award winning screenwriter, actor and LGBT activist, known for his work in the film Milk and the TV series Big Love; Dennis Cooper (born 1953), poet and novelist; Jack Larson (1928-2015), “Jimmy Olsen” on TV's Superman show; Bob Mackie (born 1940), fashion designer.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Charlotte Mary Mew was an English poet, whose work spans the cusp between Victorian poetry and Modernism.
Born: November 15, 1869, Bloomsbury, London
Died: March 24, 1928, London, United Kingdom
Buried: Hampstead Cemetery, Hampstead, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England, Plot: northern part of the cemetery, GPS (lat/lon): 51.55082, -0.15848
Find A Grave Memorial# 63323444

House: Hampstead Town Hall (Haverstock Hill, London NW3 4QP) has been listed as a queer venue since the 1970s. However, ever since the London Gay Men's Chorus was founded in 1991, its offices and facilities have been based in Hampstead Town Hall. LGMC was founded when nine friends came together to sing a few Christmas carols at Angel Underground Station hoping to raise a few pounds for the Terrance Higgins Trust. LGMC is now Europe's largest gay men's choir. Hampstead Town Hall was designed by Frederick Mew, father of Charlotte Mew (1869–1928), English poet, whose work spans the cusp between Victorian poetry and Modernism. She was born in Bloomsbury, the daughter of Frederick Mew and Anna Kendall. Her father died in 1898 without making adequate provision for his family; two of her siblings suffered from mental illness, and were committed to institutions, and three others died in early childhood leaving Charlotte, her mother and her sister, Anne. Charlotte and Anne made a pact never to marry for fear of passing on insanity to their children. (One author calls Charlotte "almost certainly chastely lesbian)". Through most of her adult life, Mew wore masculine attire and kept her hair short, adopting the appearance of a dandy. In 1898, Mew fell in love with Ella D'Arcy, a writer and the assistant literary editor of the Yellow Book. D'Arcy, however, did not reciprocate the affection. Nine years later, Mew fell in love with May Sinclair, a well known novelist who was active in the suffrage movement. Sinclair was friendly with Mew and helped with her career. Her presentation of Mew's work to Ezra Pound led to the publication of the poem “The Fête” in the Egoist. Nevertheless, Sinclair did not return Mew's affections, and may have even unsympathetically informed others of the poet's lesbianism. Mew gained the patronage of several literary figures, notably Thomas Hardy, who called her the best woman poet of her day, Virginia Woolf, who said she was "very good and interesting and quite unlike anyone else", and Siegfried Sassoon. She obtained a Civil List pension of seventy-five pounds per year with the aid of Sydney Cockerell, Hardy, John Masefield and Walter de la Mare. This helped ease her financial difficulties. After the death of her sister from cancer in 1927, she descended into a deep depression, and was admitted to a nursing home where she eventually committed suicide by drinking Lysol.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

School: University College London (UCL, Gower St, Kings Cross, London WC1E 6BT) is a public research university in London, England, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. It is the largest postgraduate institution in the UK by enrollment and is regarded as one of the world's leading multidisciplinary research universities. Established in 1826 as London University by founders inspired by the radical ideas of Jeremy Bentham, UCL was the first university institution to be established in London, and the first in England to be entirely secular and to admit students regardless of their religion. UCL also makes the contested claims of being the third-oldest university in England and the first to admit women. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Caroline Spurgeon (1869–1942), Charlotte Mew (1869–1928), Derek Jarman (1942–1994), Eileen Gray (1878–1976), Leander Starr Jameson (1853–1917).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

May Sinclair was a popular British writer who wrote about two dozen novels, short stories and poetry. She was an active suffragist, and member of the Woman Writers' Suffrage League. From the late 1920s she was suffering from the early signs of Parkinson's disease, and ceased writing. She settled with her companion of 30 years, Florence “Florrie” Bartrop, in Buckinghamshire in 1932.

Addresses:
The Gables, 96 Burcott Lane, Bierton, Aylesbury HP22 5AS, UK (51.83097, -0.78631)
Pembroke Cottage, Little Tingewick, Buckingham MK18 4AG, UK (51.98959, -1.06774)

Place
Bierton is a village in Buckinghamshire, England, about half a mile northeast of the town of Aylesbury. It is a mainly farming parish, The hamlets of Broughton, Broughton Crossing and Burcott lie within Bierton with Broughton civil parish part of Aylesbury Vale district and forms part of the Aylesbury Urban Area. Notable inhabitants of Bierton include architect Deborah Saunt of Channel 4 television's series Grand Designs, playwright Robert Farquhar, BBC fashion commentator Jerry O'Sullivan, and the notable author and poet May Sinclair who lived at The Gables in Burcott Lane for the last ten years of her life. Finmere is a village and civil parish in Oxfordshire, south of the River Great Ouse. It is almost 4 miles (6 km) west of Buckingham in Buckinghamshire and just over 4 miles (6 km) east of Brackley in Northamptonshire. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 466. Finmere's toponym is derived from the Old English for "pool frequented by woodpeckers". The village includes the hamlet of Little Tingewick.

Life
Who: Mary Amelia St. Clair (August 24, 1863 – November 14, 1946), aka May Sinclair
May Sinclair was an active suffragist, and member of the Woman Writers' Suffrage League. May Sinclair was also a significant critic in the area of modernist poetry and prose, and she is attributed with first using the term stream of consciousness in a literary context. Sinclair met Ezra Pound in 1908, and would become both his financial patron and advocate for his work. Through him she met H.D. and Richard Aldington in 1911, and she became a champion of these imagist poets, of T.S. Eliot, and of Vorticism. In 1913 May Sinclair met Charlotte Mew, whose long poem The Farmer’s Bride she admired, and the two had a brief but intense friendship. In 1934, Sinclair was living at Pembroke Cottage, Little Tingewick, in Buckinghamshire, with her maid and companion since 1919, Florence Bartrop. She moved to the Gables, 96, Burcott Lane, Bierton in 1936, where she died in 1946. She is buried at St John-at-Hampstead Churchyard, Hampstead, London.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544067568 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544067569
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6980566
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1544067569/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1913 Esther Roper and Eva Gore-Booth moved to London, at 14 Frognal Gardens, London NW3 6UX, for the sake of Eva’s health. The house has a fine mature rear garden. Frognal gardens is a very quiet position, tucked behind Hampstead Village is the most historical location abutting Church Row. Not far from here, at 108 Frognal, London NW3 6XU, lived Tamara Karsavina (1885–1978). She is buried at Hampstead Cemetery (Fortune Green Rd, West Hampstead, London NW6 1DR). 14 Frognal Gardens was listed for rent in 2014 for £5,200. In the same cemetery is buried Charlotte Mew (1869–1928).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Grayson Perry CBE RA is an English artist, known mainly for his ceramic vases and cross-dressing. Perry's vases have classical forms and are decorated in bright colours, depicting subjects at odds with their attractive appearance.
Born: March 24, 1960, Chelmsford, United Kingdom
Education: Braintree College
University of Portsmouth
King Edward VI Grammar School, Chelmsford
Lived: A House for Essex, Black Boy Ln, Wrabness, Manningtree, Essex CO11 2TW, UK (51.94118, 1.17322)
Spouse: Philippa Perry (m. 1992)
Awards: Turner Prize, British Academy Television Award for Best Specialist Factual
Movies and TV shows: All In The Best Possible Taste with Grayson Perry, Grayson/Flowers/Jewels, Bungalow Depression
Parents: Jean Dines, Tom Perry

School: King Edward VI Grammar School, or KEGS (Broomfield Rd, Chelmsford CM1 3SX), is a British grammar school with academy status located in the city of Chelmsford, Essex. It takes pupils between the ages of 11 and 18 — from Year 7 to 11 the pupils are exclusively male, although it becomes mixed in the sixth form (years 12 and 13). KEGS was one of many grammar schools founded by Edward VI. Its current form resulted from a royal warrant dated March 24, 1551, although evidence of this school exists from as far back as the 13th century, possibly earlier, in an alternative location. Indeed, the school of 1551 was merely a "rebranding" of the Chelmsford Chantry School, a Roman Catholic institution which had been abolished along with the monasteries during the English Reformation. The school was moved to its present site on Broomfield Road in 1892. Once a boarding school, it was one of many grammar schools to fully join the state sector and abolish the nominal fees. The last boarders left in the 1970s. In 1976 it admitted the first female pupil (Fiona Hook) to the Sixth Form, to study Classics. Grayson Perry (born 1960) was educated at King Edward VI Grammar School. Perry took interest in conventional boys' activities, such as model aircraft, motorcycles and girls. He was in the school's Combined Cadet Corps and wanted to train as an army officer. In the late 1970s he was involved in the Chelmsford punk scene. From an early age he liked to dress in women's clothes and in his teens realized that he was a transvestite. At the age of 15 he moved in with his father's family in Chelmsford, where he began to go out dressed as a woman. When he was discovered by his father he said he would stop, but his stepmother told everyone about it and a few months later threw him out. He returned to his mother and stepfather at Great Bardfield.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544067568 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544067569
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6980566
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1544067569/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

School: Braintree College (Church Ln, Braintree CM7 5SN), now known as The College at Braintree, is a further education college based in Braintree, Essex. It is a constituent college of the Colchester Institute. The college was originally an independently controlled institution, but merged with the Colchester Institute on 29 February 2010. Despite being part of the Colchester Institute, Braintree continues to operate under its own name. Grayson Perry (born 1960), Turner Prize winning artist, did an art foundation course at Braintree College of Further Education from 1978 to 1979.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544067568 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544067569
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6980566
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1544067569/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

School: The University of Portsmouth (University House, Winston Churchill Ave, Portsmouth PO1 2UP) is a public university in the city of Portsmouth, in the ceremonial county of Hampshire on the south coast of England; it is located mainly on Portsea Island with a population of 205,400, it is the United Kingdom's only island city. The history of the university dates back to 1908, when the Park building opened as a Municipal college and public library. The focus was on chemistry and engineering. The University's roots can be traced back even further to the Portsmouth and Gosport School of Science and the Arts. Grayson Perry (born 1960) studied for a BA in fine art at Portsmouth Polytechnic, graduating in 1982. He had an interest in film and exhibited his first piece of pottery at the "New Contemporaries" show at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in 1980. In the months following his graduation he joined The Neo Naturists, a group started by Christine Binnie to revive the "true sixties spirit – which involves living one's life more or less naked and occasionally manifesting it into a performance for which the main theme is body paint". They put on events at galleries and other venues. When he left for Portsmouth in 1979, his stepfather told him not to return home.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: “Disney meets Dalì,” that is how the BBC described A House for Essex. Ceramic artist Grayson Perry and the FAT team of architects designed this bizarre building in its pretty country setting for the Living Architecture project as a gallery and holiday home for up to four people. To the Turner prize winner, art is not art without lashings of trash.

Address: Black Boy Ln, Wrabness, Manningtree, Essex CO11 2TW, UK (51.94118, 1.17322)
Website: http://www.living-architecture.co.uk/the-houses/a-house-for-essex/overview/

Place
A House for Essex is designed to evoke a tradition of wayside and pilgrimage chapels in the landscape. It is a singular building, appearing as a small, beautifully crafted object amongst the trees and fields. Due to high demand, all holidays at A House for Essex are sold via a ballot. Each ballot offers you the chance to purchase a 2- or 3- night stay at A House for Essex, for up to 4 people. The house does not attempt to mimic the appearance or materials of existing buildings in the local village of Wrabness. Instead, it offers a unique addition. Its materials and forms are sympathetic to the site and the area’s sense of remoteness. For example, hand-made tiles relate tonally to the landscape while the building’s simple pitched roof forms echo simple agricultural buildings and farmhouses. The form of the house is solid and barn-like. A series of simple, house forms step up in scale from the entrance to the main living room space. Each of these spaces is expressed externally as a volume in its own right. The building gets higher as it steps down the hill with the tallest volume at the lowest point. It therefore presents two different faces, a modestly scaled entrance porch to the south and a taller more formal frontage to the north. Visitors entering the house from the south pass through a series of spaces that become increasingly formal, culminating in a double-height living room lined with decorative timber panelling and Grayson Perry´s richly coloured tapestries. Upstairs there are two bedrooms which have views across the landscape to the east and west. The stepping up of the volumes creates a series of interlocking spaces on the inside where each pushes into the other. The first floor bedrooms, for instance, will also have balconies that look into the living room space and the bath offers an unusual location from which to observe visitors in the hallway. The interior of the house contains a number of specially commissioned art works by Grayson Perry including beautiful tapestries, pots, decorative timberwork and mosaic floors, celebrating the history and psyche of Essex.

Life
Who: Grayson Perry, CBE (born March 24, 1960)
Grayson Perry is an artist, known mainly for his ceramic vases and cross-dressing. Perry’s vases have classical forms and are decorated in bright colours, depicting subjects at odds with their attractive appearance. There is a strong autobiographical element in his work, in which images of Perry as "Claire,” his female alter-ego, often appear. He was awarded the Turner Prize in 2003. From an early age Perry liked to dress in women’s clothes and in his teens realized that he was a transvestite. After graduating he lived a hand-to-mouth existence in squats, at one point sharing a house with milliner Stephen Jones and pop musician Boy George, the three of them competing to see who could wear the most outrageous outfits to Blitz, a New Romantic nightclub in Covent Garden, London. He lives in London with his wife, the author and psychotherapist Philippa Perry. They have one daughter, Florence, born in 1992. In 2015 he was appointed to succeed Kwame Kwei-Armah as chancellor of University of the Arts London.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544067568 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544067569
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6980566
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1544067569/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Katherine Olivia "Kate" Sessions was an American botanist, horticulturalist, and landscape architect closely associated with San Diego, California, and known as the "Mother of Balboa Park."
Born: November 8, 1857, San Francisco, California, United States
Died: March 24, 1940, San Diego, California, United States
Education: University of California, Berkeley
Lived: 4016 Randolph Street, San Diego
Buried: Mount Hope Cemetery, San Diego, San Diego County, California, USA, Plot: Division 5
Find A Grave Memorial# 75383463

School: The University of California, Berkeley, (also referred to as Berkeley, UC Berkeley, and Cal, Berkeley, CA 94720) is a public research university located in Berkeley, California. Founded in 1868, Berkeley is the oldest of the ten research universities affiliated with the University of California system, and is often cited as the top public university in the United States and around the world. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Barbara Macdonald (1913-2000), Cora Du Bois (1903–1991), Florence Yoch (1890–1972), Helen Jacobs (1908–1997), Jessica Blanche Peixotto (1864–1941), Kate Sessions (1857–1940), Lillian Faderman (born 1940), Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880–1955), Mark Bingham (1970–2001), Pauli Murray (1910–1985), Robert Duncan (1919–1988), Susan Sontag (1933–2004), Walter Plunkett (1902–1982), William “Bill” Colvig (1917–2000).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: Lee and Teats were companions who lived together from 1902 through 1943, when Lee died. Teats continued to live in their house until she died in 1952. The women were important in the early XX-century San Diego social scene, and entertained two US presidents in their home.

Addresses:
3574 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 (32.74269, -117.15871) - Alice Lee Residence
3560 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Katherine Teats Cottage
3578 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Alice Lee Cottage
Gay Village: Hillcrest (San Diego, CA 92103)

Place
Built in 1905, Design by Irving Gill with Lloyd Wright. Gardens by Kate Sessions
Known as the Teats Cottage, the Prairie-style house was built for Katherine Teats, the domestic partner of prominent San Diego socialite Alice Lee. Originally was part of a compound with three residences sharing a garden designed by noted botanist/landscape architect Kate Sessions. In May of 1906, Alice Lee granted the property of the Teats Cottage to her companion Katherine Teats. Misses Lee and Teats lived in the main house and used the other two for rentals. Miss Lee was close friends with both Mrs. Grover Clevelend and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, and often dined at the White House. President and Mrs. Roosevelt, Mrs. Cleveland, and other distinguished visitors were often guests at Miss Lee's Seventh Avenue home.

Life
Who: Alice Lee (May 27, 1854 - February 18, 1943)
Alice Lee was born in Westport, NY, and throughout her life was surrounded by individuals passionate about the Progressive movement including Teddy Roosevelt, who was married to her second cousin; Florence Nightingale; Ralph Waldo Emerson; and the Bronson Alcott family. When Lee moved to San Diego in 1902 for health reasons she became friends with the Marston Family who were involved with the Progressive movement in San Diego. Alice Lee became very involved with different organizations in San Diego including the First Unitarian Church, the Wednesday Club, the Civic Committee of the Chamber of Commerce, and other local civic and cultural groups. She took leadership positions as President of the San Diego Museum, Honorary Director of the Women’s Civic Center, Director of the Natural History Museum, President of the Balboa Park Auditorium Association, and President of the Balboa Park Commission. Alice Lee founded the group “Open Forum”, which was a public forum to openly talk about social, political, and international issues. According to a newspaper article from the San Diego Union, by 1935 the group had become one of the “oldest continuous non-legislative forum of free public discussion in the United States” before being disbanded sometime in the 1970s. Lee was also a leader of the Progressive movement in San Diego organizing Progressive thinking women to get out and vote for Teddy Roosevelt in 1932. She was recognized by the Progressive Party by being chosen to represent California at the National Convention for the Progressive Party in Chicago. Lee was the leader of the “Save the Beaches” campaign in San Diego which resulted in the city acquiring miles of beach for public use. She was also instrumental in developing the public playground system. Alice Lee was praised as a Civic leader in several publications including the San Diego Union, the Ticonderoga Sentinel, the Boston Globe, and a book entitled “Women of the West: A Series of Biographical Sketches of Living Eminent Women in the Eleven Western States of the United States of America.” Lee lived in the home at 3574 Seventh Avenue from its year of construction in 1905 until her death in 1943. Alice Lee is buried at Hillside Cemetery (165 Ridgefield Rd, Wilton, CT 06897), established in 1818.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

National Park: Named for the Spanish maritime explorer Vasco Núñez de Balboa, Balboa Park hosted the 1915–16 Panama–California Exposition and 1935–36 California Pacific International Exposition, both of which left architectural landmarks.

Address: San Diego, CA 92104 (32.73414, -117.14455)
Phone: +1 619-239-0512
Website: www.balboapark.org
National Register of Historic Places: 77000331, 1977

Place
Balboa Park is a 1,200-acre (490 ha) urban cultural park in San Diego, California. In addition to open space areas, natural vegetation zones, green belts, gardens, and walking paths, it contains museums, several theaters, and the world-famous San Diego Zoo. There are also many recreational facilities and several gift shops and restaurants within the boundaries of the park. Placed in reserve in 1835, the park's site is one of the oldest in the United States dedicated to public recreational use. Balboa Park is managed and maintained by the Parks and Recreation Department of the City of San Diego. Balboa Park is a primary attraction in San Diego and the region. Its many mature, and sometimes rare, trees and groves comprise an urban forest. Many of the original trees were planted by the renowned American landscape architect, botanist, plantswoman, and gardener Kate Sessions. An early proponent of drought tolerant and California native plants in garden design, Sessions established a nursery to propagate and grow for the park and the public. For the first few decades of its existence, "City Park" remained mostly open space. The land, lacking trees and covered in native wildflowers, was home to bobcats, rattlesnakes, coyotes, and other wildlife. Numerous proposals, some altruistic, some profit-driven, were brought forward for the development and use of the land during this time, but no comprehensive plan for development was adopted until 1902. Nevertheless, some building were constructed, including an orphanage and women's shelter (later burned down), a high school (Russ High School – later San Diego High School), and several gardens maintained by various private groups. One of the most celebrated of these early usages was a 36-acre nursery owned and maintained by local horticulturist and botanist Kate Sessions, who is often referred to as "the mother of Balboa Park." Although owned by Sessions, by agreement with the city the nursery was open to the public, and Sessions donated trees and plants to the city every year for its beautification. Sessions is responsible for bringing in many of the different varieties of native and exotic plants in the park. Her work was so progressive that she was in fact the first woman awarded the Meyer Medal for "foreign plant importation" by the American Genetic Association. The Exposition's lead designer and site planner was architect Bertram Goodhue, well known for his Gothic Revival Style churches in New York and Boston, who sought a regionally appropriate aesthetic to use in Southern California. Goodhue and associate architect Carleton Winslow chose to use the styles of highly ornamented Spanish Baroque architecture with the Spanish Colonial architecture created during the Spanish colonization era in New Spain-Mexico and the lower Americas, with Churrigueresque and Plateresque detailing "updating" the already popular Mission Revival Style—to create the Spanish Colonial Revival Style. The buildings and the style were extremely well received by the public and design professionals in California and nationally, becoming a reigning style for decades, and still the primary vernacular style in much of California. Goodhue's associate architect was Carleton M. Winslow, who is solely credited with the lattice-work Botanical Building and other structures. Goodhue's team, which included Kate Sessions and Lloyd Wright for landscape design, had won out over the local and more modernist Irving Gill to get the commission. One of the most significant improvements to the park from that time was the construction of the Cabrillo Bridge across a major canyon in the city. The bridge connects the main portion of the park with the western portion and with Laurel Street.

Life
Who: Katherine Olivia "Kate" Sessions (November 8, 1857 – March 24, 1940)
Kate Sessions was born in San Francisco, California and educated in Oakland. At the age of six, she moved with her family to a farm next to Lake Merritt. She attended the University of California, Berkeley in 1881 with a degree in natural science. While attending a San Francisco business school, at the request of a friend, she moved to San Diego in 1883 to work as an eighth grade teacher and vice principal at Russ School (now San Diego High School). She worked at the school for over a year before she left due to health problems. In San Diego, Sessions quickly moved on to her true interest, the cultivation of plants. In 1885, she purchased a nursery; within a few years she was the owner of a flower shop as well as growing fields and nurseries in Coronado, Pacific Beach, and Mission Hills. The Mission Hills Nursery, which she founded in 1910 and sold to her employees the Antonicelli brothers in 1926, is still in operation. In 1892 Sessions struck a deal with the City of San Diego to lease 30 acres (120,000 m2) of land in Balboa Park (then called City Park) as her growing fields. In return, she agreed to plant 100 trees a year in the mostly barren park, as well as 300 trees a year in other parts of San Diego. This arrangement left the park with an array of cypress, pine, oak, pepper trees and eucalyptus grown in her gardens from seeds imported from around the world; virtually all of the older trees still seen in the park were planted by her. Among many other plant introductions, she is credited with importing and popularizing the jacaranda, now very familiar in the city. She also collected, propagated, and introduced many California native plants to the horticulture trade and into gardens. In 1900, she took a trip to Baja California to find a palm tree not native in San Diego to be planted at the park. She would also later take a seven-month trip through Europe where she collected multiple plant varieties that she eventually helped plant in the park. Together with Alfred D. Robinson she co-founded the San Diego Floral Association in 1907; it is the oldest garden club in Southern California. The garden club was influential in teaching San Diegans how to grow ornamental and edible plants, at a time when most San Diego landscaping consisted of dirt and sagebrush. Sessions worked with architect Hazel Wood Waterman on the garden design for a group of houses built by San Diego socialite Alice Lee near Balboa Park. Dedicated to her plants, Kate never married. It’s been rumored that she was a lesbian, but in her younger years she also had a long list of male suitors, included John D. Spreckels. She lived to be 82, when she died in San Diego on March 24, 1940. Her office was at 4016 Randolph St, San Diego, CA 92103. She is interred in Mount Hope Cemetery (3751 Market St, San Diego, CA 92102).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Kenneth Nelson was an American actor. Born in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, Nelson appeared in several television series in the late 1940s, Captain Video and His Video Rangers and The Aldrich Family among them.
Born: March 24, 1930, Rocky Mount, North Carolina, United States
Died: October 7, 1993, London, United Kingdom
Buried: Putney Vale Cemetery and Crematorium, Wimbledon, London Borough of Merton, Greater London, England
Find A Grave Memorial# 101139656
Nominations: Golden Globe Award for Best New Star of the Year – Actor


Cemetery: Putney Vale Cemetery and Crematorium in southwest London is located in Putney Vale, surrounded by Putney Heath and Wimbledon Common and Richmond Park. It is located within 47 acres of parkland. The cemetery was opened in 1891 and the crematorium in 1938. The cemetery was originally laid out on land which had belonged to Newlands Farm, which was established in the medieval period.

Address: Stag Ln, London SW15 3DZ, UK (51.44001, -0.24122)
Phone: +44 20 8788 2113
Website: www.wandsworth.gov.uk

Place
The cemetery has two chapels, one being a traditional Church of England chapel and the other being used for multi-denomination or non-religious services. It has a large Garden of Remembrance. There are 87 Commonwealth war grave burials from WWI and 97 from WWII n the cemetery. Six Victoria Cross recipients have been buried or cremated here. The burials are scattered throughout the grounds of the cemetery and a Screen Wall Memorial has been erected to record the names of those whose graves are not marked by headstones. Those who have been cremated at Putney Vale Crematorium also have their names recorded on these panels.

Notable queer burials at Putney Vale Cemetery:
• Joe Randolph "J.R." Ackerley (1896-1967), British writer and editor. Starting with the BBC the year after its founding in 1927, he was promoted to literary editor of The Listener, its weekly magazine, where he served for more than two decades. He published many emerging poets and writers who became influential in Great Britain. He was openly gay, a rarity in his time when homosexuality was forbidden by law and socially ostracized.
• Ivy Compton-Burnett (1884-1969), English novelist, published (in the original hardback editions) as I. Compton-Burnett. She was awarded the 1955 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for her novel “Mother and Son.” Compton-Burnett spent much of her life as a companion to Margaret Jourdain (1876–1951), a leading authority and writer on the decorative arts and the history of furniture, who shared the author's Kensington flat from 1919.
• David Stuart Horner (1900-1983). In the mid-1920s Osbert Sitwell met David Horner who was his lover and companion for most of his life.
• Kenneth Nelson (1930-1993). In 1968, Nelson accepted the lead in the controversial and groundbreaking off-Broadway production of “The Boys in the Band,” the first play to explore the milieu of gay life in New York City in a verbally frank manner. He and the rest of the cast went on to appear in the 1970 film version directed by William Friedkin.
• Wilfred Thesiger (1910-2003), cremated.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Born: November 7, 1903
Died: March 24, 1992
Find A Grave Memorial# 161848975

Henriëtte Hilda Bosmans was a Dutch composer. Bosmans was born in Amsterdam, the daughter of Henri Bosmans, principal cellist of the Concertgebouw Orchestra, and the pianist Sara Benedicts, piano teacher at the Amsterdam Conservatory. A significant personality in the life of the composer was the violinist Francis Koene. Bosmans was head over heels in love with her duet partner. They were engaged; and Koene’s playing was the inspiration for the 1934 Concertstuk (concert piece) for violin and orchestra. Koene never played it as he died in 1934 as the result of a brain tumor. Bosmans fell into a deep depression. "Part of me died at that time," she wrote to her friend Matthijs Vermeulen. For years, she wrote not a single note. Just as before the war the cello of Frieda Belinfante played a key role in her life, now the voice took over. Bosmans’ muse was the French singer Noemie Perugia; she sang in 1949 in Amsterdam, and Bosmans heard the last part of her recital. She was overwhelmed. It took a while before Perugia responded to Bosmans’ musical and amorous advances, but eventually the pair developed a relationship that may be compared to that between Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears. The creative relationship did not last long. Bosmans wrote a series of inspired songs for her beloved, but died in 1952 of stomach cancer.

Together from 1949 to 1952: 3 years.
Henriëtte Hilda Bosmans (December 6, 1895 – July 2, 1952)
Noémie Pérugia (November 7, 1903 – April 1992)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Henriette Bosmans’ muse, French singer Noémie Pérugia (1903-1992), is buried in Nice; she sang in 1949 in Amsterdam, and Bosmans heard the last part of her recital. She was overwhelmed. It took a while before Perugia responded to Bosmans’ musical and amorous advances, but eventually the pair developed a relationship that may be compared to that between Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears. The creative relationship did not last long. Bosmans wrote a series of inspired songs for her beloved, but died in 1952 of stomach cancer. Bosmans is buried in Amsterdam.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906692
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Lived: Hangover House, Laguna Beach, 31172 Ceanothus Dr, Laguna Beach, CA 92651, USA (33.50984, -117.74785)
Find A Grave Memorial# 173571638

House: Architecture historian and writer Ted Wells considers Hangover House, which Richard Halliburton commissioned, one of the "best modern houses in the United States."

Address: 31172 Ceanothus Dr, Laguna Beach, CA 92651, USA (33.50984, -117.74785)
Gay Village: Laguna Beach (Orange County, CA 92651)

Place
Hangover House (also known as the Halliburton House) was designed and built by William Alexander Levy for his friend the travel writer Richard Halliburton. Constructed in 1938 on a Laguna Beach, California, hilltop, the house, boasting commanding views of the Pacific Ocean, was built with three bedrooms, one each for Halliburton, Alexander, and Halliburton's lover Paul Mooney, who was also Halliburton's editor and ghostwriter. Alexander drew upon European modern architecture and created flat-roofed boxes of concrete and glass. He hoped to create a house that, like the international modern spirit of Halliburton, soared above the clouds. Mies van der Rohe's work and his experimental concrete buildings of the 1920s, along with Le Corbusier's L'Esprit Nouveau Pavilion (1924–25) and his famous Villa Savoye (1928–29), influenced Alexander. Concrete and steel were the main materials used in its construction. Glass blocks formed part of the wall along the gallery that looked into a canyon several hundred feet below. A huge bastionlike retaining wall outside the main building made the house appear safe from intrusion and Olympian in its detachment. Alexander was a novice architect, a recent graduate of the New York University School of Architecture and close friend of Paul Mooney. Mooney managed the construction of the house, and offered occasional design advice, suggesting the creation of a small pond behind the house which, for its shape and size, he called "Clark Gable's ears." A mutual friend of Levy and Mooney, Charles Wolfsohn (born 1912), a penthouse garden designer, did the flower landscaping. The house, built of concrete and steel and bastion-like in appearance, contained a spacious living room, a spacious dining room and three bedrooms. Because of its position, perched 400 feet (120m) above a sheer canyon, it was called "Hangover House" by Mooney, and this title was cast into a retaining wall on the site. The nickname "Hangover House" is a pun on both the building's location overlooking the cliffs, and the alcohol consumed there. When he first saw the completed structure, Halliburton enthused, "it flies!" Alexander befriended Ayn Rand and provided quotes for her book “The Fountainhead” (1943). Rand's descriptions of the Heller House, and other houses designed by the book's hero Howard Roark, were believed, by Alexander, to be thinly disguised references to Hangover House. Halliburton was lost at sea in 1939. In 1942, the house was purchased for $9,000 by Gen. Wallace Thompson Scott. The house was sold in 2011 for $3.2 million, about a year after the death of the longtime owner, Zolite Scott, Wallace's daughter. As of April 2012, construction was underway to rehabilitate the building after much neglect had resulted in severe structural deterioration; although work was held up by preservationist disputes.

Life
Who: Richard Halliburton (January 9, 1900 – March 24, 1939), Paul Mooney (November 4, 1904 – March 24, 1939) and William Alexander Levy (October 21, 1909 - June 2, 1997)
Richard Halliburton was an American traveler, adventurer, and author. Best known today for having swum the length of the Panama Canal and paying the lowest toll in its history—36 cents—Halliburton was headline news for most of his brief career. His final and fatal adventure, an attempt to sail a Chinese junk, the Sea Dragon, across the Pacific Ocean from Hong Kong to the Golden Gate International Exposition in San Francisco, made him legendary. Halliburton's friends during this time included movie stars, writers, musicians, painters, and politicians, including writers Gertrude Atherton and Kathleen Norris, Senator James Phelan and philanthropist Noel Sullivan, and actors Ramón Novarro and Rod LaRoque. Halliburton never married. While young he dated several young women and, as revealed in letters to them, was infatuated with at least two. Later in his life, rumors of an impending marriage to Mary Lou Davis, who, with her two children from a previous marriage, resided at Hangover House during the Sea Dragon Expedition, were of little foundation. Halliburton was most likely bisexual. Among those romantically linked to him were film star Ramón Novarro and philanthropist Noel Sullivan, both of whom shared the bohemian lifestyle. Halliburton's most enduring relationship was with freelance journalist Paul Mooney, with whom he often shared living quarters and who assisted him with his written work. French police reports, dated 1935, noted the famed traveler's homosexual activity when in Paris - this about the time of his planned crossing by elephant over the Alps: "Mr Halliburton is a well known homosexual in some specialized establishments. One of his cruising locales was the Saint-Lazare Street." Missing at sea since March 1939, Halliburton was declared dead on October 5, 1939 by the Memphis Chancery Court. His empty grave is at Forest Hill Cemetery (1661 Elvis Presley Blvd, Memphis, TN 38106) at the Halliburton family gravesite. After the deaths of Halliburton and Mooney, William Alexander Levy assisted composer Arnold Schoenberg in the redesign of his studio in Brentwood, and also designed a house in Encino for scriptwriter David Greggory. The house in the Hollywood Hills he built for himself he called the House in Space, distinct as an early example in the region of cantilever construction. Alexander also designed wooden furniture and bowls. Alexander continued to practice architecture and interior design and by 1950 had moved permanently to West Hollywood. In 1952, Alexander opened The Mart, one of the first art and antique boutiques in Los Angeles, on Santa Monica Boulevard, operating it until 1977. During this period, he occasionally had bit parts in feature films, notably “The Shootist,” starring John Wayne, and “The McMasters,” starring Brock Peters, his sometime business partner at The Mart. A developer of the Hollywood Hills and a philanthropist, Alexander became a patron of the arts and a world traveler. Alexander's papers are kept at the Architecture and Design Collection, at the Art, Design & Architecture Museum, at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Profile

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
reviews_and_ramblings

May 2017

S M T W T F S
  1234 56
78 91011 1213
141516 17181920
21 222324252627
28293031   

Most Popular Tags

Disclaimer

All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
I'm associated with Amazon/USA Affiliates Programs.
Books reviewed on this site were usually provided at no cost by the publisher or author. However, some books were purchased by the reviewer and not provided for free. For information on how a particular title was obtained, please contact by email the blog's owner.
Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated May. 27th, 2017 12:23 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios