Mar. 27th, 2017

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Adrienne Cecile Rich was an American poet, essayist and radical feminist. She was called "one of the most widely read and influential poets of the second half of the 20th century", and was credited with ...
Born: May 16, 1929, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Died: March 27, 2012, Santa Cruz, California, United States
Education: Harvard University
Find A Grave Memorial# 87498497
Spouse: Alfred H. Conrad (m. 1953–1970)
Children: David Conrad, Jacob Conrad, Pablo Conrad
Employer: Brandeis University

Adrienne Rich was a poet, essayist and feminist. She was called "one of the most widely read and influential poets of the second half of the 20th century", credited with bringing "the oppression of women and lesbians to the forefront of poetic discourse." The senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award selected her first collection of poetry, A Change of World; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1976, Rich began her lifelong partnership with Jamaican-born novelist and editor Michelle Cliff. From 1976 to 1979, Rich taught at City College as well as Rutgers University as an English Professor. In 1979, she received an honorary doctorate from Smith College and moved with Cliff to Montague, MA. Ultimately, they moved to Santa Cruz, where Rich continued her career as a professor, lecturer, poet, and essayist. Rich and Cliff took over editorship of the lesbian arts journal Sinister Wisdom (1981–1983). Rich taught and lectured at Scripps College, San Jose State University, and Stanford University during the 1980s and 1990s. From 1981 to 1987, Rich served as an A.D. White Professor-At-Large for Cornell University.

Together from 1976 to 2012: 36 years.
Adrienne Rich (May 16, 1929 - March 27, 2012)
Michelle Cliff (born November 2, 1946)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Notable queer alumni and faculty at Harvard University:
• Henry Adams (1838-1918), after his graduation from Harvard University in 1858, embarked on a grand tour of Europe, during which he also attended lectures in civil law at the University of Berlin. He was initiated into the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity as honorary member at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Harris J. Ryan, a judge for the exhibit on electrical engineering. Through that organization, he was a member of the Irving Literary Society. In 1870, Adams was appointed professor of medieval history at Harvard, a position he held until his early retirement in 1877 at 39. As an academic historian, Adams is considered to have been the first (in 1874–1876) to conduct historical seminar work in the United States. Among his students was Henry Cabot Lodge, who worked closely with Adams as a graduate student. On June 27, 1872, Clover Hooper and he were married in Beverly, Massachusetts, and spent their honeymoon in Europe, much of it with Charles Milnes Gaskell at Wenlock Abbey in Shropshire, England. Upon their return, he went back to his position at Harvard, and their home at 91 Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, became a gathering place for a lively circle of intellectuals. Adams was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1875.
• Horatio Alger (1832-1899) passed the Harvard entrance examinations in July, 1848, and was admitted to the class of 1852. Alger's classmate Joseph Hodges Choate described Harvard at this time as "provincial and local because its scope and outlook hardly extended beyond the boundaries of New England; besides which it was very denominational, being held exclusively in the hands of Unitarians". Alger flowered in the highly disciplined and regimented Harvard environment, winning scholastic prizes and prestigious awards. His genteel poverty and less-than-aristocratic heritage, however, barred him from membership in the Hasty Pudding Club and the Porcellian Club. He was chosen Class Odist and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa Society honors in 1852, eighth in a class of 88. He is buried in the family plot at Glenwood Cemetery, Natick, MA 01760.
• Josep Alsop (1910-1989) graduated from the Groton School, a private boarding school in Groton, Massachusetts, in 1928, and from Harvard University in 1932. He is buried in the family mausoleum at Indian Hill Cemetery (383 Washington St, Middletown, CT 06457).
• A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1893 to 1898, graduating with a master's degree in 1895 and a doctorate in 1900. He was instructor and assistant professor of economics at Harvard University from 1900 to 1909.
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) studied English Literature at Harvard, graduating summa cum laude in 1921. His writing career began when Van Wyck Brooks, the Harvard teacher he most admired, invited him to write for The Freeman while he was still an undergraduate. After a short period teaching at the high school level, Arvin joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist.
• John Ashbery (born 1927) graduated in 1949 with an A.B., cum laude, was a member of the Harvard Advocate, the university's literary magazine, and the Signet Society.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959) attended from 1911 to 1912, leaving school without graduating.
• Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957) entered Harvard College in the Class of 1922. He interrupted his undergraduate career to work in Egypt and the Sudan (1922-1923) with the Harvard University/Boston Museum of Fine Arts archaeological expedition under George A. Reisner, then the leading American Egyptologist. After taking his degree in 1924, he became a graduate student in Harvard's fine arts department, where he served for three years as chief graduate assistant to Edward W. Forbes, Director of the Fogg Art Museum.
• Maud Babcock (1867-1954) was studying and teaching at Harvard University when she met noted Utahn and daughter of Brigham Young, Susa Young Gates, who, impressed by Babcock's work as a summer course instructor in physical culture, convinced her to move to Salt Lake City. She established UU's first physical training curriculum, of which speech and dramatics were part for several years.
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University. During his tenure at boarding school and university, Beebe was known for his numerous pranks. One of his more outrageous stunts included an attempt at festooning J. P. Morgan's yacht Corsair III with toilet paper from a chartered airplane. His pranks were not without consequence and he proudly noted that he had the sole distinction of having been expelled from both Harvard and Yale, at the insistence, respectively, of the president and dean of each. Beebe earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard in 1926, only to be expelled during graduate school. During and immediately after obtaining his degree from Harvard, Beebe published several books of poetry, but eventually found his true calling in journalism.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990) completed his studies in 1939, graduating with a B.A. cum laude
• Lem Billings (1916-1981) attended Harvard Business School from 1946 to 1948 and earned an MBA.
• John Boswell (1947-1994) received his doctorate in 1975.
• Roger Brown (1925-1997) started his career in 1952 as an instructor and then assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1957 he left Harvard for an associate professorship at MIT, and became a full professor of psychology there in 1960. In 1962, he returned to Harvard as a full professor, and served as chair of the Department of Social Relations from 1967 to 1970. From 1974 until his retirement in 1994, he held the title of John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William James.
• John Horne Burns (1916–1953) was the author of three novels. The first, “The Gallery” (1947), is his best known work, which was very well received when published and has been reissued several times. Burns was educated by the Sisters of Notre Dame at St. Augustine's School and then Phillips Academy, where he pursued music. He attended Harvard, where he became fluent in French, German, and Italian and wrote the book for a student musical comedy in 1936. In 1937 he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in English magna cum laude and became a teacher at the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut. Burns wrote several novels while at Harvard and at Loomis, none of which he published. Gore Vidal reported a conversation he had with Burns following “The Gallery”'s success: “Burns was a difficult man who drank too much, loved music, detested all other writers, wanted to be great.... He was also certain that to be a great writer it was necessary to be homosexual. When I disagreed, he named a half dozen celebrated contemporaries. "A Pleiad," he roared delightedly, "of pederasts!" But what about Faulkner?, I asked, and Hemingway? He was disdainful. Who said they were any good?” He died in Florence from a cerebral hemorrhage on August 11, 1953. He was buried in the family plot in Holyhood Cemetery (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467). Ernest Hemingway later sketched Burns' brief life as a writer: "There was a fellow who wrote a fine book and then a stinking book about a prep school and then just blew himself up."
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) graduated in 1936.
• Witter Bynner (1881–1968) was the first member of his class invited to join the student literary magazine, The Advocate. He was also published in another of Harvard's literary journals, The Harvard Monthly. He graduated with honors in 1902. His first book of poems, “An Ode to Harvard” (later changed to “Young Harvard”), came out in 1907. In 1911 he was the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa Poet.
• Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) began studying at Harvard University in 1894 and left after two years to become an artist.
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) entered in 1925, to pursue a masters in English.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) accepted an appointment at Harvard University in 1954 as the second person to hold the Zimurray Chair at Radcliffe College. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1955. She was the first woman tenured in Harvard's Anthropology Department and the second woman tenured in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), educated at Radcliffe College, became department chairman of child and maternal health at Harvard School of Public Health in 1956.
• Kenward Elmslie (born 1929) earned a BA at Harvard University before moving back to New York City, where he became a central figure in the New York School.
• William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952) received his Bachelor of Arts in 1886. While studying at Harvard, he and classmates began The Harvard Monthly. After his graduation and first trip to Europe in 1888, he spent several years working as a journalist in the Boston Area. In 1890, four years after his graduation from Harvard, Fullerton moved to France to begin work for The Times office in Paris.
• Henry Geldzahler (1935–1994) left graduate school in 1960 to join the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
• Julian Wood Glass, Jr, (1910-1992) attended Oklahoma schools and was graduated from Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) was an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. She was one of the first Woman of Colour/Interracial women to have a play publicly performed. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller. During the summers, Grimké frequently took classes at Harvard University, where her father had attended law school. He was the second African American to have graduated from Harvard Law School.
• Alice Hamilton (1869–1970) was hired in 1919 as assistant professor in a new Department of Industrial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, making her the first woman appointed to the faculty there in any field. Her appointment was hailed by the New York Tribune with the headline: "A Woman on Harvard Faculty—The Last Citadel Has Fallen—The Sex Has Come Into Its Own". Her own comment was "Yes, I am the first woman on the Harvard faculty—but not the first one who should have been appointed!" Hamilton still faced discrimination as a woman, and was excluded from social activities and ceremonies.
• Andrew Holleran (born 1944), pseudonym of Eric Garber, novelist, essayist, and short story writer, graduated from Harvard College in 1965.
• Henry James (1843–1916) attended Harvard Law School in 1862, but realized that he was not interested in studying law. He pursued his interest in literature and associated with authors and critics William Dean Howells and Charles Eliot Norton in Boston and Cambridge, formed lifelong friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., the future Supreme Court Justice, and with James and Annie Fields, his first professional mentors.
• Philip Johnson (1906–2005), student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) graduated with both a master's degree (1949) and doctorate (1956) in astronomy.
• Helen Keller (1880–1968) entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College, where she lived in Briggs Hall, South House.
• John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) graduated from Harvard University in June 1940.
• Alfred Kinsey (1804-1956) continued his graduate studies at Harvard University's Bussey Institute, which had one of the most highly regarded biology programs in the United States. It was there that Kinsey studied applied biology under William Morton Wheeler, a scientist who made outstanding contributions to entomology. Under Wheeler, Kinsey worked almost completely autonomously, which suited both men quite well. Kinsey chose to do his doctoral thesis on gall wasps, and began zealously collecting samples of the species. Kinsey was granted a Sc.D. degree in 1919 by Harvard University, and published several papers in 1920 under the auspices of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, introducing the gall wasp to the scientific community and describing its phylogeny. Of the more than 18 million insects in the museum's collection, some 5 million are gall wasps collected by Kinsey.
• Marshall Kirk (1957-2005) was valedictorian of his high school class and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1980, majoring in psychology, and writing his honors thesis on the testing of gifted children. In 1987 Kirk partnered with Hunter Madsen (writing under the pen-name "Erastes Pill") to write an essay, "The Overhauling of Straight America." The pair developed their argument in the 1989 book "After the Ball: How America Will Conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the ’90s." The book outlined a public relations strategy for the LGBT movement.
• Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) attended Harvard, where his father, the vice-president of Filene's Department Store, had also attended, graduating in 1930. In 1927, while still an undergraduate at Harvard, Kirstein was annoyed that the literary magazine The Harvard Advocate would not accept his work. With a friend Varian Fry, who met his wife Eileen through Lincoln's sister Mina, he convinced his father to finance their own literary quarterly, the Hound & Horn.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) graduated from Harvard University in 1907 with degrees in English and philosophy, and was honored as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and recipient of the prestigious Bowdoin Prize. After graduation, he was the first African-American selected as a Rhodes Scholar (and the last to be selected until 1960). At that time, Rhodes selectors did not meet candidates in person, but there is evidence that at least some selectors knew he was African-American.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) read Environmental Studies at the University of Manitoba, Landscape Architecture at Harvard University and completed his PhD in Historical Geography at University College, London. He lectures widely on landscape history and design both in Britain and abroad, is a lecturer on the MA course in Historical and Sustainable Architecture at New York University, and contributes regularly to a range of publications.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) completed his M.A. in 1926 and Ph.D. degree in 1927. He returned to Harvard to begin a distinguished teaching career.
• Michael McDowell (1950-1999) received a B.A. and an M.A. from Harvard College and a Ph.D in English from Brandeis University in 1978 based on a dissertation entitled "American Attitudes Toward Death, 1825-1865".
• Henry Plumer McIlhenny (1910–1986) he was graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Fine Arts in 1933. During his years at Harvard, Paul J. Sachs influenced his future collecting.
• Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930), American archeologist, artifact collector, tile-maker, and designer, attended Harvard University between 1875 and 1879, obtaining a liberal arts degree.
• Francis Davis Millet (1848–1912) graduated with a Master of Arts degree. A bronze bust in Harvard University's Widener Library also memorializes Millet.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) graduated from Harvard University in 1916. He taught English literature at the University of Wisconsin. He resigned his position for political reasons, frustrated that he was forced to give a “politician’s son who should have been flunked” passing grades. Mitchell enlisted in the army, serving in France until he was discharged as a private two years later. In 1922, following two years’ study at the University of Montpellier and Jesus College, Cambridge, he returned to the States and lived with his elderly aunt in New York. Mitchell privately studied foreign language and literature, focusing on French and Greek, before returning to Harvard and graduating with a Ph.D. in Literature in 1933.
• Agnes Morgan (1879-1976) attended Radcliffe College and received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1901 and her Master of Arts in 1903. In 1904 she attended George Pierce Baker's 47 Workshop at Harvard University.
• Frank O’Hara (1926–1966) attended with the funding made available to veterans. Published poems in the Harvard Advocate. He graduated in 1950 with a degree in English.
• Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006) studied with Walter Piston; Aaron Copland, Archibald T. Davison, and A. Tillman Merritt were also among his teachers. He completed a bachelor's degree in 1943 and a master's in 1944. He taught at various times at Simmons College (1953–1954), Boston University (1953–1954), and Harvard University (1957–1958). Among Pinkham's notable students were the jazz musician and composer Gigi Gryce (1925–1983) and the composer Mark DeVoto.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) enrolled in Harvard Law School in 1913. At the suggestion of the dean of the law school, switched to Harvard's music faculty, where he studied harmony and counterpoint with Pietro Yon.
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), after graduating from high school, gained her college diploma at Radcliffe College, where she focused primarily on poetry and learning writing craft, encountering no women teachers at all. In 1951, her last year at college, Rich's first collection of poetry, “A Change of World,2 was selected by the senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1953, Rich married Alfred Haskell Conrad, an economics professor at Harvard University she met as an undergraduate. She said of the match: "I married in part because I knew no better way to disconnect from my first family. I wanted what I saw as a full woman's life, whatever was possible." They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts and had three sons.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) earned his bachelor's degree in architecture at Auburn University (then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute) in 1940 and then moved on to the Harvard Graduate School of Design to study with Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius. After three years, he left to serve in the Navy for another three years, returning to Harvard to receive his master's in 1947
• Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895) graduated at Harvard College in 1844; overseer of Harvard University for 18 years.
• George Santayana (1863–1952) lived in Hollis Hall as a student. He was founder and president of the Philosophical Club, a member of the literary society known as the O.K., an editor and cartoonist for The Harvard Lampoon, and co-founder of the literary journal The Harvard Monthly. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1886, Santayana studied for two years in Berlin. He then returned to Harvard to write his dissertation on Hermann Lotze and teach philosophy, becoming part of the Golden Age of the Harvard philosophy department.
• Laurence Senelick (born 1942) holds a Ph.D. from Harvard. He is Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) attended Harvard University for graduate school, initially studying literature with Perry Miller and Harry Levin before moving into philosophy and theology under Paul Tillich, Jacob Taubes, Raphael Demos and Morton White. After completing her Master of Arts in philosophy, she began doctoral research into metaphysics, ethics, Greek philosophy and Continental philosophy and theology at Harvard. The philosopher Herbert Marcuse lived with Sontag and her husband Philip Rieff for a year while working on his 1955 book “Eros and Civilization.”
• Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880-1955) was educated at the University of California, Berkeley and later transferred to Radcliffe College to receive her A.B. degree. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1902.
• Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) attended Radcliffe College, then an annex of Harvard University, from 1893 to 1897.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989) entered thanks to a loan from Dr. Fred M. Smith, the president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and father of Alice Smith.
• George Tooker (1920-2011) graduated from Harvard University with an English degree in 1942 and enlisted in the Officer Candidates School (United States Marine Corps), but was discharged for medical reasons.
• Prescott Townsend (1894–1973) graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape (1938), emigrated to America, at the invitation of Walter Gropius, to teach at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. From 1938 to 1943 Tunnard taught at Harvard.
• Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (1859–1927) graduated from Harvard in 1881; he began studying law in 1883, and opened a law office specializing in international law in Washington, D.C. in 1885.
• Edward Perry Warren (1860–1928) received his B.A. in 1883.
• Harry Elkins Widener (1885-1912) was the son of George and Eleanor Widener. He lived in Elkins Park, PA. Harry studied at Hill School, a private establishment in Pottstown, PA; graduating in 1903 he left to study at Harvard (graduated 1907). Harry was a noted collector of rare books, included in his collection was a Shakespeare Folio and a Gutenberg Bible. Harry developed his bibliophilic interests while in college, when he did research among early books with coloured plates illustrating costumes for a Hasty Pudding Theatrical. In the spring of 1912, he went to England to buy books (including the second edition of Bacon's Essais, 1598) and it was while returning from this visit that he lost his life along with many of the books purchased. Harry boarded the Titanic at Cherbourg with his father and mother, George Widener's valet Edwin Keeping and Mrs Widener's maid Emily Geiger. The Widener's occupied cabins C-80-82. On the night of April 14th Harry and his parents threw a party in honour of Captain Smith which was attended by some of the most wealthy passengers on board the Titanic. Later that night Harry helped his mother into boat 4 and then stood back to await his fate, at one point he was joined by William Ernest Carter who advised him to try for a boat but Harry "I'll think I'll stick to the big ship, Billy, and take a chance." A story, never confirmed by Mrs Widener, romanticizes the death of her son. He was about to step into a lifeboat that would have saved his life when he remembered a newly acquired and unique copy of Bacon's Essais and ran back to get it. After his death the librarians turned to Mrs Widener for a donation in memory of her bibliophile son. His mother gave $2,000,000 for the construction of the building that would also house her son's collection and in 1915 the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library was dedicated. Horace Trumbauer (hon. A.M. 1915) of Philadelphia designed the library building. Harvard still pays for fresh flowers to be placed under a portrait of Widener in the chapel.
• Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), M.A. from Radcliffe College.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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School: Brandeis University (415 South St, Waltham, MA 02453) is an American private research university in Waltham, Massachusetts, 9 miles (14 km) west of Boston. Founded in 1948 as a non-sectarian, coeducational institution sponsored by the Jewish community, Brandeis was established on the site of the former Middlesex University. The university is named after Louis Brandeis, the first Jewish Justice of the U.S Supreme Court. Notable queer alumni and faculty: poet Olga Broumas (born 1949); Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), composer and conductor; author Stephen McCauley (born 1955); Michael McDowell (1950-1999), novelist and script writer; Pauli Murray (1910-1985), feminist, civil rights advocate, lawyer, and ordained priest; Adrienne Rich (1929-1955), poet, essayist and feminist; Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), First Lady of the United States.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
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Education: Dock Street Theatre, 135 Church Street, Charleston
Find A Grave Memorial# 173457557

Theatre: Dock Street Theatre (135 Church Street, 29401) was the location of an XVIII century playhouse, and later that of the ante-bellum Planter’s Hotel. With federal funds during the depression, a reproduction of an early London theatre was created within the walls of the Planter’s Hotel and on the site of the early theatre. As is likely to happen, many gay people were associated with the Dock Street Theatre and the various production companies that performed here. Dorothy D’Anna (1918-2012) was Associate Director of the Footlight Players and taught at the College of Charleston; she and her beloved partner Carol “Kit” Lyons (1927-2011) founded and ran the Little Theatre School for children, staging the productions down Queen Street at the Workshop Theatre. In the 1950s, petty thief James Blake (1922-1979), a literary sensation of his time, promoted by Nelson Algren and others, published his letters in the Paris Review. Blake, a gay man who was “kept” by a local Charleston aristocrat (whose name Blake masked in his letters), made a plea to the young gay bohemians associated with the Dock Street Theatre, revealing a homophobic and racist city where even the gay men turned on themselves. “Less Cleverness,” was what he requested. “More kindness. For the good of the breed, such as it is.”

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women's suffrage movement in England.
Born: December 9, 1869, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
Died: March 27, 1947, Tenterden, United Kingdom
Education: Royal Academy of Music
Lived: Priest’s House, Small Hythe Rd, Tenterden, Kent TN30 7NG, UK (51.0653, 0.68183)
31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, UK (51.51107, -0.12449)
Fallows Green, Harpenden, Hertfordshire
7 Smith Square, SW1P
Burleigh Mansions, 96 St Martin’s Lane, WC2N
22 Barkston Gardens, SW5
221 Camden Road, NW1
44 Finborough Road, SW10
33 Longridge Road, SW5
20 Taviton Street, WC1H
Buried: St John the Baptist, Smallhythe Road, Smallhythe, Kent, TN307NG (memorial)
Buried alongside: Christabel Marshall and Clare Atwood
Find A Grave Memorial# 161166985
Movies: Victory and Peace, Her Greatest Performance, God and the Man, The Impossible Woman
Parents: Edward William Godwin, Ellen Terry
Siblings: Edward Gordon Craig

Edith Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women's suffrage movement in England. She was the daughter
of Victorian era actress Ellen Terry and the progressive English architect-designer Edward William Godwin. Her marriage to Martin Shaw in 1903 was prevented by Ellen Terry, out of jealousy for her daughter's affection, and by Christabel Marshall, with whom she lived from 1899 until they were joined in 1916 by the artist Clare Atwood, living in a ménage à trois until Craig's death in 1947. Her family looked down her lesbian lifestyle. Her brother Edward said Edith's sexuality was a result of her "hatred of men, initiated by the hatred of her father". Craig became involved in several books about her mother and George Bernard Shaw, which created a rift with her brother, who asked Craig not to write about their mother. In 1932, Craig adopted Ruby Chelta Craig. Craig was reconciled with her brother some time before her death.

Together from 1899 to 1947: 48 years.
Christabel Gertrude Marshall aka Christopher Marie St John (October 24, 1871 – October 20, 1960)
Clare “Tony” Atwood (May 11, 1866 – August 2, 1962)
Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig (December 9, 1869 – March 27, 1947)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: The Royal Academy of Music (Marylebone Rd, Marylebone, London NW1 5HT) is a conservatoire in London, a constituent college of the University of London and is one of the top conservatoires in the world. It was founded in 1822 and is Britain's oldest degree-granting music school. It received a Royal Charter in 1830. Edith Craig (1869–1947) attended the Royal Academy of Music and held a certificate in piano from Trinity College. In her later years, after the death of her mother, Craig dictated her memoirs to her friend Vera Holme, known as Jacko. Jacko wrote them down in a quarto notebook that was "lost in an attic" for decades and then sold to Ann Rachlin in 1978. They included Craig's reminiscences of her childhood and life with her mother, Edward Gordon Craig and Henry Irving. Rachlin published them in her book “Edy was a Lady” in 2011.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Edith “Edy” Craig (1869-1947), like her younger brother Edward, was illegitimate, as her mother, Ellen Terry, was still married to her first husband George Frederic Watts when she eloped with architect-designer Edward William Godwin in 1868. Edith Craig was born the following year at Gusterwoods Common in Hertfordshire, and was given the surname “Craig” to avoid the stigma of illegitimacy. The family lived in Fallows Green, Harpenden AL5 4HD, designed by Godwin, until 1874. The couple separated in 1875.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: In 1916 Clare Atwood moved into the flat at 31 Bedford Street, Covent Garden, that Edith Craig shared with Christabel Marshall, forming a permanent ménage à trois.

Address: 31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, UK (51.51107, -0.12449)

Place
Christabel Marshall lived with Ellen Terry’s daughter Edith Craig from 1899 to Craig’s death in 1947. They lived together at 7 Smith Square, Westminster, London SW1P 3HT, from 1899 to 1907, and then 31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, from 1910 to 1940, as well as Priest’s House, Tenterden, Kent. Ellen Terry’s physical and mental health deteriorated slowly over a number of years. By the 1920s her eyesight was very poor and she had become increasingly confused. For financial reasons she was obliged to sell her Chelsea house in 1921 and took up residence in a smaller flat in Burleigh Mansions, 96 St Martin's Ln, London WC2N 4AX. In her diary for April 26, she reflects upon the move: “I am unhinged (not unhappy) and comfortable. I wonder where everything is. Cannot remember new things. All is changed. Change at 73 puzzles the will. I live in puzzledom.” She retained her country home at Smallhythe, however, and it was there she spent her last years, gradually “drifting away into a strange vague world where nothing is real and people bear no names.” She died early in the morning on 21 July 1928, following a paralysing stroke. The writer Christopher St John (née Christabel Marshall), present at Ellen’s bedside with her daughter Edith Craig, described her final hours: “The face had not been much changed by that cruel blow from Nature. But the breath of life had changed. It came more and more painfully as the dawn approached. The hand, gripping Edy’s, moved from finger to finger, and with a last effort of the voice, not miraculously clear and loud now, but thick and indistinct, spelt out on those fingers the word ‘Happy’, ‘H-a-p-p-y’ over and over again.” Their friends Radclyffe Hall (1880-1943) and Una Troubridge lived from 1933 to 1935 in nearby 17 Talbot House, 98 St Martin's Ln, London WC2N 4AX. At the same address, 31 Bedford Street, lived Margaret Webster (1905-1972), American-British theater actress, producer and director, when she was a child with her parents. Margaret Webster was born in New York City, the daughter of two famous actors, Ben Webster and Dame May Whitty. In the summer of 1906, the family sailed back to England, where Margaret was baptized on October 29, 1907, in St. Paul’s Church (known as the “Actors’ Church”) in Covent Garden. The Websters lived in an upstairs flat in a multistory, redbrick Victorian building. When she was two years old in November 1907, the family returned to the United States and settled in New York City. When the family returned to London a year later, they settled again into the flat on Bedford Street where they remained until the WWII.

Life
Who: Christabel Gertrude Marshall (October 24, 1871 – October 20, 1960), aka Christopher Marie St John
Christabel Marshall was a British campaigner for women’s suffrage, a playwright and author. Marshall lived in a ménage à trois with the artist Clare Atwood and the actress, theatre director, producer and costume designer Edith Craig from 1916 until Craig’s death in 1947. She, Edith Craig and Clare Atwood were friends with many artists and writers including lesbian novelist Radclyffe Hall, who lived near Tenterden in Rye. As Christopher St John in 1915, she published her autobiographical novel “Hungerheart,” which she had started in 1899, and which she based on her relationship with Edith Craig and her own involvement in the women’s suffrage movement. St John was contracted by Ellen Terry to assist on various publications. After Terry’s death in 1928, St John published the “Shaw–Terry Correspondence” (1931) and “Terry’s Four Lectures on Shakespeare” (1932.) St John and Craig revised and edited “Terry’s Memoirs” (1933.) After Edith Craig’s death in 1947, St John and Atwood helped to keep the Ellen Terry Memorial Museum in operation. Some of St John’s papers have survived in the National Trust’s Ellen Terry and Edith Craig Archive. Marshall died from pneumonia connected with heart disease at Tenterden in 1960.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: The home of Victorian actress Ellen Terry, where you can explore the house, cottage garden and even attend a show at the XVII century thatched Barn Theatre.

Address: B2082, Tenterden, Kent TN30 7NG, UK (51.0653, 0.68183)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 11.00-17.00 (managed by the National Trust)
Phone:+44 1580 762334
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/smallhythe-place
English Heritage Building ID: 179818 (Grade II, 1950)

Place
Built in the late XV or early XVI century
Smallhythe Place in Small Hythe, near Tenterden in Kent, is a half-timbered house and since 1947 is cared for by the National Trust. The house was originally called “Port House” and before the River Rother and the sea receded it served a thriving shipyard: in Old English hythe means "landing place.” It was the home of the Victorian actress Ellen Terry from 1899 to her death in the house in 1928. The house contains Ellen Terry’s theatre collection, while the cottage grounds include her rose garden, orchard, nuttery and the working Barn Theatre. Terry first saw the house in the company of Henry Irving, the manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London’s Covent Garden, with whom she shared a famous theatrical partnership for nearly 24 years. The house was opened to the public by Terry’s daughter Edith Craig in 1929, as a memorial to her mother. The National Trust supported Craig in her running of the museum from 1939, and took over the property when she died in 1947. There are several paintings by the artist Clare Atwood, one of the romantic companions of Edith Craig. In an adjoining room is a letter from Oscar Wilde begging Terry to accept a copy of his first play. There is also a selection of sumptuous costumes dating from Terry’s time at the Lyceum Theatre. In 1929, Craig set up the Barn Theatre in the house’s grounds, where the plays of William Shakespeare were performed every year on the anniversary of her mother’s death. This tradition continues to this day.

Life
Who: Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig (December 9, 1869 – March 27, 1947)
Edith Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women’s suffrage movement in England. She was the daughter of Victorian era actress Ellen Terry and the progressive architect-designer Edward William Godwin, and the sister of theatre practitioner Edward Gordon Craig. As a lesbian, an active campaigner for women’s suffrage, and a woman working as a theatre director and producer, Edith Craig has been recovered by feminist scholars as well as theatre historians. Craig lived in a ménage à trois with the dramatist Christabel Marshall (Christopher Marie St John, 1871-1960) and the artist Clare “Tony” Atwood (1866-1962) from 1916 until her death. Virginia Woolf is said to have used Edith Craig as a model for the character of Miss LaTrobe in her novel “Between the Acts” (1941.) After Edith Craig’s death in 1947, St John and Atwood helped to keep the Ellen Terry Memorial Museum in operation. Marshall died from pneumonia connected with heart disease at Tenterden in 1960. Atwood suffered a fractured femur, senile myocarditis and heart failure, and died at Kench Hill Nursing Home, Tenterden, Kent, on August 2, 1962. When Edith Craig died she left a request that her ashes be buried with her two lesbian partners. By the time they passed away in the 1960s, Edy’s ashes were mislaid. Dismayed at the loss of her ashes, her two friend opted for burial and they lie side by side next to the gate of the tiny churchyard at St John the Baptist (Smallhythe Road, Smallhythe, Kent, TN30 7NG), leading to the Priest’s House where they had lived with Edy. A memorial stone to Edith Craig is in the same cemetery.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Farley Earle Granger, Jr. was an American actor, best known for his two collaborations with director Alfred Hitchcock; Rope in 1948 and Strangers on a Train in 1951.
Born: July 1, 1925, San Jose, California, United States
Died: March 27, 2011, New York City, New York, United States
Education: North Hollywood High School
Find A Grave Memorial# 67599447
Books: Include Me Out: My Life from Goldwyn to Broadway
Parents: Farley Earle Granger I, Eva Hopkins
Anniversary: November 22, 1963

Farley Earle Granger was an American actor, best known for his collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock, Rope and Strangers on a Train. Despite his three unsuccessful Broadway experiences, Granger continued to focus on theater in the early 1960s. He accepted an invitation from Eva Le Gallienne to join her National Repertory Theatre. During their first season, while the company was in Philadelphia, John Fitzgerald Kennedy was assassinated. The President had attended NRT's opening night and post-performance gala in the nation's capital, so the news hit everyone in the company especially hard. Granger had become close friends with production supervisor Robert Calhoun, and although both had felt a mutual attraction, they never had discussed it. That night they became lovers.

Together from 1963 to 2008: 45 years.
Farley Granger (July 1, 1925 – March 27, 2011)
Robert Calhoun (1931 - May 24, 2008)
Anniversary: November 22, 1963

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: North Hollywood High School (5231 Colfax Ave, North Hollywood, CA 91601) is a public high school in Valley Village in Los Angeles, California. NHHS is located in the San Fernando Valley and enrolls approximately 3,000 students each year. It is located in District 2 of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Built in 1927, Lankershim High School was named for the town of Lankershim (first called Toluca, now North Hollywood) and its founding family. It opened with only a main building, auditorium, gymnaisum, and a shop & mechanics building, with 800 students, graduating its first class in 1928. The Board of Education was asked to employ teachers who were already residents of North Hollywood, creating jobs and education opportunities right in the area. Lankershim High School was renamed North Hollywood High School in 1929. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Farley Granger (1925–2011), Susan Sontag (1933-2004).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Theatre: Helen Arthur was a theatre manager, known for managing the Neighborhood Playhouse for thirteen seasons (1915-1927). Arthur was the manager of several notable actors, including Ruth Draper.

Address: 340 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75658, -73.96529)

Place
The Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre is a full-time professional conservatory for actors located at 340 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, and is known as the home of the Meisner technique. Neighborhood Playhouse had originally been founded as an off-Broadway theatre by philanthropists Alice Lewisohn and Irene Lewisohn in 1915, but closed in 1927. The following year, it re-opened as the Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre with the addition of Rita Wallach Morgenthau. Sanford Meisner joined the faculty in 1935 from the Group Theatre. Meisner used his study of Russian theatre and acting innovator, Konstantin Stanislavski's System to develop his own technique, as an alternative to Lee Strasberg's Method acting. In 1955, Farley Granger (1925-2011) moved to New York and began studying with Bob Fosse, Gloria Vanderbilt, James Kirkwood and Tom Tryon in a class taught by Sandy Meisner at the Neighborhood Playhouse.

Life
Who: Helen Jean Arthur (March 29, 1879 – December 9, 1939) and Agnes Morgan (October 31, 1879 - May 25, 1976)
Helen Arthur was born in Lancaster, Wisconsin to Lemuel John Arthur (a lawyer) and Mary Emma Ziegler Arthur. She attended Evanston Township High School, followed by a year at Northwestern University (1897-1898), and received a Bachelor of Law degree from New York University in 1901. She was the first woman to try a criminal case in New York State. During her time in law practice she co-authored the handbook "Domestic Employment: A Handbook" which sought to explain applicable laws to an area which was subject to abuse. Helen Arthur's legal work brought her into contact with Lillian Wald of the Henry Street Settlement. Arthur was in residence at the Settlement during 1906, and was one of two people known to have had romantic relationships with Wald. The two vacationed together during August-September 1906. While practicing law Arthur began writing theatre reviews for a small publication. She soon gave up her law practice and became the agent for actress Grace George. She performed secretarial work for the theatrical managers, the Shubert brothers Lee and Jacob J. Shubert. A 1915 notice in Variety announced her leaving the Shuberts brothers "after seven or eight years." The notice also mentioned that Arthur, an "occasional authoress," had written a skit based on the Shuberts featuring characters Jake and Lee and that Arthur had taken the "Jake" part. By 1915, Alice Lewisohn (later Alice Crowley) and her sister Irene Lewisohn were in need of legal help for their nascent theatrical project, the Neighborhood Playhouse. Alice called upon Arthur to assist her, becoming part of the staff, despite Sarah Cowell Le Moyne's (the head teacher) distaste for "all feminists who invade the profession of men." A 1916 article in Variety described Arthur as publicity director. Arthur was responsible for introducing Agnes Morgan (by that time her partner) to Lewisohn, who went on to become one of the Playhouse's most significant directors. In her memoir of the Playhouse, Lewisohn (now Crowley) described Arthur as "lithe, shirt-waisted, and stiff-colored Helen Arthur, dapper, bright-eyed, keen; and her friend the quiet, serious, watchful Agnes Morgan." A Playhouse performer described her as "quite a pixie, bright as a whistle, and a little devilish too." Of the relationship between Arthur and Agnes Morgan, another Playhouse performer said they "were a lesbian couple; just everyone knew." Helen Arthur also engaged in pursuits outside of the Playhouse. In 1916 she was the manager for actress Doris Keane. In 1918 Arthur managed the Over There Theatre League in which a number of actors sailed for France and England to perform for the troops stationed there. She was director of the Casino Theatre in Newport, Rhode Island from 1935-1939 during its summer seasons. The plays she produced there included “At Marian's” (with Laurette Taylor), “Night in the House” and two plays written by Morgan, “If Love Were All” and “Grandpa” (written under the pseudonym Cutler Hatch). In 1936 she and Morgan joined the Popular Price Unit of the Federal Theatre Project where they presented “American Holiday,” “Thirteenth Chair” and “Class of '29.” In 1938-1939 she was appointed executive director of the Ann Arbor Dramatic Season for 1938. After the Neighborhood Playhouse closed in 1927, Helen Arthur and Agnes Morgan formed their own company, Actor-Managers, Inc. Arthur continued to manage notable actresses including Mrs. Patrick Campbell, Florence Roberts as well as the singer Marion Kirby and dancer Angna Enters. She managed Ruth Draper for ten years, from 1929 until her death in 1939. Helen Arthur died of cerebral thrombosis at the Neurological Institute of New York. Her obituary stated that she had homes in New York City and Pleasantville, New York. Agnes Morgan was a director, playwright, actress and theatrical producer. She is most known for her association with the Neighborhood Playhouse where she was a director and functioned in numerous other roles. Morgan was born in Le Roy, New York to Frank H. Morgan, an editor, and Sarah L. Cutler Morgan, a teacher. Lewisohn described Morgan as "quiet, serious, watchful." In speaking the Lewisohn sister, founders of the Playhouse joining with Morgan and Helen Arthur, Lewisohn added "...never had five people cast in such different molds joined forces with more congeniality." In speaking of two comedies, “Great Catherine: Whom Glory Still Adores” by Shaw and “The Queen's Enemies” by Lord Dunsany, Crowley recalled that "the spirited quality in both productions was largely due to Agnes Morgan's skillful direction. Perhaps Great Catherine was paving the way to her gift in handling burlesque, which was later to create an infectious vogue on Grand Street and Broadway through the [Grand Street Follies].” Crowley described Morgan as an essential part of the Playhouse: “Agnes Morgan's apprentices were the stage crew, a neighborhood corps of assistant property boys, scene shifters, and painters But her technical facility was such that she was everywhere in the theatre, combining a collection of functions the mere mention of which would drive any "self-respecting" member of the theatre union of today into a decline. Skilled as an actor, she played an occasional role; she developed the technical side of lighting, and had an instinctive gift for direction, as for the function of stage manager. As an amateur she responded to any production need while pursuing her professional career as playwright.” Grand St. Follies: Neighborhood Playhouse had an in-house burlesque. While searching for an experimental play (promised to subscribers), Lewisohn suggested that the in-house burlesque be open to the subscribers. It had been the inspiration and creation of Agnes Morgan and Helen Arthur. The following season, staff were concerned as to whether they could equal the success of the first Grand Street Follies. "...it was clear that her genius for brilliant satire had flowered overnight. Morgan directed thirty-one out of forty-four dramas mounted at the Neighborhood Playhouse between 1915 and its closing in 1927, as well as dance and festival shows. After the Playhouse closed she formed her own company, originally sharing the name of the annual Grand Street Follies and later called Actor-Managers, Inc. which existed until 1939. She directed eight plays on Broadway between 1927 and 1935 as well as three plays for the Federal Theatre Project. In 1931 she wrote the play “If Love Were All” under the pseudonym Cutler Hatch and staged it as well. In 1940 Morgan became associate director of the Paper Mill Playhouse in New Jersey, a position she held until 1972. Morgan died in 1976 in San Bernardino, California.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Freda Beatrice Stark was a New Zealand dancer, and a prosecution witness after the prescription drug overdose of her lover, Thelma Mareo, in 1935.
Born: March 27, 1910, New Zealand
Died: March 19, 1999, Massey, New Zealand, Auckland, New Zealand
Buried: Waikumete Cemetery & Crematorium, Glen Eden, Auckland Council, Auckland, New Zealand, Plot: 95 Row 2 Div G Anglcan
Buried alongside: Thelma Mareo
Find A Grave Memorial# 72268236

Freda Stark was a New Zealand dancer. In 1933, Stark joined Ernest Rolls' revue, and met a young dancer named Thelma Trott, and the two women fell in love. In 1934, Stark was in the chorus of the Duchess of Danitz, while Trott starred. At this time, Trott married Eric Mareo, their conductor. The relationship was cut short in 1935 when Trott took a fatal overdose of the prescription drug Veronal in unexplained circumstances, leading to Mareo being charged with her murder. During the Second World War, Freda was a famed exotic dancer at Auckland's Wintergarden cabaret and nightclub, and a favorite of American troops stationed there, where she earned the title "Fever of the Fleet." Freda Stark longed to be reunited with her long dead lover Thelma Mareo and her friends made sure that wish was granted after her death in 1999: Freda, who died at 88 in a West Auckland rest home, was cremated and her ashes were buried at the foot of Thelma's grave in Waikumete Cemetery, under the words she put there long before: “Waiting till we meet again… Freda.”

Together from 1933 to 1935: 2 years.
Freda Stark (March 27, 1910 – March 19, 1999)
Thelma Clarice Trott (1906 – April 15, 1935)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Cemetery: Freda Stark (1910-1999) was a New Zealand dancer. In 1933, Stark joined Ernest Rolls' revue, and met a young dancer named Thelma Trott (1906-1935), and the two women fell in love. Trott married Eric Mareo. The relationship was cut short in 1935 when Trott took a fatal overdose of the prescription drug Veronal in unexplained circumstances, leading to Mareo being charged with her murder. Freda Stark longed to be reunited with her long dead lover Thelma Mareo and her friends made sure that wish was granted after her death in 1999: Freda, who died at 88 in a West Auckland rest home, was cremated and her ashes were buried at the foot of Thelma's grave in Waikumete Cemetery (4128 Great North Rd, Glen Eden, Waitakere 0602), under the words she put there long before: “Waiting till we meet again… Freda.”

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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George Clair Tooker, Jr. was an American figurative painter. His works are associated with Magic realism, Social realism, Photorealism and Surrealism.
Born: August 5, 1920, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: March 27, 2011, Hartland, Vermont, United States
Education: Art Students League of New York
Harvard University
Phillips Academy
Lived: Hartland (05048 Vermont)
Bleecker Street, Greenwich Village
9 W 18th St, New York, NY 10011
77 State St, Brooklyn, NY 11201
Buried: Sea View Cemetery, Mount Sinai, Suffolk County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 67683783
Books: George Tooker: Working Drawings
Periods: Social realism, Surrealism

School: Phillips Academy Andover (also known as Phillips Academy, Andover, or PA, 180 Main St, Andover, MA 01810) is a co-educational university-preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9–12, along with a post-graduate (PG) year. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957); Daniel Pinkham (1923–2006), George Tooker (1920-2011), John Horne Burns (1916–1953), William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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The Art Students League of New York is an art school located ar 215 W 57th St, 10019. The League has historically been known for its broad appeal to both amateurs and professional artists and has maintained, for over 130 years, a tradition of offering reasonably priced classes on a flexible schedule to accommodate students from all walks of life. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Paul Cadmus (1904–1999), Paul Chalfin (1874-1959), Russell Cheney (1881–1945), Kate Cory (1861–1958), Eyre de Lanux (1894-1996), Thomas Eakins (1844–1916), Jared French (1905-1988), Marsden Hartley (1877–1943), Wilna Hervey (1894–1979), Georgia O'Keeffe (1887–1986), Violet Oakley (1874-1961), George Quaintance (1902-1957), Robert Rauschenberg (1925–2008), Man Ray (1890–1976), Marion Sanford (1904-1987), Maurice Sendak (1928–2012), Prentiss Taylor (1907–1991), Paul Thek (1933-1988), George Tooker (1920–2011), Cy Twombly (1928-2011), Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875-1942), Alice Morgan Wright (1881-1975), Russel Wright (1904–1976).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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In 1945 with a stipend of $90 a month from his family, George Tooker (1920-2011) moved to a cold-water flat on Bleecker Street, 10012, in New York's Greenwich Village (rent $17 per month) where he was to live for five years. A year later, upon Lincoln Kirstein’s suggestion, he was included in Dorothy Miller’s exhibition, Fourteen Americans, at the Museum of Modern Art, which had a major impact on his developing career.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: Upon graduating in 1942, George Tooker (1920-2011) enlisted in the Marine Corps. Returning to New York, he enrolled at the Art Students League and studied with Reginald Marsh in 1943 and 1944. While he was a monitor in one of Marsh’s classes, he met Paul Cadmus, who in turn introduced him to Jared and Margaret French, artists who became lifelong friends. They also introduced him to their wider circle of friends, an accomplished group of writers, composers, dancers, and artists, including Lincoln Kirstein, W.H. Auden, Christopher Isherwood, Monroe Wheeler, and George Platt Lynes. In 1949 he met his long-time partner, William R. Christopher, who died in 1973. After a fire damaged the loft at 9 W 18th St, New York, NY 10011 in which Tooker and Christopher, were living in 1953, they bought and renovated a brownstone on State Street in Brooklyn Heights.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: After a fire damaged the loft on West 18th Street in which George Tooker (1920-2011) and his partner, William Christopher (1923-1973), painter and cabinetmaker, were living in 1953, they bought and renovated a brownstone at 77 State St, Brooklyn, NY 11201. They resided there until a short time after George's mother died in 1960, at which time they removed to Hartland, Vermont, and sold the house in Brooklyn Heights. A rooming house across the street inspired a number of his paintings in the years that followed, including his windows series. In 1954, Tooker received a commission to design the sets for Gian Carlo Menotti’s opera, “The Saint of Bleecker Street,” again thanks to Kirstein’s recommendation.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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School: In 1981, George Tooker (1920-2011) purchased from Geoffrey Fraser Champlain the Pond Cottage (249 Beaver Dam Rd, Brookhaven, NY 11719). In 1994 he sold it to the Post Morrow Foundation. Tooker found that the change experienced by the locale since he was young, and the passing of the people he associated with the area, were difficult for him; he explained, “when I was out there, I just remembered the past. ... And that's why I didn't stay. I sold the house because I was living in the past when I was down there. And I thought, in Vermont I live in the present.”

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: Later in the 1940s, Jared French (1905-1988) and his wife formed a complicated relationship with Paul Cadmus and Cadmus' then lover, George Tooker (1920–2011). When French and his wife bought a home in Hartland (05048 Vermont), they gave Cadmus a house of his own on the property. French later took the house back and gave it to his Italian lover. French died in Rome in 1988 and many of his paintings remain with his friend, Roberto Gianatta. In 1960, George Tooker and his life partner, Bill Christopher, move to Vermont. They buy a barn in White River Junction and move it to their home site in Hartland, not far from Jared and Margaret French’s summer home. They cut the Barn down quite a bit and then add on additional rooms. They permanently relocated from Brooklyn. Tooker returned to New York quite often, though, and taught at the Art Student’s League from 1965 to 1968. In order to escape the harsh Vermont weather, Tooker and Christopher began spending winters in Spain. They bought an apartment in Malaga in 1968, which Tooker maintained for the next two decades. A few years after Christopher died in 1973, Tooker converted to Catholicism and became deeply involved with his church in Vermont, the St. Francis of Assisi Church (28 Union St, Windsor, VT 05089). He painted an elaborate seven-panel work, The Seven Sacraments, which was installed in the church in 1981. In the years that followed, Tooker increasingly focused on his art and spiritual life in the relative solitude of his Vermont home. He typically followed a daily pattern of attending early Mass, returning home to paint in his studio until late afternoon, and then often sketching in the evening. He died at home in April 2011.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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Cemetery: George Tooker (1920–2011) was an American figurative painter. His works are associated with Magic realism, Social realism, Photorealism and Surrealism. In 1968, he was elected to the National Academy of Design and was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Tooker was one of nine recipients of the National Medal of Arts in 2007. Tooker died at his home in Hartland and is buried at Seaview Cemetery (233 N Country Rd, Mt Sinai, NY 11766).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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ISBN-10: 1544066589
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William Gordon Merrick was a Broadway actor, best-selling author of gay-themed novels and one of the first authors to write about homosexual themes for a mass audience.
Born: August 3, 1916, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: March 27, 1988, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Education: Princeton University
Lived: Ikonomou, Idra 180 40, Greece (37.32878, 23.47165)
25 Rampart St, Galle 80000, Sri Lanka (6.02583, 80.21563)
Buried: Greenwood Cemetery, Brielle, Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 92151384

Gordon Merrick was a Broadway actor, a best-selling author of gay-themed novels, and one of the first authors to write about homosexual themes for a mass audience. Merrick wrote stories, which depicted well-adjusted gay men engaged in romantic relationships. Each of his books had a happy ending. Merrick's best-known book is The Lord Won't Mind. The first in a trilogy, Merrick followed it up with One for the Gods in 1971 and Forth into Light in 1974. Merrick enrolled at Princeton University in 1936. He quit in the middle of his junior year and moved to New York City, where he became an actor. He landed the role of Richard Stanley in George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart's The Man Who Came to Dinner and became Hart's lover for a time. In 1980 he moved to Ceylon (now known as Sri Lanka), having bought property there in 1974. He returned to France occasionally, eventually purchasing a home in Tricqueville. For the rest of his life, he divided his time between the two countries. Charles Gerald Hulse, a dancer turned actor turned novelist (In Tall Cotton, 1987), was his partner
of 32 years, until Merrick's death in 1988, in Sri Lanka where they moved together.

Together from 1956 to 1988: 32 years.
Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, NJ 08544. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton was the fourth chartered institution of higher education in the Thirteen Colonies and thus one of the nine colonial colleges established before the American Revolution. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later, where it was renamed Princeton University in 1896. Mathematician, computer and artificial intelligence pioneer, and code-breaker Alan Turing attended Princeton University for his PhD from 1936-1938. He studied in Fine Hall (now Jones Hall) and the Palmer Physical Laboratory. Fine Hall has not change significantly since Turing's time there. In the 1950s, Turing was charged with gross indecency, and avoided prison by agreeing to drug treatments (essentially medical castration). He died of cyanide poisoning in 1954. Queen Elizabeth II granted him a posthumous pardon in 2013. Notable queer alumni and faculty at Princeton University: A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936), James Biddle (1929–2005), Lem Billings (1916-1981), George Henry Boker (1823-1890), Richard Halliburton (1900-1939), John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), William Morris Meredith (1919-2007), Gordon Merrick (1916–1988), Alan Turing (1912-1954), Thornton Wilder (1897–1975), Russel Wright (1904–1976).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
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Historic District: Gordon Merrick left France to avoid the unrest which accompanied the Algerian War of Independence. Merrick and his partner Charles Hulse moved to Greece and took up residence on the island of Hydra.

Address: Ikonomou, Idra 180 40, Greece (37.32878, 23.47165)

Place
Hydra is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece, located in the Aegean Sea between the Saronic Gulf and the Argolic Gulf. It is separated from the Peloponnese by a narrow strip of water. In ancient times, the island was known as Hydrea (Υδρέα, derived from the Greek word for "water"), a reference to the springs on the island. The municipality of Hydra consists of the islands Hydra (area 52 km2 (20.1 sq mi)), Dokos (pop. 18, area 13.5 km2 (5.2 sq mi)), and a few uninhabited islets. The province of Hydra was one of the provinces of the Piraeus Prefecture. Its territory corresponded with that of the current municipality. It was abolished in 2006. There is one main town, known simply as "Hydra port" (pop. 1,900 in 2011.) It consists of a crescent-shaped harbor, around which is centered a strand of restaurants, shops, markets, and galleries that cater to tourists and locals (Hydriots.) Steep stone streets lead up and outward from the harbor area. Most of the local residences, as well as the hostelries on the island, are located on these streets. Other small villages or hamlets on the island include Mandraki (pop. 11), Kamini, Vlychos (19), Palamidas, Episkopi, and Molos. Since 1960, the Canadian singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen has owned a house on the island.
Life
Who: Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988) and Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
In the 1950s Hydra became home to Charles Hulse and Gordon Merrick. Merrick was an American author who wrote more than a dozen novels, which were known for their gay themes. His most successful, “The Lord Won’t Mind,” was written on Hydra. While on vacation visiting the Greek island of Hydra in 1956, Merrick and Hulse bought a house on the island which was to become their home for the next twenty years. At the time, Merrick was working on his fifth novel, and Hulse and Merrick spent the years between 1960 and 1980 travelling mainly between Paris, Hydra and Galle in Sri Lanka. While on Hydra, Hulse and Merrick were hosts to socialites, intellectuals and artists from all over the world. During their theatre career, and here, Hulse and Merrick came to know people, such as Charles Laughton, Jules Dassin, Melina Mercouri, Jacqueline Onassis, Leonard Cohen and others. Hulse restored and furnished the house on Hydra, which was admired by and photographed extensively for various international magazines. In 1974 the couple bought land in Sri Lanka. Six years later they quit Greece permanently and moved to Galle, a town in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka, as the local tourism industry on Hydra had made the island too crowded for their tastes. Merrick and Hulse also returned to France occasionally, eventually purchasing a home in Tricqueville, Normandy. For the rest of their life, they divided their time between the two countries.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906692
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House: In 1974 Gordon Merrick and Charles Hulse bought land in Sri Lanka.

Address: 25 Rampart St, Galle 80000, Sri Lanka (6.02583, 80.21563)

Place
Galle is a major city in Sri Lanka, situated on the southwestern tip, 119 km from Colombo. Galle is the administrative capital of Southern Province, Sri Lanka and is the district capital of Galle District. Galle is the fifth largest city in Sri Lanka after the capital Colombo, Kandy, Jaffna and Negombo. According to James Emerson Tennent, Galle was the ancient seaport of Tarshish, from which King Solomon drew ivory, peacocks and other valuables. Cinnamon was exported from Sri Lanka as early as 1400 BC and the root of the word itself is Hebrew, so Galle may have been a main entrepot for the spice. Galle had been a prominent seaport long before western rule in the country. Persians, Arabs, Greeks, Romans, Malays, Indians, and Chinese were doing business through Galle port. In 1411, the Galle Trilingual Inscription, a stone tablet inscription in three languages, Chinese, Tamil and Persian, was erected in Galle to commemorate the second visit to Sri Lanka by the Chinese admiral Zheng He. The "modern" history of Galle starts in 1502, when a small fleet of Portuguese ships, under the command of Lourenço de Almeida, on their way to the Maldives, were blown off course by a storm. Realising that the king resided in Kotte close to Colombo, Lourenço proceeded there after a brief stop in Galle. In 1640, the Portuguese had to surrender to the Dutch East India Company. The Dutch built the present fort in the year 1663. They built a fortified wall, using solid granite, and built three bastions, known as "Sun,” "Moon" and "Star.” After the British took over the country from the Dutch in the year 1796, they preserved the Fort unchanged, and used it as the administrative centre of the district.

Life
Who: Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988) and Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
In 1980 Gordon Merrick and Charles Hulse quit Greece permanently and moved to Galle, a town in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka, as the local tourism industry on Hydra had made the island too crowded for their tastes. Hulse and Merrick bought a house at 25 Rampart Street within the precinct of Galle’s XVII century fortress. Here, Hulse worked on interior design, and began to write. By this time, Merrick had already published several books and was a celebrity. Hulse helped Merrick to prepare manuscripts for publication and the two travelled together frequently during this period. Gordon Merrick died in Colombo, Sri Lanka, of lung cancer on March 27, 1988. He was survived by his companion, Charles G. Hulse.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544068435 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544068433
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Cemetery: At Greenwood Cemetery (707 Schoolhouse Rd, Brielle, NJ 08730) are buried Roy Strickland (1918-2003) and William Wynkoop (1916-2003): they both died in 2003, 2 months apart, William 87 and Roy 85, after living together for more than 53 years. Moreover also Gordon Merrick (1916–1988), author best-known for his “The Lord Won't Mind” trilogy, is buried here.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
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Henry Davis Sleeper was a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator. He was born March 27, 1878, in Boston to Major Jacob Henry Sleeper, a distinguished Civil War veteran and Maria ...
Born: 1878, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Died: September 22, 1934, West End, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Lived: Beauport, 75 Eastern Point Blvd, Gloucester, MA 01930, USA (42.59114, -70.66009)
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery
Find A Grave Memorial# 33029215

Henry Davis Sleeper was a noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator. The Harvard economist A. Piatt Andrew who had built a handsome summer mansion, Red Roof, on a rock ledge above the harbor, introduced Henry Sleeper to the Eastern Point in Gloucester, Massachusetts in the spring of 1906. Sleeper was much taken by the location and immediately decided to build a little further along the ledge from Red Roof. Construction of Beauport, Sleeper's relatively modestly scaled Arts and Crafts-style house began in the fall of 1907 and was sufficiently finished to receive A. Piatt Andrew as a houseguest in May 1908. Abram Piatt Andrew Jr. was a United States Representative from Massachusetts. Also Sleeper became the U.S. Representative, and a major fundraiser for the American Field Service, an ambulance corps founded by Andrew early during World War I. Sleeper died in Massachusetts General Hospital of leukemia on September 22, 1934 and is buried in his family's plot in Mount Auburn Cemetery located in Watertown and Cambridge, Massachusetts. Andrew wrote the memorial tribute published in the Gloucester Daily Times. A gay man, some source say that Sleeper was in a relationship with Andrew. Others state that the two were just friends.

Together from 1906 to 1934: 28 years.
Abram Piatt Andrew Jr. (February 12, 1873 – June 3, 1936)
Henry Davis Sleeper (March 27, 1878 - September 22, 1934)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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House: Beauport, also known as Sleeper-McCann House, Little Beauport, or Henry Davis Sleeper House, is a historic house in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Address: 75 Eastern Point Blvd, Gloucester, MA 01930, USA (42.59114, -70.66009)
Hours: Tuesday to Saturday 10.00-17.00
Phone: +1 978-283-0800
Website: http://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-properties/homes/Beauport
National Register of Historic Places: 03000641, 2003 & 76000246, 1976. Also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
Built starting in 1907
Beauport was the summer home of interior decorator and antique collector Henry Davis Sleeper. Situated on the rocks overlooking Gloucester Harbor, the structure was repeatedly enlarged and modified by Sleeper, and filled with a large collection of fine art, folk art, architectural artifacts, and other collectible materials. Sleeper decorated the (ultimately 56) rooms to evoke different historical and literary themes. After his death, Charles and Helena Woolworth McCann acquired the house and its contents. They preserved much of the Sleeper’s designs and decorations, but made some modifications, including adding their porcelain collection to the house. Their heirs donated the property to the Society for the Protection of New England Antiquities (now Historic New England) in 1947, who operate the property as a house museum. Beauport served as Sleeper’s escape, a backdrop for summer parties, and as a showcase for his professional skills. The house has frequently been written about in books and magazines, with the first major article appearing in House Beautiful in 1916. It has been featured in such diverse publications as Architectural Digest, Country Living, and The Boston Globe, and as been showcased on televisions programs such as America’s Castles. In addition to the main house, the property also has a gate house, garage, and toolshed that were built by Sleeper. The gate house has been adapted by Historic New England as a visitor reception area, and the toolshed now houses restrooms. The garage is used for storage and as office space. There is a single non-contributing building on the property, a caretaker’s house, which is potentially of local historic interest as an example of a prefabricated post- WWII residential structure.

Life
Who: Henry Davis Sleeper (March 27, 1878 - September 22, 1934)
Henry Davis Sleeper was a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator. He was grandson of Jacob Sleeper, one of the founders of Boston University as well as a clothier and manager of a real estate trust. Henry Sleeper was introduced to the Eastern Point in Gloucester, Massachusetts in the spring of 1906 by the Harvard economist A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) who had built a handsome summer mansion, Red Roof, on a rock ledge above the harbor. Sleeper was much taken by the location and immediately decided to build a little further along the ledge from Red Roof. Eastern Point was an enclave occupied by a somewhat louche group of "Bohemian" artists and intellectuals with frequent visits from some of the more colorful and unconventional members of Boston Society, in particular Isabella Stewart Gardner, the legendary art collector and builder of Fenway Court in the Back Bay Fens, now the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Construction of Beauport, Sleeper’s relatively modestly scaled Arts and Crafts-style house began in the fall of 1907 and was sufficiently finished to receive A. Piatt Andrew as a house guest in May 1908. As property flanking Sleeper’s became available, Beauport was expanded several times until 1925, often in response to events or important experiences in his life. The house was now not only a home but a major showcase for Sleeper’s interior design and decoration business. Clients could choose wallpapers, window treatments, or entire rooms to have reproduced in their own houses. Sleeper had a specialty in "Puritan Revival,” the Jacobean-American architecture and decorative arts of the original American colonies, but his tastes and interests included French decor of several centuries and a great deal of orientalia. Isabella Stewart Gardner commissioned work from him; Henry Francis du Pont engaged his assistance with the big new wing of the family’s massive house, Winterthur (5105 Kennett Pike, Wilmington, DE 19735), now a famed museum of American decorative arts; he designed for Hollywood stars Joan Crawford and Fredric March. Henry Davis Sleeper died in Massachusetts General Hospital of leukemia on September 22, 1934, and is buried in his family’s plot in Mount Auburn Cemetery in Watertown and Cambridge, Massachusetts. Andrew wrote the memorial tribute published in the Gloucester Daily Times. Sleeper had never married and left no direct descendants. Beauport passed to his brother Stephen whose real estate income was unequal to Henry’s debts. Beauport was sold to Helena Woolworth McCann who was contacted by Henry Francis Du Pont urging that Sleeper’s rooms remain exactly as they were as the value of the house and its collection of art objects depended primarily on their being left unchanged. Mrs McCann preserved the house as it was; at her death, the house was inherited by her daughters from whose hands it passed into the care of Historic New England in 1942.

Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston.

Address: 580 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37479, -71.14449)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +1 617-547-7105
Website: http://mountauburn.org/
National Register of Historic Places: 75000254, 1975. Also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, Mount Auburn Cemetery marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery,” derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. It is Watertown’s largest contiguous open space and extends into Cambridge to the east, adjacent to the Cambridge City Cemetery and Sand Banks Cemetery.

Notable queer burials are at Mount Auburn Cemetery:
• Roger Brown (1925–1997) (Location: Willow Pond Knoll, Lot 11000), professor at Harvard University from 1952 until 1957 and from 1962 until 1994, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1957 until 1962. During his time at the University of Michigan, he met Albert Gilman, later a Shakespeare scholar and a professor of English at Boston University. Gilman and Brown were partners for over 40 years until Gilman's death from lung cancer in 1989. Brown's sexual orientation and his relationship with Gilman were known to a few of his closest friends, and he served on the editorial board of The Journal of Homosexuality from 1985, but he did not come out publicly until 1989. Brown chronicled his personal life with Gilman and after Gilman's death in his memoir. Brown died in 1997, and is buried next to Gilman (Location: Willow Pond Knoll, Lot 11000).
• Katharine Ellis Coman (1857-1915), author on economic subjects who lived with Katharine Lee Bates (Author of "America the Beautiful"), and died at her home, was cremated at Mount Auburn Cemetery but was buried with her parents at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
• Charlotte Cushman (1816–1876) (Location: Palm Avenue, Lot 4236), actress, her last partner was lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins, who sculpted Angels of the Water on Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, New York City.
• Martha May Eliot (1891–1978), was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health. She was a scion of the Eliot family, an influential American family that is regarded as one of the Boston Brahmins, originating in Boston, whose ancestors became wealthy and held sway over the American education system in the late XIX and early XX centuries. Her father, Christopher Rhodes Eliot, was a Unitarian minister, and her grandfather, William G. Eliot, was the first chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis. The poet, playwright, critic, and Nobel laureate T.S. Eliot was her first cousin. During undergraduate study at Bryn Mawr College she met Ethel Collins Dunham, who was to become her life partner. She was cremated at Mount Auburn but buried elsewhere.
• Mary Katherine Keemle "Kate" Field (1838-1896), American journalist, lecturer, and actress, of eccentric talent. She was the daughter of actors Joseph M. Field and Eliza Riddle. Kate Field never married. In October 1860, while visiting his mother's home in Florence, she met the celebrated British novelist Anthony Trollope. She became one of his closest friends and was the subject of Trollope's high esteem. Trollope scholars have speculated on the nature of their warm friendship. Twenty-four of his letters to Kate survive, at the Boston Public Library; hers to Trollope do not.
• Annie Adams Fields (1834–1915) (Location: Elder Path, Lot 2700), author and hostess; wife of James Thomas Fields, later companion to Sarah Orne Jewett.
• Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924) (Location: Oxalis Path, Lot 2900) was a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. She founded the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.
• Charles Hammond Gibson, Jr. (1874–1954) (Location: Sweetbrier Path, Lot 472), Boston writer and bachelor bon vivant, best known for having preserved his family's Beacon Street home as a museum of Victorian style and taste. “The Wounded Eros,” a short documentary film by Todd Gernes, explores the aesthetic relationship between Gibson's literary production and the material culture contexts of his museum and library, set within the social history of turn-of-the-century gay Boston. He had an enduring relationship with the eccentric self-styled "Count" Maurice de Mauny Talvande.
• Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908) (Location: Hemlock Path, Lot 3747), sculptor. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton (died 1864). Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie. Hosmer was good friend with Charlotte Cushman and Matilda Hays, Cushman’s partner, left Charlotte for her.
• Alice James (1848-1892) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American diarist. The only daughter of Henry James, Sr. and sister of psychologist and philosopher William James and novelist Henry James, she is known mainly for the posthumously published diary that she kept in her final years. Her companion was Katherine Peabody Loring and from their relationship it was conied the term “Boston Marriage”.
• Henry James (1843-1916) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of XIX century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
• Amy Lowell (1874–1925) (Location: Bellwort Path, Lot 3401), poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
• Abby Adeline Manning (1836-1906) (Location: Thistle Path, Lot 709), painter, and her partner, Anne Whitney (1821-1915), poet and sculptor, together.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) (Location: Walnut Avenue, Lot 7108) was an American poet, editor, and professor of English literature. Along with Gilbert Seldes, Mitchell’s editorship of The Dial magazine signaled a pivotal shift in content from political articles to aesthetics in art and literature. In 1929 he became the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Richard Cowan (1909-1939)’s diary, which he started while he was a student at Cornell, chronicles the life of a young gay man in Boston in the 1930s. Cowan committed suicide at the age of thirty. His forty-seven-year old mentor and long-term lover, Stewart Mitchell, was devastated. Mitchell resigned as president of the Massachusetts Historical Society on account of a “personal misfortune,” and wrote a friend, “There is no running away from a broken heart.” According to the Boston Herald Nov. 9, 1957: “Mitchell directed that the urn containing his mortal remains be buried, “but not in winter,” in the lot “where my dear friends Georgine Holmes Thomas and Richard David Cowan now repose”.”
• Francis Williams Sargent (1848-1920) (Location: Pilgrim Path, Lot 4141) and Jane Welles Hunnewell Sargent (1851-1936), Margarett Williams Sargent’s parents. Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) was born into the privileged world of old Boston money; she was a distant relative of John Singer Sargent.
• Henry Davis Sleeper (1878-1934) (Location: Willow Avenue, Lot 453), a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator, who had a long lasting friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, an economist, an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, the founder and director of the American Ambulance Field Service during WWI, and a United States Representative from Massachusetts.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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James VI and I was King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death.
Born: June 19, 1566, Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Died: March 27, 1625, De Vere Theobalds Estate
Buried: Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA
Buried alongside: George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham
Find A Grave Memorial# 1974
Spouse: Anne of Denmark (m. 1589–1619)
Children: Charles I of England, more
Parents: Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, Mary, Queen of Scots

Church: In the chapel of St John the Baptist in Westminster Abbey there is the tomb of Mary Kendall (died March 13, 1709/1710) dating from 1710 with an inscription recording: "That close Union and Friendship, In which she lived, with the Lady Catharine Jones (died April 23, 1740); And in testimony of which she desir’d That even their Ashes, after Death, Might not be divided.”

Address: 20 Dean’s Yard, Westminster, London SW1P 3PA, UK (51.49929, -0.1273)
Hours: Monday and Tuesday 9.30-15.30, Wednesday 9.30-18.00, Thursday and Friday 9.30-15.30, Saturday 9.30-13.30
Phone: +44 20 7222 5152
Website: http://www.westminster-abbey.org/

Place
Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the most notable religious buildings in the United Kingdom and has been the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. Between 1540 and 1556 the abbey had the status of a cathedral. Since 1560, however, the building is no longer an abbey nor a cathedral, having instead the status of a Church of England "Royal Peculiar"—a church responsible directly to the sovereign. The building itself is the original abbey church. According to a tradition first reported by Sulcard in about 1080, a church was founded at the site (then known as Thorn Ey (Thorn Island)) in the VII century, at the time of Mellitus, a Bishop of London. Construction of the present church began in 1245, on the orders of King Henry III. Since 1066, when Harold Godwinson and William the Conqueror were crowned, the coronations of English and British monarchs have been held there. There have been at least 16 royal weddings at the abbey since 1100. Two were of reigning monarchs (Henry I and Richard II), although, before 1919, there had been none for some 500 years.

Notable queer burials at Westminster Abbey:
• Anne, Queen of Great Britain (1665-1714). Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, became close to the young Princess Anne in about 1675, and the friendship grew stronger as the two grew older. Correspondence between the Duchess and the Queen reveals that the two women enjoyed a royally passionate romance. They called each other pet names: Sarah was “Mrs. Freeman” and Anne was “Mrs. Morley.” When Anne came to the throne in 1702, she named Sarah “Lady of the Bedchamber.” Anne and Sarah were virtually inseparable; no king’s mistress had ever wielded the power granted to the Duchess. Over time, Sarah became overconfident in her position and developed an arrogant attitude toward Anne, even going to far as to insult the queen in public. A cousin of Sarah’s, Abigail Hill, caught the Queen’s eye during Sarah’s frequent absences from Court, and eventually replaced her in Anne’s affections. After her final break with Anne in 1711, Sarah and her husband were dismissed from the court. Sarah enjoyed a "long and devoted" relationship with her husband of more than 40 years, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough. The money she inherited from the Marlborough trust left her one of the richest women in Europe.
• Sir Frederick Ashton (1904–1988), ballet dancer and choreographer, Memorial in Poet’s Corner (buried St Mary the Virgin Churchyard, Yaxley)
• W. H. Auden (1907-1973), poet and essayist. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey in 1974, adjoining the grave of John Masefield. Another memorial is at Christ College Cathedral, Oxford, where he graduated (buried Kirchstetten, Austria) (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Robert Baden-Powell (1857–1941) was a British Army officer, writer, author of Scouting for Boys which was an inspiration for the Scout Movement, founder and first Chief Scout of The Boy Scouts Association and founder of the Girl Guides. In the south aisle of the nave of Westminster Abbey, against the screen of St George’s chapel, there is a memorial stone to Lord and Lady Baden-Powell, by W.Soukop. Both are buried in Kenya and each had a memorial service held at the Abbey (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), Prime Minister, memorial. A memorial to Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, was unveiled in the nave of Westminster Abbey in 1997. Designed by Donald Buttress and cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Francis Beaumont (1584–1616) was a dramatist in the English Renaissance theatre, most famous for his collaborations with John Fletcher (1579–1625.) According to a mid-century anecdote related by John Aubrey, they lived in the same house on the Bankside in Southwark, "sharing everything in the closest intimacy." About 1613 Beaumont married Ursula Isley, daughter and co-heiress of Henry Isley of Sundridge in Kent, by whom he had two daughters, one posthumous. Francis Beaumont and his brother Sir John Beaumont are both buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, at the entrance to St Benedict's chapel near Chaucer's monument. Fletcher died in 1625 and is buried inside the Southwark Cathedral, London Bridge, London SE1 9DA. On 1November 6, 1996 the cathedral became a focus of controversy when it hosted a twentieth-anniversary service for the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement. In 1997 openly gay cleric, Jeffrey John became Canon Chancellor and Theologian of the Cathedral (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Aphra Behn (1640-1689) was a British playwright, poet, translator and fiction writer from the Restoration era. Behn’s close association with royalty, especially her friendship with the King’s mistress, Nell Gwyn, and her long-standing liaison with John Hoyle (died 1692), whose affairs with other men were notorious, made Behn a prime subject for court and theater gossip. Just as Behn was notorious for presenting sensational subjects on stage despite societal taboos, she achieved a reputation for unusually explicit accounts of erotic and sexual episodes in her poems. Many of these celebrated gay male and lesbian relationships. She was buried in the east cloister of Westminster Abbey, near the steps up into the church. The inscription on her tombstone, written by John Hoyle, reads: "Here lies a Proof that Wit can never be Defence enough against Mortality." John Hoyle was stabbed to death on May 1692 and is buried in the vault of the Inner Temple church, Temple, London EC4Y 7BB) (Location in the Abbey: Cloisters; East Cloister).
• William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland (1649–1709) and King William III of England (1650-1702), are buried next to Queen Mary II. King William III is buried in great simplicity in the South Aisle of the Chapel of Henry VI, and his companion William Bentinck is buried in a vault nearby. Several members of the Bentinck family are buried in the Ormond vault at the eastern end of Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey. None have monuments but their names and dates of death were added to the vaultstone in the late XIX century (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Rupert Brooke (1887-1915) died at 4:46 pm on April 23, 1915 in a French hospital ship moored in a bay off the island of Skyros in the Aegean on his way to the landing at Gallipoli. As the expeditionary force had orders to depart immediately, he was buried at 11 pm in an olive grove on Skyros, Greece. His grave remains there today. On 11 November 1985, Brooke was among 16 WWI poets commemorated on a slate monument unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey.
• Benjamin Britten (1913-1976), musician and composer. In the north choir (or Musicians) aisle in Westminster Abbey there is a memorial stone. Britten refused a formal burial since he wanted to be buried beside his partner Peter Pears (Location in the Abbey: North Quire Aisle).
• Robert Browning (1812-1889), poet, is buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. He was born on 7 May 1812 in London, a son of Robert Browning (1782-1866) and Sarah (Wiedemann). He married Elizabeth Barrett, a famous poet in her own right, in September 1846 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• George, 6th Baron Byron (1788-1824). The memorial stone in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey was given by the Poetry Society and unveiled on May 8, 1969 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Noël Coward (1899-1973), composer and playwright. A memorial was unveiled in 1984 in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. The black marble stone was cut by Ralph Beyer. Thanked by Coward’s partner, Graham Payn, for attending, the Queen Mother replied, "I came because he was my friend" (Location in the Abbey: South Quire Aisle).
• Major-General Sir Herbert Edwardes (1819–1868) was an administrator, soldier, and statesman active in the Punjab, India. He is buried in Highgate Cemetery. A memorial by sculptor William Theed junior, is on the wall of the west aisle of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. He is also commemorated by a stained glass window in the chapel of King’s College London. Brigadier-General John Nicholson (1822–1857) was a Victorian era military officer known for his role in British India. Nicholson never married, the most significant people in his life being his brother Punjab administrators Sir Henry Lawrence and Herbert Edwardes. At Bannu, Nicholson used to ride one hundred and twenty miles every weekend to spend a few hours with Edwardes, and lived in his beloved friend’s house for some time when Edwardes’ wife Emma was in England. At his deathbed he dictated a message to Edwardes saying, "Tell him that, if at this moment a good fairy were to grant me a wish, my wish would be to have him here next to my mother." The love between him and Edwardes made them, as Edwardes’ wife latter described it "more than brothers in the tenderness of their whole lives.” In the retaking of Delhi, India, Nicholson led 2,000 men (mostly British, Pathan, and Punjabi troops) through the Kashmiri Gate in Delhi. Mortally wounded he died at the hour of British victory and is buried at New Delhi (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Eliot (1819-1880) was not buried in Westminster Abbey because of her denial of the Christian faith and her "irregular" though monogamous life with Lewes. She was buried in Highgate Cemetery (East), Highgate, London, in the area reserved for religious dissenters and agnostics, beside the love of her life, George Henry Lewes. On 2June 1, 1980 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. Stone by John Skelton (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Thomas Gray (1716-1771)’s biographer William Mason erected a memorial to him, designed by John Bacon the Elder, in the east aisle of Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey in 1778. (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner)
• Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), Poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in 1975 in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. By sculptor David Peace (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• A. E. Housman (1859-1936), poet, has a memorial panel in the window above Chaucer's monument in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner). he has a memorial also at St Laurence (College Street, Ludlow, Shropshire, SY8 1AN).
• Edward Hyde, 3rd Earl of Clarendon (1661-1723), was the only son of Henry and his first wife Theodosia, daughter of Lord Capel. As Viscount Cornbury was governor of New York from 1702 to 1708. He had a very bad reputation and "his character and conduct were equally abhorred in both hemispheres". He secretly married Catherine O'Brien in 1688 and died in obscurity and debt. His only surviving son Edward as Lord Clifton took his seat in the House of Lords but died unmarried of a fever after a drinking bout. His daughter Theodosia married John Bligh, later Earl of Darnley, and both were buried in the vault (Location in the Abbey: North ambulatory)
• Henry James (1843-1916), American born novelist. On June 17, 1976 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets’ Corner Westminster Abbey by his great grand-nephew. Cut by Will Carter (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• James Kendall, politician and governor of Barbados, is buried in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. James’s niece Mary Kendall was buried in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Abbey and has a monument there with a kneeling alabaster figure of herself. The inscription, written by the Dean of Westminster Francis Atterbury, reads: "Mrs Mary Kendall daughter of Thomas Kendall Esqr. and of Mrs Mary Hallet, his wife, of Killigarth in Cornwall, was born at Westminster Nov.8 1677 and dy’d at Epsome March 4 1709/10, having reach’d the full term of her blessed Saviour’s life; and study’d to imitate his spotless example. She had great virtues, and as great a desire of concealing them: was of a severe life, but of an easy conversation; courteous to all, yet strictly sincere; humble, without meanness; beneficient, without ostentation; devout, without superstition. These admirable qualitys, in which she was equall’d by few of her sex, surpass’d by none, render’d her every way worthy of that close uion and friendship in which she liv’d with the Lady Catherine Jones; and in testimony of which she desir’d that even their ashes, after death, might not be divided: and, therefore, order’d her selfe here to be interr’d where, she knew, that excellent Lady design’d one day to rest, near the grave of her belov’d and religious mother, Elizabeth, Countess of Ranelagh. This monument was erected by Capt. Charles Kendall." Her name was inscribed on the vault stone in front of the monument in the late XIX century. Mary’s father Thomas Kendall, son of a merchant, died in 1684 and Mary lived with the Earl of Ranelagh’s family while James was in the West Indies. Lady Catherine Jones (d.1740) was the Earl’s daughter. Charles was Mary’s cousin and was in the Royal Navy. Her estates were left to her cousin Canon Nicholas Kendall. The coats of arms show those for Kendall and also "or, a chief gules overall on a bend engrailed sable three bezants" for Hallet.
• Herbert, 1st Earl Kitchener (1850-1916), Sirdar of the Egyptian army (Commander in Chief), is remembered on the altar in the south aisle of the Lady Chapel (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel)
• D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930), novelist and poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey on 1November 6, 1985. By David Parsley (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• In July 2002, a memorial window to Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) – a gift of the Marlowe Society – was unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey. Controversially, a question mark was added to the generally accepted date of death. On 2October 5, 2011 a letter from Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells was published by The Times newspaper, in which they called on the Dean and Chapter to remove the question mark on the grounds that it "flew in the face of a mass of unimpugnable evidence.” In 2012, they renewed this call in their e-book Shakespeare Bites Back, adding that it "denies history,” and again the following year in their book Shakespeare Beyond Doubt. (Buried St Nicholas Churchyard, Deptford)
• Just inside the west door of Westminster Abbey there is a memorial brass, by Christopher Ironside, to Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900-1979) and his wife, Countess Mountbatten of Burma. He was Admiral of the Fleet (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• It has been said that the greatest love of Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727)’s life was with a fellow mathematician, Fatio de Duillier. They collaborated for several years, and when they broke up over an argument in 1693, Newton suffered symptoms of a nervous breakdown. Fatio assisted John Conduitt (Newton’s nephew) in planning the design, and writing the inscription for Newton’s monument in Westminster Abbey. His large monument is by William Kent and J.M.Rysbrack. Newton has also a Memorial at Trinity College, Cambridge. Fatio died in 1753 and was buried at the church of St. Nicholas, Worcester (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• After being ill for the last twenty-two years of his life, Laurence Olivier (1907-1989) died of renal failure on 11 July 1989 at his home near Steyning, West Sussex. His cremation was held three days later. The ashes of the greatest actor of his generation, are buried in the south transept of Westminster Abbey. His stone was cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: South Transept).
• Wilfred Owen (1893-1918), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. The inscription on the stone is taken from Owen’s "Preface" to his poems; "My subject is War, and the pity of War. The Poetry is in the pity." (Buried Ors Communal Cemetery, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France)
• Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902). A small tablet was unveiled in Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey in 1953 (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Seigfried Sassoon (1886-1967), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. (Buried St Andrew Churchyard, Mells, Somerset)
• Henry John Alexander Seely (1899-1963), 2nd Lord Mottistone, of the architect firm of Seely & Paget, re-built several of the houses in Little Cloister, Westminster Abbey, after war damage. A statue by Edwin Russell remembers him (Location in the Abbey: St Catherine's Chapel Garden; Little Cloister).
• Robert Stewart (1769-1822), Viscount Castlereagh and 2nd Marquis of Londonderry, politician, was buried in the centre of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. His statue is by sculptor John Evan Thomas (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592-1628) and King James I of England (1566-1625) are buried in the Henry VII Chapel. King James I’s tomb was lost and not rediscovered until 1869. On His Majesty’s left is the magnificent tomb of his lover George Villiers. On his right is the tomb (with huge bronze figures representing Hope, Truth, Charity and Faith) of Ludovic Stuart, Duke of Richmond and Lennox (1574-1624), son of one of his earliest lovers, Esme Stuart.
• On 14 February 1995 a small stained glass memorial was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey for Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wilde (1854-1900), playwright and aesthete (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Kenneth Macpherson was born in Scotland, the son of Scottish painter, John 'Pop' Macpherson and Clara Macpherson. Descended from 6 generations of artists, Macpherson was a novelist, photographer, critic and film-maker.
Born: March 27, 1902, Scotland, United Kingdom
Died: 1971, Cetona
Lived: Villa Tuoro, Via Tuoro, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)
Villa Kenwin, 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)
Riant Chateau, Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161096858
Spouse: Bryher (m. 1927–1947)
Movies: Borderline, Dreams That Money Can Buy

Bryher was the pen name of the novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. In 1921, she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. The same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D. 's lover (H.D. was Bryher’s lover as well). In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin (Kenneth + Winifred). They formally adopted H.D.'s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson's child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, even if she continued to provide for him. Bryher and H.D. no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until H.D.’s death in 1961. Bryher, H.D., and Macpherson formed the film magazine Close Up, and the POOL Group. Only one POOL film, Borderline (1930), starring H.D. and Paul Roberson, survives in its entirety.

Together from 1927 to 1947: 20 years.
Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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George Norman Douglas was a British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro", which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Coucy Lyons. Bryher, Macpherson’s wife, supported her husband and his friend on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the aging Douglas. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas's death in 1952, writing an epitaph for Douglas, from which the Latin inscription, on Douglas's gravestone, is derived (Omnes Eodem Cogimur = "We are all driven to the same end" (i.e., death)). Douglas’s last words apparently were: "Get those fucking nuns away from me." Macpherson was Douglas’s heir, and upon his death, everything went to Islay Lyons.

They met in 1931 and remained friends until Douglas’s death in 1952: 21 years.
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 – June 14, 1971)
Norman Douglas (December 8, 1868 - February 7, 1952)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Islay Lyons was a notable Welsh photographer, novelist and linguist. During the WWII, he served in North Africa and then he was sent to the Far East to learn Japanese in 3 months. He did this with amongst others, Richard Mason, who was a lifelong friend and cousin by marriage. The character ‘Peter’ in Mason’s book The Wind Cannot Read portrays Lyons. Lyons had been the last lover of the filmmaker, Kenneth Macpherson, both of them living in the ‘Villa Tuoro’ on Capri. Norman Douglas was was their constant companion, there, during the last years of Douglas’s life. Both Macpherson and Lyons were at Norman Douglas’s bedside when he died. Douglas’s estate went to Macpherson, and at Macpherson’s death, to Islay Lyons. Another lover of Macpherson was New York cabaret singer, Jimmie Daniels. Macpherson’s wife, Bryher, financed Daniels and Macpherson’s life in New York. Before Kenneth Macpherson, in Daniels’s life there was the famed architect, Philip Johnson. They met around 1934 when Jimmie was first starting to get some real recognition as an entertainer.

Together from 1947 to 1971: 24 years.
Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons (March 7, 1922 – November 17, 1993)
Jimmie Daniels (1908 - June 29, 1984)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

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House: In September 1931, Kenneth Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build on plans drawn up several years earlier by Alexander Ferenczy.

Address: 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)

Place
The home, which overlooked Lake Geneva, came to be known as Kenwin, derived from the names of its commissioners, Kenneth and Winifred, and would double as a film studio and home, not only for themselves, but also for an assortment of dogs, cats, and monkeys. Bryher gave her address, at the time, as Villa Kenwin, Chemin de Vallon, 1814 Burier-La-Tour, Vaud, Switzerland. During the war years, Bryher would use Kenwin as a staging post for the evacuation of refugees from Nazi Germany. Abandoned after the death of Bryher who will live there until 1983, it was bought in 1987 by the architect Giovanni Pezzoli who undertook a complete renovation. It is registered as a Swiss cultural object of national importance. In 1996, a documentary film entitled "Kenwin" and telling the story of the villa Kenwin was directed by Véronique Goël on the basis of archive footage.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Bryher was the pen name of the English novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. Her father was the shipowner and financier John Ellerman, who at the time of his death in 1933, was the richest Englishman who had ever lived. He lived with her mother Hannah Glover, but did not marry her until 1908. During the 1920s, Bryher was an unconventional figure in Paris. Among her circle of friends were Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Beach and Berenice Abbott. Her wealth enabled her to give financial support to struggling writers, including Joyce and Edith Sitwell. She also helped with finance for Sylvia Beach’s bookshop Shakespeare and Company and certain publishing ventures, and started a film company Pool Group. She also helped provide funds to purchase a flat in Paris for the destitute Dada artist and writer Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. In 1918 she met and became involved in a lesbian relationship with poet Hilda Doolittle “H.D.” The relationship was an open one, with both taking other partners. In 1921 she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. That same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D.’s lover. In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin. They formally adopted H.D.’s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson’s child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, she and Doolittle no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until Doolittle’s death in 1961.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Riant Chateau, Territet (1820)

House: Since 1921, H.D. had been a close friend of Bryher. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle.

Address: Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)

Place
Built in 1913, Design by Michel Polak (1885-1948)
The Riant Chateau was built for Belgian businessman Lucien Kaisin. This complex was built for a cosmopolitan clientele and was considered very advanced for its time. It had the most modern elevators and central heating of its time, and was furnished with luxurious fittings. In its heyday, it was the meeting place for avant-garde of the cinema; it was frequently visited by such notables as Eisenstein, Room and Pabst and housed the headquarters of the publishers of the magazine Pool. The redevelopment program has ensured that the spirit of the building has been retained, while all essential services have been replaced and modern technology added. The interior of the building reflects the extravagance and luxury of the Belle Époque, with high ceilings, elaborate cornices, inlaid mirrors, stained glass, heavy oak doors, and antique oak parquet floors. Bordering the Riant Chateau is Rose Park, a beautiful park which extends to the Anglican church. At present an underground parking space is being built beneath Rose Park which is being re-landscaped and replanted with more trees for added privacy. On the other side of the garden lies the Anglican church, and beyond that the terminus of the Mont Pelerin funicular. Rose Park was a favorite haunt of the Austrian Empress Sissi, whose statue serves as a reminder to today’s visitors.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971), Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983) and Hilda "H.D." Doolittle (September 10, 1886 – September 27, 1961)
It was in 1927, from their base in Territet, that Kenneth Macpherson, Bryher and HD launched themselves as the Pool Group. Pool would veer away from the West’s commercial model of film production, and produce material which would promote cinematography as an “art form.” Their model would be based on the work coming out of Germany, particularly G W Pabst, and coming out of Russia, particularly Sergei Eisenstein. Their subject matter would be human behaviour, and its many facets, and their task would be representing this behaviour on screen, influenced by the work of Freud. Also at Territet, Macpherson founded the influential film journal, Close Up, dedicated to "independent cinema and cinema from around the world.” The first issue of Close Up, describing itself on the front cover as an "international magazine devoted to film art,” appeared in July 1927. Macpherson was editor, with Bryher as assistant editor, and Doolittle making regular contributions. Macpherson, who was particularly influenced by the Russian film-maker Sergei Eisenstein and whom he first met in 1929, "dictated the tone and direction of the publication, contributing articles that defined the role of the director and defended the integrity of cinema and its right to be considered as art.” Close Up published many of the first translations of Eisenstein’s ideas. Macpherson continued as the main editor until the magazine’s demise in 1933. Bryher is buried at Cimetière Saint-Martin (Boulevard Saint-Martin, 1800 Vevey).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Villa Tuoro is forever linked to the figure of Scots writer Norman Douglas, who lived here from the post-war period up until the time of his death in 1952. During those years, the house was the property of his great friend Kenneth McPherson. McPherson went on living there until 1957 together with Islay Bowe-Lyons, a cousin of the Queen Mother of England.

Address: Via Tuoro, 80076 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)

Place
Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro,” which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons. Today Villa Tuoro is the residence of Semiramis Zola and her husband John Lee, who bought it directly from Kenneth McPherson. Bowe-Lyons personally attended to the landscaping of the garden. On the ground floor, in the room where Douglas used to work, his writing desk and books are still in place. The windows here all look onto the garden, while as one mounts the stairs to the main floor, a panorama appears that stretches from Marina Piccola to the Certosa, and from Monte Solaro all the way to Ischia.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons (March 7, 1922 – November 17, 1993)
Kenneth Macpherson was born in Scotland, the son of Scottish painter, John “Pop” Macpherson and Clara Macpherson. Descended from 6 generations of artists, Macpherson was a novelist, photographer, critic and film-maker. His 1930 film, “Borderline,” is now vey much part of the curriculum in the study of modern cinematography today. In his work with the Pool Group (1927–1933), which he co-founded with Bryher and HD, Macpherson also established the influential film journal, Close Up. Macpherson’s story began in 1927, when he married English writer, Annie Winifred Ellerman, (known as Bryher in the literary world), the daughter of a British shipping magnate. Bryher’s inherited fortune would help to finance Macpherson’s projects. Although Bryher’s and Macpherson’s marriage lasted for twenty years, for much of the marriage, both Macpherson and Bryher had extra-marital affairs. Bryher was lesbian but Macpherson was distinctly bi-sexual. A sexual partner, common to both Bryher and Macpherson, was the American poet, Hilda Doolittle (known in literary circles as "HD.”) Doolittle had been a close friend of Bryher’s since 1921. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle, who brought along her 9-year-old daughter, Perdita. (Perdita’s father was Cecil Gray, the Scottish music critic and composer.) In 1928, Doolittle had a sexual relationship with Macpherson, becoming pregnant by him. The pregnancy would be aborted later that year. In the same year, Macpherson and Bryher formally adopted Perdita, registering her name as Frances Perdita Macpherson. In September 1931, Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build. After spending a few months in New York in 1935, Macpherson eventually based himself there to focus on writing, photography and his art collection. In 1947, Macpherson returned from America, spending much of his time in Switzerland and Italy. Bryher supported her husband and his friend, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons, on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the ageing Norman Douglas, the Scottish novelist. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas’s death in 1952, writing an epitaph for his gravestone, “Omnes Eodem Cogimur,” “Where we all must gather.” Macpherson then moved to Rome, and then, in 1965, he “retired” to Tuscany and then Thailand. Macpherson died in Cetona on June 14, 1971, leaving everything, including his inheritance from Douglas, to De Courcy Lyons. Lyons died on 1November 7, 1993, in Chiang-Mai (Mueang Chiang Mai District, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand). Following Lyons’s death, his heir, Manop Charoensuk, arranged for publication of a volume of Lyons’s photographs.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906692
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Buried: Lewes Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Lewes, Sussex County, Delaware, USA
Buried alongside: Joseph V. Hayward
Find A Grave Memorial# 89367928

Cemetery: From the few info you can find, Joseph V. Hayward (1918-1965) and Lester Welch Webb (1919-1985) were not relatives, nevertheless they are buried together at Lewes Presbyterian Church Cemetery (133 Kings Hwy, Lewes, DE 19958) with twin tombstone even if Lester died 20 years after Joseph.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Michael George Schofield was a pioneer of social research into homosexuality in the 1950s and 1960s, and a campaigner for the Homosexual Law Reform Society at a time before the Sexual Offences Act 1967 ...
Born: June 24, 1919, Leeds, United Kingdom
Died: March 27, 2014
Lived: Belsize Park
Find A Grave Memorial# 173560440
Books: The Sexual Behaviour of Young People, more

Michael George Schofield (June 24, 1919 –March 27, 2014) was a pioneer of social research into homosexuality in the 1950s and 1960s, and a campaigner for the Homosexual Law Reform Society at a time before the Sexual Offences Act 1967 partially decriminalised homosexual activity in the UK. He played a prominent role in the law reform lobbies of the 1960s and 1970s. He is the author of many books including “Sociological Aspects of Homosexuality” (1965) and “The Sexual Behaviour of Young People” (1965). Schofield retired in 1985 from public life and lived with his partner (whom he met in 1952), Anthony Skyrme, in Belsize Park until his death in 2014.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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