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Natalie Clifford Barney was an American playwright, poet and novelist who lived as an expatriate in Paris.
Born: October 31, 1876, Dayton, Ohio, United States
Died: February 2, 1972, Paris, France
Lived: 4 Rue Chalgrin, 75116 Paris, France (48.87412, 2.28996)
20 Rue Jacob, 75006 Paris, France (48.85535, 2.33564)
1626 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, D.C.
97 Cadogan Gardens, SW3
Ban-y-Bryn, Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, Hancock County, Maine, USA (44.38761, -68.20391)
Buried: Cimetiere de Passy, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 9.
Buried alongside: Romaine Brooks
Parents: Alice Pike Barney
Nominations: Lambda Literary Award for Small Press Book Award
Anniversary: May 1, 1910
Married: June 20, 1918

Renée Vivien was a British poet who wrote in the French language. She took to heart all the mannerisms of Symbolism, as one of the last poets to claim allegiance to the school. Her compositions include sonnets, hendecasyllabic verse, and prose poetry. Upon inheriting her father's fortune at 21, she immigrated permanently to France. In Paris, Vivien's dress and lifestyle were as notorious among the bohemian set as was her verse. She lived lavishly, as an open lesbian, and carried on a well-known affair with American heiress and writer Natalie Clifford Barney. She also harbored a lifelong obsession with her closest childhood friend and neighbor, Violet Shillito – a relationship that remained unconsummated. In 1900, Vivien abandoned this chaste love, when the great romance with Natalie Barney ensued. The following year Shillito died of typhoid fever, a tragedy from which Vivien, guilt-ridden, would never fully recover. By 1901, the tempestuous and often jealous relationship with Natalie Barney had already collapsed. Vivien died in Paris on the morning of November 18, 1909, at the age of 32.
Together from (around) 1898 to 1901: 3 years.
Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 – February 2, 1972)
Pauline Mary Tarn aka Renée Vivien (June 11, 1877 – November 18, 1909)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Natalie Clifford Barney was a bilingual American playwright, poet and novelist who lived as an expatriate in Paris and ran a salon there for nearly fifty years, attracting the avant-garde of Modernism. She was the wealthy heiress of a railroad fortune. Élisabeth, Duchess of Clermont-Tonnerre, was a French writer, a descendant of Henry IV of France; when she was a child, according to Janet Flanner, "peasants on her farm begged her not to clean her shoes before entering their houses". They became lovers on May 1, 1910, a date that became their anniversary. In 1918, the two filed an "unofficial" but to them, binding "marriage contract": "After nine years of life together, joys and worries shared, and affairs confessed. For the survival of the bond, that we believe-and wish to believe-is unbreakable, since at its lowest level of reciprocal emotionalism that is the conclusion reached. The union, sorely tried by the passing years, failed doubly the faithfulness test in its sixth year, showing us that adultery is inevitable in these relationships where there is no prejudice, no religion other than feelings, no laws other than desire, incapable of vain sacrifices that seem to be the negation of life...“ Barney wrote in French about women’s same-sex desire and she was openly lesbian.
Together from 1910 to 1954: 44 years.
Antoinette Corisande Elisabeth de Gramont (Apr. 23, 1875 – Dec. 6, 1954)
Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 – February 2, 1972)
Anniversary: May 1, 1910 / Married: June 20, 1918



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Romaine Brooks was an American painter who worked mostly in Paris and Capri. The most important relationship of her life was with Natalie Clifford Barney, whom she met around the start of WW I. Barney was an American-born writer who hosted a literary salon in Paris. She was avowedly no monogamous; when they met, she was already in a close long-term relationship with Duchess Elisabeth de Gramont, which would last until the Duchess' death in 1954. Romaine had many other relationships of varying length and devotion as well but at one point, she gave Barney an ultimatum to choose between her and Dolly Wilde-relenting once Barney had given in. Her own lovers were Renata Borgatti, Marchesa Luisa Casati and Winnaretta Singer, Princesse Edmond de Polignac. Barney and Brooks are both buried at Cimetière de Passy, Paris, France, Barney in the same place with her sister Laura.
Together from 1914 to 1970: 56 years.
Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 – February 2, 1972)
Beatrice Romaine Goddard aka Romaine Brooks (May 1, 1874 – December 7, 1970)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Liane de Pougy was a Folies Bergères dancer renowned as one of Paris's most beautiful and notorious courtesans. Her lesbian affair with writer Natalie Clifford Barney is recorded in her novel Idylle Saphique (1901). In 1899, after seeing de Pougy at a dance hall in Paris, Barney presented herself at de Pougy's residence in a page costume and announced that she was a "page of love" sent by Sappho. Although de Pougy was one of the most famous women in France at the time, constantly sought after by wealthy and titled men, Barney's audacity charmed and seduced her. The two were said to have had deep feelings for each other for the remainder of their lives. One of Barney’s most compelling works, Amants féminins ou la troisième (1926) is based on a tumultuous three-way love affair between Barney, Italian baroness Mimi Franchetti (one of Renata Borgatti’s lovers), and de Pougy. Liane married two time, at 16 with a naval officer, Armand Pourpe (one son, Marc Pourpe), and in 1910 with Prince Georges Ghika. Her son's death as an aviator in WWI turned her towards religion and she became a tertiary of the Order of Saint Dominic as Sister Anne-Mary.
They met in 1899 and remained friends until de Pougy’s death in 1950: 51 years.
Liane de Pougy (July 2, 1869 – December 26, 1950)
Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 - February 2, 1972)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Lucie was a French journalist, poet, novelist, sculptor, historian and designer. She was a prolific writer who produced more than 70 books. She was married to the translator J. C. Mardrus from 1900 to 1915, but her primary sexual orientation was toward women. She was involved in affairs with several women throughout her lifetime, and she wrote extensively of lesbian love. In 1902-03, she wrote a series of love poems to the American writer and salon hostess Natalie Clifford Barney, published posthumously in 1957 as Nos secrètes amours (Our Secret Loves). She also depicted Barney in her 1930 novel, L'Ange et les Pervers (The Angel and the Perverts), in which she said she "analyzed and described Natalie at length as well as the life into which she initiated me". The protagonist of the novel is a hermaphrodite named Marion who lives a double life, frequenting literary salons in female dress, then changing from skirt to trousers to attend gay soirées. Barney appears as "Laurette Wells", a salon hostess who spends much of the novel trying to win back an ex-lover, loosely based on Barney's real-life attempts at regaining her relationship with her former lover, Renée Vivien.
Lucie Delarue-Mardrus (November 3, 1874 - April 26, 1945)
Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 - February 2, 1972)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Natalie Clifford Barney lived at 1626 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington DC in her childhood. She knew she was a lesbian by age twelve and lived an outspoken and independent life unusual for a woman of this time period. Her openness and pride about her sexuality, without shame, was at least 100 years ahead of its time. She published "Some Portrait-Sonnets of Women," a book of love poems to women, under her own name in 1900. American painter Romaine Brooks was one of Barney's partners and companions for fifty years.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Bar Harbor is a town on Mount Desert Island in Hancock County, Maine. As of the 2010 census, its population is 5,235.
Address: Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, Hancock County, Maine, USA (44.38761, -68.20391)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: West Street Historic District (West St. between Billings Ave. and Eden St.), 80000226, 1980, & Harbor Lane--Eden Street Historic District (Portions of Harbor Ln. and Eden St.), 09000550, 2009
Place
Louise DeKoven Bowen, Mrs. J.T. Bowen of Chicago, friend and patroness of Jane Addams, built his summer home, Baymeath, at Bar Harbor in 1896. Baymeath was a southern colonial house four miles from Bar Harbor Village. It was situated on a hillside from which a series of terraces led down to the bay. One of these, formerly a tennis court, was a formal garden enclosed by vine-covered stone walls on two sides and high fences with actinidia on the other two. Beyond the house, another lattice-enclosed garden stood with a rose bed. Climbing roses covered all the fences. Another rose arbor led into the woods where lupine, day lilies, and wild roses grew. From all these gardens, a wide view of Frenchman’s Bay added contrast to the color of the northern flowers. The house was razed in 1979. Near Baymeath, on Lookout Point in Hull’s Cove, was a cottage called Yule Craig, designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston for the son of Senator Yulee of Florida. In 1904, the house was purchased by Mrs. Bowen’s friend, Jane Addams. A half mile path connected Baymeath and Yule Craig, and there was much visiting back and forth, as Mrs. Bowen was one of the chief supporters of Jane Addams’s Hull House Settlement in Chicago, and donor of the Bowen Country Club. Miss Addams once famously said that she could raise more money in a single month in Bar Harbor than all the rest of the year back home in Chicago. Jane Addams sold the house in 1932 to Harry Hill Thorndikes, which renamed it Thorncraig. Mrs. Thorndike’s sister, Miss Belle Gurnee, owned the property between Yule Craig and Baymeath, a large chalet built in Switzerland and imported to her property on Lookout Point. Thorncraig was inherited by the Thorndike’s son, Augustus Gurnee Thorndike, and was later purchased by John J. Emery. Emery’s aunt was married to Benjamin Moore, brother-in-law of Mrs. Moore who later owned Baymeath. Thorncraig proved to have notoriously irresolvable plumbing troubles, and was demolished in the early 1980’s. Another famous queer resident at Bar Harbor was Natalie Clifford Barney. Alice Pike Barney (1857-1931) was an artist, actor, playwright, and socialite. The daughter of Cincinnati millionaire and patron of the arts Samuel Napthali Pike, Alice was born into a life of privilege. She married Albert Clifford Barney, son of a wealthy manufacturer of railway cars, prior to her twentieth birthday. The Barney’s had two daughters, Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972) and Laura Clifford Barney (1879-1974.) The family split their time between New York City and Paris, France, until 1900, when they purchased a home in Washington, DC. Well aware of the steamy summers of the eastern United States, the Barney’s would vacation in Bar Harbor, Maine, and in 1888, commissioned a "summer cottage" in Bar Harbor they named "Ban-y-Bryn." Designed by Architect S. V. Stratton, Ban-y-Bryn was built on a steep bluff, with the front of the cottage facing the rustic Maine landscape. The rear of the home, with its prominent turret and several grand porches, overlooked Frenchman’s Bay. Rising to four stories, the home consisted of 27 rooms, including seven bedrooms, five bathrooms, five fireplaces, a large stable, seven servants’ bedrooms, and additional servants’ facilities. The top floor was reserved as studio space for Ms. Barney and her artistic pursuits. Ban-y-Bryn’s exterior was constructed of granite. The interior featured exotic hardwoods and materials, and was furnished with antiques acquired by the Barney’s during their global travels. Ban-y-Bryn was one of their many luxuries; interest in the home began to fade as their respective pursuits and tastes evolved over time. The Barney’s sold their marvelous summer dwelling in 1930. Sadly, Ban-y-Bryn was one of 67 summer cottages incinerated in the Bar Harbor fire of October 1947.
Life
Who: Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) and Mary Rozet Smith (1868-1934)
Mary Rozet Smith was a Chicago-born US philanthropist who was one of the trustees and benefactors of Hull House. She was the companion of activist Jane Addams for over thirty years. Smith provided the financing for the Hull House Music School and donated the school’s organ as a memorial to her mother. There has been much speculation of Addams and Smith’s life and relationship. Many of their letters were burned by Addams, but Addams referred to their relationship as a "marriage.” They traveled together, co-owned a home in Maine, and were committed to each other. In 1895, after Addams had suffered from a bout with typhoid fever, she went abroad with Smith, traveling to London. There, they visited several settlement houses, including Oxford House, Browning House, Bermondsey Settlement and others. They proceeded on to Moscow and met Tolstoy, then traveled through southern Russia, into Poland and Germany, before returning to Chicago. Early in 1934, Addams had a heart attack and Smith nursed her at her home, neglecting her own illness. Smith succumbed to pneumonia, fell into a coma and then died on February 22, 1934. Addams was considered too ill to descend the stairs to attend Smith’s memorial service, which she could hear from her second-floor room. Addams died on May 21, 1935.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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As young adults in Paris, Natalie Clifford Barney and Eva Palmer-Sikelianos shared an apartment at 4, rue Chalgrin.
Address: 4 Rue Chalgrin, 75116 Paris, France (48.87412, 2.28996)
Type: Private Property
Place
It was during the family’s summer vacations at Bar Harbor in Maine that Eva Palmer became acquainted with Natalie Barney. The two shared an interest in poetry, literature and horseback riding. Barney likened Palmer to a medieval virgin, an homage to her ankle-length red hair and fair countenance. The two would become young lovers and later be neighbors in Paris. Rue Chalgrin is a street in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, in the neighborhood of Chaillot. Named after Jean-François-Thérèse Chalgrin (1739-1811), architect of the Arc de Triomphe and the church of Saint-Philippe du Roule (in the 8th arrondissement.)
Life
Who: Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 – February 2, 1972) and Evelina "Eva" Palmer-Sikelianos (January 9, 1874 – June 4, 1952)
Eva Palmer-Sikelianos was an American woman notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music. Palmer’s life and artistic endeavors intersected with numerous noteworthy artists throughout her life. She was both inspired by or inspired the likes of dancers Isadora Duncan and Ted Shawn, the French literary great Colette, the poet and author Natalie Barney and the actress Sarah Bernhardt. She would go on to marry Angelos Sikelianos, a Greek poet and playwright. Together they organized a revival of the Delphic Festival in Delphi, Greece. Embodied in these festivals of art, music and theater she hoped to promote a balanced sense of enlightenment that would further the goals of peace and harmony in Greece and beyond.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Natalie Clifford Barney’s salon was held at her home at 20 rue Jacob in Paris’ Left Bank for more than 60 years and brought together writers and artists from around the world, including many leading figures in French literature along with American and British Modernists of the Lost Generation.
Address: 20 Rue Jacob, 75006 Paris, France (48.85535, 2.33564)
Type: Private Property
Place
The play “Equivoque” may have led Natalie Barney to leave Neuilly in 1909. According to a contemporary newspaper article, her landlord objected to her holding an outdoor performance of a play about Sappho, which he felt "followed nature too closely.” She canceled her lease and rented the pavilion at 20, Rue Jacob in Paris’ Latin Quarter and her salon was held there until the late 1960s. This was a small two-story house, separated on three sides from the main building on the street. Next to the pavillon was a large, overgrown garden with a Doric "Temple of Friendship" tucked into one corner. In this new location, the salon grew a more prim outward face, with poetry readings and conversation, perhaps because Barney had been told the pavillon’s floors would not hold up to large dancing parties. Frequent guests during this period included Pierre Louÿs, Paul Claudel, Philippe Berthelot and translator J. C. Mardrus. During WWI the salon became a haven for those opposed to the war. Henri Barbusse once gave a reading from his anti-war novel “Under Fire” and Barney hosted a Women’s Congress for Peace at the Rue Jacob. Other visitors to the salon during the war included Oscar Milosz, Auguste Rodin and poet Alan Seeger, who came while on leave from the French Foreign Legion. Other visitors to the salon during the 1920s included French writers Jeanne Galzy, André Gide, Anatole France, Max Jacob, Louis Aragon and Jean Cocteau along with English-language writers Ford Madox Ford, W. Somerset Maugham, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sinclair Lewis, Sherwood Anderson, Thornton Wilder, T. S. Eliot and William Carlos Williams and moreover, German poet Rainer Maria Rilke, Bengali poet Rabindranath Tagore (the first Nobel laureate from Asia), Romanian aesthetician and diplomat Matila Ghyka, journalist Janet Flanner (who set the New Yorker style), journalist, activist and publisher Nancy Cunard, publishers Caresse and Harry Crosby, art collector and patron Peggy Guggenheim, Sylvia Beach (the bookstore owner who published James Joyce’s “Ulysses”), painters Tamara de Lempicka and Marie Laurencin and dancer Isadora Duncan. In the late 1920s Radclyffe Hall drew a crowd after her novel “The Well of Loneliness” had been banned in the UK. A reading by poet Edna St. Vincent Millay packed the salon in 1932. At another Friday salon in the 1930s Virgil Thomson sang from “Four Saints in Three Acts,” an opera based on a libretto by Gertrude Stein.
Note: Rue de Seine is a street in the 6th arrondissement of Paris. The Hotel La Louisiane at 60 rue de Seine is famous for having accommodated many notable jazz musicians and writers, including Miles Davis, Chet Baker, John Coltrane, Ernest Hemingway, Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. Amantine-Lucile-Aurore Dupin known as "George Sand", French novelist known for her numerous affairs with celebrities including Frederic Chopin, lived at number 52 Rue de Seine. From 1868 to 1876, George Sand rented 5 Rue Gay-Lussac, Val-de-Grace, for her stays in Paris.
Life
Who: Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 – February 2, 1972)
Natalie Clifford Barney was an American playwright, poet and novelist who lived as an expatriate in Paris. In November, 1899 Barney met the poet Pauline Tarn, better known by her pen name Renée Vivien. For Vivien it was love at first sight, while Barney became fascinated with Vivien after hearing her recite one of her poems, which she described as "haunted by the desire for death." In 1908 Vivien attempted suicide by overdosing on laudanum and died the following year. In a memoir written fifty years later Barney said "She could not be saved. Her life was a long suicide. Everything turned to dust and ashes in her hands." Barney had become more widely known for her many relationships than for her writing or her salon. She once wrote out a list, divided into three categories: liaisons, demi-liaisons, and adventures. Colette was a demi-liaison, while the artist and furniture designer Eyre de Lanux was listed as an adventure. Among the liaisons were Olive Custance, Renée Vivien, Elisabeth de Gramont, Romaine Brooks, and Dolly Wilde. Of these, the three longest relationships were with de Gramont, Brooks, and Wilde; from 1927, she was involved with all three of them simultaneously, a situation that ended only with Wilde’s death. Her shorter affairs, such as those with Colette and Lucie Delarue-Mardrus, often evolved into lifelong friendships.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Cadogan Square is a residential square in Knightsbridge, west London, that was named after Earl Cadogan. Whilst it is mainly a residential area, some of the properties are used for diplomatic and educational purposes. The square is known for being one of the most expensive residential streets in the United Kingdom, with an average house price of around £5.75 million in 2013.
Address: Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RJ, UK
Type: Private Property
Place
The square was built between 1877 and 1888. The west side has the greatest variety of houses, all variations on the same Flemish-influenced theme. Numbers 54-58 were designed by William Young in 1877 for Lord Cadogan, and the architect J. J. Stevenson was largely responsible for the south side, built in 1879-85. The east side was built in 1879 by G. T. Robinson. Number 61 is an early example of high-class mansion flats, and number 61A was once a studio-house for a Mr F. W. Lawson. Cadogan Square is one of the most desirable residential addresses in London and is one of the most expensive in the United Kingdom. It is formed of a garden (restricted to residents) surrounded by red-brick houses, the majority of which have been converted into flats or apartments. The square is south of Pont Street, east of Lennox Gardens, and west of Sloane Street. An independent preparatory school for boys, Sussex House School, at number 68, was founded in 1953. The school is sited in a house by architect Norman Shaw. Apartments or flats tend to be available on short leases and are sold for several million pounds. There are three or so houses on the square that have not been converted into flats, and these may be valued at over £25 million each. The freeholder of most of the properties is Earl Cadogan, a multi-billionaire whose family has owned the land for several hundred years. Numbers 4 (by G.E Street), 52, 62 and 62b, 68 and 72 are all Grade II listed buildings. Writer Arnold Bennet lived at number 75 during the 1920s. On July 25, 1899, at Holy Trinity Church, Sloane Street, Cadogan Square, in London, Adolph de Meyer married Donna Olga Caracciolo, an Italian noblewoman who had been divorced earlier that year from Nobile Marino Brancaccio; she was a goddaughter of Edward VII.
Notable queer residents at Cadogan Gardens:
• From 1898 to 1913 Adolph de Meyer (1868-1946) lived in fashionable 1 Cadogan Gardens, SW3 and between 1903 and 1907 his work was published in Alfred Stieglitz’s quarterly Camera Work.
• Sir Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999) lived from 1991 to 1999 and died at 2 Cadogan Gardens, SW3.
• Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972), US born one-time lover of Oscar Wilde’s niece, Dolly Wilde, and origin of the character Valerie Seymour in “The Well of Loneliness,” lived at 97 Cadogan Gardens, SW3 in the 1920s.
• Edward Sackville-West (1901-1965) was born at 105 Cadogan Gardens, SW3 the elder child and only son of Major-General Charles John Sackville-West, who later became the fourth Baron Sackville, and his first wife, Maud Cecilia, née Bell (1873–1920.)
• In 1907 at the Homburg spa in Germany, Radclyffe Hall met Mabel Batten (1856-1916), a well-known amateur singer of lieder. Batten (nicknamed "Ladye") was 51 to Hall's 27, and was married with an adult daughter and grandchildren. They fell in love, and after Batten's husband died they set up residence together at 59 Cadogan Square, SW1X. Batten gave Hall the nickname John, which she used the rest of her life. In 1915 Hall fell in love with Mabel Batten's cousin Una Troubridge (1887–1963), a sculptor who was the wife of Vice-Admiral Ernest Troubridge, and the mother of a young daughter. Batten died the following year, and in 1917 Radclyffe Hall and Una Troubridge began living together at 22 Cadogan Court, Draycott Avenue, SW3, a move Radclyffe originally planned to do with Mabel Batten. The relationship would last until Hall's death.
• On April 5, 1895, Oscar Wilde was arrested in room 118 of the upscale Edwardian Cadogan Hotel (now Belmond Cadogan Hotel, 75 Sloane Street, SW1X) on a charge of "gross indecency" stemming from his homosexual relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas. Friends had urged Wilde to flee the country once word of his impending arrest leaked out, but Wilde was resolute, saying, "I shall stay and do my sentence, whatever it is." The poet-dramatist was sentenced to two years imprisonment with hard labor, a cruel punishment that was to signal the beginning of the end for Wilde's brightly shining star. The arrest was immortalized by English poet laureate, John Betjeman, in his poem "The Arrest of Oscar Wilde at the Cadogan Hotel."
Life
Who: Baron Adolph de Meyer (September 1, 1868 – January 6, 1946) and Olga, the Baroness de Meyer (August 8, 1871 – 1930/1931)
Baron Adolph de Meyer was a photographer famed for his elegant photographic portraits in the early XX century, many of which depicted celebrities such as Mary Pickford, Rita Lydig, Luisa Casati, Billie Burke, Irene Castle, John Barrymore, Lillian Gish, Ruth St. Denis, King George V of the United Kingdom, and Queen Mary. He was also the first official fashion photographer for the American magazine Vogue, appointed to that position in 1913. In 1899 he married Donna Olga Caracciolo. The couple reportedly met in 1897, at the home of a member of the Sassoon banking family, and Olga would be the subject of many of her husband’s photographs. The de Meyers’ marriage was one of marriage of convenience rather than romantic love, since the groom was homosexual and the bride was bisexual or lesbian. As Baron de Meyer wrote in an unpublished autobiographical novel, before they wed, he explained to Olga "the real meaning of love shorn of any kind of sensuality.” He continued by observing, "Marriage based too much on love and unrestrained passion has rarely a chance to be lasting, whilst perfect understanding and companionship, on the contrary, generally make the most durable union." The de Meyers were characterised by Violet Trefusis—who counted Olga among her lovers and whose mother, Alice Keppel, was Edward VII’s best known mistress—as "Pederaste and Médisante" because, as Trefusis observed, "He looked so queer and she had such a vicious tongue." Among Olga’s affairs was one with Winnaretta, Princess Edmond de Polignac, the Singer sewing machine heiress and arts patron, in the years 1901–05. Cecil Beaton dubbed Adolph de Maeye "the Debussy of photography.” In 1912 he photographed Nijinsky in Paris. After the death of his wife in 1930/31, Baron de Meyer became romantically involved with a young German, Ernest Frohlich (born circa 1914), whom he hired as his chauffeur and later adopted as his son. The latter went by the name Baron Ernest Frohlich de Meyer.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Passy Cemetery is a cemetery in Passy, in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, France.
Address: 2 Rue du Commandant Schloesing, 75016 Paris, France (48.8625, 2.28528)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 53 70 40 80
Place
The current cemetery replaced the old cemetery (l’ancien cimetière communal de Passy, located on Rue Lekain), which was closed in 1802. The current entrance was built in 1934 (designed by René Berger.) The retaining wall of the cemetery is adorned with a bas relief (by Louis Janthial) commemorating the soldiers who fell in the Great War.
Notable queer burials at Passy:
• Renée Vivien (June 11, 1877 –November 18, 1909), writer, poet. She was interred at Passy Cemetery in the same exclusive Parisian neighbourhood where she had lived.
• Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972) and Romaine Brooks (1874-1970) are both buried at Cimetière de Passy, Barney in the same place with her sister Laura.
• Romaine Brooks (1874-1970), painter. In 1915 Brooks met and fell in love with the writer and salon patroness Natalie Barney, and they began a relationship that would last for fifty years.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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