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George Norman Douglas was a British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. His travel books such as his 1915 Old Calabria were also appreciated for the quality of their writing.
Born: December 8, 1868, Thüringen, Austria
Died: February 7, 1952, Capri
Education: Uppingham School
Lived: 63 Albany Mansions, Albert Bridge Road, Battersea
Villa Tuoro, Via Tuoro, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)
Buried: Protestant Cemetery, Capri, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy
People also search for: Ngaire Douglas, Michael Allan, more

George Norman Douglas was a British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro", which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Coucy Lyons. Bryher, Macpherson’s wife, supported her husband and his friend on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the aging Douglas. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas's death in 1952, writing an epitaph for Douglas, from which the Latin inscription, on Douglas's gravestone, is derived (Omnes Eodem Cogimur = "We are all driven to the same end" (i.e., death)). Douglas’s last words apparently were: "Get those fucking nuns away from me." Macpherson was Douglas’s heir, and upon his death, everything went to Islay Lyons.
They met in 1931 and remained friends until Douglas’s death in 1952: 21 years.
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 – June 14, 1971)
Norman Douglas (December 8, 1868 - February 7, 1952)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 63 Albany Mansions, Albert Bridge Road, Battersea, Norman Douglas (1868-1952), “Writer, lived here.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Villa Tuoro is forever linked to the figure of Scots writer Norman Douglas, who lived here from the post-war period up until the time of his death in 1952. During those years, the house was the property of his great friend Kenneth McPherson. McPherson went on living there until 1957 together with Islay Bowe-Lyons, a cousin of the Queen Mother of England.
Address: Via Tuoro, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)
Type: Private Property
Place
Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro,” which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons. Today Villa Tuoro is the residence of Semiramis Zola and her husband John Lee, who bought it directly from Kenneth McPherson. Bowe-Lyons personally attended to the landscaping of the garden. On the ground floor, in the room where Douglas used to work, his writing desk and books are still in place. The windows here all look onto the garden, while as one mounts the stairs to the main floor, a panorama appears that stretches from Marina Piccola to the Certosa, and from Monte Solaro all the way to Ischia.
Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons (1922-1993)
Kenneth Macpherson was born in Scotland, the son of Scottish painter, John “Pop” Macpherson and Clara Macpherson. Descended from 6 generations of artists, Macpherson was a novelist, photographer, critic and film-maker. His 1930 film, “Borderline,” is now vey much part of the curriculum in the study of modern cinematography today. In his work with the Pool Group (1927–1933), which he co-founded with Bryher and HD, Macpherson also established the influential film journal, Close Up. Macpherson’s story began in 1927, when he married English writer, Annie Winifred Ellerman, (known as Bryher in the literary world), the daughter of a British shipping magnate. Bryher’s inherited fortune would help to finance Macpherson’s projects. Although Bryher’s and Macpherson’s marriage lasted for twenty years, for much of the marriage, both Macpherson and Bryher had extra-marital affairs. Bryher was lesbian but Macpherson was distinctly bi-sexual. A sexual partner, common to both Bryher and Macpherson, was the American poet, Hilda Doolittle (known in literary circles as "HD.”) Doolittle had been a close friend of Bryher’s since 1921. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle, who brought along her 9-year-old daughter, Perdita. (Perdita’s father was Cecil Gray, the Scottish music critic and composer.) In 1928, Doolittle had a sexual relationship with Macpherson, becoming pregnant by him. The pregnancy would be aborted later that year. In the same year, Macpherson and Bryher formally adopted Perdita, registering her name as Frances Perdita Macpherson. In September, 1931, Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build. After spending a few months in New York in 1935, Macpherson eventually based himself there to focus on writing, photography and his art collection. In 1947, Macpherson returned from America, spending much of his time in Switzerland and Italy. Bryher supported her husband and his friend, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons, on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the ageing Norman Douglas, the Scottish novelist. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas’s death in 1952, writing an epitaph for his gravestone, “Omnes Eodem Cogimur,” “Where we all must gather.” Macpherson then moved to Rome, and then, in 1965, he “retired” to Tuscany and then Thailand. Macpherson died in Cetona on June 14, 1971, leaving everything, including his inheritance from Douglas, to De Courcy Lyons. Lyons died on November 17, 1993, in Chiang-Mai, Thailand. Following Lyons’s death, his heir, Manop Charoensuk, arranged for publication of a volume of Lyons’s photographs.


Nancy Cunard and Norman Douglas, Villa Tuoro in Capri March 1953

Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Cimitero acattolico di Capri is a non-Catholic cemetery on the island of Capri. Established in 1878 by Englishman George Hayward, it contains 204 graves from a total of 21 different nations.
Address: Via Marina Grande, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.55153, 14.23452)
Type: Cimetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 081 838 6111
Place
Most of the people buried in the cemetery are of English,. German, Russian or American nationality. Aside from Protestants, also buried in the cemetery are people professing the Catholic religion (such as Anglicans, Jews, Orthodox). Notable interments include French Baron Jacques d'Adelsward-Fersen, Lucio Amelio, Günter Ammon, Gracie Fields, Norman Douglas and Jakob Johann von Uexküll. After WWII, the cemetery saw a period of great neglect, which ended in 1986 when the Municipality of Capri ensured the preservation and restoration of the cemetery graves.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero acattolico di Capri:
• Jacques d'Adelsward-Fersen (1880-1923), French novelist and poet. His life forms the basis of a fictionalised biography by Roger Peyrefitte.
• Norman Douglas (December 8, 1868-February 7, 1952), British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. His travel books such as his 1915 Old Calabria were also appreciated for the quality of their writing.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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