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Georgette Leblanc was a French operatic soprano, actress, author, and the sister of novelist Maurice Leblanc. She became particularly associated with the works of Jules Massenet and was an admired interpreter of the title role in Bizet's Carmen.
Born: February 8, 1869, Rouen, France
Died: October 27, 1941, Le Cannet, France
Lived: Tancarville Lighthouse, 4 route du Havre, 76430 Tancarville, France (49.47756, 0.46687)
Buried: Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery, Le Cannet, Departement des Alpes-Maritimes, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Buried alongside: Margaret Anderson
Movies: L'Inhumaine, Macbeth
Books: The children's Blue bird
Siblings: Maurice Leblanc

Margaret Anderson was the American founder, editor and publisher of the art and literary magazine The Little Review. In 1916, Anderson met Jane Heap, a spirited intellectual and artist immersed in the Chicago Arts and Crafts Movement, and a former lesbian lover to novelist Djuna Barnes. The two became lovers, and Anderson convinced her to become co-editor of The Little Review. Georgette Leblanc was a French operatic soprano, actress, author, and the sister of novelist Maurice Leblanc. Leblanc was the lover of Maurice Maeterlinck, and he wrote several parts for her. She was also a close friend of fellow Gurdjieff’s student Anderson and some scholars speculate the two may have been lovers during the last 15 years of Leblanc's life. By 1942, Anderson’s relationship with Heap had cooled, and Anderson sailed for the United States. With her passage paid by Ernest Hemingway, Anderson met on the voyage Dorothy Caruso, widow of the singer and famous tenor Enrico Caruso. The two began a romantic relationship, and lived together until Caruso's death in 1955. Anderson died in 1973 and is buried beside Georgette Leblanc in the Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery.
Together from 1926 to 1941: 15 years.
Georgette Leblanc (February 8, 1869 – October 27, 1941)
Margaret Caroline Anderson (November 24, 1886 – October 19, 1973)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

After Jane Heap moved to London, Margaret Anderson moved in the Tancarville Lighthouse for many years living with the French singer Georgette Leblanc, Anderson’s sister Lois and Lois’s daughter Linda Card.
Address: 4 route du Havre, 76430 Tancarville, France (49.47756, 0.46687)
Type: Administrative building (open to public)
Place
Built in 1838
Inactive since 1868, the Tancarville Lighthouse is a 10 m (30 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one end of a 2-story keeper's house. The Lighthouse and entire building are painted in white. Long in use as a private residence, the house has been expanded and altered from its original appearance. Located on a bluff on the north side of the Seine just east of the Tancarville bridge (E-05), about 30 km (19 mi) west of Le Havre.
Life
Who: Georgette Leblanc (February 8, 1869 – October 27, 1941)
Georgette Leblanc was born in Tancarville. Sister of the writer Maurice Leblanc, she grew up in a literary climate exaltation shines through in the course of his life. Noticed by Massenet, she debuted in 1893 at the Opera-Comique in the role of Françoise in “L’Attaque du moulin” by Bruneau, but abandoned in 1894 the Parisian scene for the Theatre de la Monnaie, emigrating in Brussels hoping to met her idol, Maurice Maeterlinck. On the sidelines of their romantic idyll, she managed to forge with him a working relationship and played “Carmen” in 1895, “Thais” and “La Navarraise” by Massenet the following year. Back to Paris, where she introduced her companion, she performed in the lieder recitals of Schubert and Schumann (translated by Maeterlinck), played “Sappho” by Gounod at the Opera-Comique in 1897 and the following year inaugurated the new “Salle Favart” in the role of Carmen. In 1902 Debussy preferred Mary Garden for the role of Mélisande that Leblanc will sing at the Opera Boston (led by A. Caplet). Meanwhile, she was in “Ariane” and “Barbe-bleue” by Dukas (Opera-Comique, 1907). She was in “L’Oiseau Blue” by A. Wolff (Met, 1919). She made lectures on the works of Maeterlinck and took part in theatrical production of his plays: “Monna Vanna” (1903), “Marie-Magdalene” (1913), “Pelléas et Mélisande” (Sarah Bernhardt playing Pelléas). During a trip to the United States she met with Helen Keller and she disclosed the Keller’s extraordinary history in Europe by publishing between 1912 and 1914 two books in English: “The Girl Who Found the Blue Bird: A Visit to Helen Keller” and “Man's Miracle, the Story of Helen Keller and her European Sisters.” After the breakup with Maeterlinck in 1918, Georgette Leblanc acquired the Tancarville Lighthouse, where she lived with her partner Margaret Anderson (1886-1973), author and publisher, American native of Indianapolis. Both were members of "La Cordée" (The Rope), a Sapphic group formed and led by the guru George Gurdjieff in 1935. Seriously ill, she moved to Le Cannet in the French Riviera in 1940, dying in 1941.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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After much suffering from emphysema, Margaret Anderson died of heart failure in 1973 at the Clinique Beausoleil in Cannes; she was buried in Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery besides Georgette Leblanc.
Address: Rue de l’Ouest, 06110 Le Cannet, France (43.57218, 7.01507)
Type: Religious Building (open to public)
Phone: +33 4 93 46 28 68
Place
After her companion Jane Heap left for London to lead Gurdjieff study groups, Anderson stayed in France and continued working with Gurdjieff, bringing two of her companions (Georgette Leblanc and Dorothy Caruso) and even Leblanc’s salt-of-the-earth housekeeper, Mathilde Serrure, into The Rope as well. She published three volumes of her own autobiography (“My Thirty Years War,” “The Fiery Fountains,” and “The Strange Necessity”), as well as her own account of the Rope years, “The Unknowable Gurdjieff.” The first volume of Georgette Leblanc autobiography was translated into English by Janet Flanner; the second, “La Machine à Courage,” deals with her impressions of Gurdjieff and her long battle with cancer, to which she succumbed in 1941, being the first of the Rope to die. Leblanc decided to move from Tancarville in the north to Le Cannet, where friends found her a modest little house, “Le Chalet Rose”. She moved there in Feb. 1940 with her two friends, Mathilde Serrure and Margaret Anderson. Georgette Leblanc died at Le Cannet, Alpes-Maritimes in 1941 and was buried in the Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery, and Mathilde Serrure and Margaret Anderson, who died later, are buried with her. Dorothy Caruso, widow of Enrico Caruso, became Anderson’s companion after Leblanc’s death and describes her latter-day acquaintance with Gurdjieff in her autobiography, “A Personal History.” After Gurdjieff’s death Anderson and Caruso moved back to United States, where Caruso died of cancer in 1955. Anderson then returned to southern France, where Mathilde Serrure lived with her until she died at the age of 90 in 1968. Anderson herself died there in the village of Le Cannet in 1973. Both of them are buried beside Georgette Leblanc.
Life
Who: Georgette Leblanc (February 8, 1869 - October 27, 1941) and Margaret Caroline Anderson (November 24, 1886 – October 19, 1973)
Georgette Leblanc was a French operatic soprano, actress, author, and the sister of novelist Maurice Leblanc. For many years Leblanc was the lover of Belgian playwright and writer Maurice Maeterlinck, and he wrote several parts for her within his stage plays. After her relationship with Maeterlinck ended, Leblanc remained active on the stage within his plays throughout the 1920s, although her singing career was pretty much over. She had a number of romantic relationships with high profile individuals during the 1920s and 1930s. For a brief time she was involved with Greco-Armenian mystic G. I. Gurdjieff. She was also a close friend of fellow Gurdjieff student Margaret Anderson and some scholars speculate the two may have been lovers during the last fifteen years of Leblanc’s life. Margaret Anderson was the American founder, editor and publisher of the art and literary magazine The Little Review, which published a collection of modern American, English and Irish writers between 1914 and 1929. In 1916, Anderson met Jane Heap, a spirited intellectual and artist immersed in the Chicago Arts and Crafts Movement, and a former lover to novelist Djuna Barnes. The two became lovers, and Anderson convinced her to become co-editor of The Little Review. Heap maintained a low profile, signing her contributions simply "jh,” but she had a major impact on the success of the journal through its bold and radical content. In early 1924, through Alfred Richard Orage, Anderson came to know of spiritual teacher George Ivanovitch Gurdjieff, and saw performances of his “Sacred dances,” first at the “Neighbourhood Playhouse,” and later at Carnegie Hall. Shortly after Gurdjieff’s automobile accident, Anderson, along with Georgette Leblanc, Jane Heap and Mathilde Serrure, moved to France to visit him at Fountainebleau-Avon, where he had set up his institute at Château du Prieuré in Avon. Anderson and Heap adopted the two sons of Anderson’s ailing sister, Lois. They brought Lois and sons Tom and Arthur “Fritz” Peters to Prieuré in June, 1924. After they returned to New York in 1925, two of the boys were taken in by Alice B. Toklas and Gertrude Stein. Later, Anderson moved to France to live in the Tancarville Lighthouse for many years with the French singer Georgette Leblanc and Lois and her daughter Linda Card. Leblanc died in 1941. By 1942 Anderson’s relationship with Heap had cooled, and, evacuating from the war in France, Anderson sailed for the United States. Jane Heap had moved to London in 1935, where she led Gurdjieff study groups until her death in 1964. With her passage paid by Ernest Hemingway, Anderson met on the voyage Dorothy Caruso, widow of the singer and famous tenor Enrico Caruso. The two began a romantic relationship, and lived together until Caruso’s death in 1955. Jane Heap died in London in 1964 and is buried at East Finchley, London Borough of Barnet. Anderson returned to Le Cannet after Caruso’s death, and there she died of emphysema on October 19, 1973. She is buried beside Georgette Leblanc in the Notre Dame des Anges Cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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