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Susan Brownell Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement.
Born: February 15, 1820, Adams, Massachusetts, United States
Died: March 13, 1906, Rochester, New York, United States
Lived: Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum, 67 East Road, Adams, MA 01220, USA (42.61546, -73.10229)
Susan B. Anthony Childhood House, 2835 NY 29, Battenville, NY 12834, USA (43.11053, -73.42311)
Susan B. Anthony House, 17 Madison St, Rochester, NY 14608, USA (43.15318, -77.62806)
Buried: Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester, Monroe County, New York, USA, Plot: Section C, Lot 93
Find A Grave Memorial# 31
Siblings: Daniel Read Anthony, Mary Stafford Anthony, Hannah Anthony, Guelma Anthony McLean, Merritt Anthony

Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. In 1851, she met Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who became her lifelong co-worker in social reform activities, primarily in the field of women's rights. Anthony and Stanton worked together in a close and productive relationship. They referred to each other as "Susan" and "Mrs. Stanton". At Anthony's 70th birthday celebration, Stanton teased her by saying, "Well, as all women are supposed to be under the thumb of some man, I prefer a tyrant of my own sex, so I shall not deny the patent fact of my subjection.” Their interests began to diverge somewhat as they grew older. Anthony began to form alliances with more conservative groups. Despite such friction, their relationship continued to be close. When Stanton died in 1902, Anthony grieved for months. Writing a tribute that appeared in The New York Times, Anthony described Stanton as having "forged the thunderbolts" that she (Anthony) "fired."
They met in 1851 and remained friends until Stanton’s death in 1902: 51 years.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902)
Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Jane Addams was a pioneer settlement social worker, public philosopher, sociologist, author, and leader in women's suffrage and world peace. She revolutionized American social reform by founding Hull House, an institution Addams established in a poor neighborhood of Chicago to provide services for recent immigrants. Addams later became the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Her closest adult companion and friend was wealthy philanthropist Mary Rozet Smith, who supported Addams's work at Hull House, and with whom she shared a romantic friendship. They always slept in the same room and the same bed, and when they traveled Jane even wired ahead to be sure they would get a hotel room with a double bed. It was said that, "Mary Smith became and always remained the highest and clearest note in the music that was Jane Addams' personal life". Together they owned a summerhouse in Bar Harbor, Maine. When apart, they would write to each other at least once a day - sometimes twice. Addams would write to Smith, "I miss you dreadfully and am yours 'til death". The letters also show that the women saw themselves as a married couple: "There is reason in the habit of married folks keeping together", Addams wrote to Smith.
Together from 1893 to 1934: 41 years.
Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935)
Mary Rozet Smith (December 23, 1868 - 1934)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Susan B. Anthony, who led the movement to obtain voting rights for women, had a passionate love affair with abolitionist Anna E. Dickinson. In one surviving letter, Anthony enticed Dickinson (whom she called a "naughty Teaze") to join her in bed, ensuring her it was "big enough and good enough to take you in.” Dickinson was an American orator and lecturer. An advocate for the abolition of slavery and for women's suffrage, as well as a gifted teacher, Dickinson was the first woman to speak before the United States Congress. At a very young age, she aided the Republican Party in the hard-fought 1863 elections and significantly influenced the distribution of political power in the Union just prior to the Civil War. Dickinson also was the first white woman on record to climb Colorado’s Longs Peak, in 1873. Among her papers there is a letter signed “Ida” that recalls, “This time last evening you were sitting on my knee, nestled close to my heart and I was the happiest of mortals.” The letter does not stop with such a maternal description. Ida goes on to remember Anna in bed, “tempting me to kiss her sweet mouth and to caress her until—well, poor little me, poor ‘booful princess.’ How can I leave thee, queen of my loving heart?”
Anna Elizabeth Dickinson (October 28, 1842 – October 22, 1932)
Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Anthony House is a historic house at 67 East Road in Adams, Massachusetts.
Address: 67 East Road, Adams, MA 01220, USA (42.61546, -73.10229)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Thursday through Monday 10.00-16.00
Phone: +1 413-743-7121
National Register of Historic Places: 85000021, 1985
Place
Built in 1817
The house is a conventional center hall 2.5 story colonial in the Federalist style. Twin chimneys rise from the building’s center line, and a modest 1.5 story ell was added onto the rear of the house, and a porch added onto the side of the rear ell in the 1950s was enclosed in the 1960s. A barn has been replaced by a modern garage on the property. Inside the house the original floorplan has been retained, with a central hall flanked by large public rooms in front of the house and smaller service rooms in the rear. The rear ell contains two small rooms. Most of the original woodwork has been retained, although one fireplace has been bricked up. The house is now a museum dedicated to showcasing Susan B. Anthony’s early years. The house is notable for its association with early educators and industrialists in Adams, and as the birthplace of suffragist Susan B. Anthony: she was born in this house on February 15, 1820. The first of the Anthonys to arrive in Adams, Massachusetts was David Anthony, the great-grandfather of Susan B. Anthony, in the years before the American Revolutionary War. He came as part of a more general migration of Quakers to the area from Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts. He established a cider mill that remains in the Anthony family to this day. His grandson, David Anthony, built this house as a gift to his son, Daniel Anthony, the father of Susan B. Anthony. Daniel was an influential member of the local Quaker community: a strong proponent of education, teaching at the East Road School, and joining with others in the tightly knit Quaker community to found the Adams Academy in 1825 on land owned by his father. Daniel Anthony also continued the family interest in mills, establishing with his brother a cotton yarn-producing mill, known as the Pump Log Mill, in 1822. In 1827 Daniel was lured by financial interests to Battenville, New York. Alma Lutz was the author of “Susan B. Anthony, Rebel, Crusader, Humanitarian” (1959). Lutz and Marguerite Smith shared a Boston apartment and a summer home in the Berkshires, Highmeadow, Berlin, N.Y., not far from Susan B. Anthony's birthplace in Adams. Lutz and Smith worked in the National Woman’s Party. They travelled together, visiting Europe several times in the 1950s. When Smith died in 1959, Lutz struggled with her grief: “It’s a hard adjustment to make, but one we all have to face in one way or another and I am remembering that I have much to be grateful for.”
Life
Who: Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)
The house remained in Anthony family hands until 1895, after which it went through a succession of owners. The Society of Friends Descendants acquired the property in 1926, and established a museum. The building was returned to private hands in 1949. It underwent restoration from 2006 to 2009. It is now home to the non-profit Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum, showcasing Susan B. Anthony’s early years and her legacy as a tireless advocate of women’s right to vote.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Susan B. Anthony Childhood House in Battenville, New York, is the childhood home of suffragette Susan B. Anthony.
Address: 2835 NY 29, Battenville, NY 12834, USA (43.11053, -73.42311)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 06001079, 2007
Place
Built in 1832
Battenville is a hamlet on the south town line of Greenwich, New York, located on the Batten Kill. As of 2006, the Susan B. Anthony Childhood House is owned by the state; it is controlled by the OPRHP / Saratoga State Park. The listing includes the house, a retaining wall, and a carriage barn. Italianate features were added to the house in 1885. The Thomas McLean House and Stoops Hotel are also listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Life
Who: Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)
Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906) lived here from age 13 to age 19, from 1833 to 1839. The family moved from Adams, Massachusetts, where she was born.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Artifacts and materials displayed in Susan B. Anthony’s former home and site of her 1872 arrest.
Address: 17 Madison St, Rochester, NY 14608, USA (43.15318, -77.62806)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Tuesday through Sunday 11.00-17.00
Phone: +1 585-235-6124
National Register of Historic Places: 66000528, 1966 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Susan B. Anthony House, in Rochester, New York, was the home of Susan B. Anthony for forty years, while she was a national figure in the women’s rights movement. She was arrested in the front parlor after attempting to vote in the 1872 Presidential Election. She resided here until her death. The Susan B. Anthony House is located at 17 Madison Street in Rochester. Access to the house is through the Susan B. Anthony Museum entrance at 19 Madison Street. Today the Susan B. Anthony House is a learning center and museum open to the public for tours and programs. The Visitor Center and Museum Shop are located in the historic house next door, 19 Madison Street, which was owned by Hannah Anthony Mosher, sister of Susan and Mary Anthony. The mission of the Susan B. Anthony House is to keep Susan B. Anthony’s vision alive and relevant. The house hosts an annual celebration of Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave women the right to vote. In 2011, the New York Times reported that the museum at the house had sold a large quantity of "a $250 handbag made of fake alligator that was inspired by one of Anthony’s own club bags, similar to a doctor’s bag," noting that for Anthony, "a bag was not a fashion statement but a symbol of independence at a time when women were not allowed to enter into a contract or even open a bank account." Papers and memorabilia about the suffrage movement were donated to the house at the request of Carrie Chapman Catt, Susan B. Anthony’s successor as President of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. They are held by the River Campus Libraries of the University of Rochester.
Life
Who: Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)
Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) worked together in a close and productive relationship. From 1880 to 1886 they were together almost every day working on the History of Woman Suffrage. They referred to each other as "Susan" and "Mrs. Stanton.” At Anthony’s 70th birthday celebration, Stanton teased her by saying, "Well, as all women are supposed to be under the thumb of some man, I prefer a tyrant of my own sex, so I shall not deny the patent fact of my subjection." Their interests began to diverge somewhat as they grew older. Despite such friction, their relationship continued to be close. When Stanton died in 1902, Anthony wrote to a friend: "Oh, this awful hush! It seems impossible that voice is stilled which I have loved to hear for fifty years. Always I have felt I must have Mrs. Stanton’s opinion of things before I knew where I stood myself. I am all at sea..." Susan B. Anthony died at the age of 86 of heart failure and pneumonia in her home in Rochester, New York, on March 13, 1906. She was buried at Mount Hope Cemetery (1133 Mt Hope Ave, Rochester, NY 14620). In the same cemetery are buried: Lilliam D. Wald (1867-1940), a nurse, humanitarian and author, known for contributions to human rights and was the founder of American community nursing, who founded the Henry Street Settlement and was an early advocate for nursing in schools; cotton broker James O. Bloss (1847-1918) who lived for nearly fifty years in a same-sex intimate partnership with John William Sterling (1844-1918).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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