reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
[personal profile] reviews_and_ramblings
Horatio Robert Forbes Brown was a Scottish historian who specialised in the history of Venice and Italy.
Born: February 16, 1854, Nice, France
Died: August 19, 1926, Belluno
Education: Clifton College
Lived: Newhall House, Carlops, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 9LY, UK (55.79672, -3.31732)
Ca’ Torresella, Zattere, Venice (45.42905, 12.32734)
Buried: Cimitero di San Michele, Venice, Città Metropolitana di Venezia, Veneto, Italy, Plot: Rec. Evangel, GPS (lat/lon): 45.4475, 12.34833
Find A Grave Memorial# 161099875

Born at Nice (then part of the kingdom of Sardinia) on February 16, 1854, Horatio Brown was the son of Hugh Horatio Brown, an advocate, of New Hall House, Carlops, who was a Deputy Lieutenant for Midlothian, and of Guglielmina Forbes, the sixth daughter of Colonel Ranaldson MacDonnell of Glengarry and Clanranald (1773–1828.) The marriage was in 1853, and his mother was a good deal younger than his father, who died on October 17, 1866, at the age of 66.
Address: Carlops, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 9LY, UK (55.79672, -3.31732)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1968 660206
Historic Scotland Building ID: 14644 (Grade B, 1979)
Place
Remodeled in 1850, Design by David Bryce (1803-1876)
There has been a house at Newhall dating back to the XIII century. The main part of the current house dates from 1703 when it replaced the original keep. This was added to under the ownership of Robert Brown in 1792 when he also built the walled garden. Many alterations were made and signs of former staircases and windows have been found in more recent alterations. Robert Brown’s son, Hugh, extended the house which included the north facing extension housing the dining room and billiard room above, the turreted front door and the domestic offices. The sun room to the rear and the extension housing the eight garages were added in recent years. The principal reception rooms include the drawing room, adjacent to the sun room with French windows to the rear lawn. To the front of the house is the dining room which can seat 22 people at one table. Since 1907, first as occasional tenants and then later as owners, the Maclagan family were connected with Newhall. The Kennedys moved to Newhall in 1998. Alison Maclagan died in 2002 aged 97
Life
Who: Horatio Robert Forbes Brown (February 16, 1854 – August 19, 1926)
Horatio Brown was a Scottish historian who specialised in the history of Venice and Italy. He spent most of his life in Venice, publishing several books about the city. He also wrote for the Cambridge Modern History, was the biographer of John Addington Symonds, and was a poet and alpinist. In 1877, the Brown family found itself in a bad financial position. Allan Brown emigrated to New South Wales, and a tenant was found for the family home in Midlothian, Newhall House. In 1879, Brown and his mother decided to live in Italy. They went first to Florence, where Guglielmina Brown’s Forbes aunts lived, and then settled at Venice, taking an apartment in the Palazzo Balbi Valier on the Grand Canal. Brown’s mother died in 1909, and Brown began to spend the summers in Midlothian, staying at the inn of Penicuik or with his friend Lord Rosebery, a former prime minister. During the Great War he stayed in Venice, and when the Austrians seemed likely to capture the city he moved to Florence, then home to Scotland, where he lived between the New club in Edinburgh and his home village of Carlops. Brown sold the Newhall estate before dying of heart failure on August 19, 1926 in Italy.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Horatio Brown moved to Ca’ Torresella on the Zattere, where he lived till 1926 when he died, apart from a temporary evacuation during WW1. Every Monday evening, he gave a salon there and British visitors armed with letters of introduction could meet all the great and good.
Address: Zattere, Venice (45.42905, 12.32734)
Type: Private Property
Place
In 1879, Horatio Brown and his mother decided to live in Italy. They went first to Florence, where Guglielmina Brown’s Forbes aunts lived, and then settled at Venice, taking an apartment in the Palazzo Balbi Valier on the Grand Canal. In 1885, the Browns bought a tall, narrow, tenement building on the Zattere looking down the Giudecca Canal and reconstructed it as a house called Cà Torresella. Brown’s close friend Antonio Salin, a gondolier, also lived in the house with his wife and family. The receptions he gave at home on Mondays were described by Frederick Rolfe, known as Baron Corvo.
Life
Who: Horatio Robert Forbes Brown (February 16, 1854 – August 19, 1926)
In Venice, Horatio Brown met the archaeologist Giacomo Boni, who became his colleague in a common passion for the antiquities of Venice and Italy. Brown became a leading figure in the English-speaking community, churchwarden of St George’s Church in campo San Vio, president of the city’s Cosmopolitan Hospital, and honorary treasurer of the Sailors’ Institute. He also befriended local gondoliers and fishermen, helping them in their battles, gaining the material for a book of local colour, “Life on the Lagoons,” which appeared in 1884. The ailing Robert Louis Stevenson (whom Brown had met in 1881 at Symonds’s house at Davos, Switzerland) read it and wrote the poem "To H. F. Brown" to celebrate "your spirited and happy book.” An alpinist, Brown climbed peaks in Switzerland, the Carnic Alps and the Tyrol, and was a member of the Alpine Club of Venice. Lord Ronald Gower stayed with Brown in Venice in the 1890s and noted in his diary: "Every morning Horatio Brown goes to his work at the Archives, and I go a-sight-seeing." Brown spent part of the summer of 1895 staying with Gower in London, when they visited picture galleries together. In 1899, his portrait was painted by Henry Scott Tuke. Brown’s friend John Addington Symonds appointed him his literary executor, so that in 1893, when Symonds died, Brown received all his private papers. He went on to publish “John Addington Symonds, a Biography” (1895), followed in 1923 by “Letters and Papers of John Addington Symonds.” In both, he suppressed almost all of Symonds’s homosexuality, and in Brown’s own will he left orders for the destruction of the papers, apart from Symonds’s autobiography, and that was not to be published for at least fifty years. In 1923, an equally discreet obituary of Frederick Rolfe was printed in the London Mercury, and Brown commented with sympathy: “If it was necessary to modify concerning Rolfe – a freelance with no ties – imagine what I was forced to do in my John Addington Symonds books, with his daughters and their husbands insisting on seeing the MS before it was printed!” Brown published some homoerotic poems in his collection “Drift” (1900), but was hostile to the Uranian writers in the circle of Edward Carpenter, and because of his suppression of the truth about Symonds they saw him as a hindrance to homosexual emancipation. After the war he sold most of his Venetian house, keeping an apartment. In March 1925 he had a heart attack, but recovered. He died of heart failure on August 19, 1926 at Belluno, where he had gone to escape the summer heat. He was cremated on San Michele. His estate at death was £6,117, a substantial sum. Brown’s friend and fellow-historian Frederick York Powell described him as "Horatio Brown, the Venetian historian, a real good sort, cheery, broad-faced, shock-headed, tumble-dressed,” while after his death the Cornhill Magazine called him a "Scotch laird, with his ruddy countenance, muscular limbs, and sturdy frame.”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

San Michele is an island in the Venetian Lagoon, northern Italy. It is associated with the sestiere of Cannaregio, from which it lies a short distance northeast.
Address: 30135 Venezia, Italy (45.44644, 12.34685)
Type: Cemetery (Open to public)
Phone: +39 041 729 2811
Place
Along with neighbouring San Cristoforo della Pace, the island was a popular place for local travellers and fishermen to land. Mauro Codussi's Chiesa di San Michele in Isola of 1469, the first Renaissance church in Venice, and a monastery lie on the island, which also served for a time as a prison. San Cristoforo was selected to become a cemetery in 1807, designed by Gian Antonio Selva, when under French occupation it was decreed that burial on the mainland (or on the main Venetian islands) was unsanitary. The canal that separated the two islands was filled in during 1836, and subsequently the larger island became known as San Michele. Bodies were carried to the island on special funeral gondolas. Among those buried there are Igor Stravinsky, Joseph Brodsky, Jean Schlumberger, Christian Doppler, Frederick Rolfe, Horatio Brown, Sergei Diaghilev, Ezra Pound, Luigi Nono, Catherine Bagration, Franco Basaglia, Paolo Cadorin, Zoran Mušič, Helenio Herrera, Emilio Vedova, and Salvador de Iturbide y Marzán. The cemetery is still in use today. The cemetery contains 7 war graves from WWI of officers and seamen of the British merchant and Royal Navy. Aspasia Manos was initially interred at the cemetery of Isola di San Michele. Her remains were later transferred to the Royal Cemetery Plot in the park of Tatoi Palace. Other attractions include the Cappella Emiliana.
Notable queer burials at Isola di San Michele:
• Princess Catherine Bagration (1783-1857) was the wife of the general Pyotr Bagration. She was known for her beauty, love affairs and outrageous behaviour. She counted many Parisian celebrities among her close friends: Stendhal, Benjamin Constant, the Marquis de Custine, even the Queen of Greece. The Princess's cook for a time was Marie-Antoine Carême, the founder of Haute Cuisine. Balzac mentions in one of his letters that she was one of the two women upon whom he based the character Feodora, heroine of his first novel “La Peau de Chagrin”. Similarly Victor Hugo mentions her salon in “Les Misérables”.
• Horatio Brown (February 16, 1854-August 19, 1926) was a Scottish historian who specialised in the history of Venice and Italy.
• Sergei Diaghilev (1872-1929) was a Russian art critic, patron, ballet impresario and founder of the Ballets Russes, from which many famous dancers and choreographers would arise.
• Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was an expatriate American poet and critic, and a major figure in the early modernist movement. His contribution to poetry began with his development of Imagism, a movement derived from classical Chinese and Japanese poetry, stressing clarity, precision and economy of language.
• Frederick Rolfe, better known as Baron Corvo (1860-1913), was an English writer, artist, photographer and eccentric.
• Jean Schlumberger (1907-1987) was a French jewelry designer especially well known for his work at Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger was a very private person but liked to socialize among friends like Cristóbal Balenciaga, Emilio Terry, Diana Vreeland and Hubert de Givenchy.
• Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) was a Russian (and later, a naturalized French and American) composer, pianist and conductor. He is widely considered one of the most important and influential composers of the XX century.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Profile

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
reviews_and_ramblings

April 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
91011121314 15
16 1718 1920 21 22
23 24252627 28 29
30      

Most Popular Tags

Disclaimer

All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
I'm associated with Amazon/USA Affiliates Programs.
Books reviewed on this site were usually provided at no cost by the publisher or author. However, some books were purchased by the reviewer and not provided for free. For information on how a particular title was obtained, please contact by email the blog's owner.
Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Apr. 30th, 2017 06:59 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios