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Marcel Moore, born Suzanne Alberte Malherbe, was a French illustrator, designer, and photographer. She, along with her romantic and creative partner Claude Cahun, was a surrealist writer and photographer.
Born: July 19, 1892, Nantes, France
Died: February 19, 1972, Jersey
Lived: St. Brelade’s Bay Hotel, La Route de la Baie, St Brelade, Jersey CI. JE3 8EF, UK (49.18539, -2.20132)
Buried: St Brelade, Rue de la Baie, at the western end of St Brelade's Bay, Jersey, Channel Islands, JE3 8EP
Buried alongside: Claude Cahun
Find A Grave Memorial# 100891884
Period: Surrealism

Claude Cahun was a French artist, photographer and writer. Their work was both political and personal, and often undermined traditional concepts of gender roles. Claude was the niece of an avant-garde writer Marcel Schwob and the great-niece of Orientalist David Léon Cahun. They began making photographic self-portraits as early as 1912, when they were 18 years old, and they continued taking images of themself through the 1930s. Around 1919, they changed their name to Claude Cahun, after having previously used the names Claude Courlis (after the curlew) and Daniel Douglas (after Lord Alfred Douglas). During the early 20s, they settled in Paris with their lifelong partner and stepsibling Suzanne Malherbe, whom they met at the lycée (high school). For the rest of their lives together, Cahun and Malherbe collaborated on various written works, sculptures, photomontages and collages. They befriended Henri Michaux, Pierre Morhange and Robert Desnos. Around 1922 Claude and Malherbe began holding artists' salons at their home. Among the regulars who would attend were artists Henri Michaux and André Breton and literary entrepreneurs Adrienne Monnier and Sylvia Beach. Claude and Suzanne are buried together at St Brelade's Church in the island of Jersey.
Together from 1909 to 1954: 45 years.
Lucy Renee Mathilde Schwob aka Claude Cahun (October 25, 1894 – December 8, 1954)
Suzanne Malherbe aka Marcel Moore (July 19, 1892 - February 19, 1972)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore had a long association with Jersey, having spent many childhood holidays in the Island. They usually stayed at St Brelade’s Bay Hotel and became friends with the owners, the Colley family
Address: La Route de la Baie, St Brelade, Jersey CI. JE3 8EF, UK (49.18539, -2.20132)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1534 746141
Place
In the late XIX century the St. Brelade’s Bay Hotel was hardly more than a pub owned by a local brewery. It was situated where the Cocktail Bar is now. Apart from the parish church, the only houses in the bay at that time were four farms, some fishermen’s cottages and the Martello Tower. Sarah Jennings, a publican by trade, became the license holder in 1877. Her daughter, Ellen, took over the tenancy in 1880 and in 1884 married Alan Harden an “ambitious commercial traveller.” Over the following years they had three daughters, Helen, May and Eve. Alan Harden was successful, he considerably enlarged the premises, doubling the bedroom capacity. The room rate at that time was seven shillings and sixpence for full board, with free use of a bathing machine; a lobster lunch was one shilling and sixpence. In 1917 Mr. Harden asked the brewery to sell him the freehold, but they refused. He immediately bought a plot of land right next door and built the granite building at the west end of the Hotel and threatened to open a rival establishment.In 1919 the brewery reluctantly sold the freehold to him and the next door property was turned into self contained flats. Alan Harden died in 1924 and the license was inherited by Helen Colley, his widowed eldest daughter. During her time in charge, the two buildings were joined together and considerable improvements were made to the interior including, amongst other things, “Electric light throughout.” Then, and earlier, a large proportion of the vegetables used in the Hotel were grown in what is now the gardens. Three “côtils” of Jersey Royals on the hillside at the back, tomatoes and cucumbers in the greenhouses, vegetables where the pool bar and tennis court are now, cherry and pear trees where the swimming pool is situated and an apple orchard on the car park. Helen Colley retired in 1933 and her only son Bob took over the reins; the Germans invaded Jersey on July the 1st 1940 and he escaped to England on one of the last steamers. His mother and his aunts remained on the island throughout the occupation. The Hotel was taken over by unwelcome visitors and was used as a “Soldatenheim” a place for rest and recreation away from the front line. Jersey was a prestigious part of Hitler’s “Atlantic Wall ” and amongst the numerous defensive/aggressive constructions built by slave labour on the island were the sea wall stretching the length of the bay and, beneath the terrace at the front of the Hotel an air-raid shelter, now used as a holding tank for rainwater that falls upon the Hotel. In May 1945 Bob Colley returned to Jersey, with his new wife, Audrey, and his stepson. The Hotel was in an appalling condition after the four years of the Occupation and it took some years to be up and running properly again. Tourism in Jersey started to boom in the late nineteen fifties and during this period the other hotels in the bay were built. Bob Colley made some massive changes to the premises, all the bedrooms were made en-suite, the swimming pool was built along with the pool bar and grill and a new floor was added. Bob Colley died in 1965 and for the next twenty five years the Hotel was run by his step son Digby, who returned his shares to the family in 1990. Robert and Mandy Colley then ran the hotel until 2009 the fifth generation of the family to run the hotel. In Nov. 2009, the hotel was sold to Jayne Best, daughter of Wigan Athletic Chairman Dave Whelan. In the following years the hotel underwent major refurbishments and expansion with the addition of the DW Health Club which opened in Jan. 2012. Under the guidance of Jayne the hotel re-established itself at the forefront of Jersey hotels and has become one of the leading hotels within the Channel Islands. In 2013 following Wigan’s historic FA Cup win, the Whelan family brought the trophy to the hotel where it was displayed within the Bay Restaurant and the Health Club for local and guests to view. During the FA Cups visit it also went to three schools in the local area of the hotel in order to promote the development through sport.
Life
Who: Lucy Renee Mathilde Schwob (October 25, 1894 – December 8, 1954) aka Claude Cahun and Suzanne Alberte Malherbe (July 19, 1892 – February 19, 1972) aka Marcel Moore
In 1937 Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore purchased La Rocquaise, a house just opposite the hotel, and moved there permanently in 1938. The garden, the house and the area around the bay were favourite settings for Cahun’s work. While living in Jersey they were generally known by their real names and gained a reputation for strange behaviour, such as taking their cat for a walk on a lead and wearing trousers. They remained here throughout the occupation, carrying out subversive resistance activities for which they were arrested and imprisoned. Claude Cahun was a French artist, photographer and writer. Her work was both political and personal, and often undermined traditional concepts of gender roles. Though Cahun’s writings suggested she identified as agender, most academic writings use feminine pronouns when discussing her and her work, as there is little documentation that gender neutral pronouns were used or preferred by the artist. In 1929 Cahun translated Havelock Ellis’ theories on the third gender. Around 1919, she changed her name to Claude Cahun, after having previously used the names Claude Courlis (after the curlew) and Daniel Douglas (after Lord Alfred Douglas.) During the early 20s, she settled in Paris with her lifelong partner and step-sibling Suzanne Malherbe. For the rest of their lives together, Cahun and Malherbe (who adopted the name "Marcel Moore") collaborated on various written works, sculptures, photomontages and collages. The two published articles and novels, notably in the periodical "Mercure de France,” and befriended Henri Michaux, Pierre Morhange and Robert Desnos. Around 1922 Claude and Malherbe began holding artists’ salons at their home. Among the regulars who would attend were artists Henri Michaux and André Breton and literary entrepreneurs Sylvia Beach and Adrienne Monnier. In 1937 Cahun and Malherbe settled in Jersey. Following the fall of France and the German occupation of Jersey and the other Channel Islands, they became active as resistance workers and propagandists. Fervently against war, the two worked extensively in producing anti-German fliers. Many were snippets from English-to-German translations of BBC reports on the Nazis’ crimes and insolence, which were pasted together to create rhythmic poems and harsh criticism. The couple then dressed up and attended many German military events in Jersey, strategically placing them in soldier’s pockets, on their chairs, etc. Also, they inconspicuously crumpled up and threw their fliers into cars and windows. In many ways, Cahun and Malherbe’s resistance efforts were not only political but artistic actions, using their creative talents to manipulate and undermine the authority which they despised. In many ways, Cahun’s life’s work was focused on undermining a certain authority, however her specific resistance fighting targeted a physically dangerous threat. In 1944 she was arrested and sentenced to death, but the sentences were never carried out. They were saved by the Liberation of Jersey in 1945, but their home and property had been confiscated and much of their art destroyed by the Germans. However, Cahun’s health never recovered from her treatment in jail, and she died in 1954. She is buried at St Brelade (Rue de la Baie, at the western end of St Brelade's Bay, Jersey, Channel Islands, JE3 8EP). Moore relocated to a smaller home, Carola in Beaumont. Moore committed suicide in 1972. She was buried with her partner Claude Cahun in St Brelade’s Church.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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