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Elizabeth Bowen, CBE was an Irish novelist and short story writer.
Born: June 7, 1899, Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Died: February 22, 1973, London, United Kingdom
Education: Downe House School
Lived: White Lodge, Headington House Lodge, Old High St, Oxford, OX3 9HN, UK (51.76127, -1.21159)
2 Clarence Terrace, Marylebone, London NW1 4RD, UK (51.52501, -0.15946)
Bowen's Court, Farahy, Co. Cork, Ireland (52.23727, -8.45635)
Buried: Farahy Church Cemetery (North Cork), Farahy, County Cork, Ireland
Find A Grave Memorial# 13718039
Movies: The Last September

In 1923 Elizabeth Bowen married Alan Charles Cameron. and when he was appointed Secretary to the City of Oxford Education Committee in 1925, they moved to Waldencote in the Croft in Old Headington. The house was originally the Coach House for Headington Lodge, and has now reverted to that name.
Address: Headington House Lodge, Old High St, Oxford, OX3 9HN, UK (51.76127, -1.21159)
Type: Private Property
Place
White Lodge in Osler Road is the south wing of the mansion that was known as Headington Lodge. The main part of the mansion to the north is now known as Sandy Lodge. In the late XVIII century the brewer Edward Tawney (1735–1800) built a “gentleman’s farmhouse” in the Croft (Osler Road did not exist until 1802.) On his death in 1800 he left that farmhouse to his cousin’s daughter, Mrs Ann Wharton (née Tawney), with instructions that it should go to her eldest son Theophilus Wharton after her death. Theophilus Wharton inherited his mother’s farmhouse on her death in 1824, and lived in the farmhouse with his brother Bryan (1782–1839.) Neither of the brothers married, and they converted the farmhouse into the regency villa it is today. It was originally known as Headington Lodge, and its main entrance was in Osler Road, where its own little lodge (or gatehouse) still stands to the south, beside Cuckoo Lane. The present house called Greenways is in part of what was Wharton’s garden. Its former lodge is now 38 Osler Road. On the death of Theophilus Wharton in 1831 Headington Lodge passed to his nephew (and Ann Wharton’s grandson), Mark Theophilus Morrell. On his death in 1842 it passed to his cousin, Charles Tawney. Charles (1780–1853) was a partner in the Hall & Tawney Brewery and had been Mayor of Oxford in 1837 and 1840. His town home was Brewery House in Paradise Street, Oxford, but he must have used this as his country retreat, as the Headington Rent-Book for Dec. 1850 shows him as both owner and occupier at this time. Its rateable value was then £58, and its estimated extent just over 5 acres. Charles Tawney died in 1853 and his wife in 1854, and their children, Henry Copland Tawney and Mrs Elizabeth Copland Fisher inherited the house. Between 1861 and 1902 Headington Lodge was let out to various people: Mrs Williams (1861), the Misses Hillderson (1863), John Martin, a retired storekeeper from Portsmouth Dockyard (1871), George Crunwell (1875–6), Colonel (later Major General) John Desborough (while he rebuilt The Priory, 1877–1883), Frederick Evans (1890–95), and Mrs Burch (1896–7.) In 1881 the mansion was bought and then rented out by William Wootten-Wootten of Headington House. His widow gave it to their son Montague on his marriage in 1888, but initially he continued to live in St Giles. By the time of the 1901 census the whole house had become known as White Lodge rather than Headington Lodge, and Montague Wootten is listed there at the age of 48 with his wife Mary and three-year-old son Kenneth, looked after by six indoor servants, with his gardener living in the lodge. Eight years later, in 1909, Montague Wootten committed suicide in the house as a result of financial problems: he was a partner of Parsons, Thomson & Co. (Barclays) at the Old Bank in Oxford’s High Street. The house was leased by a Mrs Newall or Newhall from 1910 to 1914. The next lessee, Miss MacGregor, founded Headington School in this house. It was opened by the Bishop of Liverpool in 1915 with ten boarders and eight day-girls. By 1918 the school had transferred to Brookside. In 1920 The Lodge was bought from Montague Wootten-Wootten’s estate by Edwin J. Hall, who lived in Clifton House on the London Road and built the cinema in New High Street in his garden. Hall divided it into the two separate houses it is today, naming them White Lodge and Sandy Lodge, and let them out to Walter Smith and Raymond Holmes respectively. The novelist Elizabeth Bowen lived at White Lodge from 1960 to 1965.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bowen, CBE (June 7, 1899 – February 22, 1973)
Elizabeth Bowen’s marriage to Cameron (which survived until his death 22 years later) was apparently not consummated, and early in 1933 Elizabeth fell in love with Humphry House. She had an affair with him that continued after his marriage in Dec. 1933, and his wife, Madeleine House, came with her baby to stay with Elizabeth Bowen at Waldencote in the spring of 1935. Later in 1935 Elizabeth Bowen left Waldencote and moved to London with her husband, who had been appointed Secretary to the Central Council for Schools Broadcasting. In 1952 (after more books and more affairs), Elizabeth Bowen moved with her husband to Bowen’s Court (the house in Cork that Elizabeth had inherited back in 1930 on the death of her father); and in August that year her husband died there. In 1959 she was forced to sell Bowen’s Court, which was demolished in 1960. Elizabeth Bowen returned to Old Headington in 1960, and for the next five years lived at White Lodge, where she is listed in Kelly’s Directory simply as “Mrs A. Cameron.” She was President of the Old Headington branch of the Women’s Institute from 1961 to 1964. Elizabeth Bowen moved to Hythe in 1965. She died of lung cancer in University College Hospital on February 22, 1973. She was buried with her husband in Cork.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

English Heritage Blue Plaque: 1–7 Clarence Terrace, Elizabeth Bowen (1899–1973), "Writer lived here 1935–1952"
Address: 2 Clarence Terrace, Marylebone, London NW1 4RD, UK (51.52501, -0.15946)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 209191 (Grade I, 1970)
Place
Clarence Terrace overlooks Regent’s Park in Marylebone, City of Westminster, London. This terrace is the smallest in the park. This row of terraced houses is named after William IV. It was designed by Decimus Burton. It is composed of three sections, a centre and two wings, of the Corinthian order, connected by two colonnades of the Ilyssus Ionic order. The elevation is divided into three stories; namely, a rusticated entrance, which serves as a basement to the others, a Corinthian order embellishing the drawing room and chamber stories. There is also a well proportioned entablature.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bowen, CBE (June 7, 1899 – February 22, 1973)
Elizabeth Bowen was an Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer. In 1923 she married Alan Cameron, an educational administrator who subsequently worked for the BBC. The marriage has been described as "a sexless but contented union." The marriage was reportedly never consummated. She had various extra-marital relationships, including one with Charles Ritchie, a Canadian diplomat seven years her junior, which lasted over thirty years. She also had an affair with the Irish writer Seán Ó Faoláin and a relationship with the American poet May Sarton. Bowen and her husband first lived near Oxford, where they socialized with Maurice Bowra, John Buchan and Susan Buchan, and where she wrote her early novels, including “The Last September” (1929.) Following the publication of “To the North” (1932) they moved to 2 Clarence Terrace, Regent’s Park, London, where she wrote “The House in Paris” (1935) and “The Death of the Heart” (1938.) In 1937, she became a member of the Irish Academy of Letters. In 1977, Victoria Glendinning published the first biography on Elizabeth Bowen. In 2009, Glendinning published a book about the relationship between Charles Ritchie and Bowen, based on his diaries and her letters to him. In 2012, English Heritage marked Bowen’s Regent’s Park home at Clarence Terrace with a blue plaque. A blue plaque was also unveiled October 19, 2014 to mark Bowen’s residence at the Coach House, The Croft, Headington from 1925-35.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Bowen's Court was a historic country house near Kildorrery in County Cork, Ireland.
Address: Farahy, Co. Cork, Ireland (52.23727, -8.45635)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in the 1770s
Bowen’s Court was located in the townland of Farahy near Kildorrery in North Cork. The house was built by Henry Cole Bowen. The house was the seat of the Bowen family until 1959 when it was sold by the author Elizabeth Bowen. Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to it as Faraghy, the seat of Mr. Cole Bowen. It was held in fee by Mrs. Eliza Bowen at the time of Griffith’s Valuation, when it was valued at £75. (“House: Bowen’s Court” Landed Estates Database). The house was demolished in 1961. All that remains today is the walls of the 2.5 acre garden. Elizabeth Bowen re-used descriptions of the house in her novels. For example, the house in “The Last September” is directly modelled on Bowen’s Court. Bowen wrote a history of the house, entitled “Bowen's Court,” in 1942.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bowen, CBE (June 7, 1899 – February 22, 1973)
Elizabeth Dorothea Cole Bowen was born on June 7, 1899 at 15 Herbert Place in Dublin and baptised in the nearby St Stephen's Church on Upper Mount Street. Her parents, Henry Charles Cole Bowen and Florence (née Colley) Bowen later brought her to Bowen's Court at Farahy, near Kildorrery, County Cork, where she spent her summers. She mixed with the Bloomsbury Group, becoming good friends with Rose Macaulay who helped her seek out a publisher for her first book, a collection of short stories entitled Encounters (1923). In 1930 Bowen became the first (and only) woman to inherit Bowen's Court, but remained based in England, making frequent visits to Ireland. Her husband, Alan Cameron, retired in 1952 and they settled in Bowen’s Court, where Cameron died a few months later. Many writers visited her at Bowen's Court from 1930 onwards, including Virginia Woolf, Eudora Welty, Carson McCullers, Iris Murdoch, and the historian Veronica Wedgwood. For years Bowen struggled to keep the house going, lecturing in the United States to earn money. In 1957 her portrait was painted at Bowen's Court by her friend, painter Patrick Hennessy. She travelled to Italy in 1958 to research and prepare “A Time in Rome” (1960), but by the following year Bowen was forced to sell her beloved Bowen's Court, which was demolished in 1961. After spending some years without a permanent home, Bowen finally settled at "Carbery", Church Hill, Hythe, in 1965. In 1972 Bowen developed lung cancer. She died in University College Hospital on February 22, 1973, aged 73. She is buried with her husband in Farahy, County Cork churchyard, close to the gates of Bowen's Court, where there is a memorial plaque to the author at the entrance to St Colman's Church, where a commemoration of her life is held annually.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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