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Violet Oakley was the first American woman to receive a public mural commission. During the first quarter of the twentieth century, she was renowned as a pathbreaker in mural decoration, a field that had been exclusively practiced by men.
Born: June 10, 1874, New Jersey, United States
Died: February 25, 1961, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Art Students League of New York
Drexel University
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
Lived: Plashbourne Estate, 51 Carlton Rd, Yonkers, NY 10708, USA (40.93906, -73.84728)
Cogslea, 627 St Georges Rd, Philadelphia, PA 19119, USA (40.05254, -75.20455)
Buried: Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA, Plot: Section 163, Lot 14788
Find A Grave Memorial# 10067778
Period: Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
Books: Samuel F.B. Morse: A Dramatic Outline of the Life of the Father of Telegraphy & the Founder of the National Academy of Design, more

Violet Oakley and her friends, the artists Elizabeth Shippen Green and Jessie Willcox Smith, all former students of Howard Pyle, were named the Red Rose girls by him. The three illustrators received the "Red Rose Girls" nickname while they lived together in the Red Rose Inn in Villanova, Pennsylvania from 1899 to 1901. They later lived, along with Henrietta Cozens, in a home in the Mt. Airy neighborhood of Philadelphia that they named Cogslea after their four surnames (Cozens, Oakley, Green and Smith).
Address: 627 St Georges Rd, Philadelphia, PA 19119, USA (40.05254, -75.20455)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 77001188, 1977
Place
In 1996, Violet Oakley was elected to the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame, the last of the “Red Rose Girls” to be inducted, but one of only ten women in the hall. Her home and studio at Yonkers, New York, where she resided intermittently between 1912 and 1915 is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Plashbourne Estate. Oakley was a member of Philadelphia's The Plastic Club, an organization established to promote "Art for art's sake". Other members included Elenore Abbott, Jessie Willcox Smith, and Elizabeth Shippen Green. Many of the women who founded the organization had been students of Howard Pyle. It was founded to provide a means to encourage one another professionally and create opportunities to sell their works of art. On June 14, 2014, Miss Oakley was featured in the first gay-themed tour of Green-Wood Cemetery, where she is interred in the Oakley family plot, Section 63, Lot 14788.
Life
Who: Violet Oakley (June 10, 1874 – February 25, 1961)
Violet Oakley was the first American woman to receive a public mural commission. During the first quarter of the XX century, she was renowned as a pathbreaker in mural decoration, a field that had been exclusively practiced by men. Oakley excelled at murals and stained glass designs that addressed themes from history and literature in Renaissance-revival styles. Elizabeth Shippen Green (September 1, 1871 – 1954) was an American illustrator. She illustrated children's books and worked for many years for Harper's Magazine. In 1911, at the age of forty, Green married Huger Elliott, an architecture professor, after a five-year engagement, and moved away from Cogslea. Green continued to work through the 1920s and illustrated a nonsense verse alphabet with her husband. Green died May 29, 1954 and is buried at The University of the South (735 University Ave, Sewanee, TN 37383). Jessie Willcox Smith (September 6, 1863 – May 3, 1935) was one of the most prominent female illustrators in the United States during the Golden Age of American illustration. She was a prolific contributor to respected books and magazines during the late XIX and early XX centuries. She illustrated stories and articles for clients such as Century, Collier's, Leslie's Weekly, Harper's, McClure's, Scribners, and the Ladies' Home Journal. She had an ongoing relationship with Good Housekeeping, including the long-running Mother Goose series of illustrations and creating all the covers from 1915 to 1933. Among the more than 60 books that Smith illustrated were Louisa May Alcott's “Little Women” and “An Old-Fashioned Girl,” Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's “Evangeline,” and Robert Louis Stevenson's “A Child's Garden of Verses.” Henrietta Cozens (1862-1940), served as the "wife" of the household. As the women's fame grew, the press lauded their accomplished Boston marriage. But when Green married at 39 after a seven-year engagement, Oakley's devastation created a scandal and severed the group's artistic partnership.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Violet Oakley’s home and studio at Yonkers, New York, where she resided intermittently between 1912 and 1915.
Address: 51 Carlton Rd, Yonkers, NY 10708, USA (40.93906, -73.84728)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 07000777, 2007.
Place
Built in 1911, Design by Carrère and Hastings (John Merven Carrère (1858-1911) and Thomas Hastings (1860-1929))
Plashbourne Estate is a historic estate located in the Lawrence Park West section of Yonkers, Westchester County, New York. It was built for artist Violet Oakley in the Tudor Revival style. It is a 2 1⁄2-story stone building with an irregular compound plan and cross-gabled roofline. After 1915, it became the home of Anna Lawrence Bisland (1872–1950), third daughter of William Van Duzer Lawrence, who resided there until her death. Grayson L. Kirk (1903–1997) resided at Plashbourne Estate from 1973 until his death.
Life
Who: Violet Oakley (June 10, 1874 – February 25, 1961)
As educational opportunities were made more available in the XIX century, women artists became part of professional enterprises, including founding their own art associations. Artwork made by women was considered to be inferior, and to help overcome that stereotype women became "increasingly vocal and confident" in promoting women's work, and thus became part of the emerging image of the educated, modern and freer "New Woman". Artists "played crucial roles in representing the New Woman, both by drawing images of the icon and exemplyfying this emerging type through their own lives." In the late XIX century and early XX century about 88% of the subscribers of 11,000 magazines and periodicals were women. As women entered the artist community, publishers hired women to create illustrations that depict the world through a woman's perspective. Other successful illustrators other than Violet Oakley were Jennie Augusta Brownscombe, Jessie Wilcox Smith, Rose O'Neill, and Elizabeth Shippen Green.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Kings County, New York.
Address: 500 25th St, Brooklyn, NY 11232, USA (40.65901, -73.99569)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 7.45-17.00
National Register of Historic Places: 97000228, 1977 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Located in Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn, it lies several blocks southwest of Prospect Park, between Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, Borough Park, Kensington, and Sunset Park. Paul Goldberger in The New York Times, wrote that it was said "it is the ambition of the New Yorker to live upon the Fifth Avenue, to take his airings in the Park, and to sleep with his fathers in Green-Wood.” The Pierrepont papers deposited at the Brooklyn Historical Society contain material about the organizing of Green-Wood Cemetery.
Notable queer burials at Green-Wood Cemetery:
• Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988), was one of the most important artists of the XX century. In 2006, Equality Forum featured Jean-Michel Basquiat during LGBT history month.
• Henry Ward Beecher (1813–1887), was a Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer, and speaker, known for his support of the abolition of slavery.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990), was a composer, conductor, author, music lecturer, and pianist. In a book released in October, 2013, “The Leonard Bernstein Letters,” his wife reveals his homosexuality.
• Elizabeth M. Cushier (died 1931). Doctors Emily Blackwell (1826-1910) and Elizabeth Cushier had a Boston Marriage. Blackwell co-founded the New York Infirmary for Women and Children (1857) and its Women's Medical College. Cushier was professor of medicine at the college and Blackwell's life-partner for twenty-eight years. About the relationship, Dr. Cushier wrote, “Thus the years happily passed” until in 1910 “a sad blow came in the death of Dr. Blackwell, making an irreparable beak in my life.” Dr. Blackwell is buried at Chilmark Cemetery, Massachusetts.
• Mary Elisabeth Dreier (September 26, 1875- August 15, 1963), was a New York social reformer along with her sister Margaret. Two other sisters, Dorothea and Katherine, were painters. She never married, but shared a home with fellow reformer Frances Kellor (buried alongside her). After Kellor’s death, Dreier lived alone for the rest of her life until dying in 1963, at her summer home in Bar Harbor, Maine.
• Fred Ebb (1928–2004), was a musical theatre lyricist who had many successful collaborations with composer John Kander. Ebb is interred in a mausoleum with Edwin “Eddie” Aldridge (1929–1997) and Martin Cohen (1926–1995) on the banks of Sylvan Water. In addition to the names and dates of each man, the phrase, “Together Forever” is also chiseled on the front of the mausoleum.
• Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829–1869), was a composer and pianist, best known as a virtuoso performer of his own romantic piano works.
• Richard Isay (1934–2012), was a psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, author and gay activist. Isay is considered a pioneer who changed the way that psychoanalysts view homosexuality.
• Paul Jabara (1948–1992), was an actor, singer, and songwriter. Paul Jabara died from AIDS complications after a long illness in Los Angeles, California.
• Frances Alice Kellor (October 20, 1873 – January 4, 1952), shared a home with fellow reformer Mary Dreier from 1905 until her death in 1952. Kellor was an American social reformer and chief investigator for the Bureau of Industries and Immigration of New York State in 1910-13, who specialized in the study of immigrants to the United States and women.
• Violet Oakley (1874–1961), was the first American woman to receive a public mural commission. Oakley and her friends, the artists Elizabeth Shippen Green and Jessie Willcox Smith, all former students of Howard Pyle, were named the Red Rose girls by him.
• Emma Stebbins (1815–1882), was among the first notable American woman sculptors, companion to actress Charlotte Cushman.
• Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933), artist. His daughter, Dorothy Trimble Tiffany (1891–1979), as Dorothy Burlingham, became a noted psychoanalyst and lifelong friend and partner of Anna Freud.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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