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Vincent Gabriel Fourcade was a French interior designer and the business and life partner of Robert Denning. "Outrageous luxury is what our clients want," he once said.
Born: February 27, 1934, Paris, France
Died: December 23, 1992, 17th arrondissement, Paris, France
Lived: Bridgehampton, NY, USA (40.93787, -72.30091)
125 E 73rd St, New York, NY 10021, USA (40.77148, -73.96203)
16 Rue de Chazelles, 75017 Paris, France (48.88011, 2.3051)
Find A Grave Memorial# 8642566

Vincent Gabriel Fourcade was a French interior designer. "Outrageous luxury is what our clients want," he once said. Robert Denning was an American interior designer whose lush interpretations of French Victorian decor became an emblem of corporate raider tastes in the 1980s. Fourcade met Denning in 1959, when Denning was a protégé of Edgar de Evia. He had acquired an eye for design and effect from working with the photographer on sets for many fabric and furniture accounts, and with whom he shared one of the most magnificent Manhattan apartments on the top three floors of the Rhinelander Mansion. In 1960, Denning and Fourcade formed the firm of Denning & Fourcade, Inc., which would for over forty-five years set a standard for a list of clients that read like a social registry. Referred to in New York magazine as "...the Odd Couple. Boyish, down-to-earth Denning is the hardest worker, while Fourcade sniffs the client air to gauge if it's socially registered before he goes beyond the fringe." Denning 'reinvented' himself to use his own word, after Fourcade's death from AIDS in 1992. He died in his apartment in the Lombardy Hotel in New York City in 2005.
Together from 1959 to 1992: 33 years.
Robert Denning (March 13, 1927 – August 26, 2005)
Vincent Fourcade (February 27, 1934 - December 23, 1992)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Vincent Fourcade and Robert Denning built a house in Bridgehampton, L.I., that was featured in House & Gardens.
Address: Bridgehampton, NY, USA (40.93787, -72.30091)
Type: Private Property
Place
Bridgehampton is a hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) in the South Fork of Suffolk County, New York. The population was 1,756 at the 2010 census. Bridgehampton is in the town of Southampton, on Long Island. Shortly after the founding of Southampton in 1640, settlers began to move east to the area known by the Shinnecock Indians as Sagaponack and Mecox. At the head of Sagg Pond the hardy settlers established a community called Bullhead, later renamed Bridgehampton—after the bridge built across the pond. Sagg Bridge was built in 1686 by Ezekiel Sandford. The bridge was the link between Mecox and Sagaponack and gave this locality its name of Bridgehampton. The notorious criminal and memoirist Stephen Burroughs lived there during the XVIII century and helped found the town’s first library in 1793; the volumes he purchased could be found in the Bridgehampton Public Library as late as 2002. Bridgehampton became the home of the horse show known as the Hampton Classic and a road racing course that figured prominently in American automobile racing.
Life
Who: Vincent Gabriel Fourcade (February 27, 1934 – December 23, 1992) and Robert Denning (March 13, 1927 –August 26, 2005)
Born in 1934 to a family of distinguished French aesthetes, Vincent Fourcade spent much of his formative years in a twenty-bedroom house replete with made-to-order Majorelle furnishings. He abandoned a career as a banker at twenty-four to become a designer of lavish party décors—for one soiree he and Robert Denning, whom he met in 1959, covered the floor with a hundred old raccoon coats. The dashingly handsome Fourcade segued easily into the role of major decorator, despite his lack of training. "I learned my trade by going out every evening as a young man," Fourcade told the art historian Rosamond Bernier. "I went to every pretty house in France and Italy and other places, too, and I remembered them all, even down to what was on each little table."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Vincent Fourcade was known for his attention to detail, great wit and extreme good looks. The red brick mansion he shared with Robert Denning on East 73d Street in Manhattan and the house he built in Bridgehampton, L.I., were the subjects of articles in decorating magazines around the world.
Address: 125 E 73rd St, New York, NY 10021, USA (40.77148, -73.96203)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 82003374, 1982
Place
The East 73rd Street Historic District is a block of that street on the Upper East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is a neighborhood of small rowhouses built from the mid-XIX to early XX centuries. Many of the houses were originally carriage houses for wealthy residents of the Upper East Side, such as Edward Harkness, and their facades still reflect that origin. Among the architects who designed the buildings were Richard Morris Hunt and Charles Romeyn. Later owners included Joseph Pulitzer. Eventually the buildings were converted for automotive use. Some have become purely residential. The block has remained architecturally distinct even as those around it have seen larger and more modern construction replace all or some of their original buildings. Development of the future Upper East Side began in the early 1860s with the construction of rowhouses for middle and working class buyers on the cross streets several blocks east of Central Park. Among those houses were a row of six built by an E.H. Robbins on East 73rd. Two of those, 171 and 175, are the only rowhouses left from that group. In the decades at the end of the century, the city’s wealthy began building large houses for themselves near the park, sometimes demolishing the original rowhouses to do so. The East 73rd Street houses were not in an ideal location for such housing, but they were the right distance for carriage houses for their horses and buggies: a short walk from their houses but far enough away that the noise and odor would not disturb them. They usually included housing for the servants who fed and drove the horses. Richard Morris Hunt designed 166 East 73rd, the first one, for art collector Henry Marquand in 1883. In 1890 the large stable at 182 was built to rent stable space to owners who did not want or could not afford to build their own carriage houses. The other carriage houses were gradually built in the 1890s, with the last ones completed early in the next century. Among these, Charles Romeyn contributed the neo-Flemish building next to Hunt’s in 1899. Shortly after Marquard’s death, Hunt’s was sold to Joseph Pulitzer, then publisher of the New York World, who lived several blocks to the east at 73rd and Park. By this time the automobile was beginning to come into use, especially among the wealthy residents of the Upper East Side. In 1906 the newest building in the district, 177–79 East 73rd, was built specifically to house cars instead of horses. Two years later, in 1908, the commercial stable across from it at 182 was converted for automotive use as well. At that same time, in 1907, Standard Oil heir and philanthropist Edward Harkness, who lived nearby at Fifth Avenue and 75th Street, bought 161. He spent two years converting it into a garage with a squash court and locker room upstairs, in addition to chauffeur’s quarters. Gradually the other carriage houses followed, with some being sold and converted into owner-occupied housing with an attached garage. By 1920 this process was complete, and the neighborhood assumed its present form. During the XX century some of the buildings took on importance in the city’s musical community. Pulitzer’s estate sold the carriage house at 166 to the MacDowell Club, named after composer and pianist Edward MacDowell, after his death. The club in turn sold it to the Central Gospel Chapel of New York, which met there until 1980. In 1950 the Dalcroze School of Music in New York, the only music teachers’ training school in the Western Hemisphere personally authorized by Émile Jaques-Dalcroze, moved into 161 for a few decades.
Life
Who: Vincent Gabriel Fourcade (February 27, 1934 – December 23, 1992) and Robert Denning (March 13, 1927 – August 26, 2005)
Robert Denning was an interior designer whose lush interpretations of French Victorian decor became an emblem of corporate raider tastes in the 1980s. From 1960 the firm of Denning & Fourcade would become known for colorful extravagance and over the top opulence. Clients beginning with Michel David-Weill; the Ogden Phipps family, for whom they did fifteen houses; Henry Kravis, whose home, and their decorating, was parodied in the 1990 movie "The Bonfire of the Vanities" with Tom Hanks; Charles and Jayne Wrightsman; Henry Kissinger; Diana Ross; Oscar de la Renta both in Manhattan and Connecticut; Beatriz and Antenor Patiño, the Bolivian tin magnate and Jean Vanderbilt, to name only a few, began to roll in. Soon they were established and known for creating an established and “old money” atmosphere anywhere. For thirty years they were courted on both sides of the Atlantic. Denning kept the fragrance Sous Le Vent in his automobiles to remind him of Lillian Bostwick Phipps who always wore the scent. Longtime clients such as Spencer Hays, the Richard Merillats for whom he has designed homes in Naples, Florida and Michigan, the Countess Rattazzi, for whom he did homes in Manhattan, South America and Italy (15 houses in all) looked forward to shopping sprees with him be it in the wholesale import markets in New York City or the Paris flea market. Denning’s five story townhouse for Phyllis Cerf Wagner is described as: “cozy and grand at the same time, but not elaborately fussy." Eugenia Sheppard of the New York Herald Tribune dubbed their work "Le Style Rothschild." It reeked de l’argent. "Outrageous luxury is what our clients want," Denning & Fourcade said. This was the 1980s, the era of instant wealth. They visually defined it, giving crisp money the appearance of provenance and what Denning called "a casual English attitude about grandeur." Often perceived as “the Odd Couple. Boyish, down-to-earth Denning is the hardest worker, while Fourcade sniffs the client air to gauge if it’s socially registered before he goes beyond the fringe." Jewelry designer Kenneth Jay Lane developed a passion for art pieces from the Middle East which the firm was in the vanguard of introducing and has also used some of their lighting treatments. Denning designed Jason Epstein’s SoHo home from scratch in the shell of the building that housed the first consolidated New York police department. This was an entirely new effort for the designer who is known by many to specialize in a period "we’d call early-fringed-lampshade, but chic.” They would also amass a large collection of artwork and bronzes. They would commission original works of art and collect many of the same artists that they would recommend to their clients.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

By 1990 the disease would take control of Vincent Fourcade’s life and early in 1992 Denning & Fourcade would take the Concorde one last time to Paris where he would live his remaining days in their apartment at 16 rue de Chazelles, just up the street from the studio of the sculptor Frédéric Bartholdi, who is best known for the Statue of Liberty.
Address: 16 Rue de Chazelles, 75017 Paris, France (48.88011, 2.3051)
Type: Private Property
Place
The living room of the apartment that Denning and Fourcade shared in Paris and decorated in the late 1980s was “rather tame compared with rooms we did for our clients,” said Denning. A screen provided the “shot of red” that Fourcade recommended for every room. For the Paris apartment’s master bedroom, the partners chose an Italian Empire bed, a XIX century Russian chandelier and a pair of tasseled XIX century French bergères. Signature touches included plenty of lamps and double- and triple-hung oil paintings.The Great Statue of Liberty, ready in Paris for shipment to New York, in Rue de Chazelles, Vintage Postcard
Life
Who: Vincent Gabriel Fourcade (February 27, 1934 – December 23, 1992) and Robert Denning (March 13, 1927 – August 26, 2005)
Vincent Fourcade was a French interior designer and the business and life partner of Robert Denning. "Outrageous luxury is what our clients want," he once said. A handsome eligible bachelor, he was never without invitations in the United States either. He tried a career in banking, the business of his father and grandfather in Paris. He met Robert Denning in 1959. Denning, a protégé of Edgar de Evia, had acquired an eye for design and effect from working with the photographer on sets for many fabric and furniture accounts, and with whom he shared one of the most magnificent Manhattan apartments on the top three floors of the Rhinelander Mansion. It would be here that early clients such as Lillian Bostwick Phipps and her husband Ogden Phipps would be entertained, as de Evia was spending more and more time on his estate in Greenwich, Connecticut. While Vincent would take Ogden Phipps to good dealers where he would spend millions of dollars on signed pieces of French furniture, Bob would take Lillian Bostwick Phipps down to 11th Street. "It infuriated Vincent. He used to say “Bobby, you have ruined the Phippses for me by giving Mrs. Phipps that strange appetite for 11th Street.” Early in the 1980s Fourcade contracted AIDS. He kept his looks and strength through most of that decade as Denning and he would divide their time between New York and Paris, crossing the Atlantic on the Concorde. His older brother Xavier Fourcade, the internationally known contemporary art dealer, died of the disease in 1987 at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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