reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
[personal profile] reviews_and_ramblings
Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, known as Viscount Corvedale from 1937 to 1947, was a British socialist politician who had a career at political odds with his father, the Conservative prime minister Stanley Baldwin.
Born: March 1, 1899, Malvern Hills District, United Kingdom
Died: August 10, 1958, London, United Kingdom
Education: Eton College
Lived: Shirburn Castle, Castle Rd, Shirburn, Watlington, Oxfordshire OX49 5DJ, UK (51.65756, -0.99379)
93 Eaton Square, Belgravia, London SW1W 9DA, UK
Astley Hall, Church Ln, Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire DY13 0RJ, UK (52.30761, -2.2959)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161195675
Party: Labour Party
Parents: Lucy Baldwin, Countess Baldwin of Bewdley, Stanley Baldwin
Grandparent: Alfred Baldwin

Oliver Baldwin was a British politician, son of three-time Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin. The Daily Mail on August 5, 1931, was dominated by a story claiming that Oliver Baldwin was living with a man named John Boyle. “We do not know if Mr. Oliver Baldwin and Mr. John Boyle are indulging in unnatural vice, but if they are committing criminal acts the police should be informed and a criminal prosecution brought.” That afternoon Stanley Baldwin gave a press conference with his wife Lucy and Oliver. He said that Oliver had the love and support of himself and his wife. They knew that he and John Boyle were close friends and were living together. What they did in their personal lives was no one's business and certainly not a matter for the law. In 1948, Oliver was appointed Governor of the Leeward Islands and took John Boyle with him.

Together from 1923 & 1958: 35 years.
John Parke Boyle (1893 - 1969)
Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, Viscount Corvedale (March 1, 1899 – August 10, 1958)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: Shirburn Castle is at the village of Shirburn, 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Thame, Oxfordshire. Shirburn Castle was the seat of the Earls of Macclesfield.

Address: Castle Rd, Shirburn, Watlington, Oxfordshire OX49 5DJ, UK (51.65756, -0.99379)

Place
George Parker, 2nd Earl of Macclesfield (c.1695–1764), celebrated as an astronomer, spent much time conducting astronomical observations at Shirburn Castle, which his father had bought in 1716. Here he built an observatory and a chemical laboratory. The observatory was "equipped with the finest existing instruments" and the 2nd Earl of Macclesfield used it from 1740. In 1761 the astronomer Thomas Hornsby observed the transit of Venus from the castle grounds. The Macclesfield Psalter, a lavishly illuminated manuscript from the English region of East Anglia, written in Latin and produced around 1330, was discovered in Shirburn Castle in 2004 when the contents of the Library were catalogued for auction. The present owner of the castle is the Beechwood Estates Company, the Macclesfield family estate management company. Following a long-running and acrimonious court battle, Richard Timothy George Mansfield Parker, the 9th Earl of Macclesfield, was evicted from the family seat at the end of 2004. The castle was used for external shots of Midsomer Priory for the popular television series “Midsomer Murders.”

Life
Who: Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (March 1, 1899 – August 10, 1958) and John Parke Boyle (July 30, 1893 – February 24, 1969)
On his return from Armenia Oliver Baldwin made two major decisions. First, any talk of engagement to Dorothea Arbuthnot was a fraud; he was homosexual and needed to live the rest of his life with a male partner, whom he found in the person of John Parke Boyle, the son of an army officer, descended from the earls of Cork. Together they set up home in Oxfordshire, first at Shirburn and then at North Stoke, keeping geese and hens and taking in lodgers, with Oliver trying to make money by writing. He refused to accept money from his father, except for small cheques at Christmas or for his birthday. Second, Oliver decided his politics lay decisively on the left. The substance of an interview he gave to the Westminster Gazette was taken up by Fred Gorle of the Social Democratic Federation. Baldwin was invited to become a member, which he immediately did. H. M. Hyndman, the guiding spirit of the SDF, remained his political inspiration for the rest of his life. Some members of his family thought that the adoption of socialism was deeply treacherous, but Stanley Baldwin was always warm, generous and understanding of the idealism of his elder son. His mother, coming from a background where the questioning of received ideas was not just possible but expected, was also supportive, and on a personal level too – she wrote to John Boyle to say, “Thank you for loving my Oliver.” Oliver Baldwin threw a party in honour of his father, on December 15, 1938. In Oliver’s words “it was a wonderful evening and made the old man very happy.” The following day Stanley wrote to his son, “I enjoyed every minute of your happy party last night. In the excitement of leaving I don’t believe I said Good Night to Johnny, whose work as caterer was beyond praise. Bless you. Your loving old Father.” Oliver’s parents treated John Boyle as an ideal son-in-law and would begin letters to him with “My dear Johnny.” John Parke Boyle was the son of Major Charles John Boyle and Lillian Kennedy Pochin. He was educated at Bradfield School and was invested as a Fellow, Zoological Society (F.Z.S.) His sister Lilian Joanna Vere Boyle married George Loveden William Henry Parker (1888-1975), 7th Earl of Macclesfield, son of George Augustus Parker, Viscount Parker and Carine Agnes Loveden, on 9 June 1909. For a time, Oliver and John lived at Shirburn at John’s brother-in-law’s castle, before moving to North Stoke. John Parke Boyle is buried at St Mary the Virgin (Church Lane, North Stoke, Oxfordshire, OX10 6BQ).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: Astley Hall is a country house in Astley near Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire. The hall is significant as the home of Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin, who died here in 1947. It is now operated as a nursing home by Heritage Manor Ltd and known as Astley Hall Care Home.

Address: Church Ln, Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire DY13 0RJ, UK (52.30761, -2.2959)

Place
Astley Hall is a small, three storey country house set in 20 acres of parkland, situated two miles outside Stourport-on-Severn. The house consists of a main block that is linked to an L-shaped stable wing. In addition, the estate features a separate park lodge (Baldwin Lodge), formal garden and kitchen garden. The present buildings date from mid-XIX century with early XX century additions. To the right of the main house is a stone Tudor arched garden entrance, to the left of the main house is a slightly later cross-gabled extension with clock and brick stable range with stone dressings. The main house is an ashlar construction with slate roof. On the roof there are grouped chimneys with decorative shafting. The Jacobean façade features a 3-storey 3-bay centre block and 2-storey single bay wings with cornices, parapets and shaped gables. The outer bays of main block have 2-storey angled bay windows with open parapets. Access to the main house is via a semi-circular headed doorway with rusticated arch and a Ionic motif above a keystone. Above the porch is inscribed "SLB 1912,” which refers to the date of the final acquisition of the house and additions to it by Stanley and Lucy Baldwin. The porch is flanked by a transomed window and Ionic pilasters. On the interior, the entrance lobby has a Jacobean strapwork ceiling. On the garden front, the main house is slightly plainer with a 2-storey pedimented porch containing a coat of arms. The extension to the right has on first floor Ionic 3-bay loggia with arched central bay, a further extension to right terminates in a rendered pavilion possibly concealing water tower. The main house at Astley Hall was built between 1830 and 1850 for the Lea family. Thomas Simcox Lea, of Astley Hall, was High Sheriff of Worcestershire in 1845. At the beginning of the XX century it was sold to Stanley Baldwin, who lived at Astley Hall from 1902 until his death in 1947. In 1912 he managed to buy the whole of the house and its additions. Lucy Baldwin died of a heart attack at Astley Hall in June 1945. Stanley Baldwin, then 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, continued to live at Astley Hall until his death there on 1December 4, 1947. After Lord Baldwin’s death, Astley Hall was sold and became a school, and later a care home. Astley Hall was acquired by its current owners in May 2012. It is now in institutional use as a nursing home and not open to the public.

Life
Who: Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (March 1, 1899 – August 10, 1958) and John Parke Boyle (July 30, 1893 – February 24, 1969)
Oliver Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, known as Viscount Corvedale from 1937 to 1947, was a British socialist politician who had a career at political odds with his father, the Conservative prime minister Stanley Baldwin. Educated at Eton, which he hated, Baldwin left as soon as he could. After serving in the army during WWI he undertook various jobs, including a brief appointment as an officer in the Armenian army, and wrote journalism and books on a range of topics. He served two terms as a Labour Member of Parliament between 1929 and 1947. Baldwin never achieved ministerial office in Britain. His last post was as Governor of the Leeward Islands, from 1948 to 1950. After WWII Baldwin served briefly as British Vice-Consul in Boulogne, and then travelled in north Africa. He refused to be supported by his father, and earned a living as a journalist and travel writer. A chance meeting in Alexandria led to an appointment as an infantry instructor in the newly-independent Armenia, but soon after he took up the post in 1920 the democratic government collapsed and Baldwin was imprisoned by Bolshevik-backed revolutionaries. He was freed two months later when democracy was restored, but en route back to Britain he was arrested by the Turkish authorities, accused of spying for Soviet Russia. He was held for five months, in grim conditions, with execution a constant threat. He later wrote a book about his experiences, called “Six Prisons and Two Revolutions.” After his release Baldwin returned to Britain, and in 1922 was briefly engaged to Dorothea ("Doreen") Arbuthnot, the daughter of a political ally of his father. Coming to terms with the fact that he was homosexual, Baldwin broke off the engagement, and settled with John ("Johnnie") Boyle. Described in The New Statesman as "a charming ne’er-do-well,” Boyle, who was six years older than Baldwin, became his lifelong partner. Boyle’s family came from Oxfordshire, where he and Baldwin set up home together, living in what the biographer Christopher J Walker describes as "gentle, amicable, animal-loving, primitive, homosexual socialism.” Oliver’s mother, Lucy, arrived to write to Johnnie “Thank you for loving my Oliver.” In February 1948 Baldwin was appointed Governor and Commander in Chief of the Leeward Islands, a British colonial territory in the Caribbean. Boyle accompanied him, to the disapproval of some of the British establishment in Antigua. Partly for this reason, and partly because Baldwin made no secret of his continuing socialist views or his desire for multiracial inclusiveness, he was recalled in 1950.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: English Heritage Blue Plaque: 93 Eaton Square, Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (1867–1947), "Prime Minister lived here"

Address: Eaton Square, Belgravia, London SW1W 9DA, UK

Place
Eaton Square is a residential garden square in London’s Belgravia district. Eaton Square is one of the three garden squares built by the Grosvenor family when they developed the main part of Belgravia in the XIX century, and is named after Eaton Hall, the Grosvenor country house in Cheshire. Eaton Square is larger but less grand than the central feature of the district, Belgrave Square, and both larger and grander than Chester Square. The first block was laid out by Thomas Cubitt from 1827.

Notable queer residents at Eaton Square:
• No. 1, SW1W 9DA, Engligh Blue Plaque: Robert, Lord Boothby (1900-1986), “Politician, Author and Broadcaster lived here 1946-1986.” Often known as Bob Boothby, was a British Conservative politician. Boothby was openly bisexual, in a time when male homosexual activity was a criminal offence. While an undergraduate at Magdalen College, Oxford, Boothby earned the nickname "the Palladium", because "he was twice nightly". He later spoke about the role of a speculated homosexual relationship in the drowning of his friend Michael Llewelyn Davies (one of the models for Peter Pan) and fellow Oxonian Rupert Buxton. From 1954 he campaigned publicly for homosexual law reform. In 1963 Boothby began an illicit affair with East End cat burglar Leslie Holt (died 1979), a younger man he met at a gambling club. Holt introduced him to the gangster Ronald Kray, the younger, homosexual, Kray twin. After his death from a heart attack in Westminster Hospital, London, aged 86, Boothby's ashes were scattered at Rattray Head near Crimond, Aberdeenshire, off the coast of his former constituency.
• No. 93, SW1W 9AQ, Engligh Blue Plaque: Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (1867-1947), “Prime Minister lived here”. Oliver Baldwin (1899-1958) was born at Astley Hall, Worcestershire, the elder son of the businessman Stanley Baldwin and his wife Lucy, née Ridsdale. Baldwin senior was elected a Conservative MP in 1908, and rose within fifteen years to become prime minister. Coming to terms with the fact that he was homosexual, Oliver Baldwin broke off his engagement, and settled with John ("Johnnie") Boyle. Described in The New Statesman as "a charming ne’er-do-well,” Boyle, who was six years older than Baldwin, became his lifelong partner. Boyle’s family came from Oxfordshire, where he and Baldwin set up home together, living in what the biographer Christopher J Walker describes as "gentle, amicable, animal-loving, primitive, homosexual socialism.”
• Admiral Henry John Codrington lived at No. 112, SW1W 9AE, South side of Eaton Square. Emily Faithfull (1835-1895) had been companion to Mrs. Helen Codrington for 10 years. When Admiral Henry John Codrington returned from the Crimea, he told Emily to leave the house, threatening to have the reason for her dismissal made public. Codrington (1808-1877) was a Royal Navy officer. As a junior officer, he saw action supporting the blockade of Algiers by Greek revolutionaries during the Greek War of Independence and was later present at the Battle of Navarino during the same war. He later undertook a survey of enemy positions prior to the bombardment of Acre during the Egyptian–Ottoman War. As a captain, Codrington provided refuge on board ship for Leopold II, Grand Duke of Tuscany and his family who were fleeing from revolutionary forces and then commanded the HMS Royal George in the Baltic Sea during the Crimean War. He went on to be Admiral superintendent of Malta Dockyard and then Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth. In April 1849 Codrington married Helen Jane Webb; they had two daughters. Following a much publicised divorce in 1864 in which the Admiral accused his first wife of having a close relationship with Emily Faithfull, he married Catherine Aitchison (née Compton) in August 1869. Helen Codrington, the younger of the two daughters of Henry Codrington, married in 1878 John Roche Dasent, the eldest son of George Webbe Dasent. Anne Jane Codrington married in 1882, Henry Stormont (Finch-Hatton), 13th Earl of Winchilsea and 8th Earl of Nottingham, descendent of Sir John Finch. When Admiral Codrington filed for divorce on grounds of adultery, Helen Codrington counterclaimed with the accusation that in October 1856 he had attempted to rape Faithfull while she was a guest in their house. At first, Emily Faithfull agreed to give evidence on behalf of Mrs. Codrington but later changed her mind. N° 111 and 112 in Eaton Square was sold in 2010 for 24 million pound.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Profile

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
reviews_and_ramblings

June 2017

S M T W T F S
     1 23
4 5 6 7 8910
11 12 1314 151617
1819 2021 22 23 24
252627282930 

Most Popular Tags

Disclaimer

All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
I'm associated with Amazon/USA Affiliates Programs.
Books reviewed on this site were usually provided at no cost by the publisher or author. However, some books were purchased by the reviewer and not provided for free. For information on how a particular title was obtained, please contact by email the blog's owner.
Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jun. 25th, 2017 03:49 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios