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Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women's suffrage movement in England.
Born: December 9, 1869, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
Died: March 27, 1947, Tenterden, United Kingdom
Education: Royal Academy of Music
Lived: Priest’s House, Small Hythe Rd, Tenterden, Kent TN30 7NG, UK (51.0653, 0.68183)
31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, UK (51.51107, -0.12449)
Fallows Green, Harpenden, Hertfordshire
7 Smith Square, SW1P
Burleigh Mansions, 96 St Martin’s Lane, WC2N
22 Barkston Gardens, SW5
221 Camden Road, NW1
44 Finborough Road, SW10
33 Longridge Road, SW5
20 Taviton Street, WC1H
Buried: St John the Baptist, Smallhythe Road, Smallhythe, Kent, TN307NG (memorial)
Buried alongside: Christabel Marshall and Clare Atwood
Find A Grave Memorial# 161166985
Movies: Victory and Peace, Her Greatest Performance, God and the Man, The Impossible Woman
Parents: Edward William Godwin, Ellen Terry
Siblings: Edward Gordon Craig

Edith Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women's suffrage movement in England. She was the daughter
of Victorian era actress Ellen Terry and the progressive English architect-designer Edward William Godwin. Her marriage to Martin Shaw in 1903 was prevented by Ellen Terry, out of jealousy for her daughter's affection, and by Christabel Marshall, with whom she lived from 1899 until they were joined in 1916 by the artist Clare Atwood, living in a ménage à trois until Craig's death in 1947. Her family looked down her lesbian lifestyle. Her brother Edward said Edith's sexuality was a result of her "hatred of men, initiated by the hatred of her father". Craig became involved in several books about her mother and George Bernard Shaw, which created a rift with her brother, who asked Craig not to write about their mother. In 1932, Craig adopted Ruby Chelta Craig. Craig was reconciled with her brother some time before her death.

Together from 1899 to 1947: 48 years.
Christabel Gertrude Marshall aka Christopher Marie St John (October 24, 1871 – October 20, 1960)
Clare “Tony” Atwood (May 11, 1866 – August 2, 1962)
Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig (December 9, 1869 – March 27, 1947)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
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School: The Royal Academy of Music (Marylebone Rd, Marylebone, London NW1 5HT) is a conservatoire in London, a constituent college of the University of London and is one of the top conservatoires in the world. It was founded in 1822 and is Britain's oldest degree-granting music school. It received a Royal Charter in 1830. Edith Craig (1869–1947) attended the Royal Academy of Music and held a certificate in piano from Trinity College. In her later years, after the death of her mother, Craig dictated her memoirs to her friend Vera Holme, known as Jacko. Jacko wrote them down in a quarto notebook that was "lost in an attic" for decades and then sold to Ann Rachlin in 1978. They included Craig's reminiscences of her childhood and life with her mother, Edward Gordon Craig and Henry Irving. Rachlin published them in her book “Edy was a Lady” in 2011.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: Edith “Edy” Craig (1869-1947), like her younger brother Edward, was illegitimate, as her mother, Ellen Terry, was still married to her first husband George Frederic Watts when she eloped with architect-designer Edward William Godwin in 1868. Edith Craig was born the following year at Gusterwoods Common in Hertfordshire, and was given the surname “Craig” to avoid the stigma of illegitimacy. The family lived in Fallows Green, Harpenden AL5 4HD, designed by Godwin, until 1874. The couple separated in 1875.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544067568 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544067569
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House: In 1916 Clare Atwood moved into the flat at 31 Bedford Street, Covent Garden, that Edith Craig shared with Christabel Marshall, forming a permanent ménage à trois.

Address: 31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, UK (51.51107, -0.12449)

Place
Christabel Marshall lived with Ellen Terry’s daughter Edith Craig from 1899 to Craig’s death in 1947. They lived together at 7 Smith Square, Westminster, London SW1P 3HT, from 1899 to 1907, and then 31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, from 1910 to 1940, as well as Priest’s House, Tenterden, Kent. Ellen Terry’s physical and mental health deteriorated slowly over a number of years. By the 1920s her eyesight was very poor and she had become increasingly confused. For financial reasons she was obliged to sell her Chelsea house in 1921 and took up residence in a smaller flat in Burleigh Mansions, 96 St Martin's Ln, London WC2N 4AX. In her diary for April 26, she reflects upon the move: “I am unhinged (not unhappy) and comfortable. I wonder where everything is. Cannot remember new things. All is changed. Change at 73 puzzles the will. I live in puzzledom.” She retained her country home at Smallhythe, however, and it was there she spent her last years, gradually “drifting away into a strange vague world where nothing is real and people bear no names.” She died early in the morning on 21 July 1928, following a paralysing stroke. The writer Christopher St John (née Christabel Marshall), present at Ellen’s bedside with her daughter Edith Craig, described her final hours: “The face had not been much changed by that cruel blow from Nature. But the breath of life had changed. It came more and more painfully as the dawn approached. The hand, gripping Edy’s, moved from finger to finger, and with a last effort of the voice, not miraculously clear and loud now, but thick and indistinct, spelt out on those fingers the word ‘Happy’, ‘H-a-p-p-y’ over and over again.” Their friends Radclyffe Hall (1880-1943) and Una Troubridge lived from 1933 to 1935 in nearby 17 Talbot House, 98 St Martin's Ln, London WC2N 4AX. At the same address, 31 Bedford Street, lived Margaret Webster (1905-1972), American-British theater actress, producer and director, when she was a child with her parents. Margaret Webster was born in New York City, the daughter of two famous actors, Ben Webster and Dame May Whitty. In the summer of 1906, the family sailed back to England, where Margaret was baptized on October 29, 1907, in St. Paul’s Church (known as the “Actors’ Church”) in Covent Garden. The Websters lived in an upstairs flat in a multistory, redbrick Victorian building. When she was two years old in November 1907, the family returned to the United States and settled in New York City. When the family returned to London a year later, they settled again into the flat on Bedford Street where they remained until the WWII.

Life
Who: Christabel Gertrude Marshall (October 24, 1871 – October 20, 1960), aka Christopher Marie St John
Christabel Marshall was a British campaigner for women’s suffrage, a playwright and author. Marshall lived in a ménage à trois with the artist Clare Atwood and the actress, theatre director, producer and costume designer Edith Craig from 1916 until Craig’s death in 1947. She, Edith Craig and Clare Atwood were friends with many artists and writers including lesbian novelist Radclyffe Hall, who lived near Tenterden in Rye. As Christopher St John in 1915, she published her autobiographical novel “Hungerheart,” which she had started in 1899, and which she based on her relationship with Edith Craig and her own involvement in the women’s suffrage movement. St John was contracted by Ellen Terry to assist on various publications. After Terry’s death in 1928, St John published the “Shaw–Terry Correspondence” (1931) and “Terry’s Four Lectures on Shakespeare” (1932.) St John and Craig revised and edited “Terry’s Memoirs” (1933.) After Edith Craig’s death in 1947, St John and Atwood helped to keep the Ellen Terry Memorial Museum in operation. Some of St John’s papers have survived in the National Trust’s Ellen Terry and Edith Craig Archive. Marshall died from pneumonia connected with heart disease at Tenterden in 1960.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: The home of Victorian actress Ellen Terry, where you can explore the house, cottage garden and even attend a show at the XVII century thatched Barn Theatre.

Address: B2082, Tenterden, Kent TN30 7NG, UK (51.0653, 0.68183)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 11.00-17.00 (managed by the National Trust)
Phone:+44 1580 762334
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/smallhythe-place
English Heritage Building ID: 179818 (Grade II, 1950)

Place
Built in the late XV or early XVI century
Smallhythe Place in Small Hythe, near Tenterden in Kent, is a half-timbered house and since 1947 is cared for by the National Trust. The house was originally called “Port House” and before the River Rother and the sea receded it served a thriving shipyard: in Old English hythe means "landing place.” It was the home of the Victorian actress Ellen Terry from 1899 to her death in the house in 1928. The house contains Ellen Terry’s theatre collection, while the cottage grounds include her rose garden, orchard, nuttery and the working Barn Theatre. Terry first saw the house in the company of Henry Irving, the manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London’s Covent Garden, with whom she shared a famous theatrical partnership for nearly 24 years. The house was opened to the public by Terry’s daughter Edith Craig in 1929, as a memorial to her mother. The National Trust supported Craig in her running of the museum from 1939, and took over the property when she died in 1947. There are several paintings by the artist Clare Atwood, one of the romantic companions of Edith Craig. In an adjoining room is a letter from Oscar Wilde begging Terry to accept a copy of his first play. There is also a selection of sumptuous costumes dating from Terry’s time at the Lyceum Theatre. In 1929, Craig set up the Barn Theatre in the house’s grounds, where the plays of William Shakespeare were performed every year on the anniversary of her mother’s death. This tradition continues to this day.

Life
Who: Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig (December 9, 1869 – March 27, 1947)
Edith Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women’s suffrage movement in England. She was the daughter of Victorian era actress Ellen Terry and the progressive architect-designer Edward William Godwin, and the sister of theatre practitioner Edward Gordon Craig. As a lesbian, an active campaigner for women’s suffrage, and a woman working as a theatre director and producer, Edith Craig has been recovered by feminist scholars as well as theatre historians. Craig lived in a ménage à trois with the dramatist Christabel Marshall (Christopher Marie St John, 1871-1960) and the artist Clare “Tony” Atwood (1866-1962) from 1916 until her death. Virginia Woolf is said to have used Edith Craig as a model for the character of Miss LaTrobe in her novel “Between the Acts” (1941.) After Edith Craig’s death in 1947, St John and Atwood helped to keep the Ellen Terry Memorial Museum in operation. Marshall died from pneumonia connected with heart disease at Tenterden in 1960. Atwood suffered a fractured femur, senile myocarditis and heart failure, and died at Kench Hill Nursing Home, Tenterden, Kent, on August 2, 1962. When Edith Craig died she left a request that her ashes be buried with her two lesbian partners. By the time they passed away in the 1960s, Edy’s ashes were mislaid. Dismayed at the loss of her ashes, her two friend opted for burial and they lie side by side next to the gate of the tiny churchyard at St John the Baptist (Smallhythe Road, Smallhythe, Kent, TN30 7NG), leading to the Priest’s House where they had lived with Edy. A memorial stone to Edith Craig is in the same cemetery.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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