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Kenneth Macpherson was born in Scotland, the son of Scottish painter, John 'Pop' Macpherson and Clara Macpherson. Descended from 6 generations of artists, Macpherson was a novelist, photographer, critic and film-maker.
Born: March 27, 1902, Scotland, United Kingdom
Died: 1971, Cetona
Lived: Villa Tuoro, Via Tuoro, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)
Villa Kenwin, 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)
Riant Chateau, Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161096858
Spouse: Bryher (m. 1927–1947)
Movies: Borderline, Dreams That Money Can Buy

Bryher was the pen name of the novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. In 1921, she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. The same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D. 's lover (H.D. was Bryher’s lover as well). In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin (Kenneth + Winifred). They formally adopted H.D.'s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson's child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, even if she continued to provide for him. Bryher and H.D. no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until H.D.’s death in 1961. Bryher, H.D., and Macpherson formed the film magazine Close Up, and the POOL Group. Only one POOL film, Borderline (1930), starring H.D. and Paul Roberson, survives in its entirety.

Together from 1927 to 1947: 20 years.
Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
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George Norman Douglas was a British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro", which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Coucy Lyons. Bryher, Macpherson’s wife, supported her husband and his friend on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the aging Douglas. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas's death in 1952, writing an epitaph for Douglas, from which the Latin inscription, on Douglas's gravestone, is derived (Omnes Eodem Cogimur = "We are all driven to the same end" (i.e., death)). Douglas’s last words apparently were: "Get those fucking nuns away from me." Macpherson was Douglas’s heir, and upon his death, everything went to Islay Lyons.

They met in 1931 and remained friends until Douglas’s death in 1952: 21 years.
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 – June 14, 1971)
Norman Douglas (December 8, 1868 - February 7, 1952)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
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Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Islay Lyons was a notable Welsh photographer, novelist and linguist. During the WWII, he served in North Africa and then he was sent to the Far East to learn Japanese in 3 months. He did this with amongst others, Richard Mason, who was a lifelong friend and cousin by marriage. The character ‘Peter’ in Mason’s book The Wind Cannot Read portrays Lyons. Lyons had been the last lover of the filmmaker, Kenneth Macpherson, both of them living in the ‘Villa Tuoro’ on Capri. Norman Douglas was was their constant companion, there, during the last years of Douglas’s life. Both Macpherson and Lyons were at Norman Douglas’s bedside when he died. Douglas’s estate went to Macpherson, and at Macpherson’s death, to Islay Lyons. Another lover of Macpherson was New York cabaret singer, Jimmie Daniels. Macpherson’s wife, Bryher, financed Daniels and Macpherson’s life in New York. Before Kenneth Macpherson, in Daniels’s life there was the famed architect, Philip Johnson. They met around 1934 when Jimmie was first starting to get some real recognition as an entertainer.

Together from 1947 to 1971: 24 years.
Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons (March 7, 1922 – November 17, 1993)
Jimmie Daniels (1908 - June 29, 1984)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: In September 1931, Kenneth Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build on plans drawn up several years earlier by Alexander Ferenczy.

Address: 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)

Place
The home, which overlooked Lake Geneva, came to be known as Kenwin, derived from the names of its commissioners, Kenneth and Winifred, and would double as a film studio and home, not only for themselves, but also for an assortment of dogs, cats, and monkeys. Bryher gave her address, at the time, as Villa Kenwin, Chemin de Vallon, 1814 Burier-La-Tour, Vaud, Switzerland. During the war years, Bryher would use Kenwin as a staging post for the evacuation of refugees from Nazi Germany. Abandoned after the death of Bryher who will live there until 1983, it was bought in 1987 by the architect Giovanni Pezzoli who undertook a complete renovation. It is registered as a Swiss cultural object of national importance. In 1996, a documentary film entitled "Kenwin" and telling the story of the villa Kenwin was directed by Véronique Goël on the basis of archive footage.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Bryher was the pen name of the English novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. Her father was the shipowner and financier John Ellerman, who at the time of his death in 1933, was the richest Englishman who had ever lived. He lived with her mother Hannah Glover, but did not marry her until 1908. During the 1920s, Bryher was an unconventional figure in Paris. Among her circle of friends were Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Beach and Berenice Abbott. Her wealth enabled her to give financial support to struggling writers, including Joyce and Edith Sitwell. She also helped with finance for Sylvia Beach’s bookshop Shakespeare and Company and certain publishing ventures, and started a film company Pool Group. She also helped provide funds to purchase a flat in Paris for the destitute Dada artist and writer Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. In 1918 she met and became involved in a lesbian relationship with poet Hilda Doolittle “H.D.” The relationship was an open one, with both taking other partners. In 1921 she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. That same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D.’s lover. In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin. They formally adopted H.D.’s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson’s child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, she and Doolittle no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until Doolittle’s death in 1961.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544068435 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544068433
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Riant Chateau, Territet (1820)

House: Since 1921, H.D. had been a close friend of Bryher. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle.

Address: Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)

Place
Built in 1913, Design by Michel Polak (1885-1948)
The Riant Chateau was built for Belgian businessman Lucien Kaisin. This complex was built for a cosmopolitan clientele and was considered very advanced for its time. It had the most modern elevators and central heating of its time, and was furnished with luxurious fittings. In its heyday, it was the meeting place for avant-garde of the cinema; it was frequently visited by such notables as Eisenstein, Room and Pabst and housed the headquarters of the publishers of the magazine Pool. The redevelopment program has ensured that the spirit of the building has been retained, while all essential services have been replaced and modern technology added. The interior of the building reflects the extravagance and luxury of the Belle Époque, with high ceilings, elaborate cornices, inlaid mirrors, stained glass, heavy oak doors, and antique oak parquet floors. Bordering the Riant Chateau is Rose Park, a beautiful park which extends to the Anglican church. At present an underground parking space is being built beneath Rose Park which is being re-landscaped and replanted with more trees for added privacy. On the other side of the garden lies the Anglican church, and beyond that the terminus of the Mont Pelerin funicular. Rose Park was a favorite haunt of the Austrian Empress Sissi, whose statue serves as a reminder to today’s visitors.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971), Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983) and Hilda "H.D." Doolittle (September 10, 1886 – September 27, 1961)
It was in 1927, from their base in Territet, that Kenneth Macpherson, Bryher and HD launched themselves as the Pool Group. Pool would veer away from the West’s commercial model of film production, and produce material which would promote cinematography as an “art form.” Their model would be based on the work coming out of Germany, particularly G W Pabst, and coming out of Russia, particularly Sergei Eisenstein. Their subject matter would be human behaviour, and its many facets, and their task would be representing this behaviour on screen, influenced by the work of Freud. Also at Territet, Macpherson founded the influential film journal, Close Up, dedicated to "independent cinema and cinema from around the world.” The first issue of Close Up, describing itself on the front cover as an "international magazine devoted to film art,” appeared in July 1927. Macpherson was editor, with Bryher as assistant editor, and Doolittle making regular contributions. Macpherson, who was particularly influenced by the Russian film-maker Sergei Eisenstein and whom he first met in 1929, "dictated the tone and direction of the publication, contributing articles that defined the role of the director and defended the integrity of cinema and its right to be considered as art.” Close Up published many of the first translations of Eisenstein’s ideas. Macpherson continued as the main editor until the magazine’s demise in 1933. Bryher is buried at Cimetière Saint-Martin (Boulevard Saint-Martin, 1800 Vevey).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544068435 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544068433
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House: Villa Tuoro is forever linked to the figure of Scots writer Norman Douglas, who lived here from the post-war period up until the time of his death in 1952. During those years, the house was the property of his great friend Kenneth McPherson. McPherson went on living there until 1957 together with Islay Bowe-Lyons, a cousin of the Queen Mother of England.

Address: Via Tuoro, 80076 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)

Place
Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro,” which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons. Today Villa Tuoro is the residence of Semiramis Zola and her husband John Lee, who bought it directly from Kenneth McPherson. Bowe-Lyons personally attended to the landscaping of the garden. On the ground floor, in the room where Douglas used to work, his writing desk and books are still in place. The windows here all look onto the garden, while as one mounts the stairs to the main floor, a panorama appears that stretches from Marina Piccola to the Certosa, and from Monte Solaro all the way to Ischia.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons (March 7, 1922 – November 17, 1993)
Kenneth Macpherson was born in Scotland, the son of Scottish painter, John “Pop” Macpherson and Clara Macpherson. Descended from 6 generations of artists, Macpherson was a novelist, photographer, critic and film-maker. His 1930 film, “Borderline,” is now vey much part of the curriculum in the study of modern cinematography today. In his work with the Pool Group (1927–1933), which he co-founded with Bryher and HD, Macpherson also established the influential film journal, Close Up. Macpherson’s story began in 1927, when he married English writer, Annie Winifred Ellerman, (known as Bryher in the literary world), the daughter of a British shipping magnate. Bryher’s inherited fortune would help to finance Macpherson’s projects. Although Bryher’s and Macpherson’s marriage lasted for twenty years, for much of the marriage, both Macpherson and Bryher had extra-marital affairs. Bryher was lesbian but Macpherson was distinctly bi-sexual. A sexual partner, common to both Bryher and Macpherson, was the American poet, Hilda Doolittle (known in literary circles as "HD.”) Doolittle had been a close friend of Bryher’s since 1921. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle, who brought along her 9-year-old daughter, Perdita. (Perdita’s father was Cecil Gray, the Scottish music critic and composer.) In 1928, Doolittle had a sexual relationship with Macpherson, becoming pregnant by him. The pregnancy would be aborted later that year. In the same year, Macpherson and Bryher formally adopted Perdita, registering her name as Frances Perdita Macpherson. In September 1931, Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build. After spending a few months in New York in 1935, Macpherson eventually based himself there to focus on writing, photography and his art collection. In 1947, Macpherson returned from America, spending much of his time in Switzerland and Italy. Bryher supported her husband and his friend, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons, on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the ageing Norman Douglas, the Scottish novelist. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas’s death in 1952, writing an epitaph for his gravestone, “Omnes Eodem Cogimur,” “Where we all must gather.” Macpherson then moved to Rome, and then, in 1965, he “retired” to Tuscany and then Thailand. Macpherson died in Cetona on June 14, 1971, leaving everything, including his inheritance from Douglas, to De Courcy Lyons. Lyons died on 1November 7, 1993, in Chiang-Mai (Mueang Chiang Mai District, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand). Following Lyons’s death, his heir, Manop Charoensuk, arranged for publication of a volume of Lyons’s photographs.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906692
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