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Born: Sheffield, United Kingdom
People also search for: Terry Jastrow, Laurie Slade, Peter Rowe
Anniversary: February 17, 1994

Award-winning theatre Composer Matthew Bugg and Marketing Professional Tobias "Toby" Oliver have been together since 1994. They live in Sheffield with their beloved Dachshund, Georgie. Matthew grew up in Sheffield and began his theatre training at the age of four. He achieved the highest mark in the country at A Level Music, and won the Roland Gregory Prize and Barber Scholarship at the University of Birmingham. Before even graduating, Matthew landed his first professional theatre job at the Mercury Theatre, Colchester. Tobias grew up in London and read English with Drama at the University of Sheffield. He went on to study Text and Performance at RADA and King’s College London. After 20 years working in the arts and major events industries he became Marketing Director of Mr. Bugg Presents, a music theatre company his husband, composer Matthew Bugg, and he set up with producer Keith Arrowsmith. They have taken their critically acclaimed production, Miss Nightingale – the musical written by Matthew, on two hugely successful tours of the UK, including a run in London’s West End. They are now working on their second show, alongside a potential USA production and movie version of Miss Nightingale.
Together since 1994: 21 years.
Matthew Bugg (born Sept. 19, 1974) & Tobias Oliver (born July 13, 1972)
Anniversary: February 17, 1994
Matthew and I met on the dance floor of a nightclub in Sheffield that had a ‘lesbian and gay night’ once a week. I was studying at University and he was training in music and dance. There was an instant attraction. I loved the beauty, abandon and joy with which he danced. And once we started talking, we did not stop until the club closed. However, at the time I had a boyfriend in London and managed to muster up just enough self-control to resist when Matthew tried to kiss me. So our relationship was initially based on friendship. We became the very best of friends spending hours together talking, dancing and laughing. (Nothing has changed!) As my relationship in London ended, it became clear that Matthew and I were meant to be. We finally enjoyed our first kiss at the same club at a Valentine’s Day night and have been together ever since. Our early years were spent living apart, spending hours on the phone and travelling across the country to see one another at weekends as I returned to London to begin my career and Matthew went to University. So much has changed since we met, the club is long closed and the equal rights we campaigned for are gradually coming into law. In 2007, we celebrated our 13th anniversary with a Civil Partnership in front of our family and friends. In 2015, now British law has changed again, we plan to convert this into a marriage. So much has changed, changed for the better. The beautiful boy I fell in love with has grown into a handsome man - it has been wonderful growing up together, I look forward to growing old together. -Toby Oliver



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Friedrich Alfred Krupp was a German steel manufacturer of the company Krupp. He was the son of Alfred Krupp and inherited the family business when his father died in 1887.
Born: February 17, 1854, Essen, Germany
Died: November 22, 1902, Essen, Germany
Lived: Villa Krupp, Viale Giacomo Matteotti, 12, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.54769, 14.24378)
Buried: Friedhof Bredeney, Essen, Essener Stadtkreis, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Find A Grave Memorial# 67917896
Spouse: Margarethe Krupp (m. 1882–1902)
Children: Bertha Krupp, Barbara Krupp
Parents: Bertha Krupp, Alfred Krupp
Grandchild: Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach

Friedrich Alfred Krupp loved the Italian island of Capri, where he often lived for some months in each year.
Address: Viale Giacomo Matteotti, 12, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.54769, 14.24378)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone:+39 081 837 0362
Place
Originally Villa Krupp was named Blaesus, in honor of the Greek poet. From 1906 to 1909, guest of the Settanni family, Maksim Gor’kij resided at the villa as well. After that, the villa was converted into an hotel, and the name was changed in Villa Krupp, in honor of Alfred Krupp, who built the street below and the gardens, which he donated to Capri. The Grand Hotel Quisisana is the largest and one of the best known hotels on the island of Capri. It is located in the heart of the old town of Capri, opposite the Hotel Residenza Capri and the Villa Sanfelice, to the south of the Piazza Umberto I. Set in gardens with "sprawling buildings [which] are painted a distinctive yellow and accented with vines," it is also a notable dining venue in the historic centre of Capri. British doctor George Sidney Clark established a sanatorium in 1845, turning it into the Grand Hotel Quisisana in 1861. "Qui si sana" means "here one heals" in Italian. The hotel contains 148 rooms. There are eight conference rooms, one of which can accommodate for up to 500 people. The La Colombaia restaurant serves lunch in the outdoor restaurant next to the pool and serves fresh seafood, pastas and pizzas, chicken dishes and fruits, cheeses and pastries. The Restaurant Quisi indoors serves Italian cuisine for dinner, accompanied by romantic music. It has been cited as one of Italy’s finest hotel restaurants. Since 1986, the Grand Hotel has been a member of The Leading Hotels of the World. They say of it, "Surrounded by its own lush park, the Quisisana is a veritable oasis of relaxation. Terraces overlook the sea and gardens, and the traditional, elegantly furnished accommodations – some with whirlpool baths – are the perfect expression of Capri’s Dolce Vita, famous throughout Italy and the world. Movie stars, royalty, politicians and heads of state have all chosen the Quisisana for their vacation on the Island of Capri, confirming the hotel as one of the world’s most exclusive resorts." Famous guests of the hotel include Russian writer Maxim Gorky, Russian singer Feodor Chaliapin, Oscar Wilde (together with Lord Alfred Douglas) and Friedrich Alfred Krupp. Other notable guests have been Tom Cruise, Sidney Sheldon, Gianni Agnelli, Claudette Colbert, Jean-Paul Sartre, Gerald Ford, and Sting. After escaping Egypt in 1952, King Farouk I was a guest of the hotel during part of his exile in Italy.
Life
Who: Friedrich Alfred Krupp (February 17, 1854 – November 22, 1902)
Friedrich Alfred Krupp was a German steel manufacturer of the company Krupp.Krupp was born in Essen, Germany. His father was Alfred Krupp. In 1887, Friedrich took over the leadership of his father’s company. He married Margarethe Krupp (born Freiin von Ende.) They had two daughters: Bertha and Barbara (married Tilo Freiherr von Wilmowsky.) Krupp increased and diversified the output of the Krupp Works, which he extended by the incorporation with them of other enterprises. A member of the Prussian Upper House and Council of State, he also sat in the Reichstag from 1893 to 1898. When in Capri, he stayed at the hotel Quisisana and had two yachts, Maya and Puritan. His hobby was Oceanography. He met Felix Anton Dohrn and Ignazio Cerio on Capri. On 15 November, 1902 the Social Democratic magazine Vorwärts claimed in an article that Friedrich Alfred Krupp was homosexual, that he had a number of liaisons with local boys and men and that his fondest attachment was to Adolfo Schiano, an 18-year-old barber and amateur musician. A week later, on November 22, 1902, Krupp committed suicide. In a speech at Krupp’s burial, Emperor Wilhelm II attacked the Social Democratic politicians, insisting that they had lied about Krupp’s sexual orientation. Krupp’s heirs began a suit against Vorwärts, but soon abandoned the action.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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At Friedhof Bredeney (Westerwaldstraße 6, 45133 Essen) is buried Friedrich Alfred Krupp (1854-1902), German steel manufacturer of the company Krupp. Krupp loved the Italian island of Capri, where he often lived for some months in each year. He stayed at the hotel Quisisana and had two yachts, Maya and Puritan. On 15 November, 1902 the Social Democratic magazine Vorwärts claimed in an article that Friedrich Alfred Krupp was homosexual, that he had a number of liaisons with local boys and men and that his fondest attachment was to Adolfo Schiano, an 18-year-old barber and amateur musician. A week after the German article was published, on November 22, 1902, Krupp committed suicide. In a speech at Krupp's burial, Emperor Wilhelm II attacked the Social Democratic politicians, insisting that they had lied about Krupp's sexual orientation. Krupp's heirs began a suit against Vorwärts, but soon abandoned the action.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard was an American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. Her influence was instrumental in the passage of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution.
Born: September 28, 1839, Churchville, New York, United States
Died: February 17, 1898, New York City, New York, United States
Lived: Frances Willard House, 1730 Chicago Ave, Evanston, IL 60201, USA (42.04891, -87.67872)
Frances Willard Schoolhouse, Rock County 4-H Fair Inc, 1301 Craig Ave, Janesville, WI 53545, USA (42.69161, -89.00531)
Buried: Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA, Plot: Section F
Find A Grave Memorial# 6555
Organizations founded: Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Prohibition Party

Frances Willard was an American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. Anna Adams Gordon was an American social reformer and songwriter. In 1877, Gordon met Willard at a Dwight L. Moody revival meeting, in the building where Willard was holding temperance meetings. The two became close friends, with Gordon continuing to play organ for Willard's meetings. Gordon eventually moved into Willard's residence as her personal secretary. Modern scholars have speculated on the precise nature of the relationship between Gordon and Willard (who preferred to be called "Frank"), believing both to have been lesbians. They remained intimate friends until Willard's death in 1898, at which time Lillian M. N. Stevens became president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, with Gordon as vice-president. That same year, Gordon also wrote a memorial biography of Willard. Upon Lillian Stevens' death in 1914, Anna Adams Gordon became president of the WCTU. “The loves of women for each other grow more numerous each day, and I have pondered much why these things were. That so little should be said about them surprises me, for they are everywhere…. In these days, when any capable and careful women can honorably earn her own support, there is no village that has not its examples of “two hearts in counsel,” both of which are feminine.” –Frances E. Willard, Glimpses of Fifty Years (1889)
Together from 1877 to 1898: 21 years.
Anna Adams Gordon (July 21, 1853 – June 15, 1931)
Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The Frances Willard Schoolhouse is located in Janesville, Wisconsin.
Address: Rock County 4-H Fair Inc, 1301 Craig Ave, Janesville, WI 53545, USA (42.69161, -89.00531)
Type: Education facility (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: 77000054, 1977
Place
The schoolhouse was built by Josiah Willard and his neighbor, David Inman. It was named after Willard’s daughter, Frances, the noted suffragist.
Life
Who: Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898)
In 1869, Frances Willard (1839-1898) was involved in the founding of Evanston Ladies’ College. In 1870, the college united with the former North Western Female College to become the Evanston College for Ladies, of which Willard became president. After only one year, the Evanston College for Ladies merged with Northwestern University and Willard became Northwestern’s first Dean of Women of the Women’s College. However, that position was to be short-lived due to her resignation in 1874. After her resignation, Willard focused her energies on a new career, traveling the American East Coast participating in the women’s temperance movement. Her tireless efforts for women’s suffrage and prohibition included a fifty-day speaking tour in 1874, an average of 30,000 miles of travel a year, and an average of four hundred lectures a year for a ten-year period, mostly with her longtime companion Anna Adams Gordon (1853-1931). In 1877, Gordon met Frances E. Willard at a Dwight L. Moody revival meeting, in the building where Willard was holding temperance meetings. Gordon’s younger brother Arthur had died just days before, a traumatic event which had, as Willard later wrote, driven Gordon "Godward.” The two became close friends, with Gordon continuing to play organ for Willard’s meetings. Gordon eventually moved into Willard’s residence as her personal secretary.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Frances Willard House was the home of Frances Willard and her family and was the longtime headquarters of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU.) Willard called the house Rest Cottage because it became a place for her to rest in between her tours and WCTU activities.
Address: 1730 Chicago Ave, Evanston, IL 60201, USA (42.04891, -87.67872)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +1 847-328-7500
National Register of Historic Places: 66000318, 1966. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The original 1865 house was probably based on a pattern book. It was an L-shaped building with vertical board and batten siding. The 1878 addition was consistent with the architectural form of the house but greatly expanded it. Proceeds from the sale of Willard’s autobiography were used to add large bay windows on the main facade around 1890. Willard made another addition in 1893. The two-story house is in the Carpenter Gothic style. It is painted pearl grey and has white trim. The front of the house has two columned porches. Three small porches lead to other entrances, and the second floor has a balcony on the rear. The three gables on the main facade have decorative trim and a turned finial in the center. There are seventeen rooms in the house, most with oak and walnut flooring.
Life
Who: Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898) and Anna Adams Gordon (July 21, 1853 – June 15, 1931)
Frances Willard was born in 1839 in Churchville, New York. When she was two, her family moved to Oberlin, Ohio, a town recently founded by ministers who wanted to build a community with strong Christian morals. When she was 18, Willard moved with her family to Evanston, Illinois to attend the Northwestern Female College. She spent the next sixteen years of her life as an educator at a variety of institutions across the county. In 1865, her father Josiah, who stayed in Evanston, built a house, which remains as the southern portion of the current structure. Frances Willard returned to Evanston and moved in with her father in 1871 when she accepted a position as Dean of the Women’s College at Northwestern. Unhappy with the role of women at the university, and frequently at odds with University President Charles Henry Fowler, Willard resigned three years later. Willard’s resignation prompted a change in her life. She resumed her position as a travelling educator, but began to focus on the study of temperance. In the summer of 1874, Willard travelled around the East Coast to meet with other temperance advocates. She also became a noted public speaker on the virtue. Returning to Evanston, she helped to found the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) and was elected its first corresponding secretary and first president of the Chicago chapter. Her brother Oliver died in 1878, and Frances decided to expand her Evanston home that April to accommodate his widow and four children. The next year, she was elected President of the WCTU. After her brother’s family moved to Germany, Willard began to rent out the northern section of her house to friends and fellow WCTU members. This section soon became used as an informal headquarters for the WCTU under Willard. Willard died in 1898 and left the entire house to the WCTU in her will. Two years later, the WCTU made the house in Evanston its national headquarters. The WCTU also made the house into a museum dedicated to Willard in that year. In 1910, the organization built the Literature Building in the rear of the property. Museum tours are now offered to the public on the first and third Sundays of every month. Willard is buried at Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago. Her lifelong companion Anna Adams Gordon is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, Mattapan, Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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At Rosehill Cemetery (5800 N Ravenswood Ave, Chicago, IL 60660) is buried Frances Willard (1839-1898), American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. In the same cemetery is buried Margaret “Marty” Mann (1904-1980), an early female member of Alcoholics Anonymous and author of the chapter "Women Suffer Too" in the second through fourth editions of the Big Book of AA.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Dieter Cunz was an emigre from Nazi Germany first to Switzerland and then to the U.S. who taught German language and literature as a professor at the University of Maryland from 1939 to 1957 and at Ohio ...
Born: August 4, 1910, Westerwald, Alpenrod, Germany
Died: February 17, 1969, Columbus, Ohio, United States
Education: Ohio State University
University of Maryland
Buried: Walnut Grove Cemetery, Worthington, Franklin County, Ohio, USA, Plot: Lot 178, Section D, Space #2 east
Buried alongside: Oskar Seidlin
Find A Grave Memorial# 36405794
Partner: Oskar Seidlin
Books: German for Beginners, The Maryland Germans

Richard Plant was a German-American writer. He is said to have written, in addition to the works published under his own name, several detective novels or Kriminalromane, with Dieter Cunz and Oskar Seidlin, under the collective pen name of Stefan Brockhoff. Upon the accession of the Nazis to power in Germany in 1933, and the enforcement of the Paragraph 175 against homosexuality, Plant was obliged to leave Germany for Switzerland in concert with his partner, Oskar Seidlin. In 1939, Seidlin obtained a lectureship (in 1941 elevated to assistant professorship) at Smith College for women in Northampton, Massachusetts. At Smith, he is said to have had a relationship with Newton Arvin. Seidlin also served on the Advisory Council of Princeton University for several terms. Plant is the author of The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War against Homosexuals, the first comprehensive book in English on the fate of the homosexuals in Nazi Germany. The horror of camp life is described through diaries, previously untranslated documents, and interviews with and letters from survivors, revealing how the anti-homosexual campaign was conducted.
Together from (before) 1933 to 1984: 51 years.
Oskar Seidlin (February 17, 1911 – December 11, 1984)
Richard Plant (July 22, 1910 – March 3, 1998)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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By the early 1900s, downtown Columbus residents and professors from The Ohio State University had built summer homes in Clintonville and the surrounding farmland was developed into housing developments shortly after the extension of the streetcar lines northward from Columbus. A business district developed in Beechwold, separated by nearly a mile of residences from the Clintonville district to the south. Both communities were entirely part of Columbus by the 1950s after it annexed most of Clinton Township.
Address: Walnut Grove Cemetery, 5561 Milton Ave, Columbus, OH 43085 (40.0759, -83.02371)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 614-885-5933
Place
Clintonville is a neighborhood in north-central Columbus, Ohio, with around 30,000 residents. Clintonville is an informal neighborhood. The southern border is loosely defined as Arcadia Avenue or the Glen Echo Ravine. To the east, either Interstate 71 or the adjacent railroad tracks are commonly accepted. The western boundary is assumed to be the Olentangy River. The northern border of Clintonville is the most ambiguous, with definitions anywhere in the 3 mi (4.8 km) stretch from Cooke Road to the southern border of Worthington. Worthington is a city in Franklin County, Ohio, and is a northern suburb of the larger Columbus. The population was 13,575 at the 2010 census. The city was founded in 1803 by the Scioto Company led by James Kilbourne, who was later elected to the United States House of Representatives, and named in honor of Thomas Worthington, who later became governor of Ohio.
Life
Who: Dieter Cunz (August 4, 1910 – February 17, 1969), Oskar Seidlin (February 17, 1911 – December 11, 1984) and Richard Plant (July 22, 1910 – March 3, 1998)
Dieter Cunz was an emigre from Nazi Germany first to Switzerland and then to the U.S. who taught German language and literature as a professor at the University of Maryland from 1939 to 1957 and at Ohio State University from 1957 until his death in 1969. He authored a number of fictional and non-fictional works. He studied at the University of Frankfurt. Here in the fall of 1931 he met two gay Jewish students of German literature, Richard Plaut and Oskar Koplowitz, and Koplowitz became his life partner. In 1938 Cunz, Koplowitz, and Plaut emigrated to the U.S., where within a year their paths diverged. While Plaut, who officially changed his name to Plant, remained in New York, Koplowitz, who changed his name to Seidlin, moved to Massachusetts in 1939 to take up a teaching position at Smith College. Cunz, who arrived in New York in August 1938, relocated to Maryland in October 1939. In 1957, Cunz accepted an offer to chair the German Department at Ohio State University following the departure of Bernhard Blume for Harvard University. Here he joined his partner Seidlin, who had been teaching at Ohio State since 1946, and the two built a house in the suburb Worthington. Cunz and Seidlin enjoyed summer vacations in the company of Richard Plant in Manomet, Massachusetts, and Mallnitz, Austria. Cunz was in declining health during his final years, suffering from high blood pressure and a heart valve defect. Even so, his death following a heart attack on February 17, 1969, at the age of 58, was unexpected and plunged Seidlin into a deep depression. In a signal honor, Ohio State University in 1973 named its new building for foreign languages and literatures after him (Dieter Cunz Hall, at 1841 Millikin Road, Columbus, Ohio). Oskar Seidlin taught German language and literature as a professor at Smith College, Middlebury College, Ohio State University, and Indiana University from 1939 to 1979. He authored a number of fictional and non-fictional works. In 1972, he found a new partner in the 35-year-old Hans Høgel, whom he visited regularly in Denmark and with whom he vacationed in the Great Smoky Mountains and the Caribbean. A heavy smoker, he suffered a heart attack in June, 1984 and was diagnosed with a malignant tumor at the beginning of October; he died nine weeks later. In accordance with his wishes, his mortal remains were interred alongside those of Dieter Cunz at the Walnut Grove Cemetery (5561 Milton Ave, Columbus, OH 4308). Richard Plant became a professor at the City University of New York, where he taught German language and literature from 1947 to 1973. He authored a number of fictional and non-fictional works as well as an opera scenario. He resided in Greenwich Village. Plant's companion during his final years was Michael Sasse. His papers are preserved in the Manuscripts and Archives Division of the New York Public Library.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. As a child, he had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny", by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life.
Born: March 9, 1892, Brighton, United Kingdom
Died: February 17, 1981, Montcuq, France
Lived: Wissett Lodge, Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Charleston Farmhouse, West Firle, Lewes, East Sussex BN8 6LL, UK (50.84268, 0.11559)
Hilton Hall, High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
Château de Charry, Le Verger de Charry, 46800 Montcuq, France (44.31818, 1.22313)
Find A Grave Memorial# 133696391
Spouse: Angelica Garnett (m. 1942)
Movies: The Sailor's Return
Children: Amaryllis Garnett

David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. As a child, he had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny", by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. A writer, he first met members of the Bloomsbury group in 1910 but was not fully accepted by them until 1914, when he became Duncan Grant's lover. Like Grant, Garnett was a conscientious objector and having worked in France in 1915 with the Friends War Victims Relief Mission, he worked as a farm laborer to avoid conscription on his return to England. Garnett moved with Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell to Charleston farmhouse in 1916. He married Grant’s daughter (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), Angelica, in 1942. He was present at her birth on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry, to the horror of her parents.
Together from 1914 to 1921: 7 years.
David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
Duncan Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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"Vanessa Bell, who had fallen in love with Duncan Grant before the start of the war, was painting in a farm-cottage on the Sussex coast, living in an uneasy triangle with Duncan and his new lover, David (known as Bunny) Garnett. In 1918 Bell gave birth to Grant’s child, Angelica Bell.” Hermione Lee, “Virginia Woolf” (1996)
Address: Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 01986 873173
Place
Wissett is a village and parish in the Waveney district of Suffolk located at 52.35N 01.46E TM3679 about 2 km (about 1.5 miles) northwest of Halesworth. Historically, it was in the hundred of Blything. It has a population of about 200, measured at 268 in the 2011 Census. Wisset manor was held by Ralph the staller, Baron of Gael in Brittany before the Norman Conquest. Ralph was created Earl of Suffolk and Norfolk in 1067, but his son lost the title and the manor passed to Count Alan of Brittany and Richmond in 1075. The Domesday Book shows that in 1086 Wissett had a church at Rumburgh with two carucates of free land, twelve monks, and a chapel in the village. The XI century flint parish church dedicated to Saint Andrew has a circular church tower with a floor dated to the XII Century. This is the oldest recorded church tower floor in the United Kingdom. Built as a chapel to Rumburgh Priory, the surviving elements of the Norman church are two doors to the nave and the tower arch. The parish is now part of the Blyth Valley Team Ministry in the diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich. Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, and David Garnett lived in Wissett for the summer of 1916. Virginia Woolf (Vanessa’s sister) said after visiting them: "Wissett seems to lull asleep all ambition. Don’t you think they have discovered the secret of life? I thought it wonderfully harmonious." Wissett Hall is a red brick manor house owned by Colin Holmes, co-founder of Dencora PLC. The village pub is the Plough Inn. Wissett Wines are produced at the Valley Farm Vineyards by Elaine Heeler and Vanessa Tucker, who brought the business in 2014, Wissett Wines was established in 1987.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981), Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978) and Vanessa Bell, née Stephen (May 30, 1879 – April 7, 1961)
David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. He was the son of Constance Clara Garnett (née Black), an English translator of XIX-century Russian literature, one of the first English translators of Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Anton Chekhov who introduced them on a wide basis to the English-speaking public, and Edward William Garnett, an English writer, critic and a significant and personally generous literary editor, who was instrumental in getting D. H. Lawrence's “Sons and Lovers” published. As a child, David had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny,” by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. His first wife was illustrator Rachel "Ray" Marshall (1891–1940), sister of translator and diarist Frances Partridge. He and Ray, whose woodcuts appear in some of his books, had two sons, one of whom (Richard) went to Beacon Hill School. Ray died relatively young of breast cancer. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. He was present at the birth of Grant’s daughter, Angelica (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?.” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry (on May 8, 1942), to the horror of her parents.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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In 1922 David Garnett published the highly successful novel, “Lady Into Fox.” The money he made from this book enabled him to buy Hilton Hall, an early XVII century house near Huntingdon.
Address: High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 54022 (Grade II, 1951)
Place
Described as “The most beautiful of all the Bloomsbury houses” by biographer, critic and art historian Frances Spalding, Hilton Hall was bought by David Garnett Fox in 1924. There he entertained many literary friends: T.E. Lawrence would startle the village by roaring up unannounced on his motorbike; Virginia Woolf came and amused his boys by pretending to be a wolf. D.H. Lawrence teased him for living in a Hall, but added: “It’s not at all grand, except in the way a grandmother is grand, by being ancient.” Hilton Hall was built early in the XVII century perhaps by Robert Walpole, (a very distant relative of the prime minister) who died there in 1699 and is buried in Hilton Church. It was refronted and given new sash windows and panelling in the middle of the XVIII century but the fine Jacobean staircase, wide floorboards and moulded beams all remain. Otherwise it has been very little altered except by an extension containing panelling and a bay window salvaged from the ruins of Old Park Farm in Hilton. Behind the house there is a large dovehouse, also of the XVII century, which was used by Garnett’s second wife, Angelica, as a studio. She was the daughter of the Bloomsbury artists Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell, and was herself a noted artist. She has left her mark on the house with a decorated bedroom mantelpiece, a large mural in the dovehouse and a mosaic doorstep. Because of its place in the history of the Bloomsbury Group, and its collection of paintings and sculpture – especially by Angelica’s parents, it has been a popular destination for groups from the Cambridge branch of the Art Fund and the Friends of Kettle Yard. The grounds are all enclosed by hedging and fencing. Swimming pool, kitchen garden.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
The Garnetts lived at Hilton Hall, Hilton near St Ives in Cambridgeshire, where David Garnett kept a herd of Jersey cows. They had four daughters: in order, Amaryllis, Henrietta, and twins Nerissa and Frances; eventually the couple separated. Amaryllis Garnett (1943–1973) was an actress who had a small part in Harold Pinter’s film adaptation of “The Go-Between” (1970.) She drowned in the Thames, aged 29. Henrietta Garnett married Lytton Burgo Partridge, her father’s nephew by his first wife Ray, but was left a widow with a newborn infant when she was 18; she oversaw the legacies of both David Garnett and Duncan Grant. Nerissa Garnett (1946–2004) was an artist, ceramicist, and photographer. Fanny (Frances) Garnett moved to France where she became a farmer.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

As one of David Garnett’s friends pointed out: "Here he bottled wine and cooked for his many visitors, and could be seen sitting out of doors under a large straw hat typing away at his latest book."
Address: Le Verger de Charry, 46800 Montcuq, France (44.31818, 1.22313)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in the XV century
The Château de Charry is a castle in the commune of Montcuq in the Lot département of France. The castle was built in three stages. It was initially a keep whose principal masonry was flanked by two polygonal towers. It was encircled by a fortified curtain wall; the remains of this are the third tower, though not connected to the main building, and a rectangular barbican. Cannon positions defended access to the well. An underground passage linked the barbican to one of the towers of the keep. A second period of building, in the XVII century, added the central building to the right of the tower, as well as buildings forming the court. In the XIX century, the main building was joined to the round tower of the ramparts. This keep provided a firing line between Montcuq and the keep at Marcilhac, and guaranteed the defence of the Charry valley The castle is privately owned. It has been listed since 1976 as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
After his separation from Angelica Bell, David Garnett, the British writer and publisher and a prominent member of the Bloomsbury Group, moved to France and lived in a pleasant house in the grounds at the Château de Charry, Montcuq (near Cahors) leased to him by the owners, Jo and Angela D’Urville. He continued to write, made friends among the local English community, and lived there until his death in 1981. The Frances and Ralph Partridge’s son, Burgo, had married Angelica and David Garnett’s daughter, Henrietta, but died of a heart attack on September 7, 1963, aged only 28.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Corinne Roosevelt was an American poet, writer, lecturer, and public speaker. She was also the younger sister of former President of the United States Theodore Roosevelt and an aunt of former First Lady of the United States, Eleanor Roosevelt.
Born: September 27, 1861, New York City, New York, United States
Died: February 17, 1933, New York City, New York, United States
Buried: Robinson Cemetery, Columbia Center, Herkimer County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 54494616
Children: Theodore Douglas Robinson, Corinne Alsop Cole
Parents: Martha Bulloch Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt Sr.
Siblings: Theodore Roosevelt, Bamie Roosevelt, Elliott Bulloch Roosevelt

At Robinson Cemetery (Gelston Castle, 980 Robinson Rd, Mohawk, NY 13407) is buried Corinne Roosevelt Robinson (September 27, 1861 — February 17, 1933), American poet, writer, lecturer, and public speaker. Younger sister of President Theodore Roosevelt and an aunt of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. Bisexual, she was good friend with Edith Wharton. Corinne Roosevelt married Douglas Robinson, Jr., son of Douglas Robinson, Sr. and Frances Monroe. Frances was a grandniece of President James Monroe.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lived: 1 Sutton Pl, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75738, -73.96029)
Buried: Moravian Cemetery, New Dorp, Richmond County (Staten Island), New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 145795799

In 1903, Willian K. Vanderbilt married Anne Harriman, daughter of banker Oliver Harriman. She was a widow to sportsman Samuel Stevens Sands and to Lewis Morris Rutherfurd, Jr., son of the astronomer Lewis Morris Rutherfurd. Her second husband died in Switzerland in 1901. Always in 1903, along with Anne Morgan and Bessie Marbury, Anne helped organize the Colony Club, the first women's social club in New York. This same coterie would go on to create the exclusive neighborhood of Sutton Place, along Manhattan's East River, which prompted gossip papers of the 1920s to loudly whisper of an "Amazon Enclave“. Together Bessie Marbury and Elsie de Wolfe cultivated a different sort of salon culture in their Sutton Place home, regularly visited by leading American and European writers and artists. Anne was also a lifelong philanthropist: she was responsible for the building of the "open-stair" apartment houses, four large buildings with 384 apartments on Avenue A (now York Avenue) between 77th and 78th streets in New York. These revolutionary new buildings were intended to house patients suffering from tuberculosis, then the scourge of New York slums, and their families in airy, sanitary surroundings. She paid the $1 million cost of the partments, which were designed by Henry Atterbury Smith. Completed in 1910, the buildings still exist and are still occupied.
Together from 1903 to 1920: 17 years.
Anne Harriman Sands Rutherfurd Vanderbilt (Feb. 17, 1861 – Apr. 20, 1940)
William Kissam Vanderbilt I (December 12, 1849 – July 22, 1920)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The Colony Club is a women-only private social club in New York City. Founded in 1903 by Florence Jaffray Harriman, wife of J. Borden Harriman, as the first social club established in New York City by and for women, it was modeled on similar clubs for men. Today, men are admitted as guests.
Address: 120 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10016 (40.74553, -73.98476), & 564 Park Ave, New York, NY 10065, USA (40.76513, -73.96864)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 212-838-4200
National Register of Historic Places: Old Colony Club, 80002706, 1980
Place
The club and the street in front of it were often the site of large suffrage rallies sponsored by the Equal Franchise Society to which many members of the Club belonged. With other wealthy women, including Anne Tracy Morgan (a daughter of J.P. Morgan), Anne Harriman raised $500,000, and commissioned Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White to build the original clubhouse, later known as the "Old Colony Club.” This building – at 120 Madison Avenue, between East 30th and East 31st Streets on the west side of Madison – was built between 1904 and 1908 and was modelled on XVIII century houses in Annapolis, Maryland. The interiors, which exist largely unchanged and have been accorded the landmark status, were created by Elsie de Wolfe – later to become Lady Mendl – a former actress who had recently opened an interior-design business, and whose companion, the theatrical agent Elisabeth Marbury, was one of the club’s founders. Stanford White was slain by Harry K. Thaw months before construction of the Colony Club was completed. The building was designed in the Federal Revival style, and has unusual brickwork done in a diaper pattern as a notable feature of its facade. The Old Colony Club was sold after the club moved to its new location in 1916. Today, the building houses the East Coast headquarters of the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. It was awarded landmark status by the City of New York in 1966. The second clubhouse, located at 564 Park Avenue, also known as 51 East 62nd Street, on the northwest corner, was commissioned in 1913 and constructed from 1914 to 1916. It was designed by Delano & Aldrich in the Neo-Georgian style, with interiors designed by Elsie de Wolfe. The building has a marble base with red-brick and marble trim and columns for the upper floors. According to Andrew Dolkart: “This is not one of Delano & Aldrich’s more elegant works in the Colonial idiom, perhaps because it was nearly impossible to create a well-proportioned design for a building with the complex spatial requirements of this club. The beautifully appointed interior included the lounges, dining rooms, and bedrooms common to social clubs, but also had a two-story ballroom, a basement swimming pool and spa that connected via an express elevator to a gymnasium on the fifth floor, two squash courts, servants’ rooms (in 1925 there were thirteen female servants), and even a kennel where members could leave their pets.” In 1973, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger’s birthday party was held at the Colony Club; among the guests were four couples whom Kissinger had ordered to be wiretapped, and in 2007, memorial services for Brooke Astor were held there. The club continues its policy of women-only membership – new members must be recommended by current members — although it was unsuccessfully contested in court in 1987 by conservative radio talk-show host Bob Grant and Sidney Siller, who founded the National Organization for Men. The Club presently has approximately 2,500 members who have access to discussions, concerts, and wellness and athletic programs. The Clubhouse consist of seven stories, 25 guest bedrooms, three dining rooms, two ballrooms, a lounge, a squash court, an indoor pool, a fitness facility and three personal spa service rooms. Annual gross revenues are more than $10 million.
Notable queer members at The Colony Club:
• Anne Harriman Sands Rutherfurd Vanderbilt (1861-1940), along with Anne Morgan and Elisabeth Marbury helped organize the Colony Club. They were known as the Amazon Enclave, from the Sutton Place neighbourhood where they all lived.
• Elisabeth “Bessy” Marbury (1856-1933), a pioneering theatrical and literary agent and producer who represented prominent theatrical performers and writers in the late XIX and early XX centuries and helped shape business methods of the modern commercial theater. She was the longtime companion of Elsie de Wolfe.
• Anne Tracy Morgan (July 25, 1873 – January 29, 1952), a philanthropist who provided relief efforts in aid to France during and after WWI and WWII with her life partner Anne Murray Dike. Daughter of J.P. Morgan.
Notable queer alumni at American Academy of Dramatic Arts:
• Diana Barrymore (1921-1960) was an American film and stage actress. While in her teens, Barrymore decided to study acting and enrolled at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. Because of the prominence of the Barrymore name in the world of theatre, her move onto the stage began with much publicity including a 1939 cover of Life.
• Brad Davis (1949-1991) was an American actor, known for starring in the 1978 film “Midnight Express” and 1982 film “Querelle.” At 16, after winning a music-talent contest, Davis worked at Theater Atlanta. He later moved to New York City and attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, as well as studied acting at the American Place Theater.
• Katharine Hepburn (1907–2003)
• Guthrie McClintic (1893–1961) was a successful theatre director, film director and producer based in New York. McClintic attended Washington University and New York's American Academy of Dramatic Arts and became an actor but soon became a stage manager and casting director for major Broadway producer Winthrop Ames.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Sutton Place first became fashionable around 1920, when several wealthy socialites, including Anne Harriman Vanderbilt and Anne Morgan, built townhouses on the eastern side of the street, overlooking the East River. Both townhouses were designed by Mott B. Schmidt, launching a career that included many houses for the wealthy.
Address: Sutton Pl, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75738, -73.96029)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Sutton Place Historic District (1--21 Sutton Pl. & 4--16 Sutton Sq.), 85002294, 1985
Place
Elisabeth Marbury, the wealthy literary agent and producer who had been born into an aristocratic family, commissioned society architect Mott Schmidt to transform a Victorian rowhouse at No. 13 Sutton Place into a Georgian residence. She moved in with her long-time companion, decorator Elsie de Wolfe, and began a campaign of convincing her other female friends to follow suit. One of those friends was Anne Vanderbilt whose husband, William K. Vanderbilt died on July 22, 1920, making Anne a widow for the third time. New York society was shocked when, on January 9, 1921, a New York Times headline reported that “Mrs. W.K. Vanderbilt to Live In Avenue A.” She had sold her gargantuan Fifth Avenue mansion for $3 million to move to what the newspaper called “a little-known two-block thoroughfare.” She used $50,000 of the $3 million to purchase Effingham Sutton’s house, No. 1, and, like Elisabeth Marbury, who was already living there, hired Mott B. Schmidt to renovate it into a 13-room Georgian mansion. Anne Vanderbilt’s close friend, 38-year old Anne Tracy Morgan, daughter of J. Pierpont Morgan, announced her plans to have Mott Schmidt create a house abutting the new Vanderbilt house. “Miss Morgan’s new home is being altered, to conform somewhat to the Colonial style of Mrs. Vanderbilt’s house, after which type most of the houses in the exclusive-little nook have been patterned,” said The Times. “Many of the rooms will contain rare old paneling and furniture. Some of these furnishings will be brought from abroad, but much of it will be Colonial. It is expected that the cost of the site and the remodeling will be about $125,000.” By now the neighborhood was filling with single and very wealthy women who were keeping Mott and Elsie de Wolfe busy changing XIX century middle class homes into fashionable neo-Georgian residences. Anne Vanderbilt’s sister, Mrs. Stephen Olin, was already here as were Mrs. Lorillard Cammann and Francis B. Griswold. Sutton Place was dubbed “The Amazon Enclave.” Two months later Mott Schmidt filed revised plans for Anne Morgan’s house at No. 3 Sutton Place. She had purchased the house next door, No. 5, and the original plans were scrapped so that the two houses could be merged. “The new plans call for the rebuilding of the two structures into a four-story dwelling in American Colonial style with a roof garden,” reported The Times. Reflecting their close relationship, Morgan and Vanderbilt would share a common garden to the rear. To create the illusion of a vintage home, Mott reused the bricks from the old buildings on the site. An elevator, in-house incinerator, gas furnace and refrigerators brought the home squarely into the modern age. Mott based the design on two Philadelphia houses; the 1765 Samuel Powel House and its neighbor, the Benjamin Wister Morris House. He treated the Morgan house and the Vanderbilt house as two independent but critically-related designs. A critic assessed them saying “No more valuable or successful examples of the consistent and intelligent use of English architectural precedent in the designing of American houses are to be found than these two houses on Sutton Place.” The house was completed in 1922 and House & Garden praised Morgan for her choice of XVIII Century interiors. “There are hundreds of beautiful drawing rooms in New York, but I know of no one but Miss Morgan who has determined to make the largest and most important room in her house an early American one. She is using an old pine paneled room, such as were often seen in old Southern houses. The New England pine rooms were usually much smaller and the paneling was generally more severe.” The house of Anne Morgan on Sutton Place was purchased after her death by Arthur Amory Houghton, Jr., the great-grandson of the founder of Corning Glass. Twenty years later, Houghton donated the house to the United Nations Association of the United States. The association leased it to the United Nations for a year as the home of the Secretary General, then sold it to the organization in 1973. Today the stately home of Anne Morgan remains the home of the U.N.’s Secretary General. Its colonial façade, along with those of its neighbors built by independent-thinking women who broke free of tradition, looks as though it has stood there for centuries. 360 E. 55th Street, 404 E. 55th Street and 405 E. 54th Street are known as The Sutton Collection. Located in the heart of Sutton Place, the Sutton Collection is made up of three unique buildings, each building is filled with exceptional architectural details and true New York style that can only be found in the rarest of pre-war properties. At 404 E 55th St resided Noel Coward, this was the playwright’s last Manhattan residence.
Life
Who: Anne Tracy Morgan (July 25, 1873 – January 29, 1952)
Anne Morgan was a philanthropist who provided relief efforts in aid to France during and after WWI and WWII. Morgan was educated privately, traveled frequently and grew up amongst the wealth her father had amassed. She was awarded a medal from the National Institute of Social Science in 1915, the same year she published the story “The American Girl.” In 1932 she became the first American woman appointed a commander of the French Legion of Honor. In 1903 she became part owner of the Villa Trianon near Versailles, France, along with decorator and socialite Elsie De Wolfe (1859-1950) and theatrical/literary agent Elisabeth “Bessie” Marbury (1856-1933.) Morgan was instrumental in assisting De Wolfe, her close friend, in pioneering a career in interior decoration. The three women, known as "The Versailles Triumvirate," hosted a salon in France and, in 1903, along with Anne Vanderbilt (1861-1940), helped organize the Colony Club, the first women’s social club in New York City and, later, helped found the exclusive neighborhood of Sutton Place along Manhattan’s East River.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Moravian Cemetery at 2205 Richmond Road in New Dorp on Staten Island, New York is the largest cemetery on the island. The cemetery encompasses 113 acres (46 hectares), and is the property of the Moravian Church of Staten Island. Opened in 1740, it is situated on the southeastern foot of the Todt Hill ridge, and to its southwest is High Rock Park, one of the constituent parks of the Staten Island Greenbelt.
Address: 2205 Richmond Rd, Staten Island, NY 10306, USA (40.58006, -74.11392)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 718-351-0136
Place
In what was a purely farming community, the 113-acre (46 ha) cemetery was originally made available as a free cemetery for the public in order to discourage families from using farm burial plots. The Moravian Cemetery is the burial place for a number of famous Staten Islanders, including members of the Vanderbilt family. In the XIX century Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt gave the Moravian Church 8 1⁄2 acres (3.4 ha), and later his son William Henry Vanderbilt gave a further 4 acres (1.6 ha) and constructed the residence for the cemetery superintendent. The Vanderbilt mausoleum, designed by Richard Morris Hunt and constructed in 1885–1886, is part of the family's private section within the cemetery. Their mausoleum is a replica of a Romanesque church in Arles, France. The landscaped grounds around the Vanderbilt mausoleum were designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. The Vanderbilt section is not open to the public.
Notable queer burials at Moravian Cemetery:
• Alice Austen (March 17, 1866 – June 9, 1952). The Staten Island Historical Society arranged for Alice Austen’s funeral and she was buried in the Austen family plot. Upon Austen’s partner's death, Gertrude, her family learned that Alice and Gertrude had wanted to be buried together. Alice Austen had made arrangements for Gertrude to be interred in the Austen family plot. The Tate family, however, refused to honor the women's wishes. Gertrude is buried at Cypress Hills Cemetery (833 Jamaica Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11208).
• Anne Harriman Vanderbilt (1864-1940), social leader and a philanthropist on two continents, will be remembered particularly in Paris for her work in behalf of France and the allies in the WWI.
• William Kissam Vanderbilt I (1849–1920) was an American heir, businessman, philanthropist and horsebreeder. Born into the Vanderbilt family, he managed his family railroad investments. Vanderbilt died in Paris, France on July 22, 1920. His remains were brought home and interred in the Vanderbilt family vault in the Moravian Cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Sir Alan Arthur Bates, CBE was an English actor who came to prominence in the 1960s, when he appeared in films ranging from the popular children's story Whistle Down the Wind to the "kitchen sink" drama A Kind of Loving.
Born: February 17, 1934, Allestree, Derby, United Kingdom
Died: December 27, 2003, Westminster, United Kingdom
Education: Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
Lived: 1 Earls Terrace, W8
Buried: All Saints, Mill Lane, Bradbourne, Derbyshire, DE6 1PA
Find A Grave Memorial# 8214917
Spouse: Victoria Ward (m. 1970–1992)
TV shows: Oliver's Travels, Laurence Olivier Presents, The Mayor of Casterbridge
Awards: Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Acting Ensemble, more

Sir Alan Arthur Bates, CBE was an English actor who came to prominence in the 1960s, a time of high creativity in British cinema, when he appeared in films ranging from the popular children's story Whistle down the Wind to the "kitchen sink" drama A Kind of Loving. John Curry was a British figure skater. He was the 1976 Olympic and World Champion. Prior to the 1976 World Championships, Curry was outed as gay by a German tabloid newspaper, Bild-Zeitung. It caused a brief scandal in Europe at the time, but the press and public generally ignored Curry’s sexual orientation for many years afterwards. In 1987, Curry was diagnosed with HIV, and in 1991 with AIDS. Before his death, he spoke openly to the press about both his disease and his sexual orientation. He died of an AIDS-related heart attack on April 15, 1994 in Binton; he was 44 years old. A 2007 biography of actor Alan Bates claimed that Curry and Bates had a two-year affair, and that Curry died in Bates' arms. Other than Curry, Bates had numerous homosexual relationships throughout his life, including those with actors Nickolas Grace and Peter Wyngarde.
Together from 1992 to 1994: 2 years.
Sir Alan Bates (February 17, 1934 - December 27, 2003)
John Curry (September 9, 1949 - April 15, 1994)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Actors Peter Wyngarde and Alan Bates shared a flat at no. 1 Earls Terrace, W8 for some years in the 1960s.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At All Saints (Mill Lane, Bradbourne, Derbyshire, DE6 1PA) is buried Alan Bates (February 17, 1934 –December 27, 2003). Bates had numerous homosexual relationships throughout his life, including those with actors Nickolas Grace and Peter Wyngarde and with Olympic skater John Curry. In 1994 Curry died from AIDS in Bates' arms.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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This is is a very special gift my friend Paul Richmond is doing to this blog and the Rainbow Awards. As you all know, the pin-up boy of the Rainbow Awards, with the special E tattoo on his arm, has been created by Paul specifically for the Rainbow Awards, and now he created a black and white version you can download and color :-) So please enjoy Paul's new book AND this special gift.

CHEESECAKE BOYS - ADULT COLORING BOOK by Paul Richmond

Thanks so much for welcoming me to your blog again, Elisa! You were one of the very first people to share my early Cheesecake Boy paintings on your blog, and you encouraged me to explore the publishing world because you thought my work should be on books. I'm happy to report that I've done over four hundred book covers since that conversation, so you might have been onto something! And today, I am super excited to be here sharing a new project, my very first coloring book which was released this week by Dreamspinner Press featuring our old friends, the Cheesecake Boys!

I started the series years ago because I was fascinated with pinup art from the 40’s and 50’s and wanted to reimagine the concept from a gay male perspective. The hilarious scenarios that artists like Gil Elvgren and Art Frahm concocted to disrobe their female subjects never seemed to be applied to male models. I thought that needed to change!

Cheesecake Boys - An Adult Coloring Book casts hot male models in skin-baring poses that were typically reserved for women. It contains 22 original pinup boy illustrations featuring men accidentally exposing their underwear and more in overtly-contrived wardrobe malfunction scenes that include dog-walking, grocery shopping, and working out. I've been sharing some of the images online through my website and coloring enthusiasts around the world have begun making their mark. It’s such a thrill to see how people are building upon the simple lines to create imaginative, colorful, and totally unique pieces of art. I absolutely love seeing all the different interpretations!



Elisa, I wanted to celebrate our history together by making a special free coloring page for you to share with your readers. I was honored when you asked me to create a Cheesecake Boy illustration for the Rainbow Awards a while back. Today I've turned him into a line drawing that anyone can download and color however they'd like - crayons, colored pencils, paint, GLITTER...the possibilities are endless! And those who prefer to color digitally should feel free to load him into their favorite coloring apps. The drawing is formatted so it works well with the Recolor app, so that's a good one to try for anyone who has never colored digitally before.

I would love to see everyone's creations, so please post them to social media with the hashtag #PAULRICHMONDSTUDIO. Everyone's invited to join my Hello Pauly group on Facebook too where people are sharing their Cheesecake Boy masterpieces: http://www.facebook.com/groups/1131241860229354

I've always wanted to make a coloring book, and I am SO grateful to Dreamspinner Press for helping me make that dream come true! You can pick up the book now at a 25% discount through Feb. 18!

Purchase links for Cheesecake Boys - An Adult Coloring Book from Dreamspinner Press:
Standard ($12.99) - https://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/books/cheesecake-boys-an-adult-coloring-book-by-paul-richmond-8212-b
Signed Edition ($14.99) - https://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/books/cheesecake-boys-an-adult-coloring-book-signed-edition-by-paul-richmond-8214-b

Find out more at cheesecakeboy.com.

Cheesecake Boys YouTube video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYXJnQS25f8

###

Paul Richmond’s career has included exhibitions in galleries throughout the United States as well as publication in numerous art journals and anthologies. His work is collected by individuals around the globe. He recently displayed his expressive oil painting series War Paint at the Evansville Museum of Art in Indiana as well as completing two commissions for James Franco to be used in his upcoming film The Long Home. He is the Associate Art Director for Dreamspinner Press and co-founder of the You Will Rise Project, an organization that empowers those who have experienced bullying to speak out creatively through the language, visual, and performing arts. He lives with his husband Dennis and two whippets in Monterey, California.

artworks :-) )

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Keith Allen Haring was an American artist and social activist whose work responded to the New York City street culture of the 1980s by expressing concepts of birth, death, sexuality, and war.
Born: May 4, 1958, Reading, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: February 16, 1990, New York City, New York, United States
Education: School of Visual Arts
Lived: 676 Broadway
Buried: in a field near Bowers, Pennsylvania (ashes)
Find A Grave Memorial# 3479
Medium: Screen printing
Periods: Contemporary art, Pop art
Influenced by: Jean-Michel Basquiat, Pablo Picasso, Walt Disney, more

Today Bowers is a stable community with many of the properties remaining in the possession of descendants of early settlers until quite recently. Edwin DeLong's grand farmhouse was occupied by his grandson, William DeLong and his wife Jane, until her death in 1996. George Grim's auto dealership, built on his father's farm, is still owned by George's son. Other properties like the large mansions along Old Bowers Road did not remain in family ownership over time, but their occupants were distinguished in other ways. One of these mansions was the childhood home of the famed artist Keith Haring in the 1960s. A small housing development, built in the 1960s, stands on the edge of the village core and houses nearly half of the village's present population but is not a significant visual disruption in the landscape. Haring died on February 16, 1990. On March 3 a pair of memorials were held in Berks County. A church service, his parents' choice, took place in Bowers. An open-air service, his friends' choice, occurred on a hill near Kutztown. In an episode retold in John Gruen's 1991 oral biography, more than 40 people, invited by longtime friend Kermit Oswald, distributed Haring's ashes around one of his childhood meditation spots.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Keith Haring’s second studio was at 676 Broadway, on the fifth floor.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Katharine Cornell was an American stage actress, writer, theater owner and producer. She was born in Berlin to American parents and raised in Buffalo, New York.
Born: February 16, 1893, Berlin, Germany
Died: June 9, 1974, Tisbury, Massachusetts, United States
Education: University at Buffalo
Lived: 139 Queen St, Cobourg, ON K9A 1N1, Canada (43.95981, -78.15947)
23 Beekman Pl, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75286, -73.96511)
Peter Rock, Woods Road, Snedens Landing
Buried: Tisbury Village Cemetery, Tisbury, Dukes County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 235
Spouse: Guthrie McClintic (m. 1921–1961)
Movies: Stage Door Canteen, Helen Keller in Her Story, This Is Our Island
Books: I wanted to be an actress
Parents: Peter Cornell , Alice Gardner Plimpton

Katharine Cornell was an American stage actress, writer, theater owner and producer. Cornell is regarded as one of the greatest American stage actresses of the 20th century. She was nicknamed "First Lady of the Theatre," a title also bestowed upon her friend Helen Hayes, though each deferred to the other. Cornell is noted for her major Broadway roles in serious dramas, often directed by her husband, Guthrie McClintic. Guthrie McClintic was a successful theatre director, film director and producer based in New York. In what may have been lavender marriages, homosexual McClintic was married to actress Estelle Winwood, and then to actress Katharine Cornell—herself a lesbian—for forty years. After they were married, they formed a production team M.C. & C Company, which produced all her plays for the rest of his life. He directed every play that Cornell starred in, including Romeo and Juliet, Candida, Antony and Cleopatra, No Time for Comedy, Antigone, St. Joan, The Doctor's Dilemma, Three Sisters, There Shall Be No Night, and The Constant Wife. During their stage career, Cornell and McClintic lived in at 23 Beekman Place in Manhattan. The fourth floor belonged to McClintic, the 3rd floor to Cornell and the bottom two floors were shared.
Together from 1921 to 1961: 40 years.
Guthrie McClintic (August 6, 1893 - October 29, 1961)
Katharine Cornell (February 16, 1893 – June 9, 1974)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Katharine Cornell was a member of the “Sewing circles” in New York, and had relationships with Nancy Hamilton, Tallulah Bankhead, and Mercedes de Acosta, among others. Nancy Hamilton was an American actress, playwright, lyricist, director and producer. She worked in the New York theater from 1932-1954. She wrote sketches and lyrics for the revues New Faces of 1934 (1934), One for the Money (1939), Two for the Show (1940) and Three to Make Ready (1946). She is best known as the lyricist for the popular song, How High the Moon. Helen Keller: A Life was produced by Nancy Hamilton and narrated by Katharine Cornell (about Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller). Dear Liar was both Cornell’s and Guthrie McClintic’s last play. On October 29, 1961, McClintic passed away at his and Cornell’s Palisades home. Nearing 70, feeling a lack of connection to the current theater and without the partner who had helped her shape her career for 40 years, Cornell retired from the stage. Over the next 13 years, she split her time between her Manhattan apartment and her beloved Martha’s Vineyard house, where she lived with lifelong friend and companion, Nancy Hamilton. She and Hamilton were active members of the Vineyard Haven community until Cornell’s death on June 9, 1974. Cornell was buried in Tisbury on Martha's Vineyard.
Together from (around) 1930 to 1974: 44 years.
Katharine Cornell (February 16, 1893 – June 9, 1974)
Nancy Hamilton (July 27, 1908 - February 18, 1985)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Katharine Cornell married Guthrie McClintic on September 8, 1921, in her aunt's summer home in Cobourg, Ontario, Canada. Cornell's family often summered there among other wealthy Americans. Nonetheless, it is generally acknowledged that Cornell was a lesbian, and Guthrie was gay, and their union was a lavender marriage.
Address: 139 Queen St, Cobourg, ON K9A 1N1, Canada (43.95981, -78.15947)
Type: Private Property
Place
Colonel Chambliss, Managing Director of the Cobourg & Marmora Railway and Mining Company built this American style Victoria house, "Hadfield Hurst" (202 Green Street), in 1879. In 1890, Colonel Douglas Cornell of Buffalo, purchased it as a summer residence. In 1929, it became a girls' school known as "Hatfield Hall". In 1873 Major William Taylor built the house at 139 Queen Street. It later belonged to Lydia Cornell, whose niece Katharine Cornell, a famous Broadway actress, was married here in 1921.
Life
Who: Guthrie McClintic (August 6, 1893 – October 29, 1961) and Katharine Cornell (February 16, 1893 – June 9, 1974)
Katharine Cornell was an American stage actress, writer, theater owner and producer. Cornell is regarded as one of the greatest American stage actresses of the 20th century. She was nicknamed "First Lady of the Theatre," a title also bestowed upon her friend Helen Hayes, though each deferred to the other. Cornell is noted for her major Broadway roles in serious dramas, often directed by her husband, Guthrie McClintic. Guthrie McClintic was a successful theatre director, film director and producer based in New York. In what may have been lavender marriages, homosexual McClintic was married to actress Estelle Winwood, and then to actress Katharine Cornell— herself a lesbian— for forty years. After they were married, they formed a production team M.C. & C Company, which produced all her plays for the rest of his life. During their stage career, Cornell and McClintic lived in at 23 Beekman Place in Manhattan. The fourth floor belonged to McClintic, the 3rd floor to Cornell and the bottom two floors were shared.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

During their stage career, Katharine Cornell and Guthrie McClintic lived in at 23 Beekman Place. The fourth floor belonged to McClintic, the 3rd floor to Cornell and the bottom two floors were shared.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Tisbury Village Cemetery (Tisbury, MA 02568) is buried Katharine Cornell (1893-1974), American stage actress, writer, theater owner and producer. She married Guthrie McClintic on September 8, 1921, in her aunt's summer home in Cobourg, Ontario, Canada. Cornell's family often summered there among other wealthy Americans. It is generally acknowledged that Cornell was a lesbian, and Guthrie was gay, and their union was a lavender marriage. She was a member of the "sewing circles" in New York, and had relationships with Nancy Hamilton, Tallulah Bankhead, and Mercedes de Acosta, among others. The couple eventually bought a townhouse at 23 Beekman Place in Manhattan.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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John Richard Schlesinger, CBE was an English film and stage director, and actor. He won an Academy Award for Best Director for Midnight Cowboy, and was nominated for two other films.
Born: February 16, 1926, London, United Kingdom
Died: July 25, 2003, Palm Springs, California, United States
Education: Balliol College
Uppingham School
Lived: 13 Inver Court, Inverness Terrace, W2
53 Hollycroft Avenue, NW3
15 Templewood Avenue, NW3
Find A Grave Memorial# 7708054
Books: Sunday Bloody Sunday
Parents: Bernard Schlesinger, Winifred Schlesinger

John Schlesinger was an English director and actor. He won an Academy Award for Best Director for Midnight Cowboy, and was nominated for two other films (Darling and Sunday Bloody Sunday). Schlesinger's life partner since 1966, until his death, was photographer Michael Childers. Alan Bennett gave Schlesinger's own account of his investiture with the CBE: “John was so aware of his sexuality that he managed to detect a corresponding awareness in the unlikeliest of places. On this occasion HMQ had a momentary difficulty getting the ribbon round his sizeable neck, whereupon she said "Now, Mr. Schlesinger, we must try and get this straight," the emphasis according to John very much hers and which he took as both a coded acknowledgement of his situation and a seal of royal approval.” Schlesinger was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for his services to film in 1970. In 2003, a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California Walk of Stars was dedicated to him.
Together from 1966 to 2003: 37 years.
John Schlesinger (February 16, 1926 – July 25, 2003)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

English Heritage Blue Plaque: 17 East Heath Road, “Katherine Mansfield (1888–1923) writer, and her husband John Middleton Murry (1889–1957) critic lived here”.
Addresses:
1 Ellerdale Cl, London NW3 6BE, UK (51.55445, -0.17962)
17 E Heath Rd, London NW3 1AL, UK (51.56079, -0.17506)
Branch Hill, London NW3, UK (51.56067, -0.18363)
Place
Hampstead Heath (locally known as "the Heath") is a large, ancient London park, covering 320 hectares (790 acres.) Hampstead Heath, a grassy public space sitting astride a sandy ridge, is one of the highest points in London, running from Hampstead to Highgate, which rests on a band of London Clay. The Heath is rambling and hilly, embracing ponds, recent and ancient woodlands, a lido, playgrounds, and a training track, and it adjoins the stately home of Kenwood House and its grounds. The south-east part of the Heath is Parliament Hill, from which the view over London is protected by law. Running along its eastern perimeter are a chain of ponds – including three open-air public swimming pools – which were originally reservoirs for drinking water from the River Fleet. The Heath is a Site of Metropolitan Importance for Nature Conservation, and part of Kenwood is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. Lakeside concerts are held there in summer. The Heath is managed by the City of London Corporation, and lies mostly within the London Borough of Camden with the adjoining Hampstead Heath Extension and Golders Hill Park in the London Borough of Barnet. The Heath first entered the history books in 986 when Ethelred the Unready granted one of his servants five hides of land at "Hemstede.” This same land is later recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as held by the monastery of St. Peter’s at Westminster Abbey, and by then is known as the "Manor of Hampstead.” Westminster held the land until 1133 when control of part of the manor was released to one Richard de Balta; then during Henry II’s reign the whole of the manor became privately owned by Alexander de Barentyn, the King’s butler. Manorial rights to the land remained in private hands until the 1940s when they lapsed under Sir Spencer Pocklington Maryon Wilson, though the estate itself was passed on to Shane Gough, 5th Viscount Gough. Over time, plots of land in the manor were sold off for building, particularly in the early XIX century, though the Heath remained mainly common land. The main part of the Heath was acquired for the people by the Metropolitan Board of Works. Parliament Hill was purchased for the public for £300,000 and added to the park in 1888. Golders Hill was added in 1898 and Kenwood House and grounds were added in 1928. From 1808 to 1814 Hampstead Heath hosted a station in the shutter telegraph chain which connected the Admiralty in London to its naval ships in the port of Great Yarmouth. The City of London Corporation has managed the Heath since 1989. Before that it was managed by the GLC and before that by the London County Council (LCC.) In 2009, the City of London proposed to upgrade a footpath across the Heath into a service-road. The proposal met with protests from local residents and celebrities, and did not proceed.
Notable queer residents at Hampstead Heath:
• In 1936 Beverly Nichols (September 9, 1898-September 15, 1983) purchased a house at One Ellerdale Close, NW3. Ellerdale Road is one of Hampstead’s premier turnings, ideally located off the top of Fitzjohns Avenue. A book about Beverly Nichols’ city garden near Hampstead Heath in London, “Green Grows the City,” published in 1939, was very successful. That book introduced Arthur R. Gaskin, who was Nichols’s manservant from 1924 until Gaskin’s death in 1966. Gaskin was a popular character, who also appeared in the succeeding gardening books.
• Lord Alfred Douglas, or “Bosie,” Oscar Wilde’s one time lover and ruin, moved at 26 Church Row, NW3 with his wife (he was by now officially heterosexual) in 1907 until 1910, shortly after winning a libel suit against “The Daily News,” which had run an obituary calling him a degenerate, only to find he was still alive. Though not a great writer, the peer was highly rated by the young John Betjeman, who told C.S. Lewis, his tutor at Oxford, that Douglas was a better poet than Shakespeare.
• Katherine Mansfield (1888–1923) and John Middleton Murry (1889–1957) lived at 17 E Heath Road, NW3. A prominent critic, Murry is best remembered for his association with Katherine Mansfield, whom he married in 1918 as her second husband, for his friendship with D. H. Lawrence, T. S. Eliot, and for his friendship (and brief affair) with Frieda Lawrence. Following Mansfield’s death, Murry edited her work. Mansfield had several romantic relationships with both men and women. She became pregnant in 1909 but her lover’s parents did not approve of the relationship and they broke up. She hastily married a George Bowden, a singing teacher, but left him the same evening, before the marriage could be consummated. Mansfield later miscarried. Mansfield began a relationship with Ida Baker which continued for many years, even after Mansfield met her second husband, John Middleton Murray, in 1911. “Baker, whom Mansfield often called, with a mixture of affection and disdain, her “wife”, moved in with her shortly afterwards.” Mansfield was diagnosed with tuberculosis in 1917, leading to her death in 1923.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: The Chestnuts, Branch Hill, NW3 Paul Robeson (1898–1976), “Singer and Actor lived here 1929–1930"
• John Schlesinger (1926-2003) was an English film and stage director, and actor. He won an Academy Award for Best Director for “Midnight Cowboy,” and was nominated for two other films (“Darling” and “Sunday Bloody Sunday”). Schlesinger was born at 53 Hollycroft Avenue, NW3 into a middle class Jewish family, the son of Winifred Henrietta (née Regensburg) and Bernard Edward Schlesinger, a physician. He recalled a normal, middle-class childhood in Hampstead (he grew up at 15 Templewood Avenue, NW3), though he was not happy at the boarding-schools to which he was sent.
• Josephine Hutchinson (1903-1998), American actress who appeared in “North By North West” (1959) lived at Swiss Cottage, 4 Finchley Road, NW3.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In the 1950s John Schlesinger lived at 13 Inver Court, Inverness Terrace, W2.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Horatio Robert Forbes Brown was a Scottish historian who specialised in the history of Venice and Italy.
Born: February 16, 1854, Nice, France
Died: August 19, 1926, Belluno
Education: Clifton College
Lived: Newhall House, Carlops, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 9LY, UK (55.79672, -3.31732)
Ca’ Torresella, Zattere, Venice (45.42905, 12.32734)
Buried: Cimitero di San Michele, Venice, Città Metropolitana di Venezia, Veneto, Italy, Plot: Rec. Evangel, GPS (lat/lon): 45.4475, 12.34833
Find A Grave Memorial# 161099875

Born at Nice (then part of the kingdom of Sardinia) on February 16, 1854, Horatio Brown was the son of Hugh Horatio Brown, an advocate, of New Hall House, Carlops, who was a Deputy Lieutenant for Midlothian, and of Guglielmina Forbes, the sixth daughter of Colonel Ranaldson MacDonnell of Glengarry and Clanranald (1773–1828.) The marriage was in 1853, and his mother was a good deal younger than his father, who died on October 17, 1866, at the age of 66.
Address: Carlops, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 9LY, UK (55.79672, -3.31732)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1968 660206
Historic Scotland Building ID: 14644 (Grade B, 1979)
Place
Remodeled in 1850, Design by David Bryce (1803-1876)
There has been a house at Newhall dating back to the XIII century. The main part of the current house dates from 1703 when it replaced the original keep. This was added to under the ownership of Robert Brown in 1792 when he also built the walled garden. Many alterations were made and signs of former staircases and windows have been found in more recent alterations. Robert Brown’s son, Hugh, extended the house which included the north facing extension housing the dining room and billiard room above, the turreted front door and the domestic offices. The sun room to the rear and the extension housing the eight garages were added in recent years. The principal reception rooms include the drawing room, adjacent to the sun room with French windows to the rear lawn. To the front of the house is the dining room which can seat 22 people at one table. Since 1907, first as occasional tenants and then later as owners, the Maclagan family were connected with Newhall. The Kennedys moved to Newhall in 1998. Alison Maclagan died in 2002 aged 97
Life
Who: Horatio Robert Forbes Brown (February 16, 1854 – August 19, 1926)
Horatio Brown was a Scottish historian who specialised in the history of Venice and Italy. He spent most of his life in Venice, publishing several books about the city. He also wrote for the Cambridge Modern History, was the biographer of John Addington Symonds, and was a poet and alpinist. In 1877, the Brown family found itself in a bad financial position. Allan Brown emigrated to New South Wales, and a tenant was found for the family home in Midlothian, Newhall House. In 1879, Brown and his mother decided to live in Italy. They went first to Florence, where Guglielmina Brown’s Forbes aunts lived, and then settled at Venice, taking an apartment in the Palazzo Balbi Valier on the Grand Canal. Brown’s mother died in 1909, and Brown began to spend the summers in Midlothian, staying at the inn of Penicuik or with his friend Lord Rosebery, a former prime minister. During the Great War he stayed in Venice, and when the Austrians seemed likely to capture the city he moved to Florence, then home to Scotland, where he lived between the New club in Edinburgh and his home village of Carlops. Brown sold the Newhall estate before dying of heart failure on August 19, 1926 in Italy.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Horatio Brown moved to Ca’ Torresella on the Zattere, where he lived till 1926 when he died, apart from a temporary evacuation during WW1. Every Monday evening, he gave a salon there and British visitors armed with letters of introduction could meet all the great and good.
Address: Zattere, Venice (45.42905, 12.32734)
Type: Private Property
Place
In 1879, Horatio Brown and his mother decided to live in Italy. They went first to Florence, where Guglielmina Brown’s Forbes aunts lived, and then settled at Venice, taking an apartment in the Palazzo Balbi Valier on the Grand Canal. In 1885, the Browns bought a tall, narrow, tenement building on the Zattere looking down the Giudecca Canal and reconstructed it as a house called Cà Torresella. Brown’s close friend Antonio Salin, a gondolier, also lived in the house with his wife and family. The receptions he gave at home on Mondays were described by Frederick Rolfe, known as Baron Corvo.
Life
Who: Horatio Robert Forbes Brown (February 16, 1854 – August 19, 1926)
In Venice, Horatio Brown met the archaeologist Giacomo Boni, who became his colleague in a common passion for the antiquities of Venice and Italy. Brown became a leading figure in the English-speaking community, churchwarden of St George’s Church in campo San Vio, president of the city’s Cosmopolitan Hospital, and honorary treasurer of the Sailors’ Institute. He also befriended local gondoliers and fishermen, helping them in their battles, gaining the material for a book of local colour, “Life on the Lagoons,” which appeared in 1884. The ailing Robert Louis Stevenson (whom Brown had met in 1881 at Symonds’s house at Davos, Switzerland) read it and wrote the poem "To H. F. Brown" to celebrate "your spirited and happy book.” An alpinist, Brown climbed peaks in Switzerland, the Carnic Alps and the Tyrol, and was a member of the Alpine Club of Venice. Lord Ronald Gower stayed with Brown in Venice in the 1890s and noted in his diary: "Every morning Horatio Brown goes to his work at the Archives, and I go a-sight-seeing." Brown spent part of the summer of 1895 staying with Gower in London, when they visited picture galleries together. In 1899, his portrait was painted by Henry Scott Tuke. Brown’s friend John Addington Symonds appointed him his literary executor, so that in 1893, when Symonds died, Brown received all his private papers. He went on to publish “John Addington Symonds, a Biography” (1895), followed in 1923 by “Letters and Papers of John Addington Symonds.” In both, he suppressed almost all of Symonds’s homosexuality, and in Brown’s own will he left orders for the destruction of the papers, apart from Symonds’s autobiography, and that was not to be published for at least fifty years. In 1923, an equally discreet obituary of Frederick Rolfe was printed in the London Mercury, and Brown commented with sympathy: “If it was necessary to modify concerning Rolfe – a freelance with no ties – imagine what I was forced to do in my John Addington Symonds books, with his daughters and their husbands insisting on seeing the MS before it was printed!” Brown published some homoerotic poems in his collection “Drift” (1900), but was hostile to the Uranian writers in the circle of Edward Carpenter, and because of his suppression of the truth about Symonds they saw him as a hindrance to homosexual emancipation. After the war he sold most of his Venetian house, keeping an apartment. In March 1925 he had a heart attack, but recovered. He died of heart failure on August 19, 1926 at Belluno, where he had gone to escape the summer heat. He was cremated on San Michele. His estate at death was £6,117, a substantial sum. Brown’s friend and fellow-historian Frederick York Powell described him as "Horatio Brown, the Venetian historian, a real good sort, cheery, broad-faced, shock-headed, tumble-dressed,” while after his death the Cornhill Magazine called him a "Scotch laird, with his ruddy countenance, muscular limbs, and sturdy frame.”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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San Michele is an island in the Venetian Lagoon, northern Italy. It is associated with the sestiere of Cannaregio, from which it lies a short distance northeast.
Address: 30135 Venezia, Italy (45.44644, 12.34685)
Type: Cemetery (Open to public)
Phone: +39 041 729 2811
Place
Along with neighbouring San Cristoforo della Pace, the island was a popular place for local travellers and fishermen to land. Mauro Codussi's Chiesa di San Michele in Isola of 1469, the first Renaissance church in Venice, and a monastery lie on the island, which also served for a time as a prison. San Cristoforo was selected to become a cemetery in 1807, designed by Gian Antonio Selva, when under French occupation it was decreed that burial on the mainland (or on the main Venetian islands) was unsanitary. The canal that separated the two islands was filled in during 1836, and subsequently the larger island became known as San Michele. Bodies were carried to the island on special funeral gondolas. Among those buried there are Igor Stravinsky, Joseph Brodsky, Jean Schlumberger, Christian Doppler, Frederick Rolfe, Horatio Brown, Sergei Diaghilev, Ezra Pound, Luigi Nono, Catherine Bagration, Franco Basaglia, Paolo Cadorin, Zoran Mušič, Helenio Herrera, Emilio Vedova, and Salvador de Iturbide y Marzán. The cemetery is still in use today. The cemetery contains 7 war graves from WWI of officers and seamen of the British merchant and Royal Navy. Aspasia Manos was initially interred at the cemetery of Isola di San Michele. Her remains were later transferred to the Royal Cemetery Plot in the park of Tatoi Palace. Other attractions include the Cappella Emiliana.
Notable queer burials at Isola di San Michele:
• Princess Catherine Bagration (1783-1857) was the wife of the general Pyotr Bagration. She was known for her beauty, love affairs and outrageous behaviour. She counted many Parisian celebrities among her close friends: Stendhal, Benjamin Constant, the Marquis de Custine, even the Queen of Greece. The Princess's cook for a time was Marie-Antoine Carême, the founder of Haute Cuisine. Balzac mentions in one of his letters that she was one of the two women upon whom he based the character Feodora, heroine of his first novel “La Peau de Chagrin”. Similarly Victor Hugo mentions her salon in “Les Misérables”.
• Horatio Brown (February 16, 1854-August 19, 1926) was a Scottish historian who specialised in the history of Venice and Italy.
• Sergei Diaghilev (1872-1929) was a Russian art critic, patron, ballet impresario and founder of the Ballets Russes, from which many famous dancers and choreographers would arise.
• Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was an expatriate American poet and critic, and a major figure in the early modernist movement. His contribution to poetry began with his development of Imagism, a movement derived from classical Chinese and Japanese poetry, stressing clarity, precision and economy of language.
• Frederick Rolfe, better known as Baron Corvo (1860-1913), was an English writer, artist, photographer and eccentric.
• Jean Schlumberger (1907-1987) was a French jewelry designer especially well known for his work at Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger was a very private person but liked to socialize among friends like Cristóbal Balenciaga, Emilio Terry, Diana Vreeland and Hubert de Givenchy.
• Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) was a Russian (and later, a naturalized French and American) composer, pianist and conductor. He is widely considered one of the most important and influential composers of the XX century.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Henry Brooks Adams was an American historian and member of the Adams political family, being descended from two U.S. Presidents.
Born: February 16, 1838, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Died: March 27, 1918, Washington, D.C., United States
Education: Harvard Univeristy
Humboldt University of Berlin
Buried: Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, District Of Columbia, USA, Plot: Section E, Lot 202, GPS (lat/lon): 38.94679, -77.0106
Find A Grave Memorial# 5
Spouse: Marian Hooper Adams (m. 1872)

End of 2003, Howard Austen died; later, in Feb. 2005, he was re-buried at Rock Creek Cemetery, in Washington, D.C., in a joint grave meant for both Gore Vidal and Austen.
Address: 201 Allison St NW, Washington, DC 20011, USA (38.94744, -77.01203)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 (202) 726-2080
National Register of Historic Places: 77001498, 2010
Place
Rock Creek Cemetery is an 86-acre (350,000 m2) cemetery with a natural rolling landscape located at Rock Creek Church Road, NW, and Webster Street, NW, off Hawaii Avenue, NE in Washington, D.C.’s Petworth neighborhood. It is across the street from the historic Soldiers’ Home and the Soldiers’ Home Cemetery. It also is home to the InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington. It was first established in 1719 as a churchyard within the glebe of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish. The Vestry later decided to expand the burial ground as a public cemetery to serve the city of Washington and this was established through an Act of Congress in 1840. The expanded Cemetery was landscaped in the rural garden style, to function as both a cemetery and a public park. It is a ministry of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish with sections for St. John’s Russian Orthodox Church and St. Nicholas Orthodox Church. Rock Creek Cemetery’s park-like setting has many notable mausoleums, sculptures, and tombstones. The best known is Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Stanford White’s Adams Memorial, a contemplative, androgynous bronze sculpture seated before a block of granite. It marks the graves of Marian Hooper “Clover" Adams and her husband, Henry Adams, and sometimes mistakenly, the sculpture is referred to as Grief. Saint-Gaudens entitled it The Mystery of the Hereafter and The Peace of God that Passeth Understanding. Other notable memorials include the Frederick Keep Monument, the Heurich Mausoleum, the Hitt Monument, the Hardon Monument, the Kauffman Monument, known as The Seven Ages of Memory, the Sherwood Mausoleum Door, and the Thompson-Harding Monument.
Notable queer burials at Rock Creek Cemetery:
• Henry Brooks Adams (1838-1918)
• Howard Auster (1929–2003)
• Frances Benjamin "Fannie" Johnston (1864-1952), pioneering photojournalist and documentary photographer. She was cremated and her ashes scattered over the family plot.
• James Trimble, III (1925-1945)
• Gore Vidal (1925–2012)
Life
Who: Eugene Louis Vidal (October 3, 1925 – July 31, 2012) aka Gore Vidal and Howard Auster (1929 – September 22, 2003) aka Howard Austen
Gore Vidal and Howard Austen are buried side by side at Rock Creek Cemetery. Near them there is also Henry Adams, the American journalist, novelist, academic and historian who featured in Vidal’s books, and the great love of Gore Vidal’s life, Jimmy Trimble. Gore Vidal’s second novel, “The City and the Pillar” (1948) caused a moralistic furor over his dispassionate presentation of a young protagonist coming to terms with his homosexuality and a male homosexual relationship. The novel was dedicated to "J.T."; decades later, Vidal confirmed that the initials were those of James Trimble III, killed in the Battle of Iwo Jima on March 1, 1945; and that Jimmie Trimble was the only person Gore Vidal ever loved.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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George Francis Alexander Seymour, 7th Marquess of Hertford was the son of Hugh Seymour, 6th Marquess of Hertford.
Born: October 20, 1871
Died: February 16, 1940
Lived: Ragley Hall, Alcester B49 5NJ, UK (52.198, -1.89599)
Buried: Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA
Find A Grave Memorial# 173506576
Spouse: Alice Cornelia Thaw
Parents: Hugh Seymour, 6th Marquess of Hertford
Coronation date: 1912
Grandparent: Francis Seymour, 5th Marquess of Hertford

The country estate of George Seymour (1871-1940), Earl of Yarmouth and 7th Marquess of Hertford. Seymour inherited Ragley Hall in 1912 but never lived there, preferring the high life in London. Ragley Hall is a mid XVIII century park landscaped by Lancelot Brown, with late XIX century formal gardens and pleasure grounds laid out by Robert Marnock.
Address: Alcester B49 5NJ, UK (52.198, -1.89599)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1789 762090
English Heritage Building ID: 305020 (Grade I, 1967)
Place
Ragley Hall is located south of Alcester, Warwickshire, eight miles (13 km) west of Stratford-upon-Avon. It is the ancestral seat of the Marquess of Hertford and is one of the stately homes of England. The house, which was designed by Dr Robert Hooke, was built for the Edward Conway, 1st Earl of Conway and completed in 1680. The Great Hall is thought to have been decorated by James Wyatt in 1780. Financial instability of the Seymour family left the house threatened with demolition more than once. In 1912, following the death of Hugh Seymour, 6th Marquess of Hertford, the estate's trustees recommended that the house be demolished. However, during World War I and World War II, the house found use as a military hospital. Hugh Seymour, 8th Marquess of Hertford, who inherited Ragley Hall from his uncle in 1940, fought to save it after the war. It was refurbished between 1956 and 1958, when it became one of the first stately homes opened to the public. In 1983, the painter Graham Rust completed a huge mural including pets, friends and family members which is known as "The Temptation" and is exhibited on the Southern staircase. Ragley was the site of the Jerwood Sculpture Park, opened in July 2004. The Park included works that won the Jerwood Sculpture Prizes, and the work of Dame Elisabeth Frink, among others. However the site was closed in April 2012.
Life
Who: George Francis Alexander Seymour, 7th Marquess of Hertford (October 20, 1871 – February 16, 1940)
George Seymour, 7th Marquess of Hertford, was the son of Hugh Seymour, 6th Marquess of Hertford. Seymour became a Lieutenant in the Warwickshire regiment before joining the Black Watch. He became Earl of Yarmouth in 1884 and the 7th Marquess of Hertford in 1901. In 1895 he arrived at the sugar district of Mackay, Queensland, Australia, taking up a small mixed farm. Despite his senior rank and status, the local population showed him little respect, scandalised by his behaviour. The local paper called him a ‘skirt dancer’ and local memory is of him performing dances in a sequined outfit with butterfly wings and of hosting male-only parties on his isolated property. Seymour seems to have returned to England for Queen Victoria's Jubilee then travelled to the US, where he married Alice C. Thaw of Pittsburgh on 27 April 1903; their childless marriage was annulled in 1908 on the grounds of non-consummation. Alice Cornelia Thaw (January 2, 1880 – May 8, 1955) was an American philanthropist, born to William Thaw, Sr. and Mary Sibbet Copley. She was the younger sister of Harry Kendall Thaw. Lord Hertford filed for bankruptcy in 1910 and inherited Ragley Hall and its large Warwickshire estate in 1912, but never lived there, preferring the high life in London. Lord Hertford died in 1940, aged 68 and childless, and his titles passed to his nephew, Hugh Seymour.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Wallace Maynard "Wally" Cox was an American comedian and actor, particularly associated with the early years of television in the United States.
Born: December 6, 1924, Detroit, Michigan, United States
Died: February 15, 1973, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: Denby High School
Lived: 53 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019, USA (40.76595, -73.98029)
Buried: Death Valley, California, along with those of his close friend, actor Marlon Brando (ashes)
Buried alongside: Marlon Brando
Find A Grave Memorial# 2538
Height: 1.68 m
Books: My life as a small boy, The Tenth Life of Osiris Oaks
Spouse: Patricia Tiernan (m. 1967–1973), Milagros Tirado Fink (m. 1963–1966), Marilyn Gennaro (m. 1954–1961)

Mousy TV actor Wally Cox and his longtime roommate, the brooding Marlon Brando, were definitely one of New York’s oddest couples. Brando and Cox met when they were 9 years old. As adults, they were weight-lifting partners, and the diminutive Cox was rumored to be well built in a number of important ways. There was a widely disseminated photograph of the two men engaged in a sex act, but it may have been intentionally posed in order to provoke controversy. Though married many times and the father of many children, perhaps Brando’s longest relationship was with Cox. The two shared an apartment, and after Cox’s death in 1973, Brando rushed back to the US from Tahiti to procure his friend’s ashes. He did so telling Cox’s wife he was to scatter them on a place they used to go climbing. Instead, he kept Cox’s remains at home, and sometime even under the passenger sit in his car, often talking to the urn as if it were his still-living friend. After Brando’s own death and cremation in 2004, their ashes along with those of another longtime friend, Sam Gilman, were scattered together in Tahiti and Death Valley.
They met in 1933 and remained friends until Cox’s death in 1973: 40 years.
Marlon Brando (April 3, 1924 – July 1, 2004)
Wally Cox (December 6, 1924 – February 15, 1973)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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57th Street is one of New York City’s major thoroughfares, which runs east-west in the Midtown section of the borough of Manhattan, from the New York City Department of Sanitation’s dock on the Hudson River at the West Side Highway to a small park overlooking the East River built on a platform suspended above the FDR Drive. It is two blocks south of Central Park between Fifth Avenue and Central Park West. 57th Street is notable for prestigious art galleries, restaurants and up-market shops.
Address: 205 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019, USA (40.76595, -73.98029)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: Osborne Apartments, 93000333, 1993
Place
Beginning with the construction of One57, a 1,004 foot tall apartment building between Sixth and Seventh Avenues which was completed in 2014, a large number of very tall ultra-luxury residential buildings have been constructed or proposed on the section of 57th Street roughly corresponding to the southern edge of Central Park. Due to the often record-breaking prices that have been set for the apartments in these buildings, the press has dubbed this section of 57th Street as "Billionaires” Row.” Other projects contributing to this construction boom include the 1,396 foot tall 432 Park Avenue (located on East 57th Street), the 1,438 foot tall 111 West 57th Street, the 1,775 foot tall 225 West 57th Street, and the proposed 41 West 57th Street. These projects have generated controversy concerning the economic conditions and zoning policies that have encouraged these buildings, as well as the impact these towers will have on the surrounding neighborhoods and the shadows they will cast on Central Park.
Notable queer residents at West 57th Street:
• In 1949, Marlon Brando and his close friend Wally Cox roomed together in a 2-room apartment in a building on 53 West 57th Street. In 1943, Marlon Brando lived also at Patchin Place, while rooming with his sister, and in 1946 at 43 5th Ave, in a tiny apartment with a roommate named Igor, a Russian violinist. This was when he was studying acting in NYC. Marlon Brando was an actor, film director, and activist. He is hailed for bringing a gripping realism to film acting and is often cited as one of the greatest and most influential actors of all time. In 1973, Brando suffered a great personal loss with the death of his childhood and best friend Wally Cox. Brando appeared unannounced at Cox’s wake. As told by Patricia Bosworth to A&E, Marlon showed up and "climbed up a tree and looked down on everybody. He got the ashes away from Wally Cox’s wife, the box of ashes, and they literally fought over the ashes... He kept them first in his car and then by his bed... Mrs. Cox was going to sue for the ashes but she finally said "I think Marlon needs the ashes more than I do”." At Brando’s death, he was cremated, and his ashes were put in with those of his childhood friend and another longtime friend, Sam Gilman. They were then scattered partly in Tahiti and partly in Death Valley.
• The Osborne Apartments are located at 205 West 57th Street. The Osborne began construction in 1883 and was completed in 1885. The building stands behind its dour and reticent rusticated brownstone cladding, on the northwest corner of 57th Street and Seventh Avenue, catercorner from Carnegie Hall. The Osborne, far less prominent for the city’s visitors than The Dakota, was designed and built by James Edward Ware in 1883–85 and expanded with an annex to the west in 1906, designed by Alfred S. G. Taylor and Julien Clarence Levi. The stone contractor Thomas Osborne, whose ruinous speculative investment it was, gave the building his name. A visual connection to Osborne House, Queen Victoria’s summer residence in the Isle of Wight is also made. Three modillioned cornices divide the height into three broad horizontal bandings, with a two-story attic added for servants’ quarters in 1891 that is capped with a top cornice. The original building is constructed of masonry bearing walls ranging from 4 1/2 feet thick at its base to 18 inches at the top floor. The 1906 Annex is constructed of steel-framing behind brick and brownstone curtain walls. Its range of street-level shopfronts is broken at the center of the main, 57th Street front by its entrance. The unusually richly decorated lobby, in American Renaissance taste, has stuccoed and mosaic-tiled walls, floors that mix tile mosaics and slabs of varicolored Italian marble. Complementary marble was used for the wainscoting and carved marble recesses with benches. Mosaics and glazed terracotta "Della Robbia" panels cover the walls and ceilings in rich hues of red, blue and gold leaf, with contributions by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, the great sculptor of the American Renaissance, the muralist John La Farge, glass by Tiffany Studios and French designer Jacob Adolphus Holzer. Leo Lerman (May 23, 1914 – August 22, 1994) was a writer and editor who worked for Condé Nast Publications for more than 50 years. Lerman’s lifelong love and partner was artist Gray Foy, together from 1948 until Lerman’s death in 1994. When Lerman died without completing his life story, Gray discovered that Leo had actually kept diary-like notebooks. Foy showed them to Stephen Pascal, who used these notebooks and other outside materials about Lerman’s life to put together the book. Gray Foy (August 10, 1922 - November 23, 2012) was an artist of considerable early reputation, who was known in later years as a tastemaker, bon vivant, salonnier, partygoer, party-giver, genteel accumulator and perennial fixture of New York cultural life. He died at 90, in the 3,500-square-foot, largely lilac-walled apartment in the Osborne, where he had lived since the 1960s in congenial Victorian profusion. After the death of his long time partner, Leo Lerman, he married Joel Kaye, who survives him. On any given night — first in the crumbling brownstone on upper Lexington Avenue where their romance began in the late 1940s, and later in the apartment in the Osborne, to which the couple moved in 1967 — the Foy-Lerman firmament might include many of these stars: Frederick Ashton, George Balanchine, Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, Maria Callas, Mr. Capote, Carol Channing, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, Aaron Copland, Marcel Duchamp, Margot Fonteyn, John Gielgud, Martha Graham, Cary Grant, Anaïs Nin, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Edith Sitwell, Susan Sontag, Virgil Thomson, Lionel and Diana Trilling and Anna May Wong. After Gray Foy’s death, the apartment’s content was auctioned off.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Susan Brownell Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement.
Born: February 15, 1820, Adams, Massachusetts, United States
Died: March 13, 1906, Rochester, New York, United States
Lived: Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum, 67 East Road, Adams, MA 01220, USA (42.61546, -73.10229)
Susan B. Anthony Childhood House, 2835 NY 29, Battenville, NY 12834, USA (43.11053, -73.42311)
Susan B. Anthony House, 17 Madison St, Rochester, NY 14608, USA (43.15318, -77.62806)
Buried: Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester, Monroe County, New York, USA, Plot: Section C, Lot 93
Find A Grave Memorial# 31
Siblings: Daniel Read Anthony, Mary Stafford Anthony, Hannah Anthony, Guelma Anthony McLean, Merritt Anthony

Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. In 1851, she met Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who became her lifelong co-worker in social reform activities, primarily in the field of women's rights. Anthony and Stanton worked together in a close and productive relationship. They referred to each other as "Susan" and "Mrs. Stanton". At Anthony's 70th birthday celebration, Stanton teased her by saying, "Well, as all women are supposed to be under the thumb of some man, I prefer a tyrant of my own sex, so I shall not deny the patent fact of my subjection.” Their interests began to diverge somewhat as they grew older. Anthony began to form alliances with more conservative groups. Despite such friction, their relationship continued to be close. When Stanton died in 1902, Anthony grieved for months. Writing a tribute that appeared in The New York Times, Anthony described Stanton as having "forged the thunderbolts" that she (Anthony) "fired."
They met in 1851 and remained friends until Stanton’s death in 1902: 51 years.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902)
Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Jane Addams was a pioneer settlement social worker, public philosopher, sociologist, author, and leader in women's suffrage and world peace. She revolutionized American social reform by founding Hull House, an institution Addams established in a poor neighborhood of Chicago to provide services for recent immigrants. Addams later became the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Her closest adult companion and friend was wealthy philanthropist Mary Rozet Smith, who supported Addams's work at Hull House, and with whom she shared a romantic friendship. They always slept in the same room and the same bed, and when they traveled Jane even wired ahead to be sure they would get a hotel room with a double bed. It was said that, "Mary Smith became and always remained the highest and clearest note in the music that was Jane Addams' personal life". Together they owned a summerhouse in Bar Harbor, Maine. When apart, they would write to each other at least once a day - sometimes twice. Addams would write to Smith, "I miss you dreadfully and am yours 'til death". The letters also show that the women saw themselves as a married couple: "There is reason in the habit of married folks keeping together", Addams wrote to Smith.
Together from 1893 to 1934: 41 years.
Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935)
Mary Rozet Smith (December 23, 1868 - 1934)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Susan B. Anthony, who led the movement to obtain voting rights for women, had a passionate love affair with abolitionist Anna E. Dickinson. In one surviving letter, Anthony enticed Dickinson (whom she called a "naughty Teaze") to join her in bed, ensuring her it was "big enough and good enough to take you in.” Dickinson was an American orator and lecturer. An advocate for the abolition of slavery and for women's suffrage, as well as a gifted teacher, Dickinson was the first woman to speak before the United States Congress. At a very young age, she aided the Republican Party in the hard-fought 1863 elections and significantly influenced the distribution of political power in the Union just prior to the Civil War. Dickinson also was the first white woman on record to climb Colorado’s Longs Peak, in 1873. Among her papers there is a letter signed “Ida” that recalls, “This time last evening you were sitting on my knee, nestled close to my heart and I was the happiest of mortals.” The letter does not stop with such a maternal description. Ida goes on to remember Anna in bed, “tempting me to kiss her sweet mouth and to caress her until—well, poor little me, poor ‘booful princess.’ How can I leave thee, queen of my loving heart?”
Anna Elizabeth Dickinson (October 28, 1842 – October 22, 1932)
Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The Anthony House is a historic house at 67 East Road in Adams, Massachusetts.
Address: 67 East Road, Adams, MA 01220, USA (42.61546, -73.10229)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Thursday through Monday 10.00-16.00
Phone: +1 413-743-7121
National Register of Historic Places: 85000021, 1985
Place
Built in 1817
The house is a conventional center hall 2.5 story colonial in the Federalist style. Twin chimneys rise from the building’s center line, and a modest 1.5 story ell was added onto the rear of the house, and a porch added onto the side of the rear ell in the 1950s was enclosed in the 1960s. A barn has been replaced by a modern garage on the property. Inside the house the original floorplan has been retained, with a central hall flanked by large public rooms in front of the house and smaller service rooms in the rear. The rear ell contains two small rooms. Most of the original woodwork has been retained, although one fireplace has been bricked up. The house is now a museum dedicated to showcasing Susan B. Anthony’s early years. The house is notable for its association with early educators and industrialists in Adams, and as the birthplace of suffragist Susan B. Anthony: she was born in this house on February 15, 1820. The first of the Anthonys to arrive in Adams, Massachusetts was David Anthony, the great-grandfather of Susan B. Anthony, in the years before the American Revolutionary War. He came as part of a more general migration of Quakers to the area from Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts. He established a cider mill that remains in the Anthony family to this day. His grandson, David Anthony, built this house as a gift to his son, Daniel Anthony, the father of Susan B. Anthony. Daniel was an influential member of the local Quaker community: a strong proponent of education, teaching at the East Road School, and joining with others in the tightly knit Quaker community to found the Adams Academy in 1825 on land owned by his father. Daniel Anthony also continued the family interest in mills, establishing with his brother a cotton yarn-producing mill, known as the Pump Log Mill, in 1822. In 1827 Daniel was lured by financial interests to Battenville, New York. Alma Lutz was the author of “Susan B. Anthony, Rebel, Crusader, Humanitarian” (1959). Lutz and Marguerite Smith shared a Boston apartment and a summer home in the Berkshires, Highmeadow, Berlin, N.Y., not far from Susan B. Anthony's birthplace in Adams. Lutz and Smith worked in the National Woman’s Party. They travelled together, visiting Europe several times in the 1950s. When Smith died in 1959, Lutz struggled with her grief: “It’s a hard adjustment to make, but one we all have to face in one way or another and I am remembering that I have much to be grateful for.”
Life
Who: Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)
The house remained in Anthony family hands until 1895, after which it went through a succession of owners. The Society of Friends Descendants acquired the property in 1926, and established a museum. The building was returned to private hands in 1949. It underwent restoration from 2006 to 2009. It is now home to the non-profit Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum, showcasing Susan B. Anthony’s early years and her legacy as a tireless advocate of women’s right to vote.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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The Susan B. Anthony Childhood House in Battenville, New York, is the childhood home of suffragette Susan B. Anthony.
Address: 2835 NY 29, Battenville, NY 12834, USA (43.11053, -73.42311)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 06001079, 2007
Place
Built in 1832
Battenville is a hamlet on the south town line of Greenwich, New York, located on the Batten Kill. As of 2006, the Susan B. Anthony Childhood House is owned by the state; it is controlled by the OPRHP / Saratoga State Park. The listing includes the house, a retaining wall, and a carriage barn. Italianate features were added to the house in 1885. The Thomas McLean House and Stoops Hotel are also listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Life
Who: Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)
Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906) lived here from age 13 to age 19, from 1833 to 1839. The family moved from Adams, Massachusetts, where she was born.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Artifacts and materials displayed in Susan B. Anthony’s former home and site of her 1872 arrest.
Address: 17 Madison St, Rochester, NY 14608, USA (43.15318, -77.62806)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Tuesday through Sunday 11.00-17.00
Phone: +1 585-235-6124
National Register of Historic Places: 66000528, 1966 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Susan B. Anthony House, in Rochester, New York, was the home of Susan B. Anthony for forty years, while she was a national figure in the women’s rights movement. She was arrested in the front parlor after attempting to vote in the 1872 Presidential Election. She resided here until her death. The Susan B. Anthony House is located at 17 Madison Street in Rochester. Access to the house is through the Susan B. Anthony Museum entrance at 19 Madison Street. Today the Susan B. Anthony House is a learning center and museum open to the public for tours and programs. The Visitor Center and Museum Shop are located in the historic house next door, 19 Madison Street, which was owned by Hannah Anthony Mosher, sister of Susan and Mary Anthony. The mission of the Susan B. Anthony House is to keep Susan B. Anthony’s vision alive and relevant. The house hosts an annual celebration of Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave women the right to vote. In 2011, the New York Times reported that the museum at the house had sold a large quantity of "a $250 handbag made of fake alligator that was inspired by one of Anthony’s own club bags, similar to a doctor’s bag," noting that for Anthony, "a bag was not a fashion statement but a symbol of independence at a time when women were not allowed to enter into a contract or even open a bank account." Papers and memorabilia about the suffrage movement were donated to the house at the request of Carrie Chapman Catt, Susan B. Anthony’s successor as President of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. They are held by the River Campus Libraries of the University of Rochester.
Life
Who: Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906)
Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) worked together in a close and productive relationship. From 1880 to 1886 they were together almost every day working on the History of Woman Suffrage. They referred to each other as "Susan" and "Mrs. Stanton.” At Anthony’s 70th birthday celebration, Stanton teased her by saying, "Well, as all women are supposed to be under the thumb of some man, I prefer a tyrant of my own sex, so I shall not deny the patent fact of my subjection." Their interests began to diverge somewhat as they grew older. Despite such friction, their relationship continued to be close. When Stanton died in 1902, Anthony wrote to a friend: "Oh, this awful hush! It seems impossible that voice is stilled which I have loved to hear for fifty years. Always I have felt I must have Mrs. Stanton’s opinion of things before I knew where I stood myself. I am all at sea..." Susan B. Anthony died at the age of 86 of heart failure and pneumonia in her home in Rochester, New York, on March 13, 1906. She was buried at Mount Hope Cemetery (1133 Mt Hope Ave, Rochester, NY 14620). In the same cemetery are buried: Lilliam D. Wald (1867-1940), a nurse, humanitarian and author, known for contributions to human rights and was the founder of American community nursing, who founded the Henry Street Settlement and was an early advocate for nursing in schools; cotton broker James O. Bloss (1847-1918) who lived for nearly fifty years in a same-sex intimate partnership with John William Sterling (1844-1918).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Paul Chalfin was an artist and interior designer with an interest in architecture, most known for his work on Villa Vizcaya.
Born: November 2, 1874, New York City, New York, United States
Died: February 16, 1959, Clifton, New Jersey, United States
Education: Harvard University
Buried: Mount Hebron Cemetery, Upper Montclair, Essex County, New Jersey, USA, GPS (lat/lon): 40.8536, -74.19783
Find A Grave Memorial# 161267748
Structures: Villa Vizcaya
People also search for: James Deering, Diego Suarez, F. Burrall Hoffman

James Deering was a socialite and an antiquities collector; he was an executive in the family Deering Harvester Company and subsequent International Harvester. He is known for his landmark Vizcaya estate, where he was an early 20th century resident on Biscayne Bay, in the present day Coconut Grove district of Miami, Florida. Begun in 1910, with architecture and gardens in a Mediterranean Revival style, Vizcaya was his passionate endeavor with artist Paul Chalfin, and his winter home from 1916 to his death in 1925. While staying at Vizcaya, John Singer Sargent painted a series of watercolors of male nudes, using the African-American workers on the premises as models. Many speculate James Deering to have had a relationship with Sargent, a life-long bachelor. James Deering died in September 1925, on board the steamship SS City of Paris en route back to the United States. Despite high praise for his work on Villa Vizcaya, Chalfin never worked on another mansion; he decorated the apartment of actress Lillian Gish, friend of James Deering. Chalfin died on February 15, 1959 at the age of 84 in a nursing home in Upper Montclair, New Jersey.
Together from 1910 to 1925: 15 years.
James Deering (November 12, 1859 – September 21, 1925)
Paul Chalfin (November 2, 1874 - February 15, 1959)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Villa Vizcaya, now named the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, is the former villa and estate of businessman James Deering, of the Deering McCormick-International Harvester fortune, on Biscayne Bay in the present day Coconut Grove neighborhood of Miami, Florida.
Address: 3251 S Miami Ave, Miami, FL 33129, USA (25.74438, -80.21047)
Type: Museum (open to publich)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 9.30-16.30
National Register of Historic Places: 70000181, 1970. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built in 1916, Design by F. Burrall Hoffman (1882-1980), Interior Design Paul Chalfin (1874-1959), Landscape Design by Diego Suarez (1888-1974)
The early XX century Vizcaya estate also includes: extensive Italian Renaissance gardens; native woodland landscape; and a historic village outbuildings compound. The landscape and architecture were influenced by Veneto and Tuscan Italian Renaissance models and designed in the Mediterranean Revival architecture style, with Baroque elements. Paul Chalfin, a former art curator, painter, and interior designer, was the project’s director. He assisted and encouraged Deering to collect art items, antiquities, and architectural elements for the project. Chalfin recommended the architect F. Burrall Hoffman to design the structural and envelope of the villa, garden pavilions, and estate outbuildings. The landscape master plan and individual gardens were designed with the Colombian landscape designer Diego Suarez, who had trained with Sir Harold Acton at the gardens of Villa La Pietra outside Florence, Italy. Vizcaya’s villa exterior and garden architecture is a composite of different Italian Renaissance villas and gardens, with French Renaissance parterre features, based on visits and research by Chalfin, Deering, and Hoffman. The villa facade’s primary influence is the Villa Rezzonico designed by Baldassarre Longhena at Bassano del Grappa in the Veneto region of northern Italy. It is referred to sometimes as the "Hearst Castle of the East.” James Deering died in September, 1925, on board the steamship SS City of Paris en route back to the United States. After his death Vizcaya was inherited by his two nieces, Marion Chauncey Deering McCormick and Ely Deering McCormick Danielson. Over the decades, after hurricanes and increasing maintenance costs, they began selling the estate’s surrounding land parcels and outer gardens. In 1945 they sold significant portions of the Vizcaya property to the Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine, Florida, to build Miami’s Mercy Hospital. In 1952 Miami-Dade County acquired the villa and formal Italian gardens, needing significant restoration, for $1 million. Deering’s heirs donated the villa’s furnishings and antiquities to the County-Museum. Vizcaya began operation in 1953 as the Dade County Art Museum.
Life
Who: James Deering (November 12, 1859 – September 21, 1925)
James Deering was an industrial executive in the family Deering Harvester Company and subsequent International Harvester, a socialite, and an antiquities collector. Begun in 1910, with architecture and gardens in a Mediterranean Revival style, Vizcaya was his passionate endeavor with artist Paul Chalfin (1874-1959), and his winter home from 1916 to his death in 1925. Paul Chalfin had attended Harvard, trained as a painter at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and was an associate of renowned decorator Elsie de Wolfe. She introduced Chalfin to Deering for the interiors of his Chicago home in 1910. In 1910, Chalfin and Deering traveled through Europe together for the first trip of many over the years, in part to collect ideas and begin acquiring art, antiquities, and furnishings for the new Florida estate. The culmination of their shared effort and lasting memorial to their creative relationship is Villa Vizcaya, the Miami estate created between 1914 and 1923. Among James Deering’s closest friends were painter Gari Melchers and his wife Corinne. Through his brother Charles, also a patron of the arts and collector, he had friendships with the painters John Singer Sargent and Anders Zorn. Sargent visited Vizcaya in Mar. 1917 and produced a series of watercolors of the estate, as well as portrait of James and male nudes of the African-American workers there. After the extensive gardens were completed in 1923, Deering’s health began to weaken. Nonetheless, he traveled and entertained guests, including the silent film stars Lillian Gish and Marion Davies. James Deering died aboard the steamship SS City of Paris. His body was brought to Chicago for burial at the family plot in Graceland Cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) was an artist and interior designer with an interest in architecture, most known for his work on Villa Vizcaya. Paul Chalfin, while living at Vizcaya, maintained a homosexual relationship with Louis Koons, in the mid-1910s and early 1920s. In 1940 Chalfin retired due to failing eyesight. Paul Chalfin died on February 15, 1959 at the age of 84 in a nursing home in Upper Montclair, New Jersey, and is buried at Mount Hebron Cemetery (851 Valley Rd, Montclair, NJ 07042).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Education: University of Oxford
Lived: Lewes House, 23 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU, UK (50.87371, 0.01296)
Buried: English Cemetery, Bagni di Lucca, Provincia di Lucca, Toscana, Italy
Buried alongside: Ned Warren
Find A Grave Memorial# 139948443

Ned Warren was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum, which he did not attempt to sell during his lifetime because of its explicit depiction of homoerotic scenes. At Oxford, he met John Marshall, whom he called "Puppy." Ned and John lived together at Lewes House in East Sussex, for a time with John’s wife, Mary. On February 15, 1928, John retired for the evening, saying that he was not feeling well. Ned gave him a kiss and joined him in bed, but John died during the night. Marshall's took his last breath while Ned sat at his bedside. Servants reported that Ned's final words to the dying man were, “Goodbye, Puppy." Warren died less than one year later. Mary, John and Ned were buried in the non-Catholic cemetery in Bagni di Lucca, Italy, a town known as a spa in Etruscan and Roman times; that was John and Ned’s expressed desire, including having Mary near them. The same cemetery is the final resting place of Evangeline Whipple and Rose Cleveland.
Together from 1885 to 1928: 43 years.
Edward Perry "Ned" Warren (January 8, 1860 – December 28, 1928)
John Marshall (1862 - February 15, 1928)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The principal rooms, known to Ned Warren as the Business Room, the Red Drawing Room, the Hepplewhite Bedroom and the Dining Room, remain as originally constructed and require only the return of some of their former furnishings to recreate the grace and elegance of a typical XVIII Century country gentleman’s retreat.
Address: 23 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU, UK (50.87371, 0.01296)
Type: Administrative Building (open to public)
Phone: +44 01273 471600
English Heritage Building ID: 293121 (Grade II, 1952)
Place
Ned Warren and John Marshall lived together at Lewes House, a large residence in Lewes, East Sussex, where they became the center of a circle of like-minded men interested in art and antiquities who ate together in a dining room overlooked by Lucas Cranach’s “Adam and Eve,” now in the Courtauld Institute of Art. One account said that "Warren’s attempts to produce a supposedly Greek and virile way of living into his Sussex home" produced "a comic mixture of apparently monastic severity (no tea or soft chairs allowed) and lavish living." The early Georgian features of Lewes House probably date from 1733. The earlier two-storey part of the present house was probably built, or remodelled, around the late mediaeval core, either by John Tabor, a “Doctor of Physick” or his son-in-law, William Kempe. At the close of the XVIII Century, the property was in the ownership of Henry Humphrey. It was during his occupation that the building was sketched in 1783 by James Lambert. A copy of the drawing hangs in Lewes House and shows the house at that time to be of its original two storeys with a gabled roof and entrance porch with living accommodation over, supported by Ionic columns. A garden occupied the site of the front and western parts of the present house. It was enclosed by a high flint wall and entered by an imposing gateway on its High Street frontage. By 1812 the property had passed to Humphrey’s nephew, Henry Jackson, who was responsible for the addition of the west wing, rebuilding the front of the house and extending the property northwards to the High Street. Jackson’s new structure was of three storeys and incorporated the more fashionable high ceilings in the newly-created rooms. The work also included the construction of the present Doric porch and the flight of stone steps to pavement level, bringing the house to the appearance which it has today. By 1836 Lewes House was in the ownership of Edward Shewell, who died in 1838. Edward fathered no fewer than 20 children by two wives, the second of whom, having borne him six of those children, outlived her husband by 45 years. She died in the house on Mar. 22, 1883 aged 80 years. The property then descended to Edward’s grandsons of his first marriage, Edward Louis Shewell and Henry Shewell. E.L. Shewell was drowned at sea on May 5, 1887, during a voyage from Barcelona to Marseilles, in a collision between the two steamships “Asic” and “Ajaccio.” This left the property in the sole ownership of Henry, a Major General in the British Army, who sold the property in August 1887 to his distant aunt, Elizabeth Cooper. By 1890 the occupant was Edward Perry Warren, the third son of Samuel Denis Warren of Massachusetts who founded the Cumberland Paper Mills at Maine. He furnished the house with fine examples of antique furniture. Oriental carpets and rugs. He hung the walls with tapestries and primitive paintings, filled the bookcases with rare books and displayed his vast collection of vases, bronzes, ivories and other priceless antiquities throughout the house. In 1928 Warren had made a gift of this house (and also School Hill House, an adjoining Georgian property) to the man who began his association with Warren as Private Secretary but who was to become one of Warren’s most trusted and highly valued business associates and friend, H. Asa Thomas Esq. On April 1, 1974, following the reorganisation of local government, the house came into the ownership of the present occupant and custodian, Lewes District Council, whose principal offices are located here. The house itself is virtually unaltered except for the conversion of the domestic quarters into offices and storage accommodation.
Life
Who: Edward Perry “Ned” Warren (January 8, 1860 – December 28, 1928) and John Marshall (1862–1928)
Edward Perry Warren was born in 1860, educated at Harvard (Class of 1883) and later entered Oxford to read Classics where he gained his MA degree. From an early age Warren’s interest was antiquities – particularly Grecian – and, like his father and mother, he became a great collector of pictures, fine arts and china. Edward had little interest in the family business and, following his father’s death in 1888 (at which time he was in England) he was happy to leave those affairs in the hands of a trust so that he was free to follow his own pursuits of travel and collecting on his recently acquired income of £10,000 a year. Warren did not enjoy good health and was plagued with eye problems which necessitated early withdrawal from his studies at Oxford. However, he found the lifestyle at Lewes House very much to his liking and, as his health improved, he began the serious collection of fine arts, not only for his own satisfaction, but also, for a time, on behalf of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in America. His extensive circle of friends reflected his interest in the arts and he entertained regularly. Large parties were common and included numerous members of the Bloomsbury Group, one of whom, the artist Roger Fry, painted a water colour of the house and garden in 1910 which was presented to the Council and is now on display in the house. Warren, his lifelong friend and resident assistant John Marshall, the constant stream of visitors, whose lifestyles were quite alien to the average Lewesian, the Arab horses and the six St. Bernard dogs gave the house a reputation of eccentricity and few local people, except for his household staff, ever saw it from the inside.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Bagni di Lucca (formerly Bagno a Corsena) is a comune of Tuscany, Italy, in the Province of Lucca with a population of about 6,500. Bagni di Lucca with its thermal baths reached its greatest fame during the XIX century, especially during the French occupation.
Address: Cimitero Inglese, Via Letizia, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00566, 10.58808)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Address: Via Bagno alla Villa, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00971, 10.5879)
Type: Private Property
Address: Villa San Francesco, Via S. Francesco, 6, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00832, 10.58725)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +39 333 765 8629
Place
The town became the summer residence of the court of Napoleon and his sister, Elisa Baciocchi. A casino was built, where gambling was part of social nightlife, as well as a large hall for dances. At the Congress of Vienna (1814), the Duchy of Lucca was assigned to Maria-Louisa of Bourbon as ruler of Parma. It continued as a popular summer resort, particularly for the English, who built a Protestant church there. The church now has been converted to the Bagni di Lucca Biblioteca (library) and holds archives and records that date back to centuries ago. In 1847 Lucca with Bagni di Lucca was ceded to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, under the domain of the Grand Duke Leopold II of Lorraine. His rule started a period of decline for the springs and casino as a destination, since he was used to a secluded life. In 1853 the casino was closed. It was reopened after 1861, when Lucca became part of the unified Kingdom of Italy. In the 1940s, during the German invasion of Italy, Bagni di Lucca, along with many other towns located in the Apennines, was occupied, as they were along the Gothic Line. Several houses and mansions in the area were used as residences for German soldiers and some residents born after 1940 in this region have German ancestry. The English cemetery is a sacred place which is located in Bagni di Lucca, about 300 meters from the Church of England, on the other side of the river Lima. In 1842 Carlo Ludovico di Borbone granted to the British colony of Bagni di Lucca the faculty to establish a Protestant cemetery. They chose a place called "al Prato Santo (the Holy Meadow)" and, although the works were finished in 1844, the first burial happened immediately after the purchase. The graveyard was in operation until 1953 and there are 137 people who rest there. In 1982, with the exhaustion of a legacy for maintenance, the holy site was purchased by the town of Bagni di Lucca. The cemetery is currently managed by the Fondazione Michel de Montaigne and Istituto Storico Lucchese and is accessible to visitors every day (except Sunday) from 10.00 to 18.00. Among the people buried here, often in tombs made by famous sculptors such as Benjamin Gibson, Joseph Norfini and Emilio Duccini, are the novelist Ouida, Henry and Elizabeth Stisted and Irish entomologist Alexander Henry Haliday.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Inglese di Bagni di Lucca:
• Rose Elizabeth Cleveland (June 13, 1846 – November 22, 1918), was the First Lady of the United States from 1885 to 1886, during the first of her brother U.S. President Grover Cleveland’s two administrations.
• Nelly Erichsen (1862-1918) was an English illustrator and painter. From 1912 until Nov. 1918, Erichsen was living in the quiet Tuscan spa town of Bagni di Lucca with two companions - Evangeline Whipple and Rose Cleveland. Whipple was the widow of the American Episcopal Bishop Henry Whipple, known for his evangelical work among the native Indian population. Whipple and Cleveland had first met in the winter of 1889–1890, and resumed their relationship in 1901 (after the death of Henry Whipple), moving from the USA to Italy in 1910. In 1918 tragedy struck, when both Rose Cleveland and Nelly Erichsen were carried off by the 1918 flu pandemic which decimated the post-war World. Evangeline Whipple died in London in 1930, but she was laid to rest in Bagni di Lucca next to the tombs of the two friends who had preceded her.
• Ouida (1839-1908) was the pseudonym of the English novelist Maria Louise Ramé (although she preferred to be known as Marie Louise de la Ramée.)
• Edward Perry Warren (1860-1928), known as Ned Warren, was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum. At Oxford Edward Perry Warren met archeologist John Marshall (1862–1928), a younger man he called "Puppy," with whom he formed a close and long-lasting relationship, though Marshall married in 1907. Beginning in 1888, Warren made England his primary home. He and Marshall lived together at Lewes House (with Marshall’s wife, Mary), a large residence in Lewes, East Sussex, where they became the center of a circle of like-minded men interested in art and antiquities who ate together in a dining room overlooked by Lucas Cranach’s “Adam and Eve,” now in the Courtauld Institute of Art. Ned Warren, John Marshall and Mary are all buried together in Bagni di Lucca.
• Evangeline Marrs Whipple (1860-1930), widow for the second time (she first married the wealthy businessman Michael Hodge Simpson and then bishop Henry Benjamin Whipple), visited Bagni di Lucca in 1910, lodging at Hotel Continental and then taking residence at Casa Bernardini at Bagno alla Villa. This is the house she shared with Rose Cleveland and Nelly Ericksen. Rose and Nelly died in 1918. In 1928 Evangeline wrote “A Famous Corner of Tuscany” about Bagni di Lucca. Around this time she bought Casa Burlamacchi, completing restoring the “Casa Piccola” (Little House, now Villa San Francesco), in front of the garden at the back of the “Casa Grande” (Big House.)



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Jane Chambers was an American playwright. She was a "pioneer in writing theatrical works with openly lesbian characters".
Born: March 27, 1937, Columbia, South Carolina, United States
Died: February 15, 1983, Greenport, New York, United States
Buried: Sterling Cemetery, Greenport, Suffolk County, New York, USA, Plot: 906
Find A Grave Memorial# 18998879
Awards: Writers Guild of America Award for Television: Daytime Serials
Books: A late snow, My Blue Heaven, 2 from Chambers, more
Plays: Last Summer at Bluefish Cove
Nominations: GLAAD Media Award for Outstanding Los Angeles Theater
People also search for: Liz Tennant, Andrew Boulton, Jenny Davis, more

Jane Chambers was one of the first American playwrights to create openly lesbian characters who were comfortable with their own homosexuality. She believed that this would help eliminate homophobia. While at Goddard, she met Beth Allen, who was to become her lover, manager, and devoted lifelong companion. Subsequently Chambers’s death, Allen published a collection of her poetry as a memorial to her courage and spirit. The Women in Theatre Program of the Association for Theatre in Higher Education honored Chambers by creating the Jane Chambers Playwriting Award to encourage the writing of plays that reflect women's experience. As Chambers told the New York Times, "As we become more comfortable with ourselves, the rest of the world will become comfortable with us." She opened the door for other playwrights who wished to write affirming plays about lesbians.
Together from 1968 to 1983: 15 years.
Beth A. Allen (born 1959)
Jane Chambers (March 27, 1937 - February 15, 1983)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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At Sterling Cemetery (735 1st St, Greenport, NY 11944) is buried Jane Chambers (1937-1983), American playwright. She was a "pioneer in writing theatrical works with openly lesbian characters".



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Find A Grave Memorial# 161872368

The Oldest Gay Couple in America tells the moving and, at times, frightening story of Bruhs Mero and Gean Harwood, as they journey through the gay and lesbian scene of New York City from 1927 to the present. Covering Harwood's childhood, their professional life in the arts, the fear and repression of the McCarthy era, and their triumphant "coming out" in the eighties, it is an intimate look at the strife and joy of two lives intertwined. Gean Harwood was born in Auburn, NY, and learned to be a musician there, but the comparatively inhospitable climate for gays in an Upstate New York town like Auburn led him to New York City, where he met Mero at a party in 1929, and the two men soon became partners in both life and music, remaining together over many decades to follow. Bruhs and Gean were together for 66 years. Sixty Years with Bruhs & Gean is a lively 90-minute musical that traces their remarkable lives: both funny and touching, their story covers the breadth of 20th century gay history, from the early-closeted days of the Great Depression and World War II, into the McCarthy era, Stonewall and beyond.
Together from 1929 to 1995: 66 years.
Bruhs Mero (February 15, 1911 - August 10, 1995)
L. Eugene “Gean” Harwood (1909-2006)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Bill T. Jones is an American artistic director, choreographer and dancer. Jones has received numerous awards for his work and is the co-founder of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company.
Born: February 15, 1952 (age 64), Bunnell, Florida, United States
Education: Binghamton University
Awards: Kennedy Center Honors, more
Movies: The 11th of September: Moyers in Conversation
Nominations: Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical, more

Bill T. Jones is an American artistic director, choreographer and dancer. Jones has received numerous awards for his work and is the co-founder of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Arnie Zane was an American photographer, choreographer, and dancer. Zane was immensely interested in the human body, particularly its gestures, its movement, and its essence. Zane met Jones, the man who would later become his lifelong partner, while visiting his Alma mater. The story goes that the 22-year-old Zane was immediately enamored of Bill T. Jones (a freshman studying dance and theater at SUNY) when he spied him across campus in 1971. During that spring semester, Zane convinced Jones to travel to Amsterdam with him and explore their burgeoning romantic relationship. Jones and Bjorn Amelan found a second chapter in love after both losing their long-term partners. Jones’s spent the last 20 years and more living and collaborating with Amelan, who had a long romantic and professional relationship with famed fashion designer Patrick Kelly before he died. Since they met in 1992, the two have successfully entwined their creative work and domestic lives.
Together from 1971 to 1988: 17 years.
Arnie Zane (September 26, 1948 – March 30, 1988)
Bill T. Jones (born February 15, 1952)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Sam Irvin is a film and television director, producer, screenwriter, actor, author and film teacher.
Born: June 14, 1956 (age 60), Asheville, North Carolina, United States
Partner: Gary Bowers (1982–)
Parents: Sam Irvin, Sr.
Books: Kay Thompson: From Funny Face to Eloise
Siblings: Tim Irvin
Anniversary: February 14, 1982

Sam Irvin is an award-winning film and television director, producer, screenwriter, author, and film teacher. His directing credits include Guilty as Charged, Oblivion, Elvira's Haunted Hills, and two gay television series: Dante's Cove and From Here on Out. His other credits include co-producing The Broken Hearts Club and the Academy Award winning film Gods and Monsters. As an author, Irvin wrote the acclaimed biography Kay Thompson: From Funny Face to Eloise (Simon & Schuster). Between projects, Irvin teaches graduate courses on directing at the University Of Southern California School Of Cinematic Arts. He resides in Los Angeles with Gary Bowers, his partner since 1982. Bowers is a hairdresser and artist. "We met at a club on Christopher Street in New York," Irvin recalled. "It was called The Cock Ring -- which sounds really raunchy but, in fact, was just a neighborhood bar that played great dance music. I spotted Gary across the tiny dance floor. It was love at first sight. I asked him to dance, the music swelled, and the rest is history."
Together since 1982: 33 years.
Gary Bowers (born August 11, 1946)
Sam Irvin (born June 14, 1956)
Anniversary: February 14, 1982



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Martha May Eliot, was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health.
Born: 1891, Massachusetts, United States
Died: February 14, 1978, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
Education: Radcliffe College
Harvard Univeristy
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 105839248
Books: Infant Care
Awards: Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award

Martha May Eliot was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health. During undergraduate study at Bryn Mawr College, she met Ethel Collins Dunham, who was to become her life partner. Dunham established national standards for the hospital care of newborn children, and expanded the scope of health care for growing youngsters by monitoring their progress. After completing their undergraduate education, the two enrolled together at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1914. Lillian Faderman writes: "[At] Bryn Mawr she met a twenty-six year old freshman, Ethel Dunham. From 1910 to Ethel's death in 1969, the two women were inseparable. As a couple, Martha Eliot and Ethel Dunham succeeded in times that were as unsympathetic to professional women as they were to lesbians.” In the 1970s, during Martha's travels for WHO, they wrote each other every day: "Dearest, it was hard to say goodbye and I shall miss you terribly... Ever and ever so much love, my darling." Martha to Ethel. "How I count the time until you do arrive. I miss you my darling." Ethel to Martha.
Together from 1910 to 1969: 59 years.
Ethel Collins Dunham (1883 - 1969)
Martha May Eliot (April 7, 1891 – February 14, 1978)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Marc-André Raffalovich was a French poet and writer on homosexuality, best known today for his patronage of the arts and for his lifelong relationship with the poet John Gray.
Born: September 11, 1864, Paris, France
Died: February 14, 1934, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Lived: 9 Whitehouse Terrace, Edinburgh EH9 2EU, UK (55.93111, -3.19378)
72 South Audley Street, W1K
11 Egerton Gardens, SW3
Buried: Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, City of Edinburgh, Scotland
Find A Grave Memorial# 139612960
Books: Letters to Edward Playfair, In Fancy Dress, Tuberose and Meadowsweet

John Gray was an English poet whose works include Silverpoints, The Long Road and Park: A Fantastic Story. It has often been suggested that he was the inspiration behind Oscar Wilde's fictional Dorian Gray. Gray's life partner was Marc-Andre Raffalovich, a wealthy poet and early defender of homosexuality. On Nov. 28, 1898, at the age of 32, Gray entered the Scots College, Rome, to study for the priesthood. Cardinal Pietro Respighi at St John Lateran ordained him on Dec. 21, 1901. Raffalovich himself became a Catholic in 1896 and joined the tertiary order of Dominicans. When Gray went to Edinburgh, Raffalovich settled nearby. He helped finance St Peter's Church in Morningside where Gray would serve as priest for the rest of his life. The two maintained a chaste relationship until Raffalovich's sudden death in 1934. A devastated Gray died exactly four months later at St. Raphael's nursing home in Edinburgh after a short illness. The critic, Valentine Cunningham, has described Gray as the "stereotypical poet of the nineties“.
Together from 1896 to 1934: 38 years.
John Gray (March 9, 1866 – June 14, 1934)
Marc-Andre Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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In 1882, aged eighteen, Marc André Raffalovich (1864-1934) moved to London with his governess, Miss Florence Truscott Gribbell (c.1842-1930), with the intention of studying at the University of Oxford. Instead, he settled at 72 South Audley Street, W1K with the intention of setting up a salon. Unlike his mother, he was not entirely successful. It was during his time in London that he was introduced to the poet and writer John Henry Gray (1866–1934), through Arthur William Symons (1865–1945), literary scholar and author. They were to remain close friends and companions throughout the next forty years, dying within months of each other.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Marc André Raffalovich stayed at 11 Egerton Gardens, SW3 from 1898 to 1905 and John Gray spent his holidays there while whilst studying for the priesthood.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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St. Peter’s, Falcon Avenue, is a church that gives a remarkable experience of spaciousness for a relative small interior.
Address: 77 Falcon Avenue, Edinburgh EH10 4AN, UK (55.93024, -3.20693)
Type: Religious Building (open to public)
Phone:+44 131 447 2502
Historic Scotland Building ID: 27257 (Grade A, 1970)
Place
Built in 1905, Design by Sir Robert Lorimer (1864-1929)
The church was opened on April 25, 1907. The idea was conceived by Fr. John Gray, at the time curate at St. Patrick’s Church (40 High St, Old Town, Edinburgh EH1 1TQ), together with Marc-André Raffalovitch. On a painting inside the church, an angel with raised and partially spread wings and head bowed to right shoulder is holding a model of the Presbytery, whilst kneeling on left leg on what appears to be a coiled serpent. A large flowering plant rises vertically on the angel’s right from a two-handled vase. The work is housed in a stepped niche. In 1906, John Gray was appointed the first parish priest of St. Peter’s church in Edinburgh, which was a huge change of professional environment for him – from shabby Cowgate to affluent Morningside. His friend Raffalovich financed the building of the church in Falcon Avenue, completed in 1907. John Duncan was commissioned to paint the Stations of the Cross for the church, and was often among the guests at Raffalovich’s parties. The paintings were sold around 1965 and their present whereabouts is unknown. One visitor to the church buildings in Falcon Avenue later remembered: “The whole house was in a dim, mysterious, and elusive twilight. It was a world of half-tones: in fact it only needed an invisible gramophone playing Debussy or bits from Maeterlinck to make it quite perfect. To think of “Pellèas et Mèlisande” or “Le Cathèdrale englouti” is to capture the impression of St. Peter’s presbytery – and its creator.” Anson, 1963.
Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
John Gray was a poet whose works include “Silverpoints,” “The Long Road” and “Park: A Fantastic Story.” Gray is best known today as an aesthetic poet of the 1890s and as a friend of Ernest Dowson, Aubrey Beardsley and Oscar Wilde. He was also a talented translator, bringing works by the French Symbolists Stéphane Mallarmé, Paul Verlaine, Jules Laforgue and Arthur Rimbaud into English, often for the first time. He is purported to be the inspiration behind the title character in Wilde’s “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” but distanced himself from this rumour. In fact, Wilde’s story was serialised in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine a year before their relationship began. His relationship with Wilde was initially intense, but had cooled for over two years by the time of Wilde’s imprisonment. The relationship appears to have been at its height in the period 1891-1893. In 1882 he passed the Civil Service exams and, five years later, the University of London matriculation exams. He joined the Foreign Office where he became a librarian. He left his position at the Foreign Office on Nov. 28, 1898, at the age of 32, and he entered the Scots College, Rome, to study for the priesthood. He was ordained by Cardinal Pietro Respighi at St John Lateran on Dec. 21, 1901. He served as a priest in Edinburgh, first at Saint Patrick’s and then as rector at Saint Peter’s. John Gray was to become a close friend of the “Michael Fields” – Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper. His most important supporter, and life partner, was Marc-André Raffalovich, a wealthy poet and early defender of homosexuality. Raffalovich himself became a Catholic in 1896 and joined the tertiary order of Dominicans. When Gray went to Edinburgh he settled nearby. He helped finance St Peter’s Church in Morningside where Gray would serve as priest for the rest of his life. In 1930, Gray was installed as canon in St. Mary’s cathedral (35 Manor Pl, Edinburgh EH3 7EB). The two maintained a chaste relationship until Raffalovich’s sudden death in 1934. A devastated Gray died exactly four months later at St. Raphael’s nursing home in Edinburgh after a short illness.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In Whitehouse Terrace, Marc-André Raffalovich established a successful salon. His guests included Henry James, Lady Margaret Sackville, Compton Mackenzie, Max Beerbohm and Herbert Read.
Address: 9 Whitehouse Terrace, Edinburgh EH9 2EU, UK (55.93111, -3.19378)
Type: Private Property
Historic Scotland Building ID: 30678 (Grade B, 1993)
Place
While John Gray studied in Rome, Marc-André Raffalovich and Miss Florence Truscott Gribbell (the daughter of a Scottish bank manager and Marc-André’s former governess) spent part of each year in Edinburgh, and in 1905, they moved to Morningside, to 9 Whitehouse Terrace, where Raffalovich’s longed-for salon was finally established. “A place of intellectualism and faded decandence,” according to John Kemplay. For 25 years, until Miss Gribbell’s death in 1930, Raffalovich’s Sunday luncheon and Tuesday dinner parties were established features of the city’s social life. His home was last on the market in 2013 and sold for £2,800,000.
Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
Marc-André Raffalovich was a French poet and writer on homosexuality, best known today for his patronage of the arts and for his lifelong relationship with the poet John Gray. Marc-André went up to study in Oxford in 1882 before settling down in London and opening a salon in the 1890s. Oscar Wilde attended, calling the event a saloon rather than a salon. This is where Raffalovich met the love and companion of his life, John Gray. In 1890, his sister Sophie married the Irish nationalist politician William O’Brien (1852–1928.) In 1896, under the influence of John Gray, Raffalovich embraced Catholicism and joined the tertiary order of the Dominicans as Brother Sebastian in honour of Saint Sebastian. At the same time Gray was ordained a priest. In 1905, Gray was appointed to the parish of St Patrick in the working class Cowgate area of Edinburgh. Raffalovich followed and settled down nearby, purchasing No. 9, Whitehouse Terrace. He contributed greatly to the cost of St Peter’s Church in Morningside, Edinburgh, of which Gray was appointed the first parish priest.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Archdiocese of St Andrews & Edinburgh acquired the land in 1895 and it became Mount Vernon Cemetery. The first burial was in 1895.
Address: 49 Mount Vernon Rd, Edinburgh EH16 6JG, UK (55.91498, -3.1576)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +44 131 664 3064
Place
The land now known as Mount Vernon Cemetery was previously known as the “Lands of Nellfield” and in 1827 was renamed by the then owners as “Mount Vernon”.
Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
Given his close and intense friendship with Canon John Gray, Raffalovich is buried as close as possible to him. His tombstone reads: IN PEACE + MARC ANDRE SEBASTIAN RAFFALOVICH 11TH SEPTEMBER 1864 + FEBRUARY 14, 1934. John Gray is probably buried in the Priests' Circle as he was the founder and first priest of St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church, Falcon Road.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Anniversary: February 14, 1982

Sam Irvin is an award-winning film and television director, producer, screenwriter, author, and film teacher. His directing credits include Guilty as Charged, Oblivion, Elvira's Haunted Hills, and two gay television series: Dante's Cove and From Here on Out. His other credits include co-producing The Broken Hearts Club and the Academy Award winning film Gods and Monsters. As an author, Irvin wrote the acclaimed biography Kay Thompson: From Funny Face to Eloise (Simon & Schuster). Between projects, Irvin teaches graduate courses on directing at the University Of Southern California School Of Cinematic Arts. He resides in Los Angeles with Gary Bowers, his partner since 1982. Bowers is a hairdresser and artist. "We met at a club on Christopher Street in New York," Irvin recalled. "It was called The Cock Ring -- which sounds really raunchy but, in fact, was just a neighborhood bar that played great dance music. I spotted Gary across the tiny dance floor. It was love at first sight. I asked him to dance, the music swelled, and the rest is history."
Together since 1982: 33 years.
Gary Bowers (born August 11, 1946)
Sam Irvin (born June 14, 1956)
Anniversary: February 14, 1982



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Frederick Loewe, was an Austrian-American composer. He collaborated with lyricist Alan Jay Lerner on a series of Broadway musicals, including My Fair Lady and Camelot, both of which were made into films.
Born: June 10, 1901, Berlin, Germany
Died: February 14, 1988, Palm Springs, California, United States
Buried: Desert Memorial Park, Cathedral City, Riverside County, California, USA, Plot: B-8, #89
Find A Grave Memorial# 1417
Spouse: Ernestine Zwerline (m. 1931–1957)
Albums: Paint Your Wagon: Music from the Motion Picture Soundtrack, more
Parents: Rosa Loewe, Edmond Loewe

Frederick Loewe (1901–1988) was an Austrian-American composer. He collaborated with lyricist Alan Jay Lerner on a series of Broadway musicals, including “My Fair Lady” and “Camelot,” both of which were made into films. After “Camelot” Loewe decided to retire to Palm Springs, California, not writing anything until he was approached by Lerner to augment the “Gigi” film score with additional tunes for a 1973 stage adaptation, which won him his second Tony, this time for Best Original Score. He remained in Palm Springs, California until his death. He was buried in the Desert Memorial Park (31705 Da Vall Dr, Cathedral City, CA 92234).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Enrico Coleman was an Italian painter of British nationality. He was the son of the English painter Charles Coleman and brother of the less well-known Italian painter Francesco Coleman.
Born: June 21, 1846, Rome
Died: February 14, 1911, Rome
Buried: Campo Cestio, Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 95282554
Movement: In arte libertas

The Cimitero Acattolico ("Non-Catholic Cemetery") of Rome, often referred to as the Cimitero dei protestanti ("Protestant Cemetery") or Cimitero degli Inglesi ("Englishmen's Cemetery"), is a public cemetery in the rione of Testaccio in Rome.
Address: Via Caio Cestio, 6, 00153 Roma, Italy (41.8763, 12.4795)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 06 574 1900
Place
The Protestant Cemetery is near Porta San Paolo and adjacent to the Pyramid of Cestius, a small-scale Egyptian-style pyramid built in 30 BC as a tomb and later incorporated into the section of the Aurelian Walls that borders the cemetery. It was formerly called Cimitero Anticattolico, the anti-Catholic cemetery. It has Mediterranean cypress, pomegranate and other trees, and a grassy meadow. It is the final resting place of non-Catholics including but not exclusive to Protestants or British people. The earliest known burial is that of a University of Oxford student named Langton in 1738. The English poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley are buried there.
Notable queer burials at Campo Cestio:
• Hendrik Christian Andersen (April 15, 1872 – December 19, 1940), sculptor, friend of Henry James. A bust of the young Count Alberto Bevilacqua, a muse of sculptor Hendrik Christian Andersen, remains in the home of Henry James, Lamb House, in Rye, England. Henry James to Henrik Andersen, three years later, upon the death of Andersen’s brother: “The sense that I can’t help you, see you, talk to you, touch you, hold you close & long, or do anything to make you rest on my, & feel my deep participation – this torments me, dearest boy, makes my ache for you, & for myself; makes me gnash my teeth & groan at the bitterness of things. . . . This is the one thought that relieves me about you a little – & I wish you might fix your eyes on it for the idea, just, of the possibility. I am in town for a few weeks, but return to Rye Apr. 1, & sooner or later to have you there & do for you, to put my arm round you & make you lean on me as on a brother & a lover, & keep you on & on, slowly comforted or at least relieved of the bitterness of pain – this I try to imagine as thinkable, attainable, not wholly out of the question.”
• Dario Bellezza (1944–1996), Italian poet, author and playwright
• Enrico Coleman (1846–1911), artist and orchid-lover, friend of Giovanni “Nino” Costa (who was special friend with Elihu Vedder)
• Gregory Corso (1930–2001), American beat generation poet
• The tomb of Maria Bollvillez (Zona V.7.18) was the first of de Fauveau’s commissions from the Russian aristocracy. Félicie de Fauveau (1801–1886) was a XIX-century French sculptor who was a precursor of the pre-Raphaelite style. Her multiple sculptural works showcase a variety of techniques and mediums including marble, stone, glass and bronze. Her family connections to the restored Bourbon court of Charles X led to commissions that helped launch her early career in Paris. But in 1830 when Charles X was forced to abdicate, de Fauveau paid for her opposition to the new order by being imprisoned for three months and then, in 1833, went into exile in Florence. She made a striking figure on arrival there: as Ary Scheffer’s portrait shows, she had adopted an androgynous appearance, with cropped hair and male clothing. One visitor reported that she had vowed to keep her hair short until the Bourbon monarchy was restored in France (it never was). Her admirers included Italian opera singer Angelica Catalani and Elizabeth and Robert Browning, who had also made their home in Florence. De Fauveau’s works were coveted by the city’s Russian ex-pats including Anatole Demidoff; the artist received multiple commissions from the industrialist and enjoyed the friendship of his wife Caroline Bonaparte. The Tsar Nicolas I purchased various works from the artist and his daughter Maria Nikolaieva was given a dagger, now at the Louvre, whose handle is engraved with scenes from Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” Guy Cogeval (Musée d’Orsay) uses the word lesbienne (lesbian) in his introduction to the catalogue for the exhibition “The Amazon of sculpture”, whereas Christophe Vital mentions on the adjacent page that Félicie de Fauveau was sans doute (without doubt) in love with the young (male) page who died in the Vendée (Charles de Bonnechose, for whom Félicie designed a monument on her prison wall). Michelle Facos also explicitly suggests that Félicie de Fauveau might have been a lesbian in her “Introduction to Nineteenth-Century Art” ( 2011). Usually her relationship to the Countess de la Rochejaquelein is then referred to.
• Denham Fouts (1914-1948), referenced in literary works by Christopher Isherwood, Truman Capote, and Gore Vidal. He was also a friend of George Platt Lynes, who photographed him. Isherwood described him as a mythic figure, "the most expensive male prostitute in the world." Fouts died in 1948, at the Pensione Foggetti, in Rome, at the age of 35.
• Wilhelm von Humboldt (1794–1803), son of the German diplomat and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt and nephew of Alexander von Humboldt
• Hans von Marées (1837–1887), German painter
• Dora Ohlfsen (1878-1948) was born as Dorothea Ohlfsen-Bagge in Ballarat, Victoria. Her father was Norwegian, Christian Herm Ohlfsen-Bagge, probably born in Schleswig (northern Germany now), and her mother, Kate Harison, Australian. She claimed that her great-grandfather was the Sydney convict printer, Robert Howe. Dora was educated at Sydney Girls High School and studied piano privately with Max Volgrich and Henri Kowalski. She traveled to Germany in 1883 to continue her piano studies under Moritz Moszkowski in Berlin; however, when she contracted neuritis, she began teaching music in Germany and later in Russia, after completing piano studies at Theodor Kullak’s Neue Akademie der Tonkunst. She lived in St Petersburg with a Madame Kerbitz and took up painting; she sold one of her work to the Czarina. Her extentive knowledge of languages gained her employement with the American ambassador and allowed her to write on music, theatre, drama and art for Russian and American newspaper. After traveling through various Baltic countries, she settled in Rome to study sculpture at the French Academy and with French engraver, Pierre Dautel. She produced many medallions using academic portraits, included Lord Chelmsford, Sir James Fairfax and General Peppino Garibaldi, and Symbolyst compositions. Church commissions came from Cardinal O’Connell of Boston and Josef Alteneisel, Prince-Bishop of Brixen in the Tyrol. The medallion in bas-relief of the Prince Bishop of Brizen, Tyrol, is among her finest productions. It has been praised in the French and Italian papers as "the wonderful achievement of a beautiful young Australian, who has only studied art for a comparatively short time" (June 10 1908). During WWI she became a Red Cross nurse in Italy. The Fascist government were patrons of her work and she produced a large relief portrait medallion of Mussolini and a war memorial, “Sacrificio,” at Formia, in 1924-26. Ohlfsen was commissioned by Mussolini to design this memorial because her art studies had been solely in Italy and she had nursed Italian soldiers during the war. This is the only work of its kind in Italy to be made by a woman or a foreigner. William Moore in the Brisbane Courier of 8 March 1930 referred to her as the artist who modelled a bust of Nellie Stewart; she also sculpted the head of W.A. Holman in plaster. In 1948, she and her companion, the Russian Baroness Hélène de Kuegelgen (1879-1948), were found gassed in her studio in Rome at Via di S. Nicola da Tolentino, 00187 Roma, close to the Spanish Steps. They had been living at that address, in an area traditionally associated with artists’ studios, for nearly half a century. Police said the deaths were accidental. Hélène de Kuegelgen was the daughter of Pavel Kuegelgen and Alexandra, nee Zhudlovsky. They had moved to Italy in 1902 from St. Petersburg, a city they both loved but which they accurately saw as being on the brink of revolution. Hélène (Elena) was from a well-connected family of Balten Germans, with one uncle a physician to the Tsar and another editor of the Petersburger German newspaper. Her family also boasted several prominent artists, two of them court painters. Dora and Hélène are buried together. A relief bust of the god Dionysius, one hand raised in a gesture of blessing, watches over one of the most distinctive graves in the Cemetery (Zone 1.15.28). Ohlfsen's work is represented in the collections of the British Museum and the Petit Palais in Paris, and in Australian collections including Museum Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales.
• John Addington Symonds (1840–1893), English poet and critic
• Pavel Fedorovich Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian surrealist painter, long-time partner of Charles Henri Ford. Campo Cestio is the original burial place, he was then moved to Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris.
• Una Vincenzo, Lady Troubridge (1887-1983), died in Rome in 1963; she had left written instructions that her coffin be placed in the vault in Highgate Cemetery where Hall and Batten had been buried, but the instructions were discovered too late. She is buried in the English Cemetery in Rome, and on her coffin is inscribed "Una Vincenzo Troubridge, the friend of Radclyffe Hall".
• Elihu Vedder (1836–1923), American painter, sculptor, graphic artist
• Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840–1894) was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe. In 1893 Woolson rented an elegant apartment on the Grand Canal of Venice. Suffering from influenza and depression, she either jumped or fell to her death from a fourth story window in the apartment in January 1894, surviving for about an hour after the fall She is also memorialized by Anne's Tablet on Mackinac Island, Michigan.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692 
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Donald Jess "Don" Bachardy is an American portrait artist. He resides in Santa Monica, California. Bachardy was the life partner of writer Christopher Isherwood.
Born: May 18, 1934 (age 82), Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: Chouinard Art Institute
Lived: 145 Adelaide Dr, Santa Monica, CA 90402, USA (34.02865, -118.51404)
Artwork: Mary Lansbury, Tom Wudl, Richard Sassin, John Sonsini, more
Movies: Frankenstein: The True Story
Nominations: Nebula Award for Best Script, Lambda Literary Award for Visual Arts
Anniversary: February 14, 1953

Christopher Isherwood was an Anglo-American novelist. Donald Jess "Don" Bachardy is an American portrait artist. On Valentine's Day 1953, at the age of 48, Isherwood met teenaged Don Bachardy among a group of friends on the beach at Santa Monica. Reports of Bachardy's age at the time vary, but Bachardy later said, "At the time I was, probably, 16." In fact, Bachardy was 18. Despite the age difference, this meeting began a partnership that, though interrupted by affairs and separations, continued until the end of Isherwood's life. The two became a well-known and well-established couple in Southern Californian society with many Hollywood friends. Isherwood's finest achievement was his 1964 novel A Single Man that depicted a day in the life of George, a middle-aged, gay Englishman who is a professor at a Los Angeles university, and probably inspired by a temporary split between Isherwood and Bachardy. The 2008 film Chris & Don: A Love Story chronicled Isherwood and Bachardy's lifelong relationship.
Together from 1953 to 1986: 33 years.
Christopher Isherwood (August 26, 1904 - January 4, 1986)
Don Bachardy (born May 18, 1934)
Anniversary: February 14, 1953



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The residence at 145 Adelaide Drive was home to acclaimed author Christopher Isherwood and his partner, artist Don Bachardy, for thirty years.
Address: 145 Adelaide Dr, Santa Monica, CA 90402, USA (34.02865, -118.51404)
Type: Private Property
Place
As Christopher Isherwood's home for three decades, the house on Adelaide Drive was the backdrop to the creation of seminal works within the fields of literature, theater, television, and fine art. In 1963, the residence played a key role in events that would later inspire Isherwood's most famous novel, “A Single Man.” Following an incident with Don Bachardy that nearly ended their relationship, Isherwood temporarily moved out of the home that they had shared for seven years. It was this event, as well as Isherwood's jealousy around Bachardy's affairs and the emotional turmoil that followed, that served as creative material for “A Single Man.”
Life
Who: Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood (August 26, 1904 – January 4, 1986)
Born near Manchester, England in 1904, Isherwood became a U.S. citizen in 1946 and lived in Southern California until his death in 1986. Professionally, Isherwood was a well-known novelist, playwright, screenwriter, autobiographer, and diarist. He identified as gay and often explored this identity as a central theme in his literary work. One of his most celebrated accomplishments was his classic American novel, “A Single Man,” which was published in 1964. Isherwood was good friends with Dr. Evelyn Hooker and lived with her at 400 South Saltair Avenue from 1952 to 1953. In 1953, Isherwood met and fell in love with Don Bachardy, considered by many as Los Angeles' most celebrated portrait painter. Despite their thirty-year age difference, the couple lived together in this hillside residence from 1956 until Isherwood's death. Isherwood died at age 81 in 1986 in Santa Monica, California, from prostate cancer. His body was donated to the UCLA Medical School. Over the course of their relationship, Isherwood and Bachardy collaborated on many artistic projects, including the television film “Frankenstein: The True Story” and their diary-portrait series “October.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Anna Howard Shaw was a leader of the women's suffrage movement in the United States. She was also a physician and one of the first ordained female Methodist ministers in the United States.
Born: February 14, 1847, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
Died: July 2, 1919, Nether Providence Township, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Albion College
Boston University School of Medicine
Boston University
Boston University School of Theology
Lived: 240 S Ridley Creek Rd, Media, PA 19063, USA (39.90486, -75.39242)
Find A Grave Memorial# 101267300
Books: The Story of a Pioneer, Anna Howard Shaw

Anna Howard Shaw was a leader of the women's suffrage movement in the United States. She was also a physician and one of the first ordained female Methodist ministers in the United States.
Address: 240 S Ridley Creek Rd, Media, PA 19063, USA (39.90486, -75.39242)
Type: Private Property
Life
Who: Anna Howard Shaw (February 14, 1847 – July 2, 1919) and Lucy Elmina Anthony (October 24, 1859 – July 4, 1944)
Beginning in 1886, Shaw served as the chair of the Franchise Department of Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). Her task was "to work for woman suffrage and then to use the ballot to gain 'home protection' and temperance legislation.” However her focus on temperance subsided as she became more heavily involved in the suffrage movement by lecturing for the Massachusetts Suffrage Association and later the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA). Shaw first met Susan B. Anthony in 1887. In 1888, Shaw attended the first meeting of the International Council of Women. Susan B. Anthony encouraged her to join the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA). Having agreed, Shaw played a key role when the two suffrage associations merged when she "helped to persuade the AWSA to merge with Anthony's and Elizabeth Cady Stanton's NWSA, creating for the first time in two decades a semblance of organizational unity within the [suffrage] movement." Beginning in 1904 and for the next eleven years, Shaw was the president of NAWSA. Under her leadership, NAWSA continued to "lobby for a national constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote." During the early 20th century, Alice Paul and Lucy Burns, NAWSA members, began employing militant techniques (e.g. picketing the White House during World War I) to fight for women's suffrage. They, like other members, were inspired by the success of the militant suffragettes in England. As president of NAWSA, Shaw was pressured to support these tactics. Nevertheless, Shaw maintained that she was "unalterably opposed to militancy, believing nothing of permanent value has ever been secured by it that could not have been more easily obtained by peaceful methods.” She remained aligned with Anthony's philosophy that was against any militant tactics. In 1915, she resigned as NAWSA president and was replaced by her ally Carrie Chapman Catt. An immigrant from a poor family, Shaw grew up in an economic reality that encouraged the adoption of non-traditional gender roles. Challenging traditional gender boundaries throughout her life, she put herself through college, worked as an ordained minister and a doctor, and built a tightly-knit family with her secretary and longtime companion Lucy E. Anthony. Lucy, the niece of Susan B. Anthony, was the trusted partner and spouse of Anna Howard Shaw. Committed to gaining more rights for women. Some may argue that she was lost in the shadows of her aunt and her partner, but she was well-regarded in the circles that Anna, Lucy, and Susan were in. Anna and Lucy were together for 30 years until Anna's death in 1919. In her will, Lucy left a bulk of estate to the National League of Women Voters, Philadelphia League of Voters, and her family.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Vernon Lee was the pseudonym of the British writer Violet Paget. She is remembered today primarily for her supernatural fiction and her work on aesthetics.
Born: October 14, 1856, Boulogne-sur-Mer, France
Died: February 13, 1935, San Gervasio Bresciano
Lived: Villa Il Palmerino, Via del Palmerino 10, 50137 Florence FI, Italy (43.79225, 11.29302)
Buried: Cimitero Evangelico degli Allori, Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 21266665
Siblings: Eugene Lee-Hamilton

Vernon Lee's first "romantic friendships" may have begun in the 1870s. Her relationship with her companion Annie Meyers ended in 1881. From 1881 to 1887, her traveling companion was Mary Robinson, whom she met at a drawing-room party. Mary's eventual marriage to James Darmsteter, which was probably not consummated, ended Lee's passionate attachment. Devastated by Mary's marriage, Lee was comforted by her new friend Clementina “Kit” Anstruther-Thomson (daughter of Colonel John Anstruther-Thomson of Charleton and Carntyne VD DL JP (August 8, 1818 - October 8, 1904)), who was to have a profound effect on her work. Lee described her friendship with Kit Thomson as a "new love and new life." This friendship lasted from 1887 to 1897. Kit was a "Venus figure" for Lee; she described her in her correspondence as a "Venus de Milo," a woman of beauty, a friend, and a spiritual lover.” This relationship inspired Lee's creativity, and during this time, Lee wrote and perfected her writings on aesthetics. Kit was especially interested in bringing art to the working class. Later she worked with the Girl Guides.
Together from 1887 to 1897: 10 years.
Clementina (Kit) Caroline Anstruther-Thomson (1857 – July 7, 1921)
Violet Paget aka Vernon Lee (October 14, 1856 – February 13, 1935)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Il Palmerino belonged at the beginning of the XV century to Ottaviano Antonio di Duccio, Florentine goldsmith, brother of the famous Renaissance sculptor Agostino d`Antonio di Duccio.
Address: Via del Palmerino 10, 50137 Florence FI, Italy (43.79225, 11.29302)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +39 339 8944725
Place
In 1545 the villa became the property of Benedetto di Papi Palmerini (which probably takes its name from the palm trees he brought back home after the Crusades in the Holy Land), and subsequently, to the families Federighi, Mormorai and Baldi della Scarperia. Since 1855 was the availability of the Frati di S.Croce as a convent, only to be acquired, causing a seizure of state-owned religious property, by Count Luigi Uguccioni that carried out a major renovation as evidenced by the coat of arms in the hall. In 1889 the owner became the sophisticated and eclectic British writer Violet Paget, aka Vernon Lee, who brought improvements and innovations to the entire estate. At her death Il Palmerino was purchased by the painter Federigo Angeli and his wife, the painter and writer Carola Costa "Lola" who kept and preserved it even in difficult years. To this day, their descendents, active in the artistic circles of the city, take care of the home, promoting events and initiatives in favor of art.
Life
Who: Violet Paget (October 14, 1856 – February 13, 1935), aka Vernon Lee
Vernon Lee is remembered today primarily for her supernatural fiction and her work on aesthetics. An early follower of Walter Pater, she wrote over a dozen volumes of essays on art, music, and travel. Her longest residence was just outside Florence in the villa Il Palmerino from 1889 until her death at San Gervasio, with a brief interruption during WWI. Her library was left to the British Institute of Florence and can still be inspected by visitors. In Florence she knit lasting friendships with the painter Telemaco Signorini and the learned Mario Praz, and she encouraged his love of learning and English literature. An engaged feminist, she always dressed à la garçonne. During WWI, Lee adopted strong pacifist views, and was a member of the anti-militarist organisation, the Union of Democratic Control. She was also a lesbian, and had long-term passionate friendships with three women, Mary Robinson, Kit Anstruther-Thomson (1857-1921), and British author Amy Levy (1861-1889) Vernon’s first romantic friendships begun in the 1870s, Annie Meyers, and ended in 1881. From 1881 to 1887, her travelling companion was Mary Robinson, whom she met at a drawing-room party. Mary’s eventual marriage to James Darmsteter ended Lee’s passionate attachment. Lee was a proponent of the Aesthetic movement, and after a lengthy written correspondence met the movement’s effective leader, Walter Pater, in England in 1881, just after encountering one of Pater’s most famous disciples, Oscar Wilde. While travelling in Florence in 1886, Amy Levy met Vernon Lee and fell in love with her. Both women would go on to write works with themes of sapphic love. Lee inspired Levy’s poem "To Vernon Lee." Levy committed suicide in 1889 at the residence of her parents at Endsleigh Gardens by inhaling carbon monoxide. Lee’s subsequently relationship with Kit Anstruther-Thomson, lasted from 1887 to 1897.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692 
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori ("The Evangelical Cemetery of Laurels") is located in Florence, Italy, between 'Due Strade' and Galluzzo. The small cemetery was opened on February 26, 1860 when the non-Catholic communities of Florence could no longer bury their dead in the English Cemetery in Piazzale Donatello.
Address: Via Senese, 184, 50124 Firenze, Italy (43.74775, 11.22999)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Place
The Cemetery is named after the Allori farm where it was located. Initially a Protestant cemetery, the site is now private. Since 1970 it has accepted the dead of other denominations, including Muslims. The cemetery became newsworthy in 2006 when the writer and journalist Oriana Fallaci was buried there alongside her family and a stone memorial to Alexandros Panagoulis, her companion.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori:
• Harold Acton (1904-1994), British writer. Harold Acton’s younger brother, William, a gay artist of modest achievement, died an apparent suicide in 1945. William Acton was a British visual artist who was born in 1906. Several works by the artist have been sold at auction, including 'Armiola' sold at Christie's New York 'Victorian, Pre-Raphaelite & British Impressionist Art' in 2016 for $23,080.
• Robert Wiedeman Barrett Browning, known as Pen Browning, (1849–1912), English painter. His career was moderately successful, but he is better known as the son and heir of the celebrated English poets, Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.
• Leo Ditrichstein (1865-1928), American actor and playwriter. Educated in Austria, Ditrichstein was the author of a number of plays, five of which were made into motion pictures. Worked with Gareth Hughes, Welsh actor in theater and film who worked primarily in the United States, and who, according to historian William J. Mann, was a "flaming little queen".
• Alice Keppel (1868-1947), British mistress of Edward VII and mother of Violet Trefusis.
• John Pope-Hennessy (1913-1994), British art historian.
• Violet Page, aka Vernon Lee (1856-1935), British writer.
• Charles Alexander Loeser (1864–1928), American art historian and art collector.
• Osbert Sitwell (1892-1969), British writer.
• Frederick Stibbert (1838-1906), British art collector.
• Violet Trefusis (1894-1972), English and French writer.
• Reginald Turner (1869-1938), British writer. Turner numbered among his friends Max Beerbohm, Lord Alfred Douglas, H. G. Wells, Arnold Bennett, Somerset Maugham, D. H. Lawrence, Oscar Wilde, Osbert Sitwell and others of the London literary scene during the late XIX and early XX century. S. N. Behrman said of him, "He was one of those men who talk like angels and write like pedestrians". Harold Acton agreed, writing of Turner's conversation, "One forgot to eat while he spun his fantasies." Beerbohm said, "He would be eloquent even were he dumb," and Maugham wrote, "Reggie Turner was, on the whole, the most amusing man I have known." After Wilde's death, Turner, who was homosexual, felt few ties to England.
Burial tombstone by Adolf von Hildebrand at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori:
• RUDOLF BENNERT, Place of birth: FRANKFURT, Mother: FUSSLI M, Died: 08/09/1882, Age: 23, Plot: 2PPsSG VII 16s
• ERMINIA BUMILLER, Father: HERMAN, Mother: DANIELIS FEDERICA, Age: 82, Plot: 2PPsSG V 28r
• HERMAN BUMILLER, Died: 24/07/1898, Plot: 2PPsSG V 28s
• FEDERICA DANIELIS, Father: GIOVAN BATTISTA, Died: 13/03/1903, Age: 78, Plot: 2PPsSG V 28s
• KARL ARNOLD HILLEBRAND, Place of birth: GIESSEN, Died: 18/10/1884, Plot: 2PPsSB VII 78s
• HEINRICH EMIL HOMBERGER, Place of birth: MAINZ, Died: 01/08/1890, Plot: 2PPsSB VII 81s
• JESSY TAYLOR, Place of birth: LONDRA, Father: EDGARD, Died: 08/05/1905, Age: 78, Plot: 2PPsSB VII 79u
Life
Adolf von Hildebrand (October 6, 1847 – January 18, 1921)
Adolf von Hildebrand was a German sculptor. Hildebrand was born at Marburg, the son of Marburg economics professor Bruno Hildebrand. He studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Nuremberg, with Kaspar von Zumbusch at the Munich Academy and with Rudolf Siemering in Berlin. From 1873 he lived in Florence in San Francesco, a secularized XVI-century monastery. A particular friend of Hans von Marées, he designed the architectural setting for the painter's murals in the library of the German Marine Zoological Institute at Naples (1873). In 1877 he married Irene Schäuffelen, a separation from von Marées that was decipted by the painter in one of his works. Von Hildebrand spent a significant amount of time in Munich after 1889, executing a monumental fountain there, the Wittelsbacher Brunnen. He is known for five monumental urban fountains. Hildebrand worked in a Neo-classical tradition, and set out his artistic theories in his book “Das Problem der Form in der Bildenden Kunst” (The Problem of Form in Painting and Sculpture), published in 1893. He was ennobled by the King of Bavaria in 1904. He was the father of the painter Eva, Elizabeth, sculptor Irene Georgii-Hildebrand, Sylvie, Bertele, and Catholic theologian Dietrich von Hildebrand. He died in Munich in 1921.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692 
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lived: 410 Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
215 E. 79 St.
Stone-blossom, Clinton, NJ 08809, USA (40.65216, -74.92672)
Haymeadows, Wescott Preserve, Raven Rock Rosemont Rd, Stockton, NJ 08559, USA (40.4265, -75.01584)
Buried: in the small farmer's graveyard hidden behind a rock wall and trees at the farm at Haymeadows (New Jersey) (ashes)
Find A Grave Memorial# 150409173

Glenway Wescott was an American novelist and an important figure in the American expatriate literary community in Paris during the 1920s. Upon receiving a small printing press as a gift from his father, Monroe Wheeler began producing chapbooks of poetry under the imprint, Manikin Press. One of his first works was The Bitterns, a collection of poems by Wescott, whom he had met at the University of Chicago in 1919 and who would become Wheeler's long-time companion. 1927 brought a new challenge to their pairing: George Platt Lynes fell passionately in love with the strikingly good-looking Wheeler. Wheeler, for his part, was entranced by Lynes's "full, luscious mouth and his wasp like waist." The ménage a trois ended in February 1943 when Lynes moved out of the apartment that the three men shared, thus bringing to a close one of the longer chapters that supplemented the sixty-plus years relationship between Wescott and Wheeler. Lynes would eventually succumb to cancer in 1955 at the age of 48. Wheeler died in 1988 at the age of 89, 18 months after the death of Wescott.
Together from 1919 to 1987: 68 years.
Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987)
Monroe Wheeler (February 13, 1899 - August 14, 1988)

Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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In 1936 Lloyd Wescott purchased a 1,000-acre (4.0 km2) dairy farm along the Mulhocaway Creek in Union Township near Clinton in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Mulhocaway Farm, as it was known, became the headquarters for the Artificial Breeding Association, a pioneer in the artificial insemination of dairy cows. Glenway Wescott along with Monroe Wheeler and George Platt Lynes took over one of the farmhand houses and called it Stone-Blossom. In the 1950s, Mulhocaway Farm was acquired by the State of New Jersey under eminent domain in order to create the Spruce Run Reservoir.
Address: Clinton, NJ 08809, USA (40.65216, -74.92672)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Clinton Historic District (Roughly, along Center, W. Main, Main, E. Main, Halstead, Water, Leigh (Library) and Lower Center Sts.), 95001101, 1995
Place
Clinton is a town in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, located on the South Branch of the Raritan River. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town’s population was 2,719, reflecting an increase of 87 (+3.3%) from the 2,632 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 578 (+28.1%) from the 2,054 counted in the 1990 Census. When the Clinton post office was established in 1829, it was named for DeWitt Clinton, Governor of New York and the primary impetus behind the then-newly completed Erie Canal. Clinton was incorporated as a town by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 5, 1865, within portions of Clinton, Franklin and Union Townships. Clinton gained full independence from its three parent townships in 1895. The town is perhaps best known for its two mills which sit on opposite banks of the South Branch Raritan River. The Red Mill, with its historic village, dates back to 1810 with the development of a mill for wool processing. Across the river sits the Stone Mill, home of the Hunterdon Art Museum for Contemporary Craft and Design, located in a former gristmill that had been reconstructed in 1836 and operated continuously until 1936. In 1952, a group of local residents conceived of a plan to convert the historic building into an art museum, which is still in operation today.
Life
Who: Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987), Monroe Wheeler (1899-1988) and George Platt Lynes (April 15, 1907 – December 6, 1955)
The Elizabethtown Water Company of New Jersey was first drawn to the idea of building a reservoir at the confluence of Spruce Run and Mulhockaway Creek just before 1929. Land speculators bought almost 2,100 acres in anticipation of selling it to the water company, but the Great Depression waylaid everybody’s plans. The state acquired 1,500 acres to build a game preserve, and in 1936, the remaining 600 acres went to Lloyd Wescott and his wife Barbara for $70 an acre. After they moved into their red clapboard farmhouse, the Wescotts restored the old farm buildings and built new metal barns. Farm tenants lived close to each of three complexes of cow barns. Lloyd’s brother, Glenway Wescott, parents and other relatives lived in other separate homes on the property, which he called Mulhocaway Farm (intentionally spelled differently from the name of the creek.) The Westcotts intended to breed healthy livestock, and when the Hunterdon County Board of Agriculture was introduced to the concept of artificial breeding of dairy cattle, Lloyd proposed to construct housing for Guernsey bulls. The farm’s facility became the first artificial insemination station in the country. The old colonial house was refurnished by the Wescotts and given the romantic name Stone-blossom by Glenway Wescott. George Platt Lynes wrote to Katherine Anne Porter in 1938: “You would never know Stone-blossom. There is an acre of lawn, and a little newly-planted flower garden, and there are new stone walls and new trees. Why aren’t you here?” The three men were to remain together in New York and at Stone-blossom until 1943, when George ended his relationship with Monroe Wheeler and moved out. In 1956, the State of New Jersey revived the plan for a reservoir in the fertile valley. The Westcotts negotiated a selling price and relocated to another farm in Delaware Township in 1959, considering the move a blessing since the structures and equipment had become obsolete. Theirs was the only farm to be inundated by water from Spruce Run Creek.

Conversation Piece (Monroe Wheeler, Glenway Wescott and George Platt Lynes). Paul Cadmus Stone Blossom in the background

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Immediately after the death of her father, Alice Delamar rented a house on Park Avenue 270.
Address: Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
Type: Private Property
Place
Park Avenue is a wide New York City boulevard which carries north and southbound traffic in the borough of Manhattan, and is also a wide one-way pair in the Bronx. For most of the road’s length in Manhattan, it runs parallel to Madison Avenue to the west and Lexington Avenue to the east. Park Avenue’s entire length was formerly called Fourth Avenue; the title still applies below 14th Street. Meanwhile, the section between 14th and 17th Street is called Union Square East, and between 17th and 32nd Streets, the name Park Avenue South is used. In the Bronx, Park Avenue runs in several segments between the Major Deegan Expressway and Fordham Road.
Notable queer residents at Park Avenue:
- No. 270: real estate titan Dr. Charles V. Paterno formed the Vanderbilt Av. Realty Corp. and commissioned the architectural firm of Warren & Wetmore to design a massive U-shaped neo-Renaissance building. Paterno envisioned two distinct sections—the mansion-like apartments that took the address 270 Park Avenue, and the apartment hotel that used the name Hotel Marguery. The residents would share a 70 by 275 foot garden with a private drive. As the restrained brick and stone structure rose, Manhattan millionaires rushed to take apartments. Construction was completed, as predicted, in the fall of 1917, at a cost of around $8 million, exclusive of the land. Twelve stories tall, there were 20 acres of floor space divided into 108 apartments. Deemed the “largest apartment building in the world,” a Dec. 1917 advertisement counted “1,536 living rooms; 1,476 closets; 100 kitchens; 100 sculleries.” Potential residents could choose apartments of 6 to 10 rooms with three or four baths, at an annual rent of $4000 to $6500. Larger apartments, from 12 to 19 rooms with four to six baths, would cost $7000 to $15000. The highest rent would be equivalent to about $23,000 per month in 2015. The moneyed residents could enjoy the convenience of the downstairs restaurant, run by the Ritz-Carlton restaurant. Rudolph Guglielmi had a spacious apartment in the building in Nov. 1925 when he applied for United States citizenship. Better known to American audiences by his screen name, Rudolph Valentino, the movie star had to dodge a battery of questions. His failure to do military service during the war was brought up—he explained it was due to “a slight defect in the vision of his left eye.” The Italian Government had listed him “as a slacker.” The New York Times reported that “it was discovered to be an error which was later corrected.” Then there was the question about why Valentine’s wife, Winifred, was living on 96th Street and not in the Park Avenue apartment. “Mrs. Valentino said that the only issue between her husband and herself was that he wished her to give up all business and settle down into home life, and this she would not do.” The 1920s saw the comings and goings of other internationally-known names. In 1926 Queen Marie of Romania stayed briefly in the apartment of Ira Norris; and a year later Charles Lindbergh’s family, including his mother, stayed at No. 270 Park Avenue following his triumphant June 1927 return from Europe. Acclaimed stage actress Gertrude Lawrence (rumoured to be the lover of Daphne du Marier) took an apartment in 1929. No. 270 Park Avenue occupied the entire block between Madison Avenue and 47th and 48th Street. The 12-storey complex containing 108 suites in two separate sections, which were connected by the architects by two triumphal arches over the Vander Bild Avenue. Alice DeLamar rented the largest apartment. The apartment building stood near the Delamar Mansion, which had to be sold. An American magazine, the St. Louis Star “told” the adventures of Prince Carol of Romania (future Carol II of Romania, son of Marie of Romania) overcome by love for the fair miss De la Mar, offering his heart and his titles, but without achieving the desired result. Miss De la Mar told in a few words: “I did not want to marry the prince because I didn’t love him. I own $10 million and if I want to marry then I do not wish to give up my freedom to marry without love." The prince wrote: "The American press blew the rumor that I came to America to find a rich woman. The Daily News even picked a few candidates ahead of me: Miss Millicent Rogers, Miss Abby Rockefeller and Miss Alice Lamar." King Carol II ruled from 1930 to 1940. Carol is more known for his amorous adventures than for his way of ruling: in it, he does not seem to have excelled. In 1920 Alice Delamar moved into a beautiful house on Sunset Boulevard in Palm Beach. The inherited house of Pembroke was sold a few years later. The auction took place on August 16, 1924 in the Great Reception Hall of Pembroke. On June 24, 1947 plans were filed by architects Harrison & Abramovitz for the more than $21 million Time Life Building. The Hotel Marguery, once the largest apartment building in the world, and its astonishingly colorful history, was soon bulldozed. In 1971, Alice wrote that the complex has long been demolished. Today the site is occupied by the JP Morgan Chase Tower, constructed in 1960 and designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
- No. 410: Monroe Wheeler and Glenway Wescott’s latest apartment was in a very grand building at 410 Park Avenue, and they gave a large party for their friend. Maugham enjoyed the gathering, but when their upstairs neighbour Marlene Dietrich appeared, he felt upstaged and left. By the late 40s, Monroe Wheeler was a high profile New Yorker. His full-page portrait appeared in the Nov. 1948 issue of Vogue. At his parties at 410 Park Avenue were such celebrities as Cecil Beaton, Francis Bacon, Ben Shahn, Gore Vidal, and Christopher Isherwood. Among the regulars were Paul Cadmus, Marianne Moore, Katherine Anne Porter, Pavel Tchelitchew and Charles Henri Ford, Diana and Reed Vreeland, Joseph Campbell, the Kirsteins, E.E. Cummings, Brooke Astor, Philip Johnson, and others. Wheeler’s most amusing annual guests were Osbert and Edith Sitwell, the brother and sister poet famous for their double wit and set-up dry humor. In 1958 Monroe Wheeler learned that the grand old building at 410 Park Avenue would be demolished and replaced by a office tower. He found a small apartment at 215 E. 79 St. in a tall pale-blond brick building called the Thornely. They lived there for two years.
- No. 465, The Ritz Tower: Built in 1925 as the city’s most elegant apartment hotel, The Ritz Tower today remains one of Manhattan’s most luxurious and sought-after residential cooperatives noted for its spacious and elegant apartments, each one unique. Greta Garbo lived here for a time in the 40s. Most happy about this move was probably Mercedes de Acosta, who had an apartment at 471 Park Avenue, from where she could see Garbo's north facing rooms. Mercedes told the story that during the wartime, when people were not allowed to show light at night “we gave each other signs with candles. Why we were not arrested for this offence is still today a riddle to me.” In 1951 Garbo moved from the Ritz into a suite with four rooms located on the seventeenth floor of The Hampshire House at 150 Central Park South.
- No. 530: In 1950, Alice DeLamar’s address is still a house in New York at 530 Park Avenue. This 19-story, white-brick apartment building at 530 Park Avenue on the southwest corner at 61st Street next to the Regency Hotel was erected in 1940 and designed by George F. Pelham Jr., who also designed 41, 50, 785, 1130 and 1150 Park Avenue and 1056 Fifth Avenue. It was bought in 2007 for about $211 million by Blackrock Realty Advisors which then sold it to Aby Rosen, the owner of the Seagrams Building and Lever House on Park Avenue who converted the rental building to a condominium with 116 apartments in 2013. Handel Architects LLP was architect and William T. Georgis was interior designer for the conversion.
- No. 564: The second clubhouse of the Colony Club, was commissioned in 1913 and constructed from 1914 to 1916. It was designed by Delano & Aldrich in the Neo-Georgian style, with interiors designed by Elsie de Wolfe. See Colony Club.
- No. 570: On April 24, 1947, Willa Cather died of a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 73 in her home at 570 Park Avenue in Manhattan.
- No. 695, 10065: Hunter College is an American public university and one of the constituent organizations of the City University of New York, located in the Lenox Hill neighborhood of Manhattan's Upper East Side. The college grants undergraduate and graduate degrees in over one-hundred fields of study across five schools. Hunter College also administers Hunter College High School and Hunter College Elementary School. Founded in 1870, originally as a women's college, Hunter is one of the oldest public colleges in the United States. The college assumed the location of its main campus on Park Avenue in 1873. Hunter began admitting men into its freshman class in 1964. In 1943 Eleanor Roosevelt dedicated the former home of herself and Franklin Delano Roosevelt to the college, which reopened in 2010 as the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Audre Lorde (1934-1992); Pauli Murray (1910–1985).
- No. 882-884: Ogden Codman, Jr. collaborated with Edith Wharton on the redesign of her townhouse at 882-884 Park Avenue, now demolished.
- No. 993: From the 1940s to the mid 1970s Marlene Dietrich kept, and often resided in apartment 12E, a four room apartment in this building. She relocated to New York to be close to her daughter Maria Riva and her grandchildren. 993 Park Avenue went co-op in the late fifties and Dietrich bought an apartment in the building. The full service, thirteen storey Italianite block had been built in the teens by Bing & Bing. Dietrich decorated her modest apartment (a two bed / two bath unit of 1600 square feet), in a mixture of styles: Louis XIV furniture was offset against glizy mirrored walls befitting a movie star. When she wasn’t travelling the world with her spectacular one-woman show, Dietrich divided her time between her New York home and a Paris rental on the Avenue Montaigne. Visting Dietrich in Paris in the late 70s, her friend Leo Lerman noted "the podge of the [Parisian] flat, which I find touching and that Gray [Foy] says is so unlike her New York controlled elegance. I like both and find both very much the way she is." After a stage fall in Australia in 1975 Dietrich went into semi-retirement in Paris, becoming increasingly reclusive. Her grandson, J. Michael Riva lived at the Park Avenue apartment during the early 80s with his then-fiance, Jamie Lee Curtis, when the latter was filming "Trading Places" (1983.) Dietrich died in 1992. Her heirs sold the apartment in 1998 for $615.000. 993 Park Ave #12E reappeared on the market in 2010. The refurbished unit was listed by Sotheby’s Real Estate for $ 2.250.000.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In 1959 the Wescotts moved to a 147-acre (0.59 km2) farm further south from Clinton in Hunterdon County, near the community of Rosemont in Delaware Township. The farm had been previously owned by big band leader Paul Whiteman. Glenway Wescott moved into a two-story stone house on the property, dubbed Haymeadows. In 1987, Wescott died of a stroke at his home in Rosemont.
Address: Wescott Preserve, Raven Rock Rosemont Rd, Stockton, NJ 08559, USA (40.4265, -75.01584)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Place
Rosemont is an unincorporated community located within Delaware Township in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Located at the top of a small hill, the center of the community is along Kingwood Stockton Road (County Route 519) near its intersections with Raven Rock Rosemont Road and Rosemont Ringoes Road (CR 604.) Farmland and residences make up the surrounding area while the center of the settlement includes residences, a post office, and an antique shop. Wescott Preserve is named after Lloyd Wescott (1907-1990), an agriculturalist and philanthropist who was the founder and first chairman of the Hunterdon Medical Center. Wescott and his wife Barbara purchased this farm in 1959, and raised dairy cows. In 1966, they donated 15 acres of land to the county for open space, which became Hunterdon’s first county park. The park even predates the Division, which was established in 1973. The Wescotts donated an additional 65 acres to the county four years later. In 2006, 102 acres of mature woodlands and meadows along the Lockatong Creek were added through the generous efforts of the Peters family, the Hunterdon Land Trust Alliance, and the county. Also on the property is a former one-room schoolhouse. Built out of stone in 1861, it was known as the John Reading School or District Schoolhouse #97. Wescott Farm is one-of-a-kind farmhouse apartment located on a working grass-fed cattle and sheep farm. Original XVIII century farmhouse on a 200+ acre working farm. The farmhouse has a porch that overlooks a sculpted kitchen garden and the Delaware river in the distance. The original floor boards of the farmhouse stretch throughout the apartment and other details like moldings and exposed beams make the spaces explode with charm. The historic farmhouse has been used over the centuries by famous writers (Glenway Wescott) and musicians (Paul Whiteman.) There is cooking school located downstairs from the farm stay apartment with classes and dinners available some days and evenings.
Life
Who: Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987) and Monroe Wheeler (1899-1988)
While Monroe Wheeler was on a long museum trip to Japan and France, Lloyd Wescott found a farm that was for sale by bandleader Paul Whiteman. Glenway Wescott wrote to his mother, who was making her last visit to Wisconsin, “Lloyd has come to an agreement with Mr. Whiteman. The lawyers are drawing up the papers.” He expressed regret to Bernardine Szold: “Now the last season of our beloved valley… For me it will take all that time to prepare to move – twenty years of these attics and archives… Monroe’s as well, very massive now that he has moved from 410 Park Avenue into a small flat.” But after seeing the new farm, he praised Lloyd to William Maxwell: “My brother has bought another farm between Rosemont and Stockton in Delaware township, and is letting me have the handsomest old stone house on it. So, beyond the ordeal of moving, my way of life will not be greatly changed. My good fortune puts me to shame.” Glenway gave the name Haymeadows to the stone house and grounds being refurbished for himself and Wheeler. John Connolly drove Glenway to the property and remembered, “When I first saw it, there was a farm worker named Leroy living there with a house full of kids.” When he died, Glenway Wescot was cremated and his ashes buried in the small farmer's graveyard hidden behind a rock wall and trees at the farm at Haymeadows. In the same graveyard was buried Monroe Wheeler one year later.

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Grant DeVolson Wood was an American painter best known for his paintings depicting the rural American Midwest, particularly American Gothic, an iconic painting of the 20th century.
Born: February 13, 1891, Anamosa, Iowa, United States
Died: February 13, 1942, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
Education: Washington High School
School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Académie Julian
Lived: Grant Wood House, 800 2nd Ave SE, Cedar Rapids, IA 52403, USA (41.98209, -91.66108)
Grant Wood Studio, 5 Turners Alley SE, Cedar Rapids, IA 52402, USA (41.9821, -91.66157)
Buried: Riverside Cemetery, Anamosa, Jones County, Iowa, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 1122
Periods: Social realism, Modern art, Regionalism
Siblings: Nan Wood Graham
Parents: Hattie Weaver, Francis Maryville Wood

Grant Wood was an American painter best known for his paintings depicting the rural American Midwest, particularly American Gothic, an iconic painting of the XX century.
Addresses:
Grant Wood House, 800 2nd Ave SE, Cedar Rapids, IA 52403, USA (41.98209, -91.66108)
Grant Wood Studio, 5 Turners Alley SE, Cedar Rapids, IA 52402, USA (41.9821, -91.66157)
Life
Who: Grant DeVolson Wood (February 13, 1891 – February 13, 1942)
Grant Wood was born in rural Iowa four miles (6 km) east of Anamosa in 1891; his mother moved the family to Cedar Rapids after his father died in 1901. Soon thereafter he began as an apprentice in a local metal shop. After graduating from Washington High School, Wood enrolled in The Handicraft Guild, an art school run entirely by women in Minneapolis in 1910 (today it is a prominent artist collective in the city.) He was said to have later returned to the Guild to paint American Gothic. A year later Wood returned to Iowa, where he taught in a rural one-room schoolhouse. In 1913 he enrolled at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and performed some work as a silversmith. From 1922 to 1928, Wood made four trips to Europe, where he studied many styles of painting, especially Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. But it was the work of the XV-century Flemish artist Jan van Eyck that influenced him to take on the clarity of this technique and to incorporate it in his new works. From 1924 to 1935, Wood lived in the loft of a carriage house in Cedar Rapids, which he turned into his personal studio at "5 Turner Alley" (the studio had no address until Wood made one up). In 1932, Wood helped found the Stone City Art Colony near his hometown to help artists get through the Great Depression. He became a great proponent of regionalism in the arts, lecturing throughout the country on the topic. As his classically American image was solidified, his bohemian days in Paris were expunged from his public image. Wood was married to Sara Sherman Maxon from 1935–38. She was considerably older and friends considered the marriage a mistake for him. Wood taught painting at the University of Iowa's School of Art from 1934 to 1941. It is thought that he was a closeted homosexual, and that there was an attempt to fire him because of a relationship with his personal secretary. Critic Janet Maslin states that his friends knew him to be "homosexual and a bit facetious in his masquerade as an overall-clad farm boy". University administration dismissed the allegations and Wood would have returned as professor if not for his growing health problems. In the early hours of February 13, 1942, his 51st birthday, Wood died at the university hospital of pancreatic cancer. He is buried at Riverside Cemetery, Anamosa. When Wood died, his estate went to his sister, Nan Wood Graham, the woman portrayed in American Gothic. When she died in 1990, her estate, along with Wood's personal effects and various works of art, became the property of the Figge Art Museum in Davenport, Iowa.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt was a Swiss-born American socialite best known as the mother of fashion designer and artist Gloria Vanderbilt and maternal grandmother of television journalist Anderson Cooper.
Born: August 23, 1904, Grand Hotel National, Lucerne, Switzerland
Died: February 13, 1965, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: Convent of the Sacred Heart
Buried: Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Section D, Lot 176, Grave 2
Find A Grave Memorial# 5264
Spouse: Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt (m. 1923)
Parents: Laura Delphine Kilpatrick, Harry Hayes Morgan Sr
Children: Gloria Vanderbilt
Siblings: Thelma Furness, Viscountess Furness, Harry Hays Morgan, Jr.

Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt was a Swiss-born American socialite. Her identical twin sister, Thelma Morgan (1904–1970), became a mistress of Edward, Prince of Wales and married James Vail Converse and Marmaduke Furness, 1st Viscount Furness. Known as "The Magnificent Morgans", Gloria and Thelma were popular society fixtures, even as teenagers. On March 6, 1923, in New York City, at the townhouse of friends, Gloria Morgan became the second wife of Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt, age 42, an heir to the Vanderbilt railroad fortune. At the death of his husband in 1934, a custody battle for their only child, Gloria, erupted and made national headlines. As a result of a great deal of hearsay evidence admitted at trial, the scandalous allegations of Vanderbilt's lifestyle—including a purported lesbian relationship with Nadezhda de Torby, the Marchioness of Milford Haven—led to a new standard in tabloid newspaper sensationalism. A former maid of Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt offered testimony regarding a possible lesbian relationship between Lady Milford Haven and her former employer. Lady Milford Haven also appeared as a witness at the trial. Before leaving for the United States to testify, Lady Milford Haven publicly denounced the maid's testimony as "a set of malicious, terrible lies".
Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt (August 23, 1904 – February 13, 1965)
Nadejda Mikhailovna Mountbatten, Marchioness of Milford Haven (March 28, 1896 – January 22, 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Chloe Carter and Jean Acker, who co-owned an apartment building in Beverly Hills, are buried side by side at Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, California.
Address: 5835 W. Slauson Ave, Culver City, CA 90230, USA (33.99388, -118.38411)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 310-836-5500
Place
Holy Cross Cemetery is a Roman Catholic cemetery at 5835 West Slauson Avenue in Culver City, California, operated by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles. It is partially in the Culver City city limits. Opened in 1939, Holy Cross comprises 200 acres (81 ha.) It contains—amongst others—the graves and tombs of showbusiness professionals. Many celebrities are in the sections near "The Grotto" in the southwest part of the cemetery; after entering the main gate, turn left and follow the leftmost road up the hill.
Notable queer burials at Holy Cross Cemetery:
• Jean Acker (October 23, 1893– August 16, 1978), actress, first wife of Rudolph Valentino. She is buried alongside her long-time companion Chloe Carter (June 21, 1903 - October 28, 1993.) In the 1920s Acker met Chloe Carter, a former Ziegfeld Follies girl, who was the first wife of film composer Harry Ruby. Acker would remain with Carter for the rest of her life. Jean Acker Valentino owned a lovely duplex at 2146-2148 Fox Hills Drive, Los Angeles, California, 90025, from the 1930s until her death in 1978, living here with longtime partner Chloe Carter and renting out 2148.
• Thelma Morgan (1904–1970), socialite, twin sister of Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt. Thelma was also companion of Edward, Prince of Wales.
• Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt (1904–1965), socialite, twin sister of Thelma Morgan, mother of fashion designer Gloria Vanderbilt, and grandmother of gay journalist, author, and television personality Anderson Cooper. During Gloria Morgan’s divorce a great deal of hearsay evidence were admitted at trial, including a purported lesbian relationship with Nadezhda de Torby, the Marchioness of Milford Haven.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Florence Converse was an American author.
Born: 1871, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Died: 1967, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Wellesley College
Lived: 45 Leighton Road, Wellesley
Buried: Newton Cemetery, Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA, Plot: Sect J Lot 556
Buried alongside: Vida Dutton Scudder
Find A Grave Memorial# 77856459

Vida Dutton Scudder was an American educator, writer, and welfare activist in the social gospel movement. She was one of the most prominent lesbian authors of her time. In 1885, she and Clara French (1863 – October 6, 1888) were the first American women admitted to the graduate program at Oxford, where York Powell, John Ruskin, Leo Tolstoi, George Bernard Shaw and Fabian Socialism influenced her. Scudder and French returned to Boston in 1886. Scudder taught English literature from 1887 at Wellesley College, where she became an associate professor in 1892 and full professor in 1910. French died in 1888 of typhoid fever. From 1919 until her death, Scudder was in a lesbian relationship with Florence Converse, a member of the editorial staff of The Churchman from 1900 to 1908, when she joined the staff of the Atlantic Monthly. In Wellesley, they resided at 45 Leighton Road. Vida died just a month short of her 93 birthday at her home. The informant was Florence Converse. Vita wrote in The Wellesley Magazine, "My last word shall be one of reassurance. I have had a happy life; but I am finding my ninth decade the happiest yet.” They are both buried at Newton Cemetery, Newton, Massachusetts.
Together from 1919 to 1954: 33 years.
Florence Converse (April 30, 1871 – February 1967)
(Julia) Vida Dutton Scudder (December 15, 1861 - October 9, 1954)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Private, women-focused school founded in 1870 and known for its humanities programs.
Address: 106 Central St, Wellesley, MA 02481, USA (42.29357, -71.30592)
Type: Education facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 781-283-1000
Place
Vida Dutton Scudder taught English literature from 1887 at Wellesley College, where she became an associate professor in 1892 and full professor in 1910. Wellesley College is a private women’s liberal-arts college in the town of Wellesley, Massachusetts, west of Boston. Founded in 1870, Wellesley is a member of the original Seven Sisters Colleges. Wellesley is the highest ranking women’s college in the U.S., and one of the top liberal arts colleges, ranking 4th by U.S. News & World Report. The school is also the highest endowed women’s college. For the 2014–15 year admissions cycle, Wellesley admitted 29% of its applicants. The college is known for allowing its students to cross-register at MIT, Babson, Brandeis, and Olin College. It is also a member of a number of exchange programs with other small colleges, including opportunities for students to study a year at Amherst, Bowdoin, Connecticut College, Dartmouth, Mt. Holyoke, Smith, Trinity, Vassar, Wesleyan, and Wheaton. Wellesley was founded by Pauline and Henry Fowle Durant, believers in educational opportunity for women. Wellesley was founded with the intention to prepare women for "great conflicts, for vast reforms in social life." Its charter was signed on Mar. 17, 1870, by Massachusetts Governor William Claflin. The original name of the college was the Wellesley Female Seminary; its renaming to Wellesley College was approved by the Massachusetts legislature on March 7, 1873. Wellesley first opened its doors to students on September 8, 1875. The original architecture of the college consisted of one very large building, College Hall, which was approximately 150 metres (490 ft) in length and five stories in height. The architect was Hammatt Billings. From its completion in 1875 until its destruction by fire in 1914, it was both an academic building and residential building. A group of residence halls, known as the Tower Court complex, are located on top of the hill where the old College Hall once stood.
Notable queer alumni and faculty at Wellesley:
• Katharine Anthony (1877-1965), biographer best known for “The Lambs” (1945), a controversial study of the British writers Charles and Mary Lamb. She taught at Wellesley College in 1907.
• Katharine Lee Bates (1859-1929), full professor of English literature. Bates lived in Wellesley with Katharine Coman at 70 Curve St, Wellesley, MA 02482, historic home built in 1907 by Bates, while she was a professor at Wellesley College. Bates was born in Falmouth, Massachusetts, the daughter of Congregational pastor William Bates and his wife, Cornelia Frances Lee. She graduated from Wellesley High School in 1874 and from Wellesley College with a B.A. in 1880. Wellesley High School (50 Rice St, Wellesley Hills, MA 02481) is a public high school in the affluent town of Wellesley, Massachusetts, educating students on grades 9 through 12. In 2016 it was ranked the 21st best high school in Massachusetts and the 467th best public high school in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, earning a Gold Medal. The old school building was originally built as a public works project in 1938 during the Great Depression, designed by Perry Shaw and Hepburn and built by M. Spinelli and Sons Co., Inc. The building has been modified with several additions throughout its existence, most recently with a new fitness center. The 1938 building was replaced in 2012 with a brand new state of the art building in the former parking lot.
• Katharine Coman (1857-1915), history and political economy teacher and founder of the Wellesley College School Economics department.
• Florence Converse (1871-1967)
• Mary “Molly” Dewson (1874–1962), graduated as a social worker in 1897. She was senior class president and her classmates believed she might one day be elected president of the United States.
• Marion Dickerman (1890-1983), suffragist, educator, vice-principal of the Todhunter School and an intimate of Eleanor Roosevelt.
• Grace Frick (1903-1979), literary scholar and Marguerite Yourcenar’s intimate companion.
• Lilian Wyckoff Johnson (1864-1956), after an early education in private schools, in 1878 was sent to Dayton, Ohio to take refuge during a yellow fever outbreak; while there, she attended the Cooper Academy. Her parents then sent the 15 year old Lilian and her sister to Wellesley College in 1879, with the first two years being spent in preparatory school. However, Lilian had to return home upon the death of her mother in 1883, and was unable to complete her studies.
• Esther Lape (1881-1981), a graduate of Wellesley College, taught English at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, the University of Arizona, and Barnard College in New York City. Her life-partner was the scholar and lawyer, Elizabeth Fisher Read, who was Eleanor Roosevelt's personal attorney and financial advisor.
• Jeannette Augustus Marks (1875-1964), English and Theater professor at Mount Holyoke until her retirement in 1941 and Mary Emma Woolley’s companion.
• Julia Vida Dutton Scudder (1861-1954).
• Charlotte Anita Whitney (1867–1955), American women's rights activist, political activist, suffragist, and early Communist Labor Party of America and Communist Party USA organizer in California.
• Mary Emma Woolley (1863–1947), educator, peace activist and women’s suffrage supporter. She was the first female student to attend Brown University and served as the 11th President of Mount Holyoke College from 1900-1937.
Life
Who: (Julia) Vida Dutton Scudder (December 15, 1861 – October 9, 1954)
Vida Dutton Scudder was an educator, writer, and welfare activist in the social gospel movement. In 1885 she and Clara French (1863-1888) were the first American women admitted to the graduate program at Oxford, where she was influenced by York Powell and John Ruskin. While in England she was also influenced by Leo Tolstoi and by George Bernard Shaw and Fabian Socialism. Scudder and French returned to Boston in 1886. French died in 1888 (from typhoid fever, buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Syracuse, NY), and from 1919 until her death, Scudder lived with Florence Converse (1871-1967.) Converse graduated from Wellesley College in 1893 and was a member of the editorial staff of the The Churchman from 1900 to 1908, when she joined the staff of the Atlantic Monthly. In Wellesley they resided at 45 Leighton Road. A 6000 square foot single family home with 5 bedrooms built in 1912, it was last sold in 1987 for $460,000. Scudder retired from Wellesley in 1927 and received the title of professor emeritus. She became the first dean of the Summer School of Christian Ethics in 1930 at Wellesley. In 1931 she lectured weekly at the New School for Social Research in New York. She published an autobiography, “On Journey,” in London in 1937, and a collection of essays, “The Privilege of Age,” in New York in 1939. Vida Dutton Scudder died at Wellesley, Massachusetts, on October 10, 1954. Florence Converse and Vida Dutton Scudder are buried side by side at Newton Cemetery (791 Walnut St, Newton Centre, MA 02459).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Christopher Tunnard was a Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape. He was the cousin of the British surrealist artist John Tunnard.
Born: July 7, 1910, Victoria, Canada
Died: February 13, 1979, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
Education: Westminster School of Art
Royal Horticultural Society
Harvard University
Lived: St. Ann’s Court, St Ann's Hill Road, Surrey KT16 9NW, UK (51.39332, -0.52049)
Buried: Oak Grove Cemetery, Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, USA, Plot: Oak Grove, Plot 562
Find A Grave Memorial# 136084821
Books: Gardens in the modern landscape, Man-made America, more
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship for Humanities, US & Canada, more

St Ann's Court at Chertsey in Surrey is a reinforced concrete private house that was finished in 1936 by the Australian born architect, Raymond McGrath, for a stockbroker friend, AL Schlesinger. The house stands in 25 acres of parkland on the south slope of St Ann's Hill. Conservation work on the structure was completed in 1999 and included an authentic refurbishment of the interior at a total cost of around pounds 1 million.
Address: St Ann's Hill Road, Surrey KT16 9NW, UK (51.39332, -0.52049)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 361727 (Grade II, 1986)
Place
Built in 1936-7, Design by Raymond McGrath in consultation with Christopher Tunnard.
Reinforced concrete (L Mouchel and Partners), with internal cork insulation and vertical board-marked external finish originally painted pinkish grey, and smooth soffits (originally jade green) and beams. Flat roof; three storeys including roof terraces. Circular plan inspired by the surrounding landscape, likened by McGrath to “a big cheese, with a slice cut for the sunlight to enter the whole house.” Supporting columns set in circumference of outer walls, with solid supporting inner circle defining central circular living room and master bedroom, with semi-circle of copper-clad freestanding columns within. These constructional circles most clearly revealed on the “peeled away” south facade. Projecting winter garden and screen to west part are an integral part of McGrath's design. Metal casement windows with single transom, those to living room, master bedroom and winter garden of full height. Segmental balcony to first-floor (master bedroom) and bow-shaped terrace to second floor, served by external spiral stair with metal gate. The post and beam construction of the house is exposed and articulates the symmetrical form of the upper parts of the house. A counterpoise to the spiral stair is the rounded end of the study on the ground-floor of the other (east) side of the house. Timber door set under porch in angle created by protective wall of adjoining former tradesmen's entrance. Entrance leads into wedge-shaped terrazzo-floored hall, with terrazzo-clad stairs on outer face, having delicate metal balustrade and timber handrail. On inner face survives a mirror mosaic or “Vitroflex” panel etched with Tunnard’s layout for the garden. Principal rooms are the living room, flanked to east and west by study and dining room respectively. They form a bow-shaped plan within the circle, with service accommodation tucked discretely to the north behind projecting walls. Living room with original walnut panelling around marble-finished fireplace, timber floors and columns sheathed with polished copper. Central coved ceiling enforces the importance of the wholly circular inner area of the room. Directly above the master bedroom is also circular, with original fitted cupboards, and bed alcoves to either side, one with dressing room. Here the bow-shaped plan becomes more completely symmetrical, and this is continued on the second floor, which in addition to the roof terrace originally had the billiard room and a studio for Tunnard. McGrath described St Ann's Hill as “my most ambitious piece of domestic design in England” (Architectural Review, July, 1977). The circular plan was inspired by the surviving XVIII century landscape by Charles Hamilton, which Tunnard remodelled. Tunnard was just beginning then to practice as a full-time landscape architect, and his ideas of the integration house and landscape would only begin to have a real impact with rediscovery of the Picturesque in the '40s. As Brian Hanson says, St Ann's Hill demonstrates a genuine modern respect for genius loci as early as 1937, “without compromising the modernity of the house or resorting to gimmicks”. The building is significant too, for its structural honesty, and richness of surviving materials. The principal rooms, with their mirror design, walnut panelling and exploitation of the unusual plan form, are among the most interesting and complete surviving 1930s private house interiors to survive in England.
Life
Who: Gerald Schlesinger and Christopher Tunnard (July 7, 1910- February 13, 1979)
St Ann’s Court was commissioned as a main residence by Gerald Schlesinger and Christopher Tunnard. Schlesinger was a successful lawyer whilst Tunnard became one of the most important Modern landscape architects in Britain. The two men lived at St Ann's for most of the year (though they had a large London home) and the unusual first floor master bedroom enabled their double bed to be separated easily into two and rolled into the wings of the bow-tie shaped room. In this position the bedroom became two single bedrooms separated by movable screens and a circular dressing room. With this arrangement they could maintain the fiction when house guests were expected that they slept in separate rooms - which was essential when sex between men was illegal. From 1932-1935 Christopher Tunnard worked as a garden designer for Percy Cane, an exponent of the Arts and Crafts movement. One of Percy Cane’s jobs was for A.L. Schlesinger at 21 Addison Road, Kensington. This may have been how Tunnard came to be acquainted with Gerald L. Schlesinger, a prosperous lawyer who purchased the St. Ann’s estate in Chertsey when in 1935 he and his wife separated. The house was in poor condition, and it was decided to pull it down and build afresh. Tunnard became very involved in Schlesinger’s project, and moved there from Salcott, his house in Cobham, in September 1935. He gave “Aldbury,” in Chertsey, as his temporary address to the RHS, but from January 1936 his address changed to “The Studios, St. Ann’s Hill House.” Raymond McGrath was the architect, and he used Gordon Cullen (1914-1994) as draughtsman for the drawings. Tunnard effectively became the client, and took a very close interest in the designs. McGrath designed in a studio for Tunnard on the top floor, opening out onto the roof garden over the first floor. The structure was in reinforced concrete — very innovative for the time — with L.G. Mouchel and Partners acting as engineers. The house was under construction when the snow came in early 1936. Works continued throughout that year. Designs for the swimming pool had been drawn up in October 1935 and the working plan for the contractor a year later. The sculptor Willi Soukop, originally from Vienna but then residing at Dartington Hall, was commissioned to provide a fountain for it. Early in 1937 the finished work on the house was ready for photography and publicity.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Harvard professor and gardner designer, was drafted into the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1943 and after the war took a job teaching city planning at Yale. Enjoying the work, he did little further garden design, and reached the post of professor and chairman of the department of city planning. His publications in this area include articles such as America's super-cities and a number of books on city design in the U.S. Despite a previous long-term same-sex relationship with Gerald Schlesinger with whom he lived in England, Tunnard married Lydia Evans of Boston, Massachusetts in 1945. They had a son, Christopher. Tunnard died in New Haven in 1979. Tunnard and his wife are buried at Oak Grove Cemetery (Summer St, Plymouth, MA 02360), Plot: Oak Grove, Plot 562. In the nearby Vine Hills Cemetery (102 Samoset St, Plymouth, MA 02360) is buried Joseph Everett Chandler (1863–1946), Colonial Revival architect and pioneering designer of queer space.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Dame Christabel Harriette Pankhurst, DBE, was a suffragette born in Manchester, England. A co-founder of the Women's Social and Political Union, she directed its militant actions from exile in France from 1912 to 1913.
Born: September 22, 1880, Manchester, United Kingdom
Died: February 13, 1958, Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: University of Manchester
Lived: Eagle House, Steway Lane, Batheaston, Bath and North East Somerset BA1 7EJ, UK (51.41383, -2.31897)
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 11132115
Parents: Richard Pankhurst, Emmeline Pankhurst
Siblings: Sylvia Pankhurst

Between 1908 and 1911 Eagle House was an important refuge for those involved in the women's suffrage movement who had been released from prison after undertaking hunger strikes. Some of the women staying at the house are thought to have been lesbians or bisexual, such as Christabel Pankhurst and Anne Kenney. “While the affairs and one-night-stands at Eagle House provoked competitive rivalries, it is also clear they held the movement together. Many of the relationships provided emotional support for members of a group isolated from the rest of society.”
Address: Steway Lane, Batheaston, Bath and North East Somerset BA1 7EJ, UK (51.41383, -2.31897)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 32157 (Grade II, 1983)
Place
Built mid-XVIII century
Wing to Eagle House, now a separate house. Coursed rubble, slate roof; ashlar stack. 2 storeys. Single bay. Tripartite glazing bar sash on first floor. 6-pane door to left with rusticated ashlar surround. Included for group value. Eagle House was built in the late XVII/early XVIII century and then remodelled in 1724 and again in 1729 by John Wood, the Elder as his own house. The house has also been an important refuge for suffragettes who had been released from prison after hunger strikes, with trees being planted to commemorate each woman — at least 47 trees were planted between April 1909 and July 1911, including Emmeline Pankhurst, Christabel Pankhurst, Charlotte Despard, Millicent Fawcett and Lady Lytton.
Life
Who: Dame Christabel Harriette Pankhurst, DBE (September 22, 1880 –February 13, 1958) and Annie Kenney (September 13, 1879 – July 9, 1953)
Christabel Pankhurst was a suffragette born in Manchester, England. A co-founder of the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU), she directed its militant actions from exile in France from 1912 to 1913. In 1914 she supported the war against Germany. After the war she moved to the United States, where she worked as an evangelist for the Second Adventist movement. Christabel died February 13, 1958, at the age of 77, sitting in a straight-backed chair. Her housekeeper found her body and there was no indication of her cause of death. She was buried in the Woodlawn Memorial Cemetery in Santa Monica, California. Annie Kenney was an English working class suffragette who became a leading figure in the Women's Social and Political Union. She attracted the attention of the press and the public in 1905 when she, and Christabel Pankhurst, were imprisoned for several days for assault and obstruction, after heckling Sir Edward Grey at a Liberal rally in Manchester on the issue of votes for women. This incident is credited with inaugurating a new phase in the struggle for women's suffrage in the UK, with the adoption of militant tactics. She took her message as far afield as France and the United States, but eventually married and settled in Letchworth, Hertfordshire, after women (over 30) won the vote in 1918. Christabel Pankhurst was the most classically beautiful of the Pankhurst daughters and was the focus of a rash of “crushes” across the movement. Martin Pugh believes she was briefly involved with Mary Blathwayt who, in her turn, was probably supplanted by Annie Kenney. “Christabel was an object of desire for several suffragettes,” he said. “She was a very striking woman.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Dame Christabel Pankhurst (September 22, 1880 –February 13, 1958) is buried at Woodlawn Memorial Cemetery in Santa Monica (1847 14th St, Santa Monica, CA 90404)



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Benvenuto Cellini was an Italian goldsmith, sculptor, draftsman, soldier, musician, and artist who also wrote a famous autobiography and poetry. He was one of the most important artists of Mannerism.
Born: November 3, 1500, Florence
Died: February 13, 1571, Grand Duchy of Tuscany
Education: Accademia delle Arti del Disegno
Buried: Santissima Annunziata, Piazza SS Annunziata, 50122 Firenze
Find A Grave Memorial# 13115942
Parents: Maria Lisabetta Granacci, Giovanni Cellini
Periods: Renaissance, Mannerism

Benvenuto Cellini (1500–1571) was an Italian goldsmith, sculptor, draftsman, soldier, musician, and artist who also wrote a famous autobiography and poetry. Even if married, Cellini was officially accused or charged with the crime of sodomy once with a woman and at least three times with men, illustrating his bisexual tendencies. He died in Florence and was buried with great pomp in the church of the Santissima Annunziata (Piazza SS Annunziata, 50122 Firenze).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692 
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Buried: Mount Carmel Cemetery, Glendale, Queens County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 96057148

Carl Van Vechten was an American writer and photographer. He first married his longtime friend Anna Snyder and divorced in 1912. He wed actress Fania Marinoff in 1914. In 1919, he began a long-term relationship with Donald Angus, a 19-year-old lover of opera, who regularly accompanied the writer to nightclubs and parties in Harlem. Even after the intensity of their sexual relationship had cooled, Angus remained a close friend, not only of Van Vechten but also of his wife, until her death in 1971. Van Vechten also had a relationship with Mark Lutz, a journalist based in Virginia, with whom he exchanged daily letters for 33 years. He had one other long-lasting affair, with Saul Mauriber, a decorator and designer who eventually became his assistant and remained in this capacity for twenty years. Mauriber donated part of Carl Van Vechten’s archive to the Library of Congress, an invaluable contribution to LGBT history researcher.
They met in 1919 and remained friends until Van Vechten’s death in 1964: 45 years.
Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964)
Donald Angus (April 14, 1900 – December 7, 1982)
Mark Lutz (1901-1968)
Saul Mauriber (May 21, 1915 - February 12, 2003)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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At Mount Carmel Cemetery (83-45 Cypress Hills St, Glendale, NY 11385) is buried Saul Mauriber (1915 2003), Carl Van Vechten's long time assistant/romantic partner and executor. Also Harold Clurman (1901–1980), American theatre director and drama critic, "one of the most influential in the United States", is buried here. He was most notable as one of the three founders of the New York City's Group Theatre (1931–1941). He directed more than 40 plays in his career and, during the 1950s, was nominated for a Tony Award as director for several productions. In addition to his directing career, he was drama critic for The New Republic (1948–52) and The Nation (1953–1980), helping shape American theater by writing about it. Clurman wrote seven books about the theatre, including his memoir “The Fervent Years: The Group Theatre And The Thirties” (1961). At the age of twenty, he moved to France to study at the University of Paris. There he shared an apartment with the young composer Aaron Copland.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Born: September 10, 1899
Died: February 12, 1955
Buried: Compton Village Cemetery, Compton, Guildford Borough, Surrey, England
Spouse: Aldous Huxley (m. 1919–1955)
Children: Matthew Huxley
Grandchildren: Trevenen Huxley, Tessa Huxley

The Watts Cemetery Chapel is a chapel and in an Art Nouveau version of Celtic Revival style in the village cemetery of Compton in Surrey. It is a Grade I listed building. When Compton Parish Council created a new cemetery, local resident artist Mary Fraser-Tytler, the wife of Victorian era painter and sculptor George Frederic Watts, offered to design and build a new mortuary chapel. A group of local amateurs and enthusiasts, many of whom later went on with Mary Fraser-Tytler to found the Compton Potters' Arts Guild, constructed the chapel from 1896 to 1898; virtually every village resident was involved. Both Watts have memorials in the "cloister" a few yards from the chapel, and a number of the memorials throughout the small cemetery use unglazed terracotta, even from dates after the Compton Pottery closed in the 1950s. Members of the Huxley family, including Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) and his wife Maria Nys (1898-1955), are buried within the cemetery (Down Ln, Compton, Guildford GU3 1DN).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
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