reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161805972

Alma Lutz was born and brought up in North Dakota, graduated from the Emma Willard School and Vassar College, and attended the Boston University School
of Business Administration. She wrote numerous articles and pamphlets and for many years was a contributor to The Christian Science Monitor. Active in organizations working for the political, civil, and economic rights of women, she was also interested in preserving the records of women's role in history and serves on the Advisory Board of the Radcliffe Women's Archives. Miss Lutz is the author of Emma Willard, Daughter of Democracy (1929), Created Equal, A Biography of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1940), Challenging Years, The Memoirs of Harriot Stanton Blatch, with Harriot Stanton Blatch (1940), the editor of With Love Jane, Letters from American Women on the War Fronts (1945) and the author of Susan B. Anthony, Rebel, Crusader, Humanitarian (1959). Lutz and Marguerite Smith, a librarian at the Protestant Zion Research Library in Brookline, Massachussetts, shared their lives from 1918 until the latter's death in 1959. Their lifelong relationship began when they roomed together at Vassar. They shared a Boston apartment and a summer home in the Berkshires, Highmeadow, Berlin, N.Y., not far from Susan B. Anthony's birthplace in Adams. Lutz and Smith worked in the National Woman’s Party. They travelled together, visiting Europe several times in the 1950s. When Smith died in 1959, Lutz struggled with her grief: “It’s a hard adjustment to make, but one we all have to face in one way or another and I am remembering that I have much to be grateful for.”
Together from 1918 to 1959: 41 years.
Alma Lutz (March 2, 1890 – August 31, 1973)
Marguerite Smith (died in 1959)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Alma Lutz (1890-1973) was the author of “Susan B. Anthony, Rebel, Crusader, Humanitarian” (1959). Lutz and Marguerite Smith shared a Boston apartment and a summer home in the Berkshires, Highmeadow, Berlin, NY 12022, not far from Susan B. Anthony's birthplace in Adams. Lutz and Smith worked in the National Woman’s Party. They travelled together, visiting Europe several times in the 1950s. When Smith died in 1959, Lutz struggled with her grief: “It’s a hard adjustment to make, but one we all have to face in one way or another and I am remembering that I have much to be grateful for.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
William Colvig was an electrician and amateur musician who was the partner for 33 years of composer Lou Harrison, whom he met in San Francisco in 1967.
Born: 1917
Died: 2000
Education: University of the Pacific
University of California, Berkeley
Lived: Harrison House, 6881 Mt Lassen Ave, Joshua Tree, CA 92252, USA (34.12816, -116.22678)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161890125
Partner: Lou Harrison

Lou Silver Harrison was an American composer. He was a student of Henry Cowell, Arnold Schoenberg, and KPH Notoprojo (formerly called KRT Wasitodiningrat, informally called Pak Cokro). William (Bill) Colvig was an electrician and amateur musician who was the partner for 33 years of Harrison, whom he met in San Francisco, California in 1967. Colvig helped construct the so-called "American gamelan“, a full Javanese-style gamelan, modeled on the instrumentation of Kyai Udan Mas at U.C. Berkeley. Harrison lived for many years with Colvig in Aptos, California. They purchased land in Joshua Tree, California, where they designed and built the Harrison House Retreat, a straw bale house. Harrison died in Lafayette, Indiana, from a heart attack while on his way to a festival of his music at The Ohio State University. Harrison is particularly noted for incorporating elements of the music of non-Western cultures into his work, with a number of pieces written for Javanese style gamelan instruments, including ensembles constructed and tuned by Harrison and his partner William Colvig.
Together from 1967 to 2000: 33 years.
William “Bill” Colvig (1917-2000)
Lou Silver Harrison (May 14, 1917 - February 2, 2003)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?
tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Harrison House Music & Arts is a non-profit artist residency, performance and community arts program based in the late composer Lou Harrison’s desert retreat in Joshua Tree, California. In addition to providing an enriching creative setting to dedicated artists the program offers high-quality performing arts and workshops to the local and visiting community.
Address: 6881 Mt Lassen Ave, Joshua Tree, CA 92252, USA (34.12816, -116.22678)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 760-366-4712
Place
Harrison House is the straw bale "composer’s cave" that Lou Harrison completed in 2002 on the edge of Joshua Tree National Park. Of his chosen construction method Lou Harrison noted, "America grows enough straw in one year to satisfy all of its building needs." The design, inspired by the great Egyptian architect Hassan Fathy, is a unique structure featuring a vaulted hall that measures 36' X 12' with a sixteen foot ceiling-- proportions chosen by Harrison to create a superb and intimate sound environment for acoustic music. Harrison had one year to visit and enjoy his studio retreat where he worked on his final musical composition "Scenes from Nek Chand" for custom-made steel guitar. This structure is a special integration of design, form, materials, light, acoustics and history. The experience of being inside has been likened to a chapel, mosque or temple. It is a special gem of approximately 1,000 square feet. The vaulted main room is flanked on both sides by three equal-sized spaces. To the north are three outdoor patios separated by rounded buttresses. To the south is a "monkish" bedroom, a bathroom with all fixtures built into the corners, and a fully equipped kitchen in which Harrison’s long-time friend, and renowned artist/choreographer, Remy Charlip painted the cabinetry. Artists who have been in residence have continued to adorn the house with their work. Harrison chose Joshua Tree as the location for his retreat because the dry desert air agreed with him, the stark beauty and desert ecology attracted him and he delighted in taking his friends on tours of the area. A rich cultural history, surreal geological features and a fascinating variety of plants and animals describes the area in and around Joshua Tree National Park. The arts also hold a place in its history, including prehistoric petroglyphs and historic murals painted on buildings throughout the nearby town of Twentynine Palms. Artists have been visiting the Joshua Tree desert for decades to nourish their creativity and this burgeoning arts community continues to flourish.
Life
Who: William “Bill” Colvig (1917-2000) and Lou Silver Harrison (May 14, 1917- February 2, 2003)
Lou Harrison was an American composer. Bill Colvig was an electrician and amateur musician who was the partner for 33 years of Harrison, whom he met in San Francisco, California in 1967. Harrison lived for many years with Colvig in Aptos, California. They purchased land in Joshua Tree, California, where they designed and built the Harrison House Retreat, a straw bale house. Harrison died in Lafayette, Indiana, from a heart attack while on his way to a festival of his music at The Ohio State University.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Violet Trefusis was an English writer and socialite. She is chiefly remembered for her lengthy affair with the poet Vita Sackville-West, which the two women continued after their respective marriages.
Born: June 6, 1894, London, United Kingdom
Died: March 1, 1972, Florence
Lived: 30 Portman Square, Marylebone, London W1H 7BH, UK (51.51564, -0.15724)
Villa dell’Ombrellino, 11 Piazza di Bellosguardo, 50124 Florence, Italy (43.76501, 11.23752)
Tour de la Haute Maison, Rue de la Tour, 77650 Saint-Loup-de-Naud, France (48.53621, 3.21181)
Buried: Cimitero Evangelico degli Allori, Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy, Plot: 2PPsSI VIII 45u
Find A Grave Memorial# 9521225
Parents: Alice Keppel
Books: Violet to Vita, Don't look round, Pirates at play, more
Grandparents: William Edmonstone, Mary Elizabeth Parsons

Violet Trefusis was an English writer and socialite. She was the daughter of Alice Keppel, a mistress of King Edward VII. She is chiefly remembered for her lesbian affair with the poet Vita Sackville-West. The affair was featured in novels by both parties, and in Virginia Woolf's Orlando: A Biography: in this romanticized biography of Vita, Trefusis appears as the Russian princess Sasha. Trefusis was an inspiration to many writers' fiction and was a pivotal character in their novels including Nancy Mitford's Love in a Cold Climate as "Lady Montdore" and in Harold Acton's The Soul's Gymnasium as "Muriel", a fictional portrait of her. When she was 10, Violet met Vita (who was two years older) for the first time. Despite Vita and Violet’s marriages, they remained close until 1921, with a lot of passion and jealousy in the middle. From 1923 on, Trefusis was one of the many lovers of the Singer sewing machine heiress, Winnaretta Singer, daughter of Isaac Singer and wife of the homosexual Prince Edmond de Polignac, who introduced her to the artistic beau-monde in Paris. Vita died in 1962. Violet died at L'Ombrellino on the Bellosguardo in 1972.

Together from 1904 to 1921: 17 years.
Violet Keppel Trefusis (June 6, 1894 – February 29, 1972)
The Hon Victoria Mary Sackville-West, Lady Nicolson, CH (March 9, 1892 – June 2, 1962)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Accomodation: Violet Trefusis lived her early youth in London, where the Keppel family had a house in 30 Portman Square, Marylebone, London W1H 7BH.

Address: 30 Portman Square, Marylebone, London W1H 7BH, UK (51.51564, -0.15724)

Place
In 1898, 29-year-old Alice Keppel met Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), the 56-year-old heir apparent to the throne. It was not long before she became one of Edward’s many mistresses, despite a twenty-six-year age difference. The Prince immediately made her "La Favorita" and his semi-official mistress. Keppel lived at 30 Portman Square, where Edward visited her regularly; her husband conveniently left during the visits. Her relationship with Edward would last through his ascension to the throne in 1901 until his death in 1910. Keppel was one of the few people in Edward VII’s circle who was able to smooth his strange mood swings. She was able to turn the cranky monarch into a happy man. Sir Harold Acton described Keppel, "None could compete with her glamour as a hostess. She could have impersonated Britannia in a tableau vivant and done that lady credit." Keppel was the inspiration behind the character "Mrs. Romola Cheyne" in Vita Sackville-West’s novel, “The Edwardians.” Through her youngest daughter, Sonia Cubitt, Keppel is the great-grandmother of Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, the second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales. Portman Square is a square in London, part of the Portman Estate. It is located at the western end of Wigmore Street, which connects it to Cavendish Square to its east. It was built between 1765 and 1784 on land belonging to Henry William Portman. It included residences of Alexander Hamilton, 10th Duke of Hamilton, Sir Brook Bridges, 3rd Baronet, Henry Pelham-Clinton, 4th Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyne, George Keppel, 6th Earl of Albemarle, Sir Charles Asgill, 1st Baronet and William Henry Percy. Alexander Duff, 1st Duke of Fife maintained his London residence at No. 15 Portman Square. No. 30 is currently the Churchill Hotel, incorporating the Michelin-starred Locanda Locatelli.In 1929, Gerald Heard (1889-1971) and Christopher Wood (1900-1976) moved to 28 Portman Square, Marylebone, London W1H 6LL, where they inhabited a modern new luxury flat overlooking the roof garden of Selfridge’s department store, with “a cat which tone[d] in perfectly with the furnishings.” Like Heard, Wood had had an unhappy childhood. Born Christopher William Graham Wood to a wealthy wholesale grocery family in Lambeth, Surrey, his mother died in childbirth, and his father remarried and died shortly thereafter. His father, Graham Wood, bequeathed to him the bulk of his estate (valued at 101,556 pounds in 1905) and the guardianship of a jealous stepmother. Wood and Heard had grown in opposite directions from their early experiences: where Wood had learned to hang back, Heard had learned to entertain. Where Heard sought pleasure in ideas and spirituality and clothes, Wood sought it almost entirely in things. Where Heard dedicated himself to his writing, Wood never completed his Cambridge degree. Christopher Isherwood described Wood as “the spoilt, wayward younger son, with his airplane, his musical boxes, his superbicycle and all his other dangerous or expensive amusements and toys.” E.M. Forster took a definite dislike to Wood, describing him as “that shit.” Heard and Wood were like two sides of one person, which, according to Isherwood, gave them the air of brothers. Wood looked after Heard’s material needs, and his inheritance allowed Heard a better lifestyle than he could have achieved on his own. Still, he complained of poverty whenever Wood left town.

Life
Who: Violet Trefusis, née Keppel; (June 6, 1894 – February 29, 1972)
Violet Trefusis was a writer and socialite. She is chiefly remembered for her lengthy affair with the poet Vita Sackville-West, which the two women continued after their respective marriages to men. Trefusis wrote novels and non-fiction works, both in English and French. The affair was featured in novels by both parties, in Virginia Woolf’s novel “Orlando: A Biography,” and in many letters and memoirs of the period, roughly 1912–1922. Many are preserved at Yale University Library. Trefusis also inspired other fiction and was featured as a pivotal character in these novels, including Lady Montdore in Nancy Mitford’s “Love in a Cold Climate” and Muriel in Harold Acton’s “The Soul’s Gymnasium.” Born Violet Keppel, she was the daughter of Alice Keppel, later a mistress of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom, and her husband, The Hon. George Keppel, a son of the 7th Earl of Albemarle. Members of the Keppel family thought her biological father was William Beckett, subsequently 2nd Baron Grimthorpe, a banker and MP for Whitby.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: Violet Trefusis published several novels, some in English, some in French, that she had written in her medieval "Tour" in Saint-Loup-de-Naud, Seine-et-Marne, France – a gift from Winnaretta Singer.

Address: Rue de la Tour, 77650 Saint-Loup-de-Naud, France (48.53621, 3.21181)

Place
Built in the XIII century
The Tower of the "High House” is the former stronghold of the priory of Saint-Loup. In the XV century, because of the ruin of the priory of Saint-Loup, it became property of local lords. It passed into the hands of the family de Saint-Phalle, and the Princess de Polignac, who gave it to her lover, Violet Trefusis. Trefusis received here her friends, like Marcel Proust, who came to visit and invented for his novel “In Search of Lost Time,” the character of the Marquis de Saint-Loup. Violet Trefusis held a literary salon here from 1945 to 1966. Upon her death, the property was sold and furniture dispersed. The Tower is classified as historical monuments by order of February 16, 1990.

Life
Who: Violet Trefusis, née Keppel; (June 6, 1894 – February 29, 1972)
From 1923 to 1933, Violet Trefusis was one of the many lovers of the Singer sewing machine heiress Winnaretta Singer, daughter of Isaac Singer and wife of the homosexual Prince Edmond de Polignac, who introduced her to the artistic beau-monde in Paris. Trefusis conceded more and more to her mother’s model of being "socially acceptable" but, at the same time, not wavering in her sexuality. Singer, like Vita Sackville-West before her, dominated the relationship, though apparently to mutual satisfaction. The two were together for many years and seem to have been content. Trefusis’s mother, Alice Keppel, did not object to this affair, most likely because of Singer’s wealth and power, and the fact that Singer carried on the affair in a much more disciplined way than Vita Sackville-West. Trefusis seemed to prefer the role of the submissive and therefore fitted well with Singer, who, whip in hand, was typically dominant and in control in her relationships. Neither was completely faithful during their long affair, but, unlike Trefusis’s affair with Sackville-West, this seems to have had no negative effect on their understanding. Alvilde Chaplin, future wife of the author James Lees-Milne, was involved with Singer from 1938 to 1943; the two women were living together in London at the time of Winnaretta’s death. Violet Trefusis died at L’Ombrellino on the Bellosguardo on February 29, 1972. Her ashes were placed both in Florence and in Saint-Loup-de-Naud in the monks’ refectory near her tower.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: In 1925, Alice Keppel and her husband moved to Italy. Their daughters stayed in Britain due to their marriages. They bought Villa dell’Ombrellino in Bellosguardo near Florence, however returned to Britain in 1940, due to WWII.

Address: 11 Piazza di Bellosguardo, 50124 Florence, Italy (43.76501, 11.23752)

Place
The villa had been the home of the scientist Galileo, the poet Foscolo and the scholar C. E. Norton. Alice Keppel commissioned the architect Cecil Pinsent to lay out the villa terrace with bisecting paths, which she named a “Union Jack garden”; and after her death her daughter Violet Trefusis maintained the villa and its garden. Villa dell’Ombrellino on Bellosguardo is located in the square at number 11, in the neighborhood of Bellosguardo in Florence. The origins of the villa date back to 1372. For four years, the Villa di Bellosguardo, as it was called at that time, was inhabited by the Segni family, whose most illustrious member was the historian Bernardo Segni. In 1815 the villa was owned by the Countess Teresa Spinelli Albizi who had it completely restored. She placed on the large garden terrace that looks towards Florence a kind of iron sun Chinese umbrella that gave its name to the villa. In 1874 the building was purchased by the family Zoubow (Zubov.) Four years later, they joined it with the adjacent villa della Torricella. The merger of the two properties led to a remodeling of the two gardens, joined in one large romantic park, featuring many exotic species, such as palms, bamboo, cedar and gingko biloba. In the early years of the XX century the house passed to English woman Alice Keppel, famous beauty, known for being the favorite of Edward VII, exiled from the English court at the death of the king, which, to expand the view, demolished the Torricella, replacing it with a loggia for music. The whole park was littered with statues neo-XVI and XVIII century in Vicenza stone, concentrated particularly in the overlooking Florence. In 1926 this area of the garden was transformed into an "Italian garden,” with flower beds bordered by box hedges, by the English architect Cecil Pinsent. On the death of Alice Keppel in 1947, the villa was inherited by her eldest daughter, Violet Trefusis, which remained there until her death. Writer and essayist, Violet, which included friends and correspondents as Vita Sackville-West and François Mitterrand, has endeavored to maintain the villa and garden to the levels of the time of her mother, with a focus on flowers in pots and in the ground. The villa has had many famous guests. Galileo Galilei lived there between 1617 and 1631 and in those years he wrote his "Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems.” Anna Cora Mowatt known as Mrs. Ritchie, novelist and author of articles on the life and the events in Florence for American newspapers. Charles Eliot Norton, a scholar of Italian art and architecture, stayed all’Ombrellino between the end of 1870 and the spring of 1871. The impressionist painter Marcellin Desboutin, stayed there in the mid-XIX century. Until recently the villa was home to a conference center and services, but it’s now closed due to bankruptcy.

Life
Who: Violet Trefusis, née Keppel; (June 6, 1894 – February 29, 1972)
In 1924, Alice Keppel bought L’Ombrellino, a large villa overlooking Florence. After her parents’ death in 1947, Violet Trefusis would become the chatelaine of L’Ombrellino till the end of her life. Trefusis died at L’Ombrellino on the Bellosguardo on February 29, 1972. She died of starvation, the effect of a malabsorption disease. Her ashes were placed both in Florence at the Cimitero degli Allori (The Evangelical Cemetery of Laurels) and in Saint-Loup-de-Naud in the monks’ refectory near her tower. In the 1990 BBC Mini-series “Portrait of a Marriage,” Violet Trefusis is portrayed by Cathryn Harrison.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Cemetery: Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori ("The Evangelical Cemetery of Laurels") is located in Florence, Italy, between 'Due Strade' and Galluzzo. The small cemetery was opened on February 26, 1860 when the non-Catholic communities of Florence could no longer bury their dead in the English Cemetery in Piazzale Donatello.

Address: Via Senese, 184, 50124 Firenze, Italy (43.74775, 11.22999)

Place
The Cemetery is named after the Allori farm where it was located. Initially a Protestant cemetery, the site is now private. Since 1970 it has accepted the dead of other denominations, including Muslims. The cemetery became newsworthy in 2006 when the writer and journalist Oriana Fallaci was buried there alongside her family and a stone memorial to Alexandros Panagoulis, her companion.

Notable queer burials at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori:
• Harold Acton (1904-1994), British writer. Harold Acton’s younger brother, William, a gay artist of modest achievement, died an apparent suicide in 1945. William Acton was a British visual artist who was born in 1906. Several works by the artist have been sold at auction, including 'Armiola' sold at Christie's New York 'Victorian, Pre-Raphaelite & British Impressionist Art' in 2016 for $23,080.
• Robert Wiedeman Barrett Browning, known as Pen Browning, (1849–1912), English painter. His career was moderately successful, but he is better known as the son and heir of the celebrated English poets, Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.
• Leo Ditrichstein (1865-1928), American actor and playwriter. Educated in Austria, Ditrichstein was the author of a number of plays, five of which were made into motion pictures. Worked with Gareth Hughes, Welsh actor in theater and film who worked primarily in the United States, and who, according to historian William J. Mann, was a "flaming little queen".
• Alice Keppel (1868-1947), British mistress of Edward VII and mother of Violet Trefusis.
• John Pope-Hennessy (1913-1994), British art historian.
• Violet Page, aka Vernon Lee (1856-1935), British writer.
• Charles Alexander Loeser (1864–1928), American art historian and art collector.
• Osbert Sitwell (1892-1969), British writer.
• Frederick Stibbert (1838-1906), British art collector.
• Violet Trefusis (1894-1972), English and French writer.
• Reginald Turner (1869-1938), British writer. Turner numbered among his friends Max Beerbohm, Lord Alfred Douglas, H. G. Wells, Arnold Bennett, Somerset Maugham, D. H. Lawrence, Oscar Wilde, Osbert Sitwell and others of the London literary scene during the late XIX and early XX century. S. N. Behrman said of him, "He was one of those men who talk like angels and write like pedestrians". Harold Acton agreed, writing of Turner's conversation, "One forgot to eat while he spun his fantasies." Beerbohm said, "He would be eloquent even were he dumb," and Maugham wrote, "Reggie Turner was, on the whole, the most amusing man I have known." After Wilde's death, Turner, who was homosexual, felt few ties to England.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, known as Viscount Corvedale from 1937 to 1947, was a British socialist politician who had a career at political odds with his father, the Conservative prime minister Stanley Baldwin.
Born: March 1, 1899, Malvern Hills District, United Kingdom
Died: August 10, 1958, London, United Kingdom
Education: Eton College
Lived: Shirburn Castle, Castle Rd, Shirburn, Watlington, Oxfordshire OX49 5DJ, UK (51.65756, -0.99379)
93 Eaton Square, Belgravia, London SW1W 9DA, UK
Astley Hall, Church Ln, Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire DY13 0RJ, UK (52.30761, -2.2959)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161195675
Party: Labour Party
Parents: Lucy Baldwin, Countess Baldwin of Bewdley, Stanley Baldwin
Grandparent: Alfred Baldwin

Oliver Baldwin was a British politician, son of three-time Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin. The Daily Mail on August 5, 1931, was dominated by a story claiming that Oliver Baldwin was living with a man named John Boyle. “We do not know if Mr. Oliver Baldwin and Mr. John Boyle are indulging in unnatural vice, but if they are committing criminal acts the police should be informed and a criminal prosecution brought.” That afternoon Stanley Baldwin gave a press conference with his wife Lucy and Oliver. He said that Oliver had the love and support of himself and his wife. They knew that he and John Boyle were close friends and were living together. What they did in their personal lives was no one's business and certainly not a matter for the law. In 1948, Oliver was appointed Governor of the Leeward Islands and took John Boyle with him.

Together from 1923 & 1958: 35 years.
John Parke Boyle (1893 - 1969)
Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, Viscount Corvedale (March 1, 1899 – August 10, 1958)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: Shirburn Castle is at the village of Shirburn, 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Thame, Oxfordshire. Shirburn Castle was the seat of the Earls of Macclesfield.

Address: Castle Rd, Shirburn, Watlington, Oxfordshire OX49 5DJ, UK (51.65756, -0.99379)

Place
George Parker, 2nd Earl of Macclesfield (c.1695–1764), celebrated as an astronomer, spent much time conducting astronomical observations at Shirburn Castle, which his father had bought in 1716. Here he built an observatory and a chemical laboratory. The observatory was "equipped with the finest existing instruments" and the 2nd Earl of Macclesfield used it from 1740. In 1761 the astronomer Thomas Hornsby observed the transit of Venus from the castle grounds. The Macclesfield Psalter, a lavishly illuminated manuscript from the English region of East Anglia, written in Latin and produced around 1330, was discovered in Shirburn Castle in 2004 when the contents of the Library were catalogued for auction. The present owner of the castle is the Beechwood Estates Company, the Macclesfield family estate management company. Following a long-running and acrimonious court battle, Richard Timothy George Mansfield Parker, the 9th Earl of Macclesfield, was evicted from the family seat at the end of 2004. The castle was used for external shots of Midsomer Priory for the popular television series “Midsomer Murders.”

Life
Who: Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (March 1, 1899 – August 10, 1958) and John Parke Boyle (July 30, 1893 – February 24, 1969)
On his return from Armenia Oliver Baldwin made two major decisions. First, any talk of engagement to Dorothea Arbuthnot was a fraud; he was homosexual and needed to live the rest of his life with a male partner, whom he found in the person of John Parke Boyle, the son of an army officer, descended from the earls of Cork. Together they set up home in Oxfordshire, first at Shirburn and then at North Stoke, keeping geese and hens and taking in lodgers, with Oliver trying to make money by writing. He refused to accept money from his father, except for small cheques at Christmas or for his birthday. Second, Oliver decided his politics lay decisively on the left. The substance of an interview he gave to the Westminster Gazette was taken up by Fred Gorle of the Social Democratic Federation. Baldwin was invited to become a member, which he immediately did. H. M. Hyndman, the guiding spirit of the SDF, remained his political inspiration for the rest of his life. Some members of his family thought that the adoption of socialism was deeply treacherous, but Stanley Baldwin was always warm, generous and understanding of the idealism of his elder son. His mother, coming from a background where the questioning of received ideas was not just possible but expected, was also supportive, and on a personal level too – she wrote to John Boyle to say, “Thank you for loving my Oliver.” Oliver Baldwin threw a party in honour of his father, on December 15, 1938. In Oliver’s words “it was a wonderful evening and made the old man very happy.” The following day Stanley wrote to his son, “I enjoyed every minute of your happy party last night. In the excitement of leaving I don’t believe I said Good Night to Johnny, whose work as caterer was beyond praise. Bless you. Your loving old Father.” Oliver’s parents treated John Boyle as an ideal son-in-law and would begin letters to him with “My dear Johnny.” John Parke Boyle was the son of Major Charles John Boyle and Lillian Kennedy Pochin. He was educated at Bradfield School and was invested as a Fellow, Zoological Society (F.Z.S.) His sister Lilian Joanna Vere Boyle married George Loveden William Henry Parker (1888-1975), 7th Earl of Macclesfield, son of George Augustus Parker, Viscount Parker and Carine Agnes Loveden, on 9 June 1909. For a time, Oliver and John lived at Shirburn at John’s brother-in-law’s castle, before moving to North Stoke. John Parke Boyle is buried at St Mary the Virgin (Church Lane, North Stoke, Oxfordshire, OX10 6BQ).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: Astley Hall is a country house in Astley near Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire. The hall is significant as the home of Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin, who died here in 1947. It is now operated as a nursing home by Heritage Manor Ltd and known as Astley Hall Care Home.

Address: Church Ln, Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire DY13 0RJ, UK (52.30761, -2.2959)

Place
Astley Hall is a small, three storey country house set in 20 acres of parkland, situated two miles outside Stourport-on-Severn. The house consists of a main block that is linked to an L-shaped stable wing. In addition, the estate features a separate park lodge (Baldwin Lodge), formal garden and kitchen garden. The present buildings date from mid-XIX century with early XX century additions. To the right of the main house is a stone Tudor arched garden entrance, to the left of the main house is a slightly later cross-gabled extension with clock and brick stable range with stone dressings. The main house is an ashlar construction with slate roof. On the roof there are grouped chimneys with decorative shafting. The Jacobean façade features a 3-storey 3-bay centre block and 2-storey single bay wings with cornices, parapets and shaped gables. The outer bays of main block have 2-storey angled bay windows with open parapets. Access to the main house is via a semi-circular headed doorway with rusticated arch and a Ionic motif above a keystone. Above the porch is inscribed "SLB 1912,” which refers to the date of the final acquisition of the house and additions to it by Stanley and Lucy Baldwin. The porch is flanked by a transomed window and Ionic pilasters. On the interior, the entrance lobby has a Jacobean strapwork ceiling. On the garden front, the main house is slightly plainer with a 2-storey pedimented porch containing a coat of arms. The extension to the right has on first floor Ionic 3-bay loggia with arched central bay, a further extension to right terminates in a rendered pavilion possibly concealing water tower. The main house at Astley Hall was built between 1830 and 1850 for the Lea family. Thomas Simcox Lea, of Astley Hall, was High Sheriff of Worcestershire in 1845. At the beginning of the XX century it was sold to Stanley Baldwin, who lived at Astley Hall from 1902 until his death in 1947. In 1912 he managed to buy the whole of the house and its additions. Lucy Baldwin died of a heart attack at Astley Hall in June 1945. Stanley Baldwin, then 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, continued to live at Astley Hall until his death there on 1December 4, 1947. After Lord Baldwin’s death, Astley Hall was sold and became a school, and later a care home. Astley Hall was acquired by its current owners in May 2012. It is now in institutional use as a nursing home and not open to the public.

Life
Who: Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (March 1, 1899 – August 10, 1958) and John Parke Boyle (July 30, 1893 – February 24, 1969)
Oliver Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, known as Viscount Corvedale from 1937 to 1947, was a British socialist politician who had a career at political odds with his father, the Conservative prime minister Stanley Baldwin. Educated at Eton, which he hated, Baldwin left as soon as he could. After serving in the army during WWI he undertook various jobs, including a brief appointment as an officer in the Armenian army, and wrote journalism and books on a range of topics. He served two terms as a Labour Member of Parliament between 1929 and 1947. Baldwin never achieved ministerial office in Britain. His last post was as Governor of the Leeward Islands, from 1948 to 1950. After WWII Baldwin served briefly as British Vice-Consul in Boulogne, and then travelled in north Africa. He refused to be supported by his father, and earned a living as a journalist and travel writer. A chance meeting in Alexandria led to an appointment as an infantry instructor in the newly-independent Armenia, but soon after he took up the post in 1920 the democratic government collapsed and Baldwin was imprisoned by Bolshevik-backed revolutionaries. He was freed two months later when democracy was restored, but en route back to Britain he was arrested by the Turkish authorities, accused of spying for Soviet Russia. He was held for five months, in grim conditions, with execution a constant threat. He later wrote a book about his experiences, called “Six Prisons and Two Revolutions.” After his release Baldwin returned to Britain, and in 1922 was briefly engaged to Dorothea ("Doreen") Arbuthnot, the daughter of a political ally of his father. Coming to terms with the fact that he was homosexual, Baldwin broke off the engagement, and settled with John ("Johnnie") Boyle. Described in The New Statesman as "a charming ne’er-do-well,” Boyle, who was six years older than Baldwin, became his lifelong partner. Boyle’s family came from Oxfordshire, where he and Baldwin set up home together, living in what the biographer Christopher J Walker describes as "gentle, amicable, animal-loving, primitive, homosexual socialism.” Oliver’s mother, Lucy, arrived to write to Johnnie “Thank you for loving my Oliver.” In February 1948 Baldwin was appointed Governor and Commander in Chief of the Leeward Islands, a British colonial territory in the Caribbean. Boyle accompanied him, to the disapproval of some of the British establishment in Antigua. Partly for this reason, and partly because Baldwin made no secret of his continuing socialist views or his desire for multiracial inclusiveness, he was recalled in 1950.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: English Heritage Blue Plaque: 93 Eaton Square, Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (1867–1947), "Prime Minister lived here"

Address: Eaton Square, Belgravia, London SW1W 9DA, UK

Place
Eaton Square is a residential garden square in London’s Belgravia district. Eaton Square is one of the three garden squares built by the Grosvenor family when they developed the main part of Belgravia in the XIX century, and is named after Eaton Hall, the Grosvenor country house in Cheshire. Eaton Square is larger but less grand than the central feature of the district, Belgrave Square, and both larger and grander than Chester Square. The first block was laid out by Thomas Cubitt from 1827.

Notable queer residents at Eaton Square:
• No. 1, SW1W 9DA, Engligh Blue Plaque: Robert, Lord Boothby (1900-1986), “Politician, Author and Broadcaster lived here 1946-1986.” Often known as Bob Boothby, was a British Conservative politician. Boothby was openly bisexual, in a time when male homosexual activity was a criminal offence. While an undergraduate at Magdalen College, Oxford, Boothby earned the nickname "the Palladium", because "he was twice nightly". He later spoke about the role of a speculated homosexual relationship in the drowning of his friend Michael Llewelyn Davies (one of the models for Peter Pan) and fellow Oxonian Rupert Buxton. From 1954 he campaigned publicly for homosexual law reform. In 1963 Boothby began an illicit affair with East End cat burglar Leslie Holt (died 1979), a younger man he met at a gambling club. Holt introduced him to the gangster Ronald Kray, the younger, homosexual, Kray twin. After his death from a heart attack in Westminster Hospital, London, aged 86, Boothby's ashes were scattered at Rattray Head near Crimond, Aberdeenshire, off the coast of his former constituency.
• No. 93, SW1W 9AQ, Engligh Blue Plaque: Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (1867-1947), “Prime Minister lived here”. Oliver Baldwin (1899-1958) was born at Astley Hall, Worcestershire, the elder son of the businessman Stanley Baldwin and his wife Lucy, née Ridsdale. Baldwin senior was elected a Conservative MP in 1908, and rose within fifteen years to become prime minister. Coming to terms with the fact that he was homosexual, Oliver Baldwin broke off his engagement, and settled with John ("Johnnie") Boyle. Described in The New Statesman as "a charming ne’er-do-well,” Boyle, who was six years older than Baldwin, became his lifelong partner. Boyle’s family came from Oxfordshire, where he and Baldwin set up home together, living in what the biographer Christopher J Walker describes as "gentle, amicable, animal-loving, primitive, homosexual socialism.”
• Admiral Henry John Codrington lived at No. 112, SW1W 9AE, South side of Eaton Square. Emily Faithfull (1835-1895) had been companion to Mrs. Helen Codrington for 10 years. When Admiral Henry John Codrington returned from the Crimea, he told Emily to leave the house, threatening to have the reason for her dismissal made public. Codrington (1808-1877) was a Royal Navy officer. As a junior officer, he saw action supporting the blockade of Algiers by Greek revolutionaries during the Greek War of Independence and was later present at the Battle of Navarino during the same war. He later undertook a survey of enemy positions prior to the bombardment of Acre during the Egyptian–Ottoman War. As a captain, Codrington provided refuge on board ship for Leopold II, Grand Duke of Tuscany and his family who were fleeing from revolutionary forces and then commanded the HMS Royal George in the Baltic Sea during the Crimean War. He went on to be Admiral superintendent of Malta Dockyard and then Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth. In April 1849 Codrington married Helen Jane Webb; they had two daughters. Following a much publicised divorce in 1864 in which the Admiral accused his first wife of having a close relationship with Emily Faithfull, he married Catherine Aitchison (née Compton) in August 1869. Helen Codrington, the younger of the two daughters of Henry Codrington, married in 1878 John Roche Dasent, the eldest son of George Webbe Dasent. Anne Jane Codrington married in 1882, Henry Stormont (Finch-Hatton), 13th Earl of Winchilsea and 8th Earl of Nottingham, descendent of Sir John Finch. When Admiral Codrington filed for divorce on grounds of adultery, Helen Codrington counterclaimed with the accusation that in October 1856 he had attempted to rape Faithfull while she was a guest in their house. At first, Emily Faithfull agreed to give evidence on behalf of Mrs. Codrington but later changed her mind. N° 111 and 112 in Eaton Square was sold in 2010 for 24 million pound.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Mikhail Alekseevich Kuzmin was a Russian poet, musician and novelist, a prominent contributor to the Silver Age of Russian Poetry.
Born: October 18, 1872, Yaroslavl, Russia
Died: March 1, 1936, Saint Petersburg, Russia
Education: Saint Petersburg Conservatory
Buried: Volkovo Cemetery, Saint Petersburg, Saint Petersburg Federal City, Russia
Find A Grave Memorial# 161717806
Books: Wings, Selected writings, Kryl'ia: Povest' V Trekh Chastiakh

Konstantin Somov was a Russian artist associated with the Mir Iskusstva (The World of Art). Born into a family of a major art historian and Hermitage Museum curator Andrey Ivanovich Somov, he became interested in the 18th-century art and music at an early age. Somov studied at the Imperial Academy of Arts under Ilya Repin from 1888 to 1897. While at the Academy, he befriended Alexandre Benois, who would introduce him to Sergei Diaghilev and Léon Bakst. When the three founded the World of Art, Somov liberally contributed to its periodicals. Somov was homosexual, like many
of the World of Art members. On September 15, 1906, Mikhail Kuzmin depicts in his diary what was apparently his first sexual experience with more than one partner. The two happened to be a young man, Pavlik Maslov, Kuzmin’s lover at that time, and Konstantin Somov, Kuzmin’s close friend. After rather detailed description of the sexual encounter, Kuzmin remarks in his diary: “What an unexpected event. I was asking K.A. [Somov]: ‘Is it possible that our life will not remain for posterity?’ –
‘If these terrible diaries are preserved – then it will remain, and in the next epoch, we will be considered Marquises de Sade.’ Today I understood the importance of our art and our life.” On June 14, 2007, Somov's landscape The Rainbow (1927) was sold at Christie's for US$7.33 million, a record for a work of Russian art.

Konstantin Andreyevich Somov (November 30, 1869 – May 6, 1939)
Mikhail Alekseevich Kuzmin (October 18, 1872 – March 1, 1936)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Cemetery: The Volkovo Cemetery (Rasstannyy pr-d, 3, Sankt-Peterburg, Russia, 192007) is one of the largest and oldest non-Orthodox cemeteries in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Until the early XX century it was one of the main burial grounds for Lutheran Germans in Russia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people have been buried at this cemetery since 1773. Notable queer burials: Vsevolod Knyazev (died 1913) and Mikhail Kuzmin (1872-1936).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Mercedes de Acosta was an American poet, playwright, and novelist. Four of de Acosta's plays were produced, and she published a novel and three volumes of poetry.
Born: March 1, 1893, New York City, New York, United States
Died: May 9, 1968, New York City, New York, United States
Lived: 471 Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
558 North Bristol Avenue
Buried: Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum, Manhattan, New York County (Manhattan), New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 8744496
Spouse: Abram Poole (m. 1920–1935)
Movies: Rasputin and the Empress
Parents: Ricardo de Acosta, Micaela Hernandez de Alba y de Alba

In 1920, Eva Le Gallienne became involved with poet, novelist and playwright Mercedes de Acosta. She and de Acosta began their romance shortly after de Acosta's marriage to Abram Poole, which strained their relationship. Still, they vacationed and travelled together often, at times visiting the salon of famed writer and socialite Natalie Clifford Barney. De Acosta wrote two plays for Le Gallienne, Sandro Botticelli and Jehanne de Arc. After five years and the financial failures of both plays, they ended their relationship. De Acosta had five siblings: Aida, Ricardo Jr., Angela, Maria, and Rita. Rita became a famous beauty best known as Rita Lydig. She was photographed by Baron Adolph de Meyer, Edward Steichen, and Gertrude Käsebier, sculpted in alabaster by Malvina Hoffman, and painted by Giovanni Boldini and John Singer Sargent among others.

Together from 1920 to 1925: 5 years.
Eva Le Gallienne (January 11, 1899 – June 3, 1991)
Mercedes de Acosta (March 1, 1893 – May 9, 1968)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Mercedes de Acosta was an American poet, playwright, and novelist. She was professionally unsuccessful but is known for her many lesbian affairs with famous personalities and numerous friendships with prominent artists of the period. De Acosta's best-known relationship was with Greta Garbo. When Garbo's close friend, author Salka Viertel, introduced them in 1931, they quickly became involved. As their relationship developed, it became erratic and volatile with Garbo always in control. The two were very close sporadically and then apart for lengthy periods when Garbo, annoyed by Mercedes' obsessive behavior, coupled with her own neuroses, ignored her. In any case, they remained friends for thirty years during which time Garbo wrote de Acosta 181 letters, cards, and telegrams. About their friendship, Cecil Beaton, who was close to both women, recorded in his 1958 memoir, "Mercedes is [Garbo's] very best friend and for 30 years has stood by her, willing to devote her life to her".

Together from 1931 to 1960: 29 years.
Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990)
Mercedes de Acosta (March 1, 1893 – May 9, 1968)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Mercedes de Acosta was involved in numerous lesbian relationships with Broadway’s and Hollywood's elite and did not attempt to hide her sexuality, which was rare in her generation. In 1916, she began an affair with actress Alla Nazimova and later with dancer Isadora Duncan. After her relationship with actress Eva Le Gallienne ended, she was involved with several famous actresses and dancers including Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Ona Munson, and Russian ballerina Tamara Platonovna Karsavina. Additional unsubstantiated rumors include Pola Negri, Eleonora Duse, Katharine Cornell, and Alice B. Toklas. Mercedes threatened to throw Dietrich into a swimming pool if she continued to send flowers (Dietrich had been inundating Acosta with tulips, roses, and orchids). Unlike her professional celebrity, which was carefully crafted and maintained, Marlene Dietrich's personal life was kept out of public view. Dietrich, who was bisexual, enjoyed the thriving gay scene of the time and drag balls of 1920s Berlin. She also defied conventional gender roles through her boxing at Turkish trainer and prizefighter Sabri Mahir’s boxing studio in Berlin, which opened to women in the late 1920s. As Austrian writer Hedwig (Vicki) Baum recalls in her memoir, "I don't know how the feminine element sneaked into those masculine realms [the boxing studio], but in any case, only three or four of us were tough enough to go through with it (Marlene Dietrich was one)."

Marie Magdalene "Marlene" Dietrich (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992)
Mercedes de Acosta (March 1, 1893 – May 9, 1968)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1936 Mercedes De Acosta expected Greta Garbo to move in with her at 558 North Bristol Avenue and she erected a 10-foot tall wall with spikes atop.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

No. 465, The Ritz Tower, 10022: Built in 1925 as the city’s most elegant apartment hotel, The Ritz Tower today remains one of Manhattan’s most luxurious and sought-after residential cooperatives noted for its spacious and elegant apartments, each one unique. Greta Garbo (1905-1990) lived here for a time in the 40s. Most happy about this move was probably Mercedes de Acosta (1893-1968), who had an apartment at 471 Park Avenue, 10022 from where she could see Garbo's north facing rooms. Mercedes told the story that during the wartime, when people were not allowed to show light at night “we gave each other signs with candles. Why we were not arrested for this offence is still today a riddle to me.” In 1951 Garbo moved from the Ritz into a suite with four rooms located on the seventeenth floor of The Hampshire House at 150 Central Park South, 10019.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Church: Trinity Church Cemetery consists of three separate burial grounds associated with Trinity Church in Manhattan, New York, US. The first was established in the Churchyard located at 74 Trinity Place at Wall Street and Broadway. In 1842, the church, running out of space in its churchyard, established Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum in Upper Manhattan between Broadway and Riverside Drive, at the Chapel of the Intercession (now The Church of the Intercession, New York), formerly the location of John James Audubon's estate. A third burial place is the Churchyard of St. Paul's Chapel.

Addresses:
75 Broadway, New York, NY 10006 (40.70806, -74.01218)
209 Broadway, New York, NY 10007 (40.71132, -74.00918)
550 W 155th St, New York, NY 10032 (40.83221, -73.94521)
National Register of Historic Places: Heritage Rose District, 80002677, 2012

Place
The burial grounds have been the final resting place for many historic figures since the Churchyard cemetery opened in 1697. A non-denominational cemetery, it is the only remaining active cemetery in Manhattan. There are two bronze plaques at the Church of the Intercession cemetery commemorating the Battle of Fort Washington, which included some of the fiercest fighting of the Revolutionary War. Trinity Church Cemetery, along with Broadway, marks the center of the Heritage Rose District of NYC. Trinity Church was the site of ACT UP's first demonstration against Wall Street profiteering from AIDS. Site of a second demonstration a year later. Protesters marched from Trinity to the intersection of Broadway and Wall Street.

Notable queer burials at Trinity Church’s burial grounds:
• Mercedes De Acosta (1893-1968), Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum, author. Alice B. Toklas said of her, "Say what you will about Mercedes, she's had the most important women in the twentieth century." Her lovers included Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Isadora Duncan, stage actress Eva Le Galliene, and Tallulah Bankhead.
• John W. Mulligan (died in 1862), Trinity Churchyard. Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben legally adopted two soldiers, William North and Benjamin Walker. John W. Mulligan Jr., also considered himself one of Steuben’s sons. His birth father, John “Hercules” Mulligan, had been Alexander Hamilton’s roommate many years before. Steuben left his estate to Captains Benjamin Walker and William North. John Mulligan inherited Von Steuben’s vast library, collection of maps and $2,500 in cash.
• Charles Woodcock-Savage (1850-1923), Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum, was a New Yorker who achieved notoriety as the lover of King Karl of Württemberg, by some decades his elder. Charles Woodcock was born in New York City, the son of Jonas Gurnee Woodcock (1822–1908) and Sarah Savage Woodcock (1824–1893). He went abroad to study and found a place as chamberlain at the court of Württemberg, where he became the favorite of the king, who had had several previous favorites. In 1888 Karl named Charles Woodcock "Baron Woodcock-Savage" creating an uproar that sent Woodcock back to New York in 1890. In New York he adopted the last name "Savage." In 1906 Charles Woodcock-Savage published “A Lady in Waiting: Being extracts from the diary of Julie de Chesnil, sometime lady-in-waiting to her Majesty, Queen Marie Antoinette.” He dedicated it "To a Noble Soul I Knew and Loved and Mourn." The King had died in 1891.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Stephen James Napier Tennant was a British socialite known for his decadent lifestyle. He was called "the brightest" of the "Bright Young People".
Born: April 21, 1906, Wilsford cum Lake, United Kingdom
Died: February 28, 1987, Wilsford cum Lake, United Kingdom
Lived: Wilsford Manor, Wilsford cum Lake, Amesbury, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 7BL, UK (51.15668, -1.80983)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161194839
Parents: Edward Tennant, 1st Baron Glenconner
Partner: Siegfried Sassoon
Books: Blaydar's Children, Dark Winter Riders, Leaves from a Missionary's Notebook
Grandparent: Sir Charles Tennant, 1st Baronet

Stephen Tennant was a British aristocrat known for his decadent lifestyle. It is said, albeit apocryphally, that he spent most of his life in bed. During the 20s and 30s, Tennant was an important member - the "Brightest", it is said - of the "Bright Young People." His friends included Rex Whistler, Cecil Beaton, the Sitwells (Dame Edith Sitwell and Sir Osbert Sitwell), Lady Diana Manners and the Mitford girls – part of the set that made the Nordstrom Sisters popular at The Ritz in 1939. He is widely considered to be the model for Cedric Hampton in Nancy Mitford's novel Love in a Cold Climate; one of the inspirations for Lord Sebastian Flyte in Waugh's Brideshead Revisited and a model for Hon. Miles Malpractice in some of his other novels. Stephen Tennant had a sexual affair with the poet Siegfried Sassoon. His relationship with Sassoon was to be his most important: it lasted some four years before Tennant off-handedly put an abrupt end to it. Sassoon was reportedly depressed afterwards for three months, until he married in 1933 and became a father in 1936. Siegfried Sassoon died one week before his 81st birthday in 1967. When Tennant died in 1987, he had far outlived most of his contemporaries.

Together from 1929 to 1933: 4 years.
Siegfried Loraine Sassoon (September 8, 1886 – September 1, 1967)
Stephen James Napier Tennant (April 21, 1906 – February 28, 1987)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: For most of his life, Stephen Tennant tried to start or finish a novel – “Lascar: A Story You Must Forget.” It is popularly believed that he spent the last 17 years of his life in bed at his family manor at Wilsford cum Lake, Wiltshire, which he had redecorated by Syrie Maugham.

Address: Wilsford cum Lake, Amesbury, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 7BL, UK (51.15668, -1.80983)
Phone: +44 1980 676 109
Website: http://www.wilsfordmanor.co.uk/

Place
Built at the beginning of the XX century, Design by Detmar Blow (1867-1939)
The two principle houses in the parish are Wilsford Manor and Lake House, with both manors likely referenced in the Domesday book; held by Hamon de Masci of Hugh de Avranches, assumed to be Lake, and other by Hugh of Robert fitz Gerold, Wilsford. Wilsford Manor house was built on the site of an older house. Detmar Blow had previously worked on the Lake House restoration, as a reproduction XVII century manor house with stone mullioned windows, and stone and flint chequer-work walls. Before 1247 the Verdun family held the manor of Wilsford, who maintained a taper continually burning at the high altar of Salisbury Cathedral. It continued in the hands of the Verdun family, through service of ¼ knight’s fee, rental from the Bishop of Salisbury, and again by the service of maintaining a candle. After 1426-8, when it was still held of the Bishop but by unknown means, the overlordship ends. Upon the death of Theobald in 1316, the manor was held by his widow, Elizabeth de Burgh, after which it was transferred to Thomas de Furnival, son of one of Theobald’s female heirs. Through marriage the manor came to Thomas de Neville, later Lord Furnival. Their daughter, Maud, married John Talbot, Lord Furnival and later Earl of Shrewsbury. The manor then descended with the Talbot earldom of Shrewsbury throughout the XV and XVI centuries. In 1766 the manor was sold to John Pinkney, who along with his successor owned other holdings in the parish, and united the remaining freeholds from the manor. By 1846 the manor was in the hands of Giles Loder until it was subsequently acquired by Arthur Newall in 1890. From the early XX century the estate was leased to Sir Edward Priaulx Tennant, who bought the estate after becoming Lord Glenconner in 1911. He also united the manors of Lake and Wilsford in 1918. Glenconner’s widow married Viscount of Falloden (Foreign Secretary during WWI) who lived there until his wife died in 1928. The Tennant family maintained the manor house, and in 1932 it was occupied by the Hon. David Tennant and his wife, actress Hermione Baddeley (younger sister of Angela Baddeley, who married Glen Byam Shaw, former lover of Siegfried Sassoon, before Sassoon met Stephen Tennant), and subsequently by the Hon. Stephen Tennant, famous for his decadent lifestyle and association with, amongst others, Greta Garbo, Cecil Beaton, E.M. Foster, Virginia Woolf and Siegfried Sassoon. The Nobel Peace Prize for Literature winner V.S. Naipaul lived in a cottage in the grounds of Wilsford Manor during Stephen Tennant’s ownership. The author spent time walking around Springbottom while staying at Wilsford Manor, and much of his 1987, primarily autobiographical, “Enigma of Arrival” is set in the Wiltshire landscape.

Life
Who: Stephen James Napier Tennant (April 21, 1906 – February 28, 1987)
Stephen Tennant was a British socialite known for his decadent lifestyle. During the 1920s and 1930s, Tennant was an important member – the "Brightest,” it is said – of the "Bright Young People." His friends included Rex Whistler, Cecil Beaton, the Sitwells, Lady Diana Manners and the Mitford girls. He is widely considered to be the model for Cedric Hampton in Nancy Mitford’s novel “Love in a Cold Climate,” one of the inspirations for Lord Sebastian Flyte in Evelyn Waugh’s “Brideshead Revisited,” and a model for the Hon. Miles Malpractice in some of Waugh’s other novels. During the 1920s and 1930s, Tennant had a sexual affair with the poet Siegfried Sassoon. Prior to this, he had proposed to a friend, Elizabeth Lowndes, but had been rejected (Philip Hoare relates how Tennant discussed plans with Lowndes about bringing his nanny with them on their honeymoon.) His relationship with Sassoon, however, was to be his most important: it lasted some four years before Tennant off-handedly put an abrupt end to it. Sassoon was reportedly depressed afterwards for three months, until Sassoon married in 1933 and became a father in 1936. When Tennant died in 1987, he had far outlived most of his contemporaries. The contents of Wilsford Manor were sold by Sotheby’s raising some £1.6 million.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Married: October 4, 2008

Gloria Galasso aka G. J. Paterson lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma, with her partner since 1980 (and spouse since 2008), Miz Patricia, 3 dogs and 5 cats, rescue pets. She writes book reviews for The Gayly, a regional newspaper, and is at work on a new novel. She is active in the LGBT civil rights struggle and is a proud member and volunteer at the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center. “It never was about the musician or the instrument - it was about the laser notes in a hall of mirrors, the music itself. It was going to change the world for the better and it has. I am old now and only a house cat sunning herself in the window - but I was a tigress once and I remember. I still remember.” Bird
of Paradise, G.J. Paterson’s first novel, a mystery/thriller set in 1978 in the Los Angeles music world, was released on October 31, 2013.

Together since 1980: 35 years.
Gloria Galasso (born November 14)
Miz Patricia (February 28)
Married: October 4, 2008



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Buried: in the back yard of the sister of his companion Peter Fisher in Springfield, MA
Buried alongside: Peter Fisher
Find A Grave Memorial# 161932869

Peter Randolph Fisher graduated from high school in Eastchester, NY. He did two years at Amherst College, a short term in the Air Force then graduated from Columbia University in 1969. He joined Gay Activist Alliance (GAA) in 1970 and met his lover Marc Rubin (a founder and leader of New York City's Gay Teachers Association) - they were together until Marc's death in 2007. Fisher’s first book, The Gay Mystique, was published by Stein & Day in 1972 and was named co-winner of the American Library Association’s Gay Book of the Year Award. Fisher and Rubin were joint authors of the book Special Teachers/Special Boys. Rubin also wrote poetry from 1954 to 1969 and 1970-1974 with at least one poem published. Peter and Marc are together in the 1971 Out of the Closet film. Marc Rubin was the one taking care of Tom Doerr, a fellow GAA friend, dying of AIDS. Partners for 37 years, Fisher donated Marc's and his own papers to the Center, The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center, in NYC. Peter committed suicide on August 15, 2012, apparently never getting over losing Marc.

Together from 1970 to 2007: 37 years.
Marc Rubin (April 2, 1932 - February 28, 2007)
Peter Fisher (May 19, 1944 - August 15, 2012)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Vincent Gabriel Fourcade was a French interior designer and the business and life partner of Robert Denning. "Outrageous luxury is what our clients want," he once said.
Born: February 27, 1934, Paris, France
Died: December 23, 1992, 17th arrondissement, Paris, France
Lived: Bridgehampton, NY, USA (40.93787, -72.30091)
125 E 73rd St, New York, NY 10021, USA (40.77148, -73.96203)
16 Rue de Chazelles, 75017 Paris, France (48.88011, 2.3051)
Find A Grave Memorial# 8642566

Vincent Gabriel Fourcade was a French interior designer. "Outrageous luxury is what our clients want," he once said. Robert Denning was an American interior designer whose lush interpretations of French Victorian decor became an emblem of corporate raider tastes in the 1980s. Fourcade met Denning in 1959, when Denning was a protégé of Edgar de Evia. He had acquired an eye for design and effect from working with the photographer on sets for many fabric and furniture accounts, and with whom he shared one of the most magnificent Manhattan apartments on the top three floors of the Rhinelander Mansion. In 1960, Denning and Fourcade formed the firm of Denning & Fourcade, Inc., which would for over forty-five years set a standard for a list of clients that read like a social registry. Referred to in New York magazine as "...the Odd Couple. Boyish, down-to-earth Denning is the hardest worker, while Fourcade sniffs the client air to gauge if it's socially registered before he goes beyond the fringe." Denning 'reinvented' himself to use his own word, after Fourcade's death from AIDS in 1992. He died in his apartment in the Lombardy Hotel in New York City in 2005.
Together from 1959 to 1992: 33 years.
Robert Denning (March 13, 1927 – August 26, 2005)
Vincent Fourcade (February 27, 1934 - December 23, 1992)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Vincent Fourcade and Robert Denning built a house in Bridgehampton, L.I., that was featured in House & Gardens.
Address: Bridgehampton, NY, USA (40.93787, -72.30091)
Type: Private Property
Place
Bridgehampton is a hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) in the South Fork of Suffolk County, New York. The population was 1,756 at the 2010 census. Bridgehampton is in the town of Southampton, on Long Island. Shortly after the founding of Southampton in 1640, settlers began to move east to the area known by the Shinnecock Indians as Sagaponack and Mecox. At the head of Sagg Pond the hardy settlers established a community called Bullhead, later renamed Bridgehampton—after the bridge built across the pond. Sagg Bridge was built in 1686 by Ezekiel Sandford. The bridge was the link between Mecox and Sagaponack and gave this locality its name of Bridgehampton. The notorious criminal and memoirist Stephen Burroughs lived there during the XVIII century and helped found the town’s first library in 1793; the volumes he purchased could be found in the Bridgehampton Public Library as late as 2002. Bridgehampton became the home of the horse show known as the Hampton Classic and a road racing course that figured prominently in American automobile racing.
Life
Who: Vincent Gabriel Fourcade (February 27, 1934 – December 23, 1992) and Robert Denning (March 13, 1927 –August 26, 2005)
Born in 1934 to a family of distinguished French aesthetes, Vincent Fourcade spent much of his formative years in a twenty-bedroom house replete with made-to-order Majorelle furnishings. He abandoned a career as a banker at twenty-four to become a designer of lavish party décors—for one soiree he and Robert Denning, whom he met in 1959, covered the floor with a hundred old raccoon coats. The dashingly handsome Fourcade segued easily into the role of major decorator, despite his lack of training. "I learned my trade by going out every evening as a young man," Fourcade told the art historian Rosamond Bernier. "I went to every pretty house in France and Italy and other places, too, and I remembered them all, even down to what was on each little table."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Vincent Fourcade was known for his attention to detail, great wit and extreme good looks. The red brick mansion he shared with Robert Denning on East 73d Street in Manhattan and the house he built in Bridgehampton, L.I., were the subjects of articles in decorating magazines around the world.
Address: 125 E 73rd St, New York, NY 10021, USA (40.77148, -73.96203)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 82003374, 1982
Place
The East 73rd Street Historic District is a block of that street on the Upper East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is a neighborhood of small rowhouses built from the mid-XIX to early XX centuries. Many of the houses were originally carriage houses for wealthy residents of the Upper East Side, such as Edward Harkness, and their facades still reflect that origin. Among the architects who designed the buildings were Richard Morris Hunt and Charles Romeyn. Later owners included Joseph Pulitzer. Eventually the buildings were converted for automotive use. Some have become purely residential. The block has remained architecturally distinct even as those around it have seen larger and more modern construction replace all or some of their original buildings. Development of the future Upper East Side began in the early 1860s with the construction of rowhouses for middle and working class buyers on the cross streets several blocks east of Central Park. Among those houses were a row of six built by an E.H. Robbins on East 73rd. Two of those, 171 and 175, are the only rowhouses left from that group. In the decades at the end of the century, the city’s wealthy began building large houses for themselves near the park, sometimes demolishing the original rowhouses to do so. The East 73rd Street houses were not in an ideal location for such housing, but they were the right distance for carriage houses for their horses and buggies: a short walk from their houses but far enough away that the noise and odor would not disturb them. They usually included housing for the servants who fed and drove the horses. Richard Morris Hunt designed 166 East 73rd, the first one, for art collector Henry Marquand in 1883. In 1890 the large stable at 182 was built to rent stable space to owners who did not want or could not afford to build their own carriage houses. The other carriage houses were gradually built in the 1890s, with the last ones completed early in the next century. Among these, Charles Romeyn contributed the neo-Flemish building next to Hunt’s in 1899. Shortly after Marquard’s death, Hunt’s was sold to Joseph Pulitzer, then publisher of the New York World, who lived several blocks to the east at 73rd and Park. By this time the automobile was beginning to come into use, especially among the wealthy residents of the Upper East Side. In 1906 the newest building in the district, 177–79 East 73rd, was built specifically to house cars instead of horses. Two years later, in 1908, the commercial stable across from it at 182 was converted for automotive use as well. At that same time, in 1907, Standard Oil heir and philanthropist Edward Harkness, who lived nearby at Fifth Avenue and 75th Street, bought 161. He spent two years converting it into a garage with a squash court and locker room upstairs, in addition to chauffeur’s quarters. Gradually the other carriage houses followed, with some being sold and converted into owner-occupied housing with an attached garage. By 1920 this process was complete, and the neighborhood assumed its present form. During the XX century some of the buildings took on importance in the city’s musical community. Pulitzer’s estate sold the carriage house at 166 to the MacDowell Club, named after composer and pianist Edward MacDowell, after his death. The club in turn sold it to the Central Gospel Chapel of New York, which met there until 1980. In 1950 the Dalcroze School of Music in New York, the only music teachers’ training school in the Western Hemisphere personally authorized by Émile Jaques-Dalcroze, moved into 161 for a few decades.
Life
Who: Vincent Gabriel Fourcade (February 27, 1934 – December 23, 1992) and Robert Denning (March 13, 1927 – August 26, 2005)
Robert Denning was an interior designer whose lush interpretations of French Victorian decor became an emblem of corporate raider tastes in the 1980s. From 1960 the firm of Denning & Fourcade would become known for colorful extravagance and over the top opulence. Clients beginning with Michel David-Weill; the Ogden Phipps family, for whom they did fifteen houses; Henry Kravis, whose home, and their decorating, was parodied in the 1990 movie "The Bonfire of the Vanities" with Tom Hanks; Charles and Jayne Wrightsman; Henry Kissinger; Diana Ross; Oscar de la Renta both in Manhattan and Connecticut; Beatriz and Antenor Patiño, the Bolivian tin magnate and Jean Vanderbilt, to name only a few, began to roll in. Soon they were established and known for creating an established and “old money” atmosphere anywhere. For thirty years they were courted on both sides of the Atlantic. Denning kept the fragrance Sous Le Vent in his automobiles to remind him of Lillian Bostwick Phipps who always wore the scent. Longtime clients such as Spencer Hays, the Richard Merillats for whom he has designed homes in Naples, Florida and Michigan, the Countess Rattazzi, for whom he did homes in Manhattan, South America and Italy (15 houses in all) looked forward to shopping sprees with him be it in the wholesale import markets in New York City or the Paris flea market. Denning’s five story townhouse for Phyllis Cerf Wagner is described as: “cozy and grand at the same time, but not elaborately fussy." Eugenia Sheppard of the New York Herald Tribune dubbed their work "Le Style Rothschild." It reeked de l’argent. "Outrageous luxury is what our clients want," Denning & Fourcade said. This was the 1980s, the era of instant wealth. They visually defined it, giving crisp money the appearance of provenance and what Denning called "a casual English attitude about grandeur." Often perceived as “the Odd Couple. Boyish, down-to-earth Denning is the hardest worker, while Fourcade sniffs the client air to gauge if it’s socially registered before he goes beyond the fringe." Jewelry designer Kenneth Jay Lane developed a passion for art pieces from the Middle East which the firm was in the vanguard of introducing and has also used some of their lighting treatments. Denning designed Jason Epstein’s SoHo home from scratch in the shell of the building that housed the first consolidated New York police department. This was an entirely new effort for the designer who is known by many to specialize in a period "we’d call early-fringed-lampshade, but chic.” They would also amass a large collection of artwork and bronzes. They would commission original works of art and collect many of the same artists that they would recommend to their clients.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

By 1990 the disease would take control of Vincent Fourcade’s life and early in 1992 Denning & Fourcade would take the Concorde one last time to Paris where he would live his remaining days in their apartment at 16 rue de Chazelles, just up the street from the studio of the sculptor Frédéric Bartholdi, who is best known for the Statue of Liberty.
Address: 16 Rue de Chazelles, 75017 Paris, France (48.88011, 2.3051)
Type: Private Property
Place
The living room of the apartment that Denning and Fourcade shared in Paris and decorated in the late 1980s was “rather tame compared with rooms we did for our clients,” said Denning. A screen provided the “shot of red” that Fourcade recommended for every room. For the Paris apartment’s master bedroom, the partners chose an Italian Empire bed, a XIX century Russian chandelier and a pair of tasseled XIX century French bergères. Signature touches included plenty of lamps and double- and triple-hung oil paintings.The Great Statue of Liberty, ready in Paris for shipment to New York, in Rue de Chazelles, Vintage Postcard
Life
Who: Vincent Gabriel Fourcade (February 27, 1934 – December 23, 1992) and Robert Denning (March 13, 1927 – August 26, 2005)
Vincent Fourcade was a French interior designer and the business and life partner of Robert Denning. "Outrageous luxury is what our clients want," he once said. A handsome eligible bachelor, he was never without invitations in the United States either. He tried a career in banking, the business of his father and grandfather in Paris. He met Robert Denning in 1959. Denning, a protégé of Edgar de Evia, had acquired an eye for design and effect from working with the photographer on sets for many fabric and furniture accounts, and with whom he shared one of the most magnificent Manhattan apartments on the top three floors of the Rhinelander Mansion. It would be here that early clients such as Lillian Bostwick Phipps and her husband Ogden Phipps would be entertained, as de Evia was spending more and more time on his estate in Greenwich, Connecticut. While Vincent would take Ogden Phipps to good dealers where he would spend millions of dollars on signed pieces of French furniture, Bob would take Lillian Bostwick Phipps down to 11th Street. "It infuriated Vincent. He used to say “Bobby, you have ruined the Phippses for me by giving Mrs. Phipps that strange appetite for 11th Street.” Early in the 1980s Fourcade contracted AIDS. He kept his looks and strength through most of that decade as Denning and he would divide their time between New York and Paris, crossing the Atlantic on the Concorde. His older brother Xavier Fourcade, the internationally known contemporary art dealer, died of the disease in 1987 at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161869150

Horst Paul Albert Bohrmann, who chose to be known as Horst P. Horst, was a German-American fashion photographer. He met Valentine Lawford, British diplomat in 1938 and they would live together as a couple until Lawford's death in 1991. Together they adopted and raised a son, Richard J. Horst. Horst is best known for his photographs of women and fashion, but is also recognized for his photographs of interior architecture, still lives, especially ones including plants, and environmental portraits. One of the great iconic photos of the 20th century is The Mainbocher Corset with its erotically charged mystery, captured by Horst in Vogue’s Paris studio in 1939. Designers like Donna Karan continue to use the timeless beauty of The Mainbocher Corset as an inspiration for their outerwear collections today. Valentine Lawford was also the author of Ralph Wigram’s biography, Bound for Diplomacy (Atlantic, Little, Brown; Boston; 1963). In the 1960s, encouraged by Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, Horst began a series of photos illustrating the lifestyle of international high society; articles were written by Valentine Lawford.
Together from 1938 to 1991: 53 years.
Horst P. Horst (August 14, 1906 - November 18, 1999)
Valentine Lawford (1911 – June, 1991)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Orry-Kelly was the professional name of Orry George Kelly, an Australian-American Hollywood costume designer.
Born: December 31, 1897, Kiama, Australia
Died: February 27, 1964, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, United States
Buried: Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Hollywood Hills), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Courts of Remembrance, Columbarium of Remembrance (north), N-60282.
Find A Grave Memorial# 5902694
Parents: William Kelly
Known for: Costume design
Books: Women I've Undressed: The Fabulous Life and Times of a Legendary Hollywood Designer
Awards: Academy Award for Best Costume Design, Academy Award for Best Costume Design, Black-and-White

Orry-Kelly was the professional name of Orry George, a prolific Hollywood costume designer. He studied art in Sydney, and worked as a tailor's apprentice and window dresser. He journeyed to New York to pursue an acting career. He shared an apartment there with Charlie Spangles and Cary Grant. At the time, Cary Grant was Archibald Leach. Kelly and Grant carried on a domestic existence as a gay couple, developing a reputation for throwing wild parties. A job painting murals in a nightclub led to his employment by Fox East Coast studios illustrating titles. He designed costumes and sets for Broadway's Shubert Revues and George White's Scandals. Kelly went to Hollywood in 1932, working for all the major studios and designed for all the great actresses of the day, including Bette Davis, Kay Francis, Olivia de Havilland, Katharine Hepburn, Dolores del Río, Ava Gardner, Ann Sheridan, Barbara Stanwyck, and Merle Oberon. While in Los Angeles, he was living with Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was acknowledged also by Kelly's mother. When he died, his pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and Jack Warner read his eulogy.
Together from (around) 1932 to 1964: 32 years.
Orry George Kelly (December 31, 1897 – February 27, 1964)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries is a corporation that owns and operates a chain of cemeteries and mortuaries in Los Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties in Southern California.
Addresses:
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cathedral City), 69855 Ramon Rd, Cathedral City, CA 92234, USA (33.81563, -116.4419)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Covina Hills), 21300 Via Verde Drive, Covina, CA 91724, USA (34.06783, -117.84183)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cypress), 4471 Lincoln Ave, Cypress, CA 90630, USA (33.8337, -118.0552)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Glendale), 1712 S Glendale Ave, Glendale, CA 91205, USA (34.12524, -118.24371)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Hollywood Hills), 6300 Forest Lawn Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.14688, -118.32208)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Long Beach), 1500 E San Antonio Dr, Long Beach, CA 90807, USA (33.84384, -118.17116)
Place
The company was founded by a group of San Francisco businessmen in 1906. Dr. Hubert Eaton assumed management control in 1917 and is credited with being Forest Lawn’s "founder" because of his origination of the "memorial-park" plan. The first location was in Tropico which later became part of Glendale, California. Its facilities are officially known as memorial parks. The parks are best known for the large number of celebrity burials, especially in the Glendale and Hollywood Hills locations. Eaton opened the first mortuary (funeral home) on dedicated cemetery grounds after a long battle with established funeral directors who saw the "combination" operation as a threat. He remained as general manager until his death in 1966 when he was succeeded by his nephew, Frederick Llewellyn.
Notable queer burials at Forest Lawn Memorial Parks:
• Lucile Council (1898-1964), Section G, Lot 5 Space 9, Glendale. Florence Yoch (1890–1972) and Lucile Council were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California.
• George Cukor (1899-1983), Garden of Honor (Private Garden), Glendale. American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
• Brad Davis (1949-1991), Court of Remembrance/Columbarium of Valor, G64054, Hollywood Hills. American actor, known for starring in the 1978 film Midnight Express and 1982 film Querelle. Davis married Susan Bluestein, an Emmy Award-winning casting director. They had one child, Alex, a transgender man born as Alexandra. Davis acknowledged having had sex with men and being bisexual in an interview with Boze Hadleigh.
• Adolph de Meyer (1868-1946) died penniless in Los Angeles on January 6, 1949, and was buried under the name “Gayne Adolphus Demeyer”.
• Helen Ferguson (1901-1977), Ascension, L-7296, space 1, Glendale. For nearly thirty years, former actress and publicist Helen Ferguson had an intimate relationship with Barbara Stanwyck. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, Loretta Young and Robert Taylor, among others.
• Edmund Goulding (1891–1959), Wee Kirk Churchyard, L-260, Space 4, Glendale. He was a British film writer and director. As an actor early in his career he was one of the Ghosts in the 1922 British made Paramount silent “Three Live Ghosts” alongside Norman Kerry and Cyril Chadwick. Also in the early 1920s he wrote several screenplays for star Mae Murray for films directed by her then husband Robert Z. Leonard. Goulding is best remembered for directing cultured dramas such as “Love” (1927), “Grand Hotel” (1932) with Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, “Dark Victory” (1939) with Bette Davis, and “The Razor's Edge” (1946) with Gene Tierney and Tyrone Power. He also directed the classic film noir “Nightmare Alley” (1947) with Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell, and the action drama “The Dawn Patrol.” He was also a successful songwriter, composer, and producer.
• Howard Greenfield (1936-1986) and Tory Damon (1939-1986), Hollywood Hills. Plot: Courts of Remembrance, wall crypt #3515. Damon’s epitaph reads: Love Will Keep Us Together..., Greenfield’s continues: ... Forever.
• Francis Grierson aka Jesse Shepard (1849-1927), Glendale, Great Mausoleum, Coleus Mezzanine Columbarium. Composer and pianist.
• Edward Everett Horton (1886-1970), Whispering Pines section, Map #03, Lot 994, Ground Interment Space 3, at the top of the hill. American character actor, he had a long career in film, theater, radio, television, and voice work for animated cartoons.
• Charles Laughton (1899–1962), Court of Remembrance, C-310 (wall crypt), Hollywood Hills. English stage and film character actor, director, producer and screenwriter.
• W. Dorr Legg (1904-1994), Eternal Love, Map E09, Lot 1561, Space 3, Hollywood Hills. W. Dorr Legg was a landscape architect and one of the founders of the U.S. gay rights movement, then called the homophile movement.
• David Lewis (1903-1987) and James Whale (1889-1957), Columbarium, Glendale. When David Lewis died in 1987, his executor and Whale biographer, James Curtis, had his ashes interred in a niche across from Whale’s.
• Liberace (1919-1987), Courts of Remembrance section, Map #A39, Distinguished Memorial – Sarcophagus 4, Hollywood Hills. American pianist, singer, and actor. A child prodigy and the son of working-class immigrants, Liberace enjoyed a career spanning four decades of concerts, recordings, television, motion pictures, and endorsements.
• Paul Monette (1945-1995) and Roger Horwitz (1941-1986), Hollywood Hills. Horwitz’s headstone reads: “My little friend, we sail together, if we sail at all.”
• Marion Morgan (1881-1971), The Great Mausoleum, Dahlia Terrace, Florentine Columbarium, Niche 8446, Glendale. Choreographer, longtime companion of motion picture director Dorothy Arzner.
• George Nader (1921-2002), Mark Miller, with friend Rock Hudson (1925-1985), Cenotaph, Cathedral City. Nader inherited the interest from Rock Hudson’s estate after Hudson’s death from AIDS complications in 1985. Nader lived in Hudson’s LA home until his own death. This is a memorial, George Nader’s ashes were actually scattered at sea.
• Alla Nazimova (1879-1945), actress,Whispering Pines, lot 1689, Glendale.
• Orry-Kelly (1897-1964), prominent Australian-American Hollywood costume designer. 3 times Oscar Winner. His partner was Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was acknowledged also by Kelly's mother. When Orry-Kelly died, his pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and Jack Warner read his eulogy.
• Charles Pierce (1926–1999), Columbarium of Providence, niche 64953, Hollywood Hills. He was one of the XX century's foremost female impersonators, particularly noted for his impersonation of Bette Davis. He performed at many clubs in New York, including The Village Gate, Ted Hook's OnStage, The Ballroom, and Freddy's Supper Club. His numerous San Francisco venues included the Gilded Cage, Cabaret/After Dark, Gold Street, Bimbo's 365 Club, Olympus, The Plush Room, the Venetian Room at the Fairmont Hotel, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, and the War Memorial Opera House. He died in North Hollywood, California, aged 72, and was cremated. His memorial service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park was carefully planned and scripted by Pierce before his death.
• George Quaintance (1902-1957), Eventide Section - Lot 2116 - Space 1, Glendale. American artist famous for his "idealized, strongly homoerotic" depictions of men in physique magazines. In 1938, he returned home with his companion Victor Garcia, described as Quaintance's "model, life partner, and business associate". In the early 1950s, Quaintance and Garcia moved to Rancho Siesta, which became the home of Studio Quaintance, a business venture based around Quaintance's artworks.
• Robert J. Sandoval (1950–2006), Glendale. Sandoval was a judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Sandoval and his long-time partner, Bill Martin, adopted a son in 1992, making them one of the first gay male couples in Los Angeles County to adopt a child. The couple named their son Harrison Martin-Sandoval, combining their last names to symbolize their familial unity. Sandoval died in 2006. He is survived by his partner of 24 years, Bill Martin, and his son, Harrison Martin-Sandoval. After his death, his alma mater McGeorge School of Law honored his contributions by placing him on the Wall of Honor.
• Emery Shaver (1903-1964) and Tom Lyle (1896-1976), Sanctuary, Glendale. Tom Lyle was the founder of Maybelline.
• Ethel Waters (1896-1977), Ascension Garden, Glendale. African-American blues, jazz and gospel vocalist and actress. In 1962. Ethel Waters had a lesbian relationship with dancer Ethel Williams that led to them being nicknamed “The Two Ethels.”
• Paul Winfield (1941–2004) was an American television, film and stage actor. He was known for his portrayal of a Louisiana sharecropper who struggles to support his family during the Great Depression in the landmark film “Sounder,” which earned him an Academy Award nomination. He portrayed Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 1978 television miniseries “King,” for which he was nominated for an Emmy Award. Winfield was also known to science fiction fans for his roles in “The Terminator,” “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” and “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” Winfield was gay, but remained discreet about it in the public eye. His partner of 30 years, architect Charles Gillan, Jr., died on March 5, 2002, of bone cancer. Winfield died of a heart attack in 2004 at age 62, at Queen of Angels – Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles. Winfield and Gillan are interred together.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Malcolm Boyd was an American Episcopal priest and author. He was active in the civil rights movement as one of the Freedom Riders in 1961 and as a minister.
Born: June 8, 1923, Buffalo, New York, United States
Died: February 27, 2015, Los Angeles, California, United States
Find A Grave Memorial# 143137883
Partner: Mark Thompson
Parents: Beatrice Lowrie, Melville Boyd
Married: July 2013

Malcolm Boyd was an American Episcopal Priest and author. Boyd went on to become a prominent white clergyman in the American Civil Rights Movement. He participated as one of the Freedom riders in 1961. Boyd was also active in the anti-Vietnam War movement, marching with Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968. In 1977, Boyd came out of the closet, becoming the most prominent homosexual clergy person to come out. In 1984, Boyd met the gay activist and author Mark Thompson, who would become his long-time partner. Boyd and Thompson married in July 2013, after Proposition 8 was overturned and same-sex unions resumed in California. They lived in Los Angeles until Malcolm’s death. Thompson serves on the Advisory Board of White Crane Institute and is a frequent contributor to the homosexual wisdom and culture magazine White Crane. Boyd was the author of over 30 books and. Thompson’s last book is Advocate Days and Other Stories. Seabury Books published Black Battle, White Knight: The Authorized Biography of Malcolm Boyd by Michael Battle--with a Foreword by Nobel Laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Publication date of June 8, 2011 coincided with Malcolm's 88th birthday. Boyd died of complications from pneumonia at the age of 91 in a Los Angeles on February 27, 2015.
Together from 1984 to 2015: 31 years.
Malcolm Boyd (June 8, 1923 – February 27, 2015)
Mark Thompson (August 19, 1952 – August 11, 2016)
Married: July 2013 



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Born: 1899
Education: Mount Holyoke College
Lived: Manchester, VT 05255, USA (43.16361, -73.07228)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161802046
Books: Ghosts, ghosts, ghosts, Speed, speed, speed, more

Clara Sipprell was a Canadian-born, early 20th century photographer who lived most of her life in the US. She was well known for her pictorial landscapes and for portraits of many famous actors, artists, writers and scientists. In 1915, Sipprell and long-time family friend and teacher Jessica Beers moved to New York, where they shared an apartment on Morningside Drive. In the late 1910s, Sipprell met Irina Khrabroff, who became her friend, traveling companion and, later, dealer and business manager. When they first met Sipprell still shared her apartment with Beers, but when Beers moved out in 1923, Khrabroff moved in. Later that year Khrabroff married Feodor Cekich, and the three of them lived together. In 1937, Sipprell moved to Manchester, Vermont, and soon after, she met Phyllis Fenner, a writer, librarian, and anthologist of children's books. 14 years younger than Sipprell, Fenner soon became Sipprell's housemate and traveling companion. They had architect Harold Olmstead build them a house in Manchester. Sipprell’s ashes are buried in a plot near an outcropping of rock in Manchester. Attached to the rock is a small bronze tablet on which, in accordance with her wishes, are engraved her name along with the names of Jessica Beers and Phyllis Fenner.
Together from 1937 to 1975: 38 years.
Clara Estelle Sipprell (October 31, 1885 – April 1975)
Phyllis Reid Fenner (October 24, 1899 – February 26, 1982)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Clara Sipprell’s ashes are buried in a plot near an outcropping of rock in Manchester. Attached to the rock is a small bronze tablet on which, in accordance with her wishes, are engraved her own name along with the names of Jessica Beers and Phyllis Fenner.
Address: Manchester, VT 05255, USA (43.16361, -73.07228)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Manchester Village Historic District (US 7A, Union St., and Taconic Ave.), 84003438, 1984
Place
Manchester is a town in, and one of two shire towns (county seats) of, Bennington County, Vermont. The population was 4,391 at the 2010 census. Manchester Village, an incorporated village, and Manchester Center are settlement centers within the town. Manchester has become a tourist destination, especially for those from New York and Connecticut, offering visitors factory outlet stores of national chain retailers such as Brooks Brothers and Ralph Lauren, as well as many locally owned businesses, including the Northshire Bookstore, one of America’s leading independent bookstores. The town was one of several chartered in 1761 by Benning Wentworth, colonial governor of New Hampshire. It was his custom to name new towns after prominent English aristocrats of the day, hoping they might adopt a patronly interest in their namesakes. Wentworth named Manchester for Robert Montagu, 3rd Duke of Manchester. First settled in 1764, the town was laid out in 1784. The land was better suited for grazing than tillage, so by 1839 about 6,000 sheep roamed the pastures and hillsides. Other industries came to include iron mines, marble quarries and mills, and lumber companies. The arrival of the railroad from industrialized centers like New York City brought tourists, drawn by Manchester’s historic architecture and beautiful setting among mountains. Following the Civil War, the town developed into an affluent resort area, which it remains today. Between 1812 and 1819 Manchester was made famous by the Boorn–Colvin case, called "America’s first wrongful conviction murder case,” the subject of several books and still studied today. In 1850 Ward Manor was built on the now Ward-Equinox Estate on the 200 Acre well known Equinox Mountain. Bought by Rutherford Ward from Poplar Bluff, Missouri he moved here as threats of a Civil War was being whispered through the south and the southern part of the mid-west. It is the only brick structure ever to be built in the town’s history. It was abandoned until 1950 when Rutherford’s grandson the well known Industrialist Farmer, Dewey H. Ward renovated it and called it home during the summers. When he passed in 2002 it was left to his daughter well known jeweler and founder of Marchesa Jewelry, Louise O’Kief-Trout and his great grandson Nicholas Silvestri. Orvis is a family-owned retail and mail-order business specializing in high-end fly fishing, hunting and sporting goods. Founded in Manchester in 1856 by Charles F. Orvis to sell fishing tackle, it is the oldest mail-order retailer in the United States. Jake Burton Carpenter, founder of Burton Snowboards, perfected snowboard design in his garage in Manchester. The company operated out of Manchester until 1992 when it relocated to Burlington, Vermont. The town has three distinct state-recognized historic districts—the Depot district located on Highland Avenue and Elm Street, Bonnet Street, just north of Main Street, and Main Street itself.
Life
Who: Clara Sipprell (October 31, 1885–1975)
Clara Sipprell was a Canadian-born, early XX century photographer who lived most of her life in the United States. She was well known for her pictorial landscapes and for portraits of many famous actors, artists, writers and scientists. In 1915 Sipprell and long-time family friend and teacher Jessica Beers moved to New York, where they shared an apartment on Morningside Drive. The big city better suited Sipprell’s growing bohemian tastes, which quickly came to include smoking cigars, and pipes; drinking bourbon, driving fast convertibles, and wearing capes, exotic jewelry and embroidered Slavic clothing. One friend recalled that she "did not make her work her life, but instead crafted a life that was a work of art." Within a few months Sipprell established a portrait studio and soon established a long list of clients due to her already well-known artistry. Over the next forty years she would photograph some of the most famous artists, writers, dancers and other cultural icons of the time, including Alfred Stieglitz, Pearl S. Buck, Charles E. Burchfield, Fyodor Chaliapin, Ralph Adams Cram, W. E. B. Du Bois, Albert Einstein, Robert Frost, Granville Hicks, Malvina Hoffman, Langston Hughes, Robinson Jeffers, Isamu Noguchi, Maxfield Parrish and Eleanor Roosevelt. In the late 1910s Sipprell met a young Russian woman named Irina Khrabroff, who became her lifelong friend, traveling companion and, later, her dealer and business manager. When they first met Sipprell still shared her apartment with Beers, but when Beers moved out in 1923 Khrabroff moved in. Later that year Khrabroff married a man named Feodor Cekich, and the three of them lived together in the same apartment for many years. In 1924 the threesome traveled to Europe, where Sipprell photographed the Adriatic Coast and, through connections with the Khrabroffs, members of the Moscow arts community. Later these same connections gave her access to many Russian expatriates whom she also photographed, including Countess Alexandra Tolstoy, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Sergei Koussevitzky. Two years later Sipprell and Khrabroff, without her husband, traveled again to Yugoslavia, and Sipprell made another series of photographs of the countryside and the people. Throughout the 1920s Sipprell continued to exhibit and have her work published, and in 1928 and 1929 she was given her first one-person shows, at San Jose State Teachers College. She also continued her friendship and living arrangement with the Khrabroffs, even after they had a daughter in 1927. However, around 1932 tension developed between Sipprell and her close friends over the rise of the Stalinist government in Russia. The Khrabroffs remained loyal to the ousted czarists, and they felt Sipprell’s continued association with some who were sympathetic to the Stalinists was intolerable. By 1935 the friendship was over, and Sipprell started living on her own for the first time. In 1937 Sipprell moved to Manchester, Vermont, at the suggestion of Vermont poets Walter Hard and Robert Frost. Soon after she met Phyllis Fenner (1899–1982), a writer, librarian, and anthologist of children’s books. Fourteen years younger than Sipprell, Fenner soon became Sipprell’s housemate and traveling companion. This relationship continued through the final thirty-eight years of Sipprell’s life. In the mid-1960s, they had architect Harold Olmsted build them a house in Manchester, which included the first darkroom that Sipprell ever had in the same place she lived. Clara Sipprell died in Apr. 1975 at the age of eighty-nine. Jessica Beers had died in 1957 and is buried at Acacia Memorial Park (14951 Bothell Way NE, Seattle, WA 98155).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Nicolas Fatio de Duillier was a Swiss mathematician known for his work on the zodiacal light problem, for his very close relationship with Isaac Newton, for his role in the Newton v. Leibniz calculus ...
Born: February 26, 1664, Basel, Switzerland
Died: May 12, 1753, Worcester, United Kingdom
Buried: St Nicholas, St Nicholas Lane, off Hastings Drive & Berkeley way in Warndon Villages, half a mile from junction of the M5, Warndon, Worcestershire, WR4 0SL
Find A Grave Memorial# 161223794
Influenced by: Isaac Newton
Field: Mathematics

Sir Isaac Newton’s work laid the foundation for physics that prevailed until the theories of Einstein and Planck in the 20th century. (Newton’s laws do still apply, except on very small scales where quantum mechanics takes over.) Newton had been reluctant to publish his calculus because he feared controversy and criticism. He was close to the Swiss mathematician Nicolas Fatio de Duillier, whom he met in London around 1690. In 1691, Duillier started to write a new version of Newton's Principia. In 1693, the relationship between Duillier and Newton deteriorated, at the same time Newton suffered a nervous breakdown, and the book was never completed. Some of their correspondence has survived. Newton never married. Although it is impossible to verify, it is commonly believed that he died a virgin, as has been commented on by such figures as mathematician Charles Hutton, economist John Maynard Keynes, and physicist Carl Sagan. In 1733, Voltaire publicly stated that Newton "had neither passion nor weakness; he never went near any woman".
They met (around) 1690 and remained friends until 1693: 3 years.
Sir Isaac Newton PRS MP (December 25, 1642 – March 20, 1727)
Nicolas Fatio de Duillier (alternative names are Facio or Faccio; February 26, 1664 – May 12, 1753)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Nicolas Fatio de Duillier (February 26, 1664 - May 12, 1753) was a Swiss mathematician known for his work on the zodiacal light problem, for his very close relationship with Isaac Newton, for his role in the Newton v. Leibniz calculus controversy, and for originating the "push" or "shadow" theory of gravitation. He died in 1753 in Maddersfield near Worcester and is buried at St Nicholas (St Nicholas Lane, off Hastings Drive & Berkeley way in Warndon Villages, half a mile from junction of the M5, Warndon, Worcestershire, WR4 0SL). 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Buried: Central Cemetery, Randolph, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 161694742

Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman was a prominent 19th century American author. She is best known for two collections of stories, A Humble Romance and Other Stories (1887) and A New England Nun and Other Stories (1891). Her stories deal mostly with New England life and are among the best of their kind. Many of her celebrated stories are characterized by intense love and passionate devotion between women. Freeman is also remembered for her novel Pembroke (1894), and she contributed a notable chapter to the collaborative novel The Whole Family (1908). After her father's death, she went to live with the family of her life-long friend Mary John Wales. The two Marys lived together until her often-postponed marriage to Dr. Charles M. Freeman in 1902. Mary John was one of her few friends and it was a friendship of such intensity and love that it would survive until Mary John's death in 1914 (?). In April 1926, Freeman became the first recipient of the William Dean Howells Medal for Distinction in Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She died in Metuchen and was interred in Hillside Cemetery in Scotch Plains, New Jersey.
Together from 1883 to 1914: 31 years.
Mary E. Wilkins Freeman (October 31, 1852 - March 13, 1930)
Mary J. Wales (February 26,1847 – December 24, 1900)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Central Cemetery (327 North St, Randolph, MA 02368) is buried Mary Wales (1847-1900). When Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman’s father died suddenly in 1883, leaving her without any immediate family and an estate worth only $973, she moved in with her friend Mary John Wales and began writing as her only source of income.

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan, née Ganson was a wealthy American patron of the arts, who was particularly associated with the Taos art colony.
Born: February 26, 1879, Buffalo, New York, United States
Died: August 13, 1962, Taos, New Mexico, United States
Lived: 23 Fifth Avenue
240 Morada Ln, Taos, NM 87571, USA (36.40837, -105.56653)
Finney Farm, Finney Farm Rd, Croton-On-Hudson, NY 10520, USA (41.21709, -73.89533)
Villa Curonia, Via Suor Maria Celeste, 13, 50125 Firenze FI, Italy (43.74615, 11.2487)
Buried: Kit Carson Memorial Cemetery, Taos, Taos County, New Mexico, USA, GPS (lat/lon): 36.24478, -105.34214
Find A Grave Memorial# 9650
Spouse: Maurice Sterne (m. 1917)
Organizations: Taos art colony, Armory Show

Mabel Dodge Luhan was a wealthy American patron of the arts. She was actively bisexual during her early life and frankly detailed her passionate physical encounters with young women in her autobiography Intimate Memories (1933). Her first marriage was to Karl Evans, the son of a steamship owner in 1900. Karl died in a hunting accident leaving her a widow at the age of 23. Later she married Edwin Dodge, a wealthy architect. The Dodges lived in Florence from 1905 to 1912. At her palatial Medici villa—the Villa Curonia in Arcetri, not far from Florence—she entertained local artists, as well as Gertrude Stein, her brother Leo, Alice B. Toklas, and other visitors from Paris, including André Gide. In mid-1912, the Dodges returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village. Often in attendance were such luminaries as Carl Van Vechten, Margarett Sargent, Emma Goldman, Charles Demuth, "Big Bill" Haywood, Max Eastman, Lincoln Steffens, Hutchins Hapgood, Neith Boyce, Walter Lippmann, and John “Jack” Reed (who became her lover). In 1916, Dodge married Maurice Sterne. In 1919 Dodge, her husband, and Elsie Clews Parsons moved to Taos, New Mexico, and started a literary colony there. In 1923, after divorcing Sterne, she married Tony Luhan, a Native American. The couple lived together until Mabel died, a year before Tony did.
Together from 1923 to 1962: 39 years
Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
Tony Luhan (died in 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Mabel Dodge Luhan purchased the XV century Medici palace Villa Curonia at Arcetri, overlooking the city. Determined to restore it to its Renaissance glory, Mabel expensively furnished it in the style of the time and even had Renaissance costumes made to wear when playing hostess to her many guests.
Address: Via Suor Maria Celeste, 13, 50125 Firenze FI, Italy (43.74615, 11.2487)
Type: Private Property
Place
Famous for her lavish entertaining, Mabel Dodge Luhan in Florence sought the company of resident expatriates, visiting artists, writers and colourful eccentrics. When, in 1913, she invited Gertrude Stein to visit, she wrote, “Please come down here soon-the house is full of pianists, painters, pederasts, prostitutes, and peasants.” In Stein’s bestselling autobiography of her lifelong companion, Alice B. Toklas, she tells about the visit, describing Mabel as “a stoutish woman with a very sturdy fringe of heavy hair over her forehead, heavy long lashes and very pretty eyes and a very old-fashioned coquetry. She had a lovely voice.” She also recounts how Mabel relished in teasing her guests, especially with ghost stories. Apparently, Stein explains, “there were two of them in the Villa Curonia and Mabel was very fond of frightening visiting Americans with them, which she did in her suggestive way very effectively. Once she drove a house party... quite mad with fear. And at last to complete the effect she had the local priest in to exorcise the ghosts.” Stein, in fact, was so taken with Mabel, she wrote a piece about her entitled “Portrait of Mabel Dodge at the Villa Curonia.” Flattered, Mabel paid to publish it and, once back in America, it made her a celebrity. However, the friendship between Stein and bisexual Mabel was short lived, as Toklas became jealous of her.
Life
Who: Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan, née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
The Dodges lived in Florence from 1905 to 1912. At her palatial Medici villa—the Villa Curonia in Arcetri, not far from Florence—she entertained local artists, as well as Gertrude Stein, her brother Leo, Alice B. Toklas, and other visitors from Paris, including André Gide. A troubled liaison with her chauffeur led to two suicide attempts. For three months in 1913, Mabel again sojourned at Villa Curonia, accompanied by her latest lover, the communist journalist John (Jack) Reed, who became famous for his chronicles of the Mexican and Russian revolutions at the beginning of the XX century. Their tortuous, on-and-off relationship lasted until 1917, when Mabel married her third husband, Russian-born artist Maurice Sterne.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In mid-1912, Mabel Dodge Luhan returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue. Often in attendance were such luminaries as Carl Van Vechten, Margaret Sanger, Emma Goldman, Charles Demuth, "Big Bill" Haywood, Max Eastman, Lincoln Steffens, Hutchins Hapgood, Neith Boyce, Walter Lippmann, and John Reed. Van Vechten took Dodge as the model for the character "Edith Dale" in his novel “Peter Whiffle.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Mabel Dodge’s connection with Croton began when she arrived in a chauffer-driven limousine and rented a small house on Mt. Airy Road, locally called “Miss Sharkey’s cottage.” It was small, old, simple, and supposed to be haunted. Robert Edmond Jones, who had a studio in a shack on the property and later achieved fame as a stage designer, saw the ghost once or twice—“a nice old lady.” The cottage, hidden from view behind a tall fence, is virtually unchanged today.
Address: Finney Farm Rd, Croton-On-Hudson, NY 10520, USA (41.21709, -73.89533)
Type: Private Property
Place
Leasing Croton’s ample Finney Farm made it easier for Mabel Dodge to entertain her wide circle of friends and guests. Among them, journalist Jack Reed, her former lover, accepted her offer of the third floor of the house as a writing studio. Maurice Sterne, a Russian-born artist and sculptor, occupied a cottage behind the house. Her latest sexual partner, he spent his days painting portraits of her. She had met him at a dance recital given by young students of the Duncan school. Mabel was friend with Elizabeth Duncan, Isadora’s sister and Elizabeth asked Mabel to accompany her on a visit to Finney Farm located on the side of a hill sloping down toward the Hudson River. Almost on a whim, she decided to make Sterne her third husband--but first she had to get free of Edwin Dodge, who gallantly allowed her to charge him with desertion. Mabel and Sterne were married in Peekskill by a justice of the peace in August of 1917. When he suggested a honeymoon, she pointed out that the lease on her city apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue was about to expire and the building was to be demolished. New space had to be found. “You go on a little honeymoon out West, and I will stay here,” she told him. Sterne wrote frequent letters on the trip, but one written from Santa Fe in New Mexico would change the course of her life. He urged her to come to the Southwest and "save the Indians, their art, their culture and reveal it to the world." It was a challenge Mabel could not resist.
Life
Who: Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan, née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
When Mabel Dodge Luhan moved to Finney Farm, a large Croton estate, Maurice Sterne, who was to become Dodge’s third husband, was staying in a cottage behind the main house. Dodge offered Jack Reed the third floor of the house as a writing studio; he moved in for a short period but the situation was untenable. Later that year, 1916, Dodge married Sterne.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Mabel Dodge Luhan House, also known as Big House and St. Teresa House, is a house in Taos, New Mexico. It was a home of artist Mabel Dodge Luhan and was a haven for artists and writers.
Address: 240 Morada Ln, Taos, NM 87571, USA (36.40837, -105.56653)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 575-751-9686
National Register of Historic Places: 78001832, 1978. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The house is "one of the earliest examples of Pueblo Revival style in Taos." It is located on Luhan Lane, off Morada Lane, in Taos. It is now used as a hotel and conference center.
Life
Who: Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan, née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
Mabel Dodge Luhan was a wealthy patron of the arts. She is particularly associated with the Taos art colony. Her first marriage, in 1900 at the age of 21, was to Karl Evans, the son of a steamship owner. They had one son, and Karl died in a hunting accident two and a half years later, leaving her a widow at the age of 23. Her family sent her to Paris because she was having an affair with a prominent Buffalo gynecologist. Later that year she married Edwin Dodge, a wealthy architect. She was actively bisexual during her early life and frankly details her passionate physical encounters with young women in her autobiography “Intimate Memories” (1933.) In mid-1912, the Dodges returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village. She sailed to Europe at the end of June 1913. Her new acquaintance John Reed (Jack)—worn out from having recently organized the Paterson Pageant—travelled with her. They became lovers after arriving in Paris, where they socialized with Stein and Pablo Picasso. They moved down to the Villa Curonia, where the guests this time included Arthur Rubinstein. They returned to New York in late September 1913. In October 1913 Reed was sent to report on the Mexican Revolution by Metropolitan Magazine. Dodge followed him to Presidio, a border town, but left after a few days. Over 1914–16 a deep and continuing relationship developed between the intelligentsia of Greenwich Village and Provincetown. In 1915 she went to Provincetown with painter Maurice Sterne. She then moved to Finney Farm, a large Croton estate. In 1919 Dodge, her by then husband, Maurice Sterne, and Elsie Clews Parsons moved to Taos, New Mexico, and started a literary colony there. On the advice of Tony Luhan, a Native American whom she would marry in 1923, after divorcing Sterne, she bought a 12-acre (49,000 m2) property. D.H. Lawrence accepted an invitation from her to stay in Taos and he arrived, with Frieda his wife, in early September 1922. Dodge and Luhan hosted a number of influential artists and poets including Marsden Hartley, Arnold Ronnebeck, Louise Emerson Ronnebeck, Ansel Adams, Willa Cather, Robinson Jeffers and his wife Una, Florence McClung, Georgia O’Keeffe, Mary Hunter Austin, Frank Waters, Jaime de Angulo, and others. Dennis Hopper bought the Mabel Dodge Luhan House after seeing it while filming “Easy Rider.” Dodge died at her home in Taos in 1962 and was buried in Kit Carson Cemetery (Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos, NM 87571). Antonio "Tony" Lujan (1879-1963) is buried at Taos Pueblo Cemetery (Taos Pueblo, NM).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
José Benjamín Quintero was a Panamanian theatre director, producer and pedagogue best known for his interpretations of the works of Eugene O'Neill.
Born: October 15, 1924, Panama City, Panama
Died: February 26, 1999, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Education: University of Southern California
Find A Grave Memorial# 161890803
Movies: The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, A Moon for the Misbegotten
Books: If You Don't Dance They Beat You
Parents: Consuelo Palmerola, Carlos Rivera Quintero

José Benjamín Quintero was a Panamanian theatre director, producer and pedagogue best known for his interpretations of the works of Eugene O'Neill. He directed over seventy productions by a great number of writers, including Truman Capote, Jean Cocteau, Thornton Wilder, Jean Genet and Brendan Behan. He also directed plays by Tennessee Williams, including the 1952 production of Summer and Smoke, which made Geraldine Page a star. In 1961, he directed Vivien Leigh and Warren Beatty in The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone which brought Lotte Lenya an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actress. Quintero battled alcoholism and with the help of his life partner, Nicholas Tsacrios, a former advertising executive, was able to defeat his addiction in the 1970s. He was diagnosed with throat cancer in 1987 that necessitated the removal of his larynx, which ultimately led to his death in New York City in 1999. He remained active until nearly the end of his life. At his memorial, Liv Ullmann recalled ''He said to me, 'I am not ready to die yet, though, if I die, I have had a rich life.'” The Jose Quintero Theatre on West 42nd Street in Manhattan was named in his honor.
Together from (around) 1950 to 1999: 49 years.
José Benjamín Quintero (October 15, 1924 – February 26, 1999)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III was an American playwright. Along with Eugene O'Neill and Arthur Miller he is considered among the three foremost playwrights in 20th-century American drama.
Born: March 26, 1911, Columbus, Mississippi, United States
Died: February 25, 1983, New York City, New York, United States
Education: University of Missouri
University of Iowa
The New School
Washington University in St. Louis
Actors Studio
Lived: The Atlantic House, 4-6 Masonic Place, Provincetown, MA
Hotel Chelsea
Algonquin Hotel, 59 W 44th St, New York, NY 10036
1431 Duncan St, Key West, FL 33040, USA (24.55577, -81.7866)
Hotel Elysée, 56- 60 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.7599, -73.9732)
Buried: Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum, Saint Louis, St. Louis City, Missouri, USA, Plot: Section 15A, GPS (lat/lon): 38.70297, -90.23692
Find A Grave Memorial# 1111
Books: Memoirs, One arm, The theatre of Tennessee Williams, more
Movies: A Streetcar Named Desire, Baby Doll, The Fugitive Kind, more

Tennessee Williams was an American playwright, author of many stage classics. On a 1945 visit to Taos, New Mexico, Williams met Pancho Rodríguez y González. They lived and traveled together until late 1947 when Williams ended the affair. Rodríguez and Williams remained friends, however, and were in contact as late as the 1970s. Williams met Frank Merlo, a navy veteran, and former lover of the lyricist John Latouche, in Provincetown during the summer of 1947 where they spent a night together in the dunes. In the early autumn of 1948, Williams accidentally ran again into Merlo in New York City, and by October, they were living together. Merlo began the process of weaning the playwright off a toxic dependence on drugs and casual sex. They remained together until Merlo died of lung cancer in 1963.
Together from 1947 to 1963: 16 years.
Frank Phillip Merlo (1921 – September 21, 1963)
Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III (March 26, 1911 - February 25, 1983)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Atlantic House (4-6 Masonic Place, Provincetown, MA) was built by Provincetown's first postmaster, Daniel Pease, in 1798. It has served as a tavern since, gaining it's current name, the Atlantic House, in 1871. Many of America's most noted writers, including Eugene O'Neill and Tennessee Williams, were patrons of The Atlantic House in the 1920s. It became truly gay-friendly in the early 1950s, and has continued as a gay bar since.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Tennessee Williams visited and lived in Key West from 1941 until his death in 1983. It is believed that he wrote the final draft of “A Street Car Named Desire” while staying at the La Concha Hotel (430 Duval St, Key West, FL 33040) in 1947. He established residence here in 1949 and in 1950 bought the house at 1431 Duncan Street that was his home for 34 years. He was part of the literary movement that resulted in Key West and the Florida Keys being recognized as the cultural and historical location it is today.
Address: 1431 Duncan St, Key West, FL 33040, USA (24.55577, -81.7866)
Type: Private Property
Place
Populated in the early XX century by an eclectic mix of fishermen, spongers, rum runners, and cigar makers, the tiny island of Key West was more Caribbean than American. Over 100 miles from mainland Florida and the southernmost point in the United States, Key West has attracted numerous artists and writers, including Ernest Hemingway, Wallace Stevens, Ralph Ellison, Elizabeth Bishop, Tennessee Williams, Robert Frost, and James Merrill, with its remote location, tropical setting, and wild spirit. Near Solares Hill, the island’s highest point at sixteen feet above sea level, is Windsor Lane Compound, established in 1976. The assortment of restored shacks, shanties, and cottages, were once winter homes for writers such as Richard Wilbur, John Ciardi, John Hersey, and Ralph Ellison. On William Street is a Greek Revival house and writing studio once owned by Shel Silverstein. Heritage House Museum (410 Caroline St, Key West, FL 33040) was once the home of Jessie Porter, a fifth-generation “conch," or Key Wester. Originally built in 1830, Porter purchased the run-down Colonial home in 1930 and lovingly restored it. Her exotic garden became the center of Key West society, and artists and writers frequently gathered there, including Wallace Stevens, Archibald MacLeish, and Thornton Wilder. An old friend of Porter, Robert Frost spent many winters in her garden cottage. Another frequent visitor, Wallace Stevens once wrote in a letter that Key West “is the real thing... the sweetest doing nothing contrived.” Though good friends with Hemingway, one rainy night outside of Sloppy Joe’s bar, the two got into an infamous brawl in which Stevens broke his hand on Hemingway’s jaw.
Life
Who: Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983)
Tennessee Williams first came to Key West at age thirty, in 1941. After living in a boarding house, he bought a clapboard Bahamian cottage on the outside of town, at 1431 Duncan Street, where he created a compound with a guest cottage, swimming pool, and one-room writing studio he called the “Mad House.” Among the writers and artists that Williams met while living in Key West was Elizabeth Bishop.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

On a 1945 visit to Taos, New Mexico, Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) met Pancho Rodríguez y González, a hotel clerk of Mexican heritage. Rodríguez was, by all accounts, a loving and loyal companion. However, he was also prone to jealous rages and excessive drinking, and so the relationship was a tempestuous one. Nevertheless, in February 1946 Rodríguez left New Mexico to join Williams in his New Orleans apartment. In the summer of 1946, they were renting a “wind-battered, gray two-storied house” at 31 Pine St, Nantucket, MA 02554. Williams had been ailing on and off all year and was having difficulty with the play he was trying to write, which was then called “Chart of Anatomy.” They lived and traveled together until late 1947 when Williams ended the affair. Rodríguez and Williams remained friends, however, and were in contact as late as the 1970s.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Hotel Chelsea – also called the Chelsea Hotel, or simply the Chelsea – is a historic New York City hotel and landmark, known primarily for the notability of its residents over the years.
Address: 222 W 23rd St, New York, NY 10011, USA (40.74431, -73.9969)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone:+1 616-918-8770
National Register of Historic Places: 77000958, 1977
Place
Built between 1883 and 1885, Design by Hubert, Pirsson & Company (Philip Gengembre Hubert (1830-1911) and James W. Pirrson (1833-1888))
Opened for initial occupation in 1884, the twelve-story red-brick building that is now the Hotel Chelsea was one of the city’s first private apartment cooperatives. It was designed in a style that has been described variously as Queen Anne Revival and Victorian Gothic. Among its distinctive features are the delicate, flower-ornamented iron balconies on its facade, which were constructed by J.B. and J.M. Cornell and its grand staircase, which extends upward twelve floors. Generally, this staircase is only accessible to registered guests, although the hotel does offer monthly tours to others. At the time of its construction, the building was the tallest in New York. Hubert and Pirsson had created a "Hubert Home Club" in 1880 for "The Rembrandt,” a six-story building on West 57th Street intended as housing for artists. This early cooperative building had rental units to help defray costs, and also provided servants as part of the building staff. The success of this model led to other "Hubert Home Clubs,” and the Chelsea was one of them. Initially successful, its surrounding neighborhood constituted the center of New York’s theater district. However within a few years the combination of economic stresses, the suspicions of New York’s middle class about apartment living, the opening up of Upper Manhattan and the plentiful supply of houses there, and the relocation of the city’s theater district, bankrupted the Chelsea. In 1905, the building reopened as a hotel, which was later managed by Knott Hotels and resident manager A.R. Walty. After the hotel went bankrupt, it was purchased in 1939 by Joseph Gross, Julius Krauss, and David Bard, and these partners managed the hotel together until the early 1970s. With the passing of Joseph Gross and Julius Krauss, the management fell to Stanley Bard, David Bard’s son. On 18 June, 2007, the hotel’s board of directors ousted Bard as the hotel’s manager. Dr. Marlene Krauss, the daughter of Julius Krauss, and David Elder, the grandson of Joseph Gross and the son of playwright and screenwriter Lonne Elder III, replaced Stanley Bard with the management company BD Hotels NY; that firm has since been terminated as well. In May, 2011, the hotel was sold to real estate developer Joseph Chetrit for US$80 million. As of August 1, 2011, the hotel stopped taking reservations for guests in order to begin renovations, but long-time residents remain in the building, some of them protected by state rent regulations. The renovations prompted complaints by the remaining tenants of health hazards caused by the construction. These were investigated by the city’s Building Department, which found no major violations. In Nov. 2011, the management ordered all of the hotel’s many artworks taken off the walls, supposedly for their protection and cataloging, a move which some tenants interpreted as a step towards forcing them out as well. In 2013, Ed Scheetz became the Chelsea Hotel’s new owner after buying back five properties from Joseph Chetrit, his partner in King & Grove Hotels, and David Bistricer. Hotel Chelsea is now managed by Chelsea Hotels, formerly King & Grove Hotels. Restoration and renovation is underway and Hotel Chelsea plans to reopen in 2016.
Notable queer resident at Hotel Chelsea:
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997), novelist, short story writer, satirist, essayist, painter, and spoken word performer. A primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodernist author who wrote in the paranoid fiction genre, he is considered to be "one of the most politically trenchant, culturally influential, and innovative artists of the XX century.”
• Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008) wrote “2001: A Space Odyssey” while staying at the Chelsea.
• Quentin Crisp (1908-1999), writer and raconteur. His first stay in the Hotel Chelsea coincided with a fire, a robbery, and the death of Nancy Spungen.
• Musician, gay civil rights icon and Stonewall veteran Stormé DeLarverie (1920-2014) resided at the hotel for several decades.
• Poets Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) and Gregory Corso (1930-2001) chose it as a place for philosophical and artistic exchange.
• Brad Gooch (born 1952), writer. His 2015 memoir “Smash Cut” recounts life in 1970s and 1980s New York City, including the time Gooch spent as a fashion model, life with his then-boyfriend filmmaker Howard Brookner, living in the famous Chelsea Hotel and the first decade of the AIDS crisis.
• Herbert Huncke (1915-1996), writer and poet. In his last few years, he lived in room 828, where his rent came from financial support from Jerry Garcia of The Grateful Dead, whom Huncke never met. Herbert Huncke died in 1996 at age 81.
• Iggy Pop (born 1947), singer-songwriter, musician and actor. Pop’s career received a boost from his relationship with David Bowie when Bowie decided in 1972 to produce an album with Pop in England.
• Charles R. Jackson (1903-1968), author of “The Lost Weekend,” committed suicide in his room on September 21, 1968.
• Jasper Johns (born 1930), painter and printmaker. In 1954, after returning to New York, Johns met Robert Rauschenberg and they became long-term lovers. For a time they lived in the same building as Rachel Rosenthal. In the same period he was strongly influenced by the gay couple Merce Cunningham (a choreographer) and John Cage (a composer.)
• Jack Kerouac (1922-1969), who wrote “On the Road” there.
• Lance Loud (1951-2001), television personality, magazine columnist and new wave rock-n-roll performer. Loud is best known for his 1973 appearance in “An American Family,” a pioneer reality television series that featured his coming out, leading to his status as an icon in the gay community.
• Robert Mapplethorpe (1946-1989), photographer, known for his sensitive yet blunt treatment of controversial subject-mater in the large-scale, highly stylized black and white medium of photography. The homoeroticism of this work fuelled a national debate over the public funding of controversial artwork.
• Larry Rivers (1923-2002), artist, musician, filmmaker and occasional actor. Poet Jeni Olin was his companion. Rivers also sustained a relationship with poet Frank O’Hara in the late 1950s and delivered the eulogy at O’Hara’s funeral in 1966.
• Patti Smith (born 1946), singer-songwriter, poet and visual artist. On November 17, 2010, she won the National Book Award for her memoir “Just Kids.” The book fulfilled a promise she had made to her former long-time roommate and partner, Robert Mapplethorpe.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989), composer and critic. In 1925 in Paris, he cemented his relationship with painter Maurice Grosser (1903-1986), who was to become his life partner and frequent collaborator. He and Grosser lived at Hotel Chelsea, where he presided over a largely gay salon that attracted many of the leading figures in music and art and theather, including Leonard Bernstein, Tennessee Williams, and many others. Virgil Thomson died on September 30, 1989, in his suite at the Hotel Chelsea in Manhattan, aged 92.
• Gore Vidal (1925-2012), writer and a public intellectual known for his patrician manner, epigrammatic wit, and polished style of writing.
• Rufus Wainwright (born 1973), lived in the Chelsea Hotel in New York City for six months, during which he wrote most of his second album.
• Tennessee Williams (1911-1983), playwright and author of many stage classics. Along with Eugene O’Neill and Arthur Miller he is considered among the three foremost playwrights in XX century American drama.
• Hotel Chelsea is often associated with the Warhol superstars, as Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey directed “Chelsea Girls” (1966), a film about his Factory regulars and their lives at the hotel. Chelsea residents from the Warhol scene included Edie Sedgwick, Viva, Ultra Violet, Mary Woronov, Holly Woodlawn, Andrea Feldman, Nico, Paul America, René Ricard, and Brigid Berlin.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The San Remo Cafe was a bar at 93 MacDougal Street at the corner of Bleecker Street. It was a hangout for Bohemians and writers such as James Agee, W. H. Auden, Tennessee Williams, James Baldwin, William S. Burroughs, Gregory Corso, Miles Davis, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O'Hara, Jack Kerouac, Jackson Pollock, William Styron, Dylan Thomas, Gore Vidal, Judith Malina and many others. It opened in 1925 closed in 1967. Jack Kerouac described the bar's crowd in his novel “The Subterraneans”: “Hip without being slick, intelligent without being corny, they are intellectual as hell and know all about Pound without being pretentious or saying too much about it. They are very quiet, they are very Christlike.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Julius (159 West 10th Street at Waverly Place), is a tavern in Manhattan's Greenwich Village. It is often called the oldest continuously operating gay bar in New York City; however, its management was actively unwilling to operate as such and harassed gay customers until 1966. On April 21, 1966 members of the New York Chapter of the Mattachine Society staged a "Sip-In" at the bar which was to change the legal landscape. Dick Leitsch, the society's president, John Timmons and Craig Rodwell planned to draw attention to the practice by identifying themselves as homosexuals before ordering a drink in order to bring court scrutiny to the regulation. The three were going to read from Mattachine stationary "We are homosexuals. We are orderly, we intend to remain orderly, and we are asking for service." Newspaper articles on the wall of Julius indicate it was the favorite bar of Tennessee Williams, Truman Capote and Rudolf Nureyev. In 2016 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Hotel Elysée is a New York City hotel situated on 60 East 54th Street between Madison and Park avenues. The hotel was founded in 1926 as a European-style hotel for the carriage trade by Swiss-born Max Haering,
Address: 56- 60 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.7599, -73.9732)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 212-753-1066
Place
New York’s leading hatcheck concessionaire, Mayer Quain, purchased the hotel out of bankruptcy in 1937. After the War, his children eclectically designed every room so that no two rooms were alike. In lieu of traditional numbers, the rooms were named to reflect their personality, such as the "Sayonara" suite assigned to Marlon Brando after his starring role in “Teahouse of the August Moon.” Tennessee Williams lived in the hotel for fifteen years and died in the "Sunset" suite. Columnist Jimmy Breslin, who regards the Elysée as "a great hotel, a genuine New York landmark," succeeded Ruark as the hotel’s unofficial chronicler. Upon Tennessee Williams’s death at the Elysée in Feb. 1983, Breslin recalled the story of a transient guest who called the front desk at 5:00 am complaining that someone in the next suite was keeping her awake by typing all night. "They knew right away who the culprit was, but they couldn’t very well ask Mr. Williams to stop playwriting, so we simply moved the guest to another room." In Nov. 1948, Tallulah Bankhead celebrated President Harry S. Truman’s stunning victory over Thomas E. Dewey by throwing a noisy party at the hotel that ran non-stop for five days and nights. The Elysée is known for the Monkey Bar, a piano bar just off the lobby. Opened in the 1940s, it became known to the cognoscenti as "the place to go where jokes die," especially off-color jokes and double-entendre songs spun by such performers as Johnny Payne (1934-1964), Marion Page (1950-1965) and Mel Martin (1945-1983.) Johnny Andrews played the piano at cocktail hour for over 50 years (1936-1990.) Starting out as just another dimly lit hotel piano bar with mirrored paneling, the tiny room was expanded in the early 1950s when the mirrors were replaced by wraparound hand-painted mural by caricaturist Charlie Vella. Eight more monkeys were added to the bar mural in 1984 by artist Diana Voyentzie "to remind customers of their behaviour." In 1995, when the bar was redesigned by the architect David Rockwell, all of the monkeys were unified by Voyentzie with more monkeys and palm trees and foliage. The monkeys in the mural depict decidedly human features riding elephants, crouching under a Christmas tree, mixing up banana daiquiris for tough-looking monkey-like customers, etc. In successive years, other artists have added to the tableau.
Life
Who: Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983)
From 1948 to the early 50s, Tennessee Williams lived in New York City at 235 E 58th St; in 1965 he was at 15 W 72nd St; in 1978 at Manhattan Plaza (400 W 43rd St); last NY address was Hotel Elysee (56-60 E 54th St), where he died. In New York Tennessee Williams joined a gay social circle which included fellow writer and close friend Donald Windham (1920–2010) and his then partner Fred Melton. In the summer of 1940 Williams initiated an affair with Kip Kiernan (1918–1944), a young Canadian dancer he met in Provincetown, Massachusetts. When Kiernan left him to marry a woman he was distraught, and Kiernan’s death four years later at 26 delivered another heavy blow. On a 1945 visit to Taos, New Mexico, Williams met Pancho Rodríguez y González, a hotel clerk of Mexican heritage. Rodríguez was, by all accounts, a loving and loyal companion. However, he was also prone to jealous rages and excessive drinking, and so the relationship was a tempestuous one. Nevertheless, in Feb. 1946 Rodríguez left New Mexico to join Williams in his New Orleans apartment. They lived and traveled together until late 1947 when Williams ended the affair. Rodríguez and Williams remained friends, however, and were in contact as late as the 1970s. Williams spent the spring and summer of 1948 in Rome in the company of a teenaged Italian boy, called "Rafaello" in Williams’ “Memoirs,” to whom he provided financial assistance for several years afterwards, a situation which planted the seed of Williams’ first novel, “The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone.” When he returned to New York that spring, he met and fell in love with Frank Merlo (1922–1963), an occasional actor of Sicilian heritage who had served in the U.S. Navy in WWII. This one enduring romantic relationship of Williams’ life lasted 14 years until infidelities and drug abuse on both sides ended it. Merlo, who became Williams’ personal secretary, taking on most of the details of their domestic life, provided a period of happiness and stability as well as a balance to the playwright’s frequent bouts with depression and the fear that, like his sister Rose, he would fall into insanity. Their years together, in an apartment in Manhattan and a modest house in Key West, Florida, were Williams’ happiest and most productive. Shortly after their breakup, Merlo was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer and Williams returned to take care of him until his death on September 20, 1963. As he had feared, in the years following Merlo’s death Williams was plunged into a period of nearly catatonic depression and increasing drug use resulting in several hospitalizations and commitments to mental health facilities. On February 25, 1983, Williams was found dead in his suite at the Elysée Hotel in New York at age 71. Williams had long told his friends he wanted to be buried at sea at approximately the same place as Hart Crane, a poet he considered to be one of his most significant influences. Contrary to his expressed wishes, but at his brother Dakin Williams’ insistence, Williams was interred in Calvary Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Kate Chopin is buried at Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum (5239 W Florissant Ave, St. Louis, MO 6311), where you can also find the burial place of Tennesse Williams (his family, against his last wishes, buried him in St. Louis), and of author William S. Burroughs of the Beat Generation, at the nearby Bellefontaine Cemetery (4947 W Florissant Ave, St. Louis, MO 63115).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Born: February 25, 1926, Passaic, New Jersey, United States
Died: May 15, 2007, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Find A Grave Memorial# 161891002
Books: Desperate necessity
People also search for: Maurice Sendak, Jonathan Weinberg, Sadie Schindler, Philip Sendak

Maurice Sendak was an American illustrator and writer of children's books. He was best known for his book Where the Wild Things Are, first published in 1963. Sendak mentioned in a September 2008 article in The New York Times that he was gay and had lived with his partner, psychoanalyst Dr. Eugene Glynn, for 50 years before Glynn's death in May 2007. Revealing that he never told his parents, he said, "All I wanted was to be straight so my parents could be happy. They never, never, never knew." Other writers before (e.g., Tony Kushner in 2003) had mentioned Sendak’s relationship with Glynn and Glynn's 2007 death notice had identified Sendak as his "partner of fifty years". Sendak donated $1 million to the Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services in memory of Glynn.
Together from 1957 to 2007: 50 years.
Eugene Glynn (1926 - May 15, 2007)
Maurice Sendak (June 10, 1928 – May 8, 2012)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Arthur Lett-Haines, known as Lett Haines, was a British painter and sculptor who experimented in many different media, though he generally characterised himself as "an English surrealist".
Born: November 2, 1894, Paddington, London, United Kingdom
Died: February 25, 1978
Lived: Corfe, Taunton, Somerset TA3
Benton End House, Benton Street, Hadleigh, Suffolk IP7 5JR, UK (52.03691, 0.95912)
The Pound, Hadleigh Road, Higham, Suffolk CO7 6LE, UK(51.99071, 0.95763)
32 Great Ormond St, London WC1N, UK (51.52201, -0.11983)
9 Walterton Rd, London W9 3PE, UK (51.5253, -0.20009)
Buried: Friars Road Cemetery, Hadleigh, Babergh District, Suffolk, England
Buried alongside: Cedric Morris
Find A Grave Memorial# 161188757

Arthur Lett-Haines was a British painter and sculptor who experimented in many different media, though he characterized himself as "an English surrealist". He was part of a London artistic circle, which included D.H. Lawrence, the Sitwells (Dame Edith Sitwell and Sir Osbert Sitwell) and Wyndham Lewis. Sir Cedric Morris was a British artist, art teacher and plantsman. As an artist, he is best known for his portraits, flower paintings and landscapes. In 1916, Lett-Haines married Gertrude Aimee Lincoln at Hailsham, but he met the painter Cedric Morris in 1918. Morris and Lett Haines fell in love and began a lifetime relationship, and shortly afterwards Morris moved in with Haines and his wife, Aimee. The trio planned to go to America, but in the event, Aimee Lett-Haines left on her own, and the two men moved to Cornwall. This relationship lasted some 60 years, despite its open nature that included attachments on both sides such as Haines' affair with the artist and author Kathleen Hale. In 1937, Morris and Haines founded the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing at Dedham. The school closed when Haines died in 1978, though Morris continued to live at Benton End until his death in 1984.
Together from 1918 to 1978: 60 years.
Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Arthur Lett Haines was born at 9 Walterton Road, Paddington, London on November 2, 1894
Address: 9 Walterton Rd, London W9 3PE, UK (51.5253, -0.20009)
Type: Private Property
Place
A Victorian conversion, divided in flats. Walterton Road is a quiet and popular residential street located within close proximity of the extensive amenities in Queens Park, Maida Vale and Notting Hill. Transport links including Westbourne Park (Hammersmith & City Line), Queens Park, Maida Vale and Warwick Avenue (Bakerloo Line.)
Life
Who: Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
During WWI Arthur Lett-Haines served in the British Army and after the war he involved himself with the artistic set which included E. McKnight Kauffer, John Middleton Murry, the Sitwells, Wyndham Lewis, Katharine Mansfield and D. H. Lawrence about which time he hyphenated his name to Lett-Haines. In 1916 Lett-Haines married at Hailsham, Sussex, Gertrude Aimee Lincoln, but in 1918 he met painter Cedric Morris, who moved in with them; the following year his wife Aimee, departed for America while Morris and Lett-Haines, although a stormy partnership, lived together as lovers for some sixty years. After initially living at Newlyn, in 1920 they moved to Paris becoming part of an expatriate artistic community that included Juan Gris, Fernard Léger, Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Nancy Cunard and Ernest Hemingway. They briefly returned to London in 1926, before moving to Suffolk in 1929. Lett-Haines largely subordinating his own artistic career to promote that of his partner Cedric, despite its open nature that included attachments on both sides such as Lett-Haines’s affair with the artist and author Kathleen Hale (1898-2000.) Like his friend John Middleton Murry (1889-1957), Haines gave his students freedom to develop along independent lines and Haines himself was a less consistent painter than Morris and his work had a strong linear element. Operating on a live-in basis that mingled artistic development with a social circle, its pupils included Lucian Freud, Bettina Shaw-Lawrence, David Kentish, Maggi Hambling, David Carr, Joan Warburton and Glyn Morgan. The school he founded, Benton End, closed when Haines died on February 25, 1978, although Morris continued to live at Benton End until his death in 1984.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

After staying with his sister Nancy Morris in Corfe (Taunton, Somerset TA3), Cedric Morris (December 11, 1889 –February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines found a studio in London at Great Ormond Street to which they moved in 1927. 



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At the time of the Armistice with Germany in Nov. 1918 Cedric Morris was in London, where he met the painter Arthur Lett-Haines.
Address: 32 Great Ormond St, London WC1N, UK (51.52201, -0.11983)
Type: Private Property
Place
Cedric Morris settled in London in 1927, with a big studio at 32, Great Ormond Street, which soon became a gathering place for most of his contemporaries. Upon his arrival Roger Fry, whom he had known in Paris, elected him to the London Group and took two of his canvasses for the International Exhibition at Buenos Aires. Later, Ben Nicholson elected him to the 7 & 5 Society. He continued to exhibit with these groups for several years. In May 1927, he had his first One Man Show at Messrs. Arthur Tooth and Sons, which was a phenomenal success and thereafter has held exhibitions with West End dealers at intervals of two or three years. He has also had exhibitions at the Hague and in New York, and has been an international exhibitor at Brussells, Buenos Aires, Venice, Chicago, Pittsburg, and San Francisco. There are samples of his work in most of the important public galleries. The success of his first exhibition at Messrs. Tooth enabled him to fulfill a long defined project of painting in Wales and much of his work is of Welsh landscapes. He initiated the Welsh Contemporary Art Exhibitions in 1935, from which sprang the Welsh Contemporary Art Society.
Life
Who: Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
Sir Cedric Morris was a British artist, art teacher and plantsman. He was born in Swansea in South Wales, but worked mainly in East Anglia. As an artist he is best known for his portraits, flower paintings and landscapes. Morris went to Zennor in Cornwall, where he studied plants and painted water colours. At the time of the Armistice with Germany in Nov. 1918 he was in London, when he met the painter Arthur Lett-Haines. Morris and Lett-Haines fell in love and began a life-time relationship, and shortly afterwards Morris moved in with Lett-Haines and his second wife, Aimee. The trio planned to go to America, but in the event Aimee Lett-Haines left on her own, and the two men moved to Cornwall. They converted a row of cottages at Newlyn into a larger house and stayed there until the end of 1920, when they moved to Paris. This relationship lasted some 60 years, despite its open nature that included attachments on both sides such as Haines’ affair with the artist and author Kathleen Hale. Paris was their base for the next five years, when they travelled extensively in Europe. Morris also studied at the Academies Moderne and La Grande Chaumiere. Morris had successful exhibitions in London in 1924 and 1926, and later in that year they settled back in Britain. After staying with his sister Nancy Morris in Corfe, Morris and Haines found a studio in London at Great Ormond Street to which they moved in 1927. Morris became a member of the London Artists Association and the Seven and Five Society, for which he was proposed by Winifred Nicholson and seconded by Ben Nicholson. He became especially friendly with the painter Christopher Wood, and renewed friendship with Frances Hodgkins. At the end of the 1920s Morris became involved with much commercial work designing textiles for Cresta Silks with Paul Nash and posters for Shell and B. P.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Cedric Morris chose the country life to pursue his passion for horticulture. Early in 1929 Morris and his companion, Arthur Lett-Haines, took the lease of Pound Farm, Higham, Suffolk, and in February 1930 they gave up the London studio.
Address: Hadleigh Road, Higham, Suffolk CO7 6LE, UK(51.99071, 0.95763)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 277246 (Grade II, 1955)
Place
The Pound is a XVI-XVII century house with XIX century wing to left and XX century alterations. Timber-framed, rendered with red brick stack, XIX century wing red brick with some dark brick headers. Plain tile roof. Single-storey and attic range with gabled jettied cross wing at left. 2-storey brick addition. Half-glazed door to cross wing, jettied 1st floor. 3-light XX century casement, bargeboards to gable. 24-pane fixed window with single opening light to hall, end of beam protrudes at floor level. XX century casements and further door to right. 2 gabled dormers with XX century windows. Small XX century ridge stack to right and sawtooth stack between cross wing and hall. Brick range 3-light windows under segmental arches, 2 replaced 16-pane sashes in flush architraves above. Pair of large gabled wall dormers to rear hall range. XX century extension under pent roof. Interior: hall, somewhat rebuilt inglenook. Chamfered beam and exposed joists.
Life
Who: Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
In 1932 the owner of Pound Farm, Vivien Gribble, who was for a while his student, died and left it to Cedric Morris. Morris had resigned from the Seven and Five Society in 1930 and he resigned from the London Artist’s Association in 1933. There were many visitors at Pound Farm, including Frances Hodgkins, Barbara Hepworth and John Skeaping. Joan Warburton who was a student described Pound Farm as a paradise, mainly because of the spectacular gardens which Morris developed. She was also impressed by their spectacular parties. Morris often went painting in his native South Wales, and in 1935 at the time of the Depression was moved by the plight of the people of South Wales Valleys. He initiated a major touring exhibition of Welsh art in 1935, and was a regular teacher at Mary Horsfall’s Art’s centre at Merthyr Tydfil. In 1935 he painted two large flower murals on board the liner Queen Mary. In late 1937 Morris and Haines joined the Hadleigh Labour Party after attending a meeting addressed by Professor Catlin.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Benton End House was originally a large medieval farmhouse. From 1940 it was the home of Sir Cedric Morris, artist and plantsman, who formed the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing there. Students included Lucian Freud and Maggi Hambling.
Address: Benton Street, Hadleigh, Suffolk IP7 5JR, UK (52.03691, 0.95912)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 277783 (Grade II, 1950)
Place
Built from the XVI century, Design by Sir Peter Cheyney
XVI century and later, 2 storeys and attics, timber framed and plastered, roofs tiled. Front wings extend North and South, and wing at back extends East. The front has been largely altered and includes XVIII century features. There are 3 gabled attic dormers. 3 window range, flush frame, sash. Upper storey projects. Large, shouldered, chimney at either end. The central doorcase has flat hood on scroll brackets. At North end of front is an octagonal brick pier with pointed cap. The East wing has a brick gable with octagonal flank piers, coping and chimney stack with 2 octagonal shafts (moulded bases.) The timber framing is exposed and there is some brick nogging.
Life
Who: Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, 9th Baronet (December 11, 1889 – February 8, 1982) and Arthur Lett-Haines (1894 – February 25, 1978)
Cedric Morris and Lett-Haines opened the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing at Dedham in April 1937. Within a year they had 60 students. Lucian Freud was one of his most noted students. In 1939 the building at Dedham was destroyed by fire with several of Morris’s paintings also destroyed. By the end of the year the school was re-established at Benton End. Benton End was a rambling “Suffolk Pink” farmhouse on the outskirts of Hadleigh, set in 3 or 4 acres (1.6 ha) of orchard. Morris was intolerant of cruelty to animals and at Benton End had a running feud with a local gamekeeper who shot cats and dogs - until the latter tripped over his shotgun and killed himself. In addition to running the school, Morris indulged his passion for plants. He grew about 1,000 new Iris seedlings each year and opened Benton End to display his collection. He produced at least 90 named varieties, 45 of which were registered with the American Iris Society. Some were sold commercially and exhibited at the Chelsea Flower Show. Many of his named varieties carried the prefix "Benton,” including “Benton Menace” named after his cats, and “Benton Rubeo,” named for his pet macaw. He also used to walk the fields and hedgerows searching for softer colour variants of poppies. Morris’s work as a horticulturalist resulted in a number of plants being names after him. Morris bred birds as a hobby and his knowledge and understanding of them may have contributed to his ability to paint them. In his “Peregrin Falcons” (1942), the birds are presented in a slightly formalised and simplified manner. His intention, he explained, was to "provoke a lively sympathy with the mood of the birds which ornithological exactitude may tend to destroy." In 1947 the Morris baronetcy came to his father from a distant cousin three months before his death and Cedric Morris succeeded his father in the same year to become the 9th Baronet Morris. He became a lecturer at the Royal College of Art in 1950. From about 1975 Morris virtually gave up painting because of failing eyesight. The school closed when Haines died in 1978, though Morris continued to live at Benton End until his death. Cedric Morris died on February 8, 1982. His former pupil, Maggi Hambling visited him on the day before his death and afterwards drew a portrait of him. His grave in Hadleigh cemetery is marked by a Welsh slate headstone cut by Donald Simpson.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Born: 1935
Books: Narcotic plants, Bizarre plants, Leonardo da Vinci on plants and gardens, The Visual Art of Jean Cocteau
People also search for: Isabelle Reinharez, Marshall Lee, Jean Cocteau
Anniversary: April 20

Tony Clark came to Fine Art through a background in ballet in Europe and America where he was a soloist with the Paris Opera Ballet and Maurice Bejart’s Ballet Mudra. He also worked with Loring, Hightower and Cunningham. The French government awarded him a knighthood as Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, in recognition of his curation and organizing exhibitions, and in keeping the French arts alive. As a tireless supporter of the arts, he produced sixty-four events in one year alone. William A. Emboden Ph.D., F.L.S is the author of Leonardo da Vinci on Plants and Gardens and The Visual Art of Jean Cocteau followed it. Emboden is an artist/poet in his own right. He is also a botanist and has written several books in that field. Upon his return to the USA, Clark and Emboden founded Arts of the Theatre Gallery, Los Angeles.
Together since 1971: 44 years.
Baron Anton van Kaak II, Viscount di Vreeland (born September 4)
William A. Emboden (born February 24)
Anniversary: April 20
Feb. 1971, I entered Dr. Emboden's Ethnobotany class. There was an immediate attraction and he had to allow 17 other students enroll just to have me in the class. I was an Industrial Psychology major and William was already an internationally renowned Ethobotanist. I approached and had an affair with the professor. My true calling, from age 3, was that of a dancer. I was accepted in Bejart's Ballet Murdra and the first Grand Sujet at the Paris Opera Ballet. So I had to leave William, but return to him in 1973, where we resumed our romantic partnership. 1974 we moved into a historic Hollywoodland home where we remain until this day. In 1979, we co-founded Arts of the Theatre Gallery, which was a wonderful salon/gallery in the vintage Larchmont Village. This led us to meet very interesting people in the art world and luminaries of the theatre and film world. Ultimately, this lead to the creation of a total retrospective and world tours of the finest collection of the Art of Jean Cocteau. Today it is now Jean Cocteau Museum of Menton, France. We continue our private and professional lives together. There has been a mentorship, but roles continue to change over time. The most important thing is that we have shared values. We have shared and individual tastes were both shaped by our Scandinavian heritage. We share some friends and are independent with others. We have the richest of memories working and playing globally. Our fondest memories are sharing the visual and performing arts. The most meaningful time is just being home together. We are linked by mutual respect, love and a great deal of laughter. It is a life and love shared that is a bond that has only grown stronger and eternal. -Tony Clark 



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Lived: Shirburn Castle, Castle Rd, Shirburn, Watlington, Oxfordshire OX49 5DJ, UK (51.65756, -0.99379)
Buried: St Mary the Virgin, Church Lane, North Stoke, Oxfordshire, OX10 6BQ
Find A Grave Memorial# 161197515

Oliver Baldwin was a British politician, son of three-time Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin. The Daily Mail on August 5, 1931, was dominated by a story claiming that Oliver Baldwin was living with a man named John Boyle. “We do not know if Mr. Oliver Baldwin and Mr. John Boyle are indulging in unnatural vice, but if they are committing criminal acts the police should be informed and a criminal prosecution brought.” That afternoon Stanley Baldwin gave a press conference with his wife Lucy and Oliver. He said that Oliver had the love and support of himself and his wife. They knew that he and John Boyle were close friends and were living together. What they did in their personal lives was no one's business and certainly not a matter for the law. In 1948, Oliver was appointed Governor of the Leeward Islands and took John Boyle with him.
Together from 1923 & 1958: 35 years.
John Parke Boyle (1893 - 1969)
Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, Viscount Corvedale (March 1, 1899 – August 10, 1958)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Shirburn Castle is at the village of Shirburn, 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Thame, Oxfordshire. Shirburn Castle was the seat of the Earls of Macclesfield.
Address: Castle Rd, Shirburn, Watlington, Oxfordshire OX49 5DJ, UK (51.65756, -0.99379)
Type: Private Property
Place
George Parker, 2nd Earl of Macclesfield (c.1695–1764), celebrated as an astronomer, spent much time conducting astronomical observations at Shirburn Castle, which his father had bought in 1716. Here he built an observatory and a chemical laboratory. The observatory was "equipped with the finest existing instruments" and the 2nd Earl of Macclesfield used it from 1740. In 1761 the astronomer Thomas Hornsby observed the transit of Venus from the castle grounds. The Macclesfield Psalter, a lavishly illuminated manuscript from the English region of East Anglia, written in Latin and produced around 1330, was discovered in Shirburn Castle in 2004 when the contents of the Library were catalogued for auction. The present owner of the castle is the Beechwood Estates Company, the Macclesfield family estate management company. Following a long-running and acrimonious court battle, Richard Timothy George Mansfield Parker, the 9th Earl of Macclesfield, was evicted from the family seat at the end of 2004. The castle was used for external shots of Midsomer Priory for the popular television series “Midsomer Murders.”
Life
Who: Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (March 1, 1899 – August 10, 1958) and John Parke Boyle (July 30, 1893 – February 24, 1969)
On his return from Armenia Oliver Baldwin made two major decisions. First, any talk of engagement to Dorothea Arbuthnot was a fraud; he was homosexual and needed to live the rest of his life with a male partner, whom he found in the person of John Parke Boyle, the son of an army officer, descended from the earls of Cork. Together they set up home in Oxfordshire, first at Shirburn and then at North Stoke, keeping geese and hens and taking in lodgers, with Oliver trying to make money by writing. He refused to accept money from his father, except for small cheques at Christmas or for his birthday. Second, Oliver decided his politics lay decisively on the left. The substance of an interview he gave to the Westminster Gazette was taken up by Fred Gorle of the Social Democratic Federation. Baldwin was invited to become a member, which he immediately did. H. M. Hyndman, the guiding spirit of the SDF, remained his political inspiration for the rest of his life. Some members of his family thought that the adoption of socialism was deeply treacherous, but Stanley Baldwin was always warm, generous and understanding of the idealism of his elder son. His mother, coming from a background where the questioning of received ideas was not just possible but expected, was also supportive, and on a personal level too – she wrote to John Boyle to say, “Thank you for loving my Oliver.” Oliver Baldwin threw a party in honour of his father, on Dec. 15, 1938. In Oliver’s words “it was a wonderful evening and made the old man very happy.” The following day Stanley wrote to his son, “I enjoyed every minute of your happy party last night. In the excitement of leaving I don’t believe I said Good Night to Johnny, whose work as caterer was beyond praise. Bless you. Your loving old Father.” Oliver’s parents treated John Boyle as an ideal son-in-law and would begin letters to him with “My dear Johnny.” John Parke Boyle was the son of Major Charles John Boyle and Lillian Kennedy Pochin. He was educated at Bradfield School and was invested as a Fellow, Zoological Society (F.Z.S.) His sister Lilian Joanna Vere Boyle married George Loveden William Henry Parker (1888-1975), 7th Earl of Macclesfield, son of George Augustus Parker, Viscount Parker and Carine Agnes Loveden, on June 9, 1909. For a time, Oliver and John lived at Shirburn at John’s brother-in-law’s castle, before moving to North Stoke. John Parke Boyle is buried at St Mary the Virgin (Church Lane, North Stoke, Oxfordshire, OX10 6BQ).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Born: 1909
Died: 1988
Find A Grave Memorial# 161135316
Movies: An Elastic Affair, Night Birds

Beverley Nichols was an author, playwright, journalist, composer, and public speaker. In 1932 he began to live with the actor Cyril Butcher, and their relationship lasted 53 years, until Nichols's death; Nichols's pleas for sexual tolerance were unusually vocal for the period, and are found throughout his writings. Nichols is now best remembered for his gardening books, the first of which, Down the Garden Path, was illustrated — as were its two sequels — by Rex Whistler. This bestseller was the first of his trilogy about Allways, his Tudor thatched cottage in Glatton, Cambridgeshire. A book about Nichols' city garden near Hampstead Heath in London, Green Grows the City, published in 1939, was another big best seller. A trilogy written between 1951 and 1956 documents Nichols's travails renovating Merry Hall (Meadowstream), a Georgian manor house in Agates Lane, Ashtead, Surrey, where Nichols lived with Butcher from 1946 to 1956. Nichols's final trilogy is referred to as The Sudbrook Trilogy (1963–1968) and concerns his late 18th century attached cottage at Ham, (near Richmond), Surrey.
Together from 1930 to 1983: 53 years.
Beverley Nichols (September 9, 1898 – September 15, 1983)
Cyril Butcher (1909–1987)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Sara Josephine Baker was an American physician notable for making contributions to public health, especially in the immigrant communities of New York City.
Born: November 15, 1873, Poughkeepsie, New York, United States
Died: February 22, 1945, Princeton, New Jersey, United States
Education: New York University
Lived: Trevenna Farm, 208 Orchard Rd, Montgomery, NJ 08558, USA (40.42026, -74.66956)
Buried: Poughkeepsie Rural Cemetery, Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 139844697
Known for: Public health
Books: Fighting for Life, more

Sara Josephine Baker was an American physician notable for contributing to public health system. Ida Alexa Ross Wylie, better known as I.A.R. Wylie, was an Australian-British-American novelist, screenwriter, magazine writer and poet. She is probably best known as the author of the novel that became the basis of the film Keeper of the Flame (1942), directed by George Cukor and starring Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn. More than 30 of her works were made into films between 1915 and 1953. Sara Josephine Baker wrote very little about her personal life; however, she spent much of the later part of her life with Wylie, who self-identified as a 'woman-oriented woman'. When Baker retired in 1923, she started to run their household while writing her autobiography. In 1935, Baker and Wylie decided to move to Princeton, New Jersey, together with their friend Louise Pearce. While Baker and Pearce left little documentation of their personal lives, Wylie was open about her orientation, although she did not identify either Baker or Pearce in her writings.
Together from 1920 to 1945: 25 years.
Ida Alexa Ross “I.A.R.” Wylie (March 16, 1885 -17, 1912 – August 24, 1987)
Sara Josephine Baker (November 15, 1873 - February 22, 1945)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Trevenna Farm, 11.85 Acres In Montgomery Twp, was last sold in 2013
Address: 208 Orchard Rd, Montgomery, NJ 08558, USA (40.42026, -74.66956)
Type: Private Property
Place
The history of Trevenna Farm is a fascinating tale of a modest country dwelling dating to 1727 evolving into a refined 4U-bedroom home that graciously welcomes gatherings and personal pursuits without losing its pre-revolutionary ambiance. 11.85 acres in Montgomery Township include a pond, extra garage and barn surrounded by deep lawns. An early XIX century expansion added generous formal rooms and a center hall, now joined by a light-filled family room and well-planned kitchen wing. Skillman is named after the Skillman family. The first Skillmans were Dutch, but lived in England before moving to Brooklyn in 1664, according to family accounts. In 1729, Thomas Skillman ventured westward, buying some 500 acres (2.0 km2) of farmland on the Millstone River, near the village of Rocky Hill, for his sons, Jan and Isaac. That purchase was the Skillman family's entry into Montgomery. The Skillman area got its name when the railroads arrived in the 1870s, according to the Skillman family. Joseph A. Skillman, was a teamster who owned "wild Missouri mules," according to family accounts. When railroad workers were trying to lay tracks, their horses got bogged down in thick, clay mud, and Joseph A. Skillman came to the rescue with his mules. Railroad officials also socialized at the home of another Skillman nearby, and the new train station was named for the family. A post office opened in the station and a small village, with a hay press, feed store and hardware store, sprouted around it. It took the Skillman name, too. (While the train station is gone, remnants of the village still exist at the spot where Camp Meeting Avenue and Skillman Road meet. A clay and sculpting supply business occupies some of the buildings.) Also in Skillman was the sprawling New Jersey Village for Epileptics, a 250-acre (1.0 km2) complex opened around 1900 that had its own dairy, laundry, and movie theater. Visitors would arrive by train. Skillman was a busy little country place. There were 1,637 residents in Montgomery in 1910, compared with more than 23,000 now, according to Census data. The community now has more traffic, fewer farms and more houses (specifically developments). In 2011, Montgomery Township sold what remained of the North Princeton Developmental Center (also known as Skillman Village) to Somerset County in order for the village to be demolished.



Life
Who: Ida Alexa Ross Wylie (March 16, 1885 – November 4, 1959), aka I. A. R. Wylie, Louise Pearce (March 5, 1885 – August 10, 1959) & Sara Josephine Baker (November 15, 1873 – February 22, 1945)
Sara Josephine Baker was an American physician notable for making contributions to public health, especially in the immigrant communities of New York City. Not much is known about Baker's personal life because she is said to "have destroyed all her personal papers." However, she spent much of the later part of her life with Ida Alexa Ross Wylie, a novelist, essayist, and Hollywood scriptwriter from Australia who identified as a "woman-oriented woman." When Baker retired in 1923, she started to run their household while writing her autobiography, “Fighting For Life.” In 1935 and four years before her autobiography was published, Baker and Wylie decided to move to Princeton, New Jersey, with their friend Louise Pearce. They lived there together until Baker died in 1945, followed by Pearce, and then later Wylie who died on November 4, 1959 at the age of 74. Ida Alexa Ross Wylie was an Australian-British-American novelist, screenwriter, short story writer, and poet who was honored by the journalistic and literary establishments of her time, and was known around the world. Between 1915 and 1953, more than thirty of her novels and stories were adapted into films, including “Keeper of the Flame” (1942), which was directed by George Cukor and starred Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. Louise Pearce was an American pathologist at the Rockefeller Institute who helped develop a treatment for African sleeping sickness (trypanosomiasis). The three women were members of Heterodoxy, a feminist biweekly luncheon discussion club, of which many members were lesbian or bisexual. After Baker's death in 1945, Wylie and Pearce continued living at Trevenna Farm until both died in 1959. Her home was described as a "most delightful and interesting place to live and study. Her shelves were crowded with many old editions of medical treasures, the latest scientific literature and the latest works on international questions. She had a wonderful collection of Chinese carvings and porcelains." Ida Alexa Ross Wylie and Dr Louise Pearce are buried at Henry Skillman Burying Ground (Orchard Rd, Trevenna Farms in Rocky Hill, Montgomery Twp., Somerset, NJ) alongside Sarah Wylie, I.A.R. Wylie's bull terrier, died in 1943.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Mary Rozet Smith was a Chicago-born US philanthropist who was one of the trustees and benefactors of Hull House. She was the companion of activist Jane Addams for over thirty years.
Born: December 23, 1868, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Died: February 22, 1934
Lived: Yule Craig, Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, Hancock County, Maine, USA (44.38761, -68.20391)
Buried: Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 151456530

Jane Addams was a pioneer settlement social worker, public philosopher, sociologist, author, and leader in women's suffrage and world peace. She revolutionized American social reform by founding Hull House, an institution Addams established in a poor neighborhood of Chicago to provide services for recent immigrants. Addams later became the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Her closest adult companion and friend was wealthy philanthropist Mary Rozet Smith, who supported Addams's work at Hull House, and with whom she shared a romantic friendship. They always slept in the same room and the same bed, and when they traveled Jane even wired ahead to be sure they would get a hotel room with a double bed. It was said that, "Mary Smith became and always remained the highest and clearest note in the music that was Jane Addams' personal life". Together they owned a summerhouse in Bar Harbor, Maine. When apart, they would write to each other at least once a day - sometimes twice. Addams would write to Smith, "I miss you dreadfully and am yours 'til death". The letters also show that the women saw themselves as a married couple: "There is reason in the habit of married folks keeping together", Addams wrote to Smith.
Together from 1893 to 1934: 41 years.
Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935)
Mary Rozet Smith (December 23, 1868 - 1934)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Located in the Near West Side of Chicago, Illinois, in the XIX century Hull House opened its doors to recently arrived European immigrants.
Address: 800 S Halsted St, Chicago, IL 60607, USA (41.87162, -87.64743)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10.00-16.00, Sunday 12.00-16.00
Phone: +1 (312) 413-5353
National Register of Historic Places: 66000315, 1966. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Hull House was a settlement house in the United States that was co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr. By 1911, Hull House had grown to 13 buildings. In 1912 the Hull House complex was completed with the addition of a summer camp, the Bowen Country Club. With its innovative social, educational, and artistic programs, Hull House became the standard bearer for the movement that had grown, by 1920, to almost 500 settlement houses nationally. The Hull mansion and several subsequent acquisitions were continuously renovated to accommodate the changing demands of the association. The original building and one additional building (which has been moved 200 yards (182.9 m)) survive today. On June 12, 1974, the Hull House building was designated a Chicago Landmark. The Hull House Association ceased operations in Jan. 2012, but the Hull mansion remains open as a museum.
Life
Who: Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) and Ellen Gates Starr (March 19, 1859 – February 10, 1940)
Ellen Gates Starr taught for ten years in Chicago before joining Addams in 1888 for a tour of Europe. While in London, they were inspired by the success of the English Settlement movement and became determined to establish a similar social settlement in Chicago. They returned to Chicago and co-founded Hull House as a kindergarten and then a day nursery, an infancy care centre, and a center for continuing education for adults. Lillian Faderman argues that Starr was Addams’ "first serious attachment.” The friendship between the two lasted many years, and the two became domestic partners. Addams wrote to Starr, "Let’s love each other through thick and thin and work out a salvation.” The director of the Hull-House Museum at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Lisa Lee, has argued that the relationship was a lesbian one. Victoria Bissell Brown agrees that the two can be regarded as lesbians if they are seen as "women loving women,” although we do not necessarily have any evidence for genital sexual contact. The intensity of the relationship dwindled when Addams met Mary Rozet Smith, and the two women subsequently set up home together. Ellen died in 1940 and is buried at Convent of the Holy Child, Suffern, NY.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Bar Harbor is a town on Mount Desert Island in Hancock County, Maine. As of the 2010 census, its population is 5,235.
Address: Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, Hancock County, Maine, USA (44.38761, -68.20391)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: West Street Historic District (West St. between Billings Ave. and Eden St.), 80000226, 1980, & Harbor Lane--Eden Street Historic District (Portions of Harbor Ln. and Eden St.), 09000550, 2009
Place
Louise DeKoven Bowen, Mrs. J.T. Bowen of Chicago, friend and patroness of Jane Addams, built his summer home, Baymeath, at Bar Harbor in 1896. Baymeath was a southern colonial house four miles from Bar Harbor Village. It was situated on a hillside from which a series of terraces led down to the bay. One of these, formerly a tennis court, was a formal garden enclosed by vine-covered stone walls on two sides and high fences with actinidia on the other two. Beyond the house, another lattice-enclosed garden stood with a rose bed. Climbing roses covered all the fences. Another rose arbor led into the woods where lupine, day lilies, and wild roses grew. From all these gardens, a wide view of Frenchman’s Bay added contrast to the color of the northern flowers. The house was razed in 1979. Near Baymeath, on Lookout Point in Hull’s Cove, was a cottage called Yule Craig, designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston for the son of Senator Yulee of Florida. In 1904, the house was purchased by Mrs. Bowen’s friend, Jane Addams. A half mile path connected Baymeath and Yule Craig, and there was much visiting back and forth, as Mrs. Bowen was one of the chief supporters of Jane Addams’s Hull House Settlement in Chicago, and donor of the Bowen Country Club. Miss Addams once famously said that she could raise more money in a single month in Bar Harbor than all the rest of the year back home in Chicago. Jane Addams sold the house in 1932 to Harry Hill Thorndikes, which renamed it Thorncraig. Mrs. Thorndike’s sister, Miss Belle Gurnee, owned the property between Yule Craig and Baymeath, a large chalet built in Switzerland and imported to her property on Lookout Point. Thorncraig was inherited by the Thorndike’s son, Augustus Gurnee Thorndike, and was later purchased by John J. Emery. Emery’s aunt was married to Benjamin Moore, brother-in-law of Mrs. Moore who later owned Baymeath. Thorncraig proved to have notoriously irresolvable plumbing troubles, and was demolished in the early 1980’s. Another famous queer resident at Bar Harbor was Natalie Clifford Barney. Alice Pike Barney (1857-1931) was an artist, actor, playwright, and socialite. The daughter of Cincinnati millionaire and patron of the arts Samuel Napthali Pike, Alice was born into a life of privilege. She married Albert Clifford Barney, son of a wealthy manufacturer of railway cars, prior to her twentieth birthday. The Barney’s had two daughters, Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972) and Laura Clifford Barney (1879-1974.) The family split their time between New York City and Paris, France, until 1900, when they purchased a home in Washington, DC. Well aware of the steamy summers of the eastern United States, the Barney’s would vacation in Bar Harbor, Maine, and in 1888, commissioned a "summer cottage" in Bar Harbor they named "Ban-y-Bryn." Designed by Architect S. V. Stratton, Ban-y-Bryn was built on a steep bluff, with the front of the cottage facing the rustic Maine landscape. The rear of the home, with its prominent turret and several grand porches, overlooked Frenchman’s Bay. Rising to four stories, the home consisted of 27 rooms, including seven bedrooms, five bathrooms, five fireplaces, a large stable, seven servants’ bedrooms, and additional servants’ facilities. The top floor was reserved as studio space for Ms. Barney and her artistic pursuits. Ban-y-Bryn’s exterior was constructed of granite. The interior featured exotic hardwoods and materials, and was furnished with antiques acquired by the Barney’s during their global travels. Ban-y-Bryn was one of their many luxuries; interest in the home began to fade as their respective pursuits and tastes evolved over time. The Barney’s sold their marvelous summer dwelling in 1930. Sadly, Ban-y-Bryn was one of 67 summer cottages incinerated in the Bar Harbor fire of October 1947.
Life
Who: Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) and Mary Rozet Smith (1868-1934)
Mary Rozet Smith was a Chicago-born US philanthropist who was one of the trustees and benefactors of Hull House. She was the companion of activist Jane Addams for over thirty years. Smith provided the financing for the Hull House Music School and donated the school’s organ as a memorial to her mother. There has been much speculation of Addams and Smith’s life and relationship. Many of their letters were burned by Addams, but Addams referred to their relationship as a "marriage.” They traveled together, co-owned a home in Maine, and were committed to each other. In 1895, after Addams had suffered from a bout with typhoid fever, she went abroad with Smith, traveling to London. There, they visited several settlement houses, including Oxford House, Browning House, Bermondsey Settlement and others. They proceeded on to Moscow and met Tolstoy, then traveled through southern Russia, into Poland and Germany, before returning to Chicago. Early in 1934, Addams had a heart attack and Smith nursed her at her home, neglecting her own illness. Smith succumbed to pneumonia, fell into a coma and then died on February 22, 1934. Addams was considered too ill to descend the stairs to attend Smith’s memorial service, which she could hear from her second-floor room. Addams died on May 21, 1935.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Graceland Cemetery is a large Victorian era cemetery located in the north side community area of Uptown, in the city of Chicago, Illinois. Established in 1860, its main entrance is at the intersection of Clark Street and Irving Park Road. The Sheridan stop on the Red Line is the nearest CTA "L" station.
Address: 4001 N Clark St, Chicago, IL 60613, USA (41.95483, -87.66188)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 773-525-1105
National Register of Historic Places: 00001628, 2001
Place
In the XIX century, a train to the north suburbs occupied the eastern edge of the cemetery where the "L" now rides. The line was also used to carry mourners to funerals, in specially rented funeral cars, requiring an entry on the east wall, now closed. At that point, the cemetery would have been well outside the city limits of Chicago. After the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, Lincoln Park which had been the city's cemetery, was deconsecrated and some of the bodies moved here. The edge of the pond around Daniel Burnham's burial island was once lined with broken headstones and coping transported from Lincoln Park. Lincoln Park then became a recreational area, with a single mausoleum remaining, the "Couch tomb", containing the remains of Ira Couch. The Couch Tomb is probably the oldest extant structure in the City, everything else having been destroyed by the Great Chicago Fire. The cemetery is typical of those that reflect Queen Victoria's reconception of the early XIX century "graveyard". Instead of poorly maintained headstones, and bodies buried on top of each other, on an ungenerous parcel of land, the cemetery became a pastoral landscaped park dotted with memorial markers, with room left over for picnics, a common usage of cemeteries. The landscape architecture for Graceland was designed by Ossian Cole Simonds. The cemetery's walls are topped off with wrought iron spear point fencing. Many of the cemetery's tombs are of great architectural or artistic interest, including the Getty Tomb, the Martin Ryerson Mausoleum (both designed by architect Louis Sullivan, who is also buried here), and the Schoenhofen Pyramid Mausoleum. The industrialist George Pullman was buried at night, in a lead-lined coffin within an elaborately reinforced steel-and-concrete vault, to prevent his body from being exhumed and desecrated by labor activists. Along with its other famous burials the cemetery is notable for two statues by sculptor Lorado Taft, Eternal Silence for the Graves family plot and The Crusader that marks Victor Lawson's final resting place. The cemetery is also the final resting place of several victims of the tragic Iroquois Theater fire in which more than 600 people died.
Notable queer burials at Graceland Cemetery:
• Louise DeKoven Bowen (1859–1953) was an American philanthropist, civic leader, social reformer, and suffragist. Assisting Jane Addams, Bowen became an officer and trustee of the Hull House.
• James Deering (November 12, 1859 – September 21, 1925) was an industrial executive in the family Deering Harvester Company and subsequent International Harvester, a socialite, and an antiquities collector. He is known for his landmark Vizcaya estate, where he was an early XX-century resident on Biscayne Bay in the present day Coconut Grove district of Miami, Florida.
• Mary Rozet Smith (1868-1934) was a Chicago-born US philanthropist who was one of the trustees and benefactors of Hull House. She was the companion of activist Jane Addams for over thirty years. Smith provided the financing for the Hull House Music School and donated the school's organ as a memorial to her mother. She was active in several social betterment societies in Chicago at the turn of the XX century.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Glenway Wescott was an American poet, novelist and essayist. A figure of the American expatriate literary community in Paris during the 1920s Wescott was openly gay.
Born: April 11, 1901, Kewaskum, Wisconsin, United States
Died: February 22, 1987, Rosemont, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, New Jersey, United States
Education: University of Chicago
Lived: 410 Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
215 E. 79 St.
Stone-blossom, Clinton, NJ 08809, USA (40.65216, -74.92672)
Haymeadows, Wescott Preserve, Raven Rock Rosemont Rd, Stockton, NJ 08559, USA (40.4265, -75.01584)
Buried: in the small farmer's graveyard hidden behind a rock wall and trees at the farm at Haymeadows (New Jersey) (ashes)
Buried alongside: Monroe Wheeler
Find A Grave Memorial# 13740685
Movies: Apartment in Athens
Siblings: Lloyd Wescott

Glenway Wescott was an American novelist and an important figure in the American expatriate literary community in Paris during the 1920s. Upon receiving a small printing press as a gift from his father, Monroe Wheeler began producing chapbooks of poetry under the imprint, Manikin Press. One of his first works was The Bitterns, a collection of poems by Wescott, whom he had met at the University of Chicago in 1919 and who would become Wheeler's long-time companion. 1927 brought a new challenge to their pairing: George Platt Lynes fell passionately in love with the strikingly good-looking Wheeler. Wheeler, for his part, was entranced by Lynes's "full, luscious mouth and his wasp like waist." The ménage a trois ended in February 1943 when Lynes moved out of the apartment that the three men shared, thus bringing to a close one of the longer chapters that supplemented the sixty-plus years relationship between Wescott and Wheeler. Lynes would eventually succumb to cancer in 1955 at the age of 48. Wheeler died in 1988 at the age of 89, 18 months after the death of Wescott.
Together from 1919 to 1987: 68 years.
Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987)
Monroe Wheeler (February 13, 1899 - August 14, 1988)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?
tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1936 Lloyd Wescott purchased a 1,000-acre (4.0 km2) dairy farm along the Mulhocaway Creek in Union Township near Clinton in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Mulhocaway Farm, as it was known, became the headquarters for the Artificial Breeding Association, a pioneer in the artificial insemination of dairy cows. Glenway Wescott along with Monroe Wheeler and George Platt Lynes took over one of the farmhand houses and called it Stone-Blossom. In the 1950s, Mulhocaway Farm was acquired by the State of New Jersey under eminent domain in order to create the Spruce Run Reservoir.
Address: Clinton, NJ 08809, USA (40.65216, -74.92672)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Clinton Historic District (Roughly, along Center, W. Main, Main, E. Main, Halstead, Water, Leigh (Library) and Lower Center Sts.), 95001101, 1995
Place
Clinton is a town in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, located on the South Branch of the Raritan River. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town’s population was 2,719, reflecting an increase of 87 (+3.3%) from the 2,632 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 578 (+28.1%) from the 2,054 counted in the 1990 Census. When the Clinton post office was established in 1829, it was named for DeWitt Clinton, Governor of New York and the primary impetus behind the then-newly completed Erie Canal. Clinton was incorporated as a town by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 5, 1865, within portions of Clinton, Franklin and Union Townships. Clinton gained full independence from its three parent townships in 1895. The town is perhaps best known for its two mills which sit on opposite banks of the South Branch Raritan River. The Red Mill, with its historic village, dates back to 1810 with the development of a mill for wool processing. Across the river sits the Stone Mill, home of the Hunterdon Art Museum for Contemporary Craft and Design, located in a former gristmill that had been reconstructed in 1836 and operated continuously until 1936. In 1952, a group of local residents conceived of a plan to convert the historic building into an art museum, which is still in operation today.
Life
Who: Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987), Monroe Wheeler (1899-1988) and George Platt Lynes (April 15, 1907 – December 6, 1955)
The Elizabethtown Water Company of New Jersey was first drawn to the idea of building a reservoir at the confluence of Spruce Run and Mulhockaway Creek just before 1929. Land speculators bought almost 2,100 acres in anticipation of selling it to the water company, but the Great Depression waylaid everybody’s plans. The state acquired 1,500 acres to build a game preserve, and in 1936, the remaining 600 acres went to Lloyd Wescott and his wife Barbara for $70 an acre. After they moved into their red clapboard farmhouse, the Wescotts restored the old farm buildings and built new metal barns. Farm tenants lived close to each of three complexes of cow barns. Lloyd’s brother, Glenway Wescott, parents and other relatives lived in other separate homes on the property, which he called Mulhocaway Farm (intentionally spelled differently from the name of the creek.) The Westcotts intended to breed healthy livestock, and when the Hunterdon County Board of Agriculture was introduced to the concept of artificial breeding of dairy cattle, Lloyd proposed to construct housing for Guernsey bulls. The farm’s facility became the first artificial insemination station in the country. The old colonial house was refurnished by the Wescotts and given the romantic name Stone-blossom by Glenway Wescott. George Platt Lynes wrote to Katherine Anne Porter in 1938: “You would never know Stone-blossom. There is an acre of lawn, and a little newly-planted flower garden, and there are new stone walls and new trees. Why aren’t you here?” The three men were to remain together in New York and at Stone-blossom until 1943, when George ended his relationship with Monroe Wheeler and moved out. In 1956, the State of New Jersey revived the plan for a reservoir in the fertile valley. The Westcotts negotiated a selling price and relocated to another farm in Delaware Township in 1959, considering the move a blessing since the structures and equipment had become obsolete. Theirs was the only farm to be inundated by water from Spruce Run Creek.


Conversation Piece (Monroe Wheeler, Glenway Wescott and George Platt Lynes). Paul Cadmus Stone Blossom in the background

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Immediately after the death of her father, Alice Delamar rented a house on Park Avenue 270.
Address: Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
Type: Private Property
Place
Park Avenue is a wide New York City boulevard which carries north and southbound traffic in the borough of Manhattan, and is also a wide one-way pair in the Bronx. For most of the road’s length in Manhattan, it runs parallel to Madison Avenue to the west and Lexington Avenue to the east. Park Avenue’s entire length was formerly called Fourth Avenue; the title still applies below 14th Street. Meanwhile, the section between 14th and 17th Street is called Union Square East, and between 17th and 32nd Streets, the name Park Avenue South is used. In the Bronx, Park Avenue runs in several segments between the Major Deegan Expressway and Fordham Road.
Notable queer residents at Park Avenue:
- No. 270: real estate titan Dr. Charles V. Paterno formed the Vanderbilt Av. Realty Corp. and commissioned the architectural firm of Warren & Wetmore to design a massive U-shaped neo-Renaissance building. Paterno envisioned two distinct sections—the mansion-like apartments that took the address 270 Park Avenue, and the apartment hotel that used the name Hotel Marguery. The residents would share a 70 by 275 foot garden with a private drive. As the restrained brick and stone structure rose, Manhattan millionaires rushed to take apartments. Construction was completed, as predicted, in the fall of 1917, at a cost of around $8 million, exclusive of the land. Twelve stories tall, there were 20 acres of floor space divided into 108 apartments. Deemed the “largest apartment building in the world,” a Dec. 1917 advertisement counted “1,536 living rooms; 1,476 closets; 100 kitchens; 100 sculleries.” Potential residents could choose apartments of 6 to 10 rooms with three or four baths, at an annual rent of $4000 to $6500. Larger apartments, from 12 to 19 rooms with four to six baths, would cost $7000 to $15000. The highest rent would be equivalent to about $23,000 per month in 2015. The moneyed residents could enjoy the convenience of the downstairs restaurant, run by the Ritz-Carlton restaurant. Rudolph Guglielmi had a spacious apartment in the building in Nov. 1925 when he applied for United States citizenship. Better known to American audiences by his screen name, Rudolph Valentino, the movie star had to dodge a battery of questions. His failure to do military service during the war was brought up—he explained it was due to “a slight defect in the vision of his left eye.” The Italian Government had listed him “as a slacker.” The New York Times reported that “it was discovered to be an error which was later corrected.” Then there was the question about why Valentine’s wife, Winifred, was living on 96th Street and not in the Park Avenue apartment. “Mrs. Valentino said that the only issue between her husband and herself was that he wished her to give up all business and settle down into home life, and this she would not do.” The 1920s saw the comings and goings of other internationally-known names. In 1926 Queen Marie of Romania stayed briefly in the apartment of Ira Norris; and a year later Charles Lindbergh’s family, including his mother, stayed at No. 270 Park Avenue following his triumphant June 1927 return from Europe. Acclaimed stage actress Gertrude Lawrence (rumoured to be the lover of Daphne du Marier) took an apartment in 1929. No. 270 Park Avenue occupied the entire block between Madison Avenue and 47th and 48th Street. The 12-storey complex containing 108 suites in two separate sections, which were connected by the architects by two triumphal arches over the Vander Bild Avenue. Alice DeLamar rented the largest apartment. The apartment building stood near the Delamar Mansion, which had to be sold. An American magazine, the St. Louis Star “told” the adventures of Prince Carol of Romania (future Carol II of Romania, son of Marie of Romania) overcome by love for the fair miss De la Mar, offering his heart and his titles, but without achieving the desired result. Miss De la Mar told in a few words: “I did not want to marry the prince because I didn’t love him. I own $10 million and if I want to marry then I do not wish to give up my freedom to marry without love." The prince wrote: "The American press blew the rumor that I came to America to find a rich woman. The Daily News even picked a few candidates ahead of me: Miss Millicent Rogers, Miss Abby Rockefeller and Miss Alice Lamar." King Carol II ruled from 1930 to 1940. Carol is more known for his amorous adventures than for his way of ruling: in it, he does not seem to have excelled. In 1920 Alice Delamar moved into a beautiful house on Sunset Boulevard in Palm Beach. The inherited house of Pembroke was sold a few years later. The auction took place on August 16, 1924 in the Great Reception Hall of Pembroke. On June 24, 1947 plans were filed by architects Harrison & Abramovitz for the more than $21 million Time Life Building. The Hotel Marguery, once the largest apartment building in the world, and its astonishingly colorful history, was soon bulldozed. In 1971, Alice wrote that the complex has long been demolished. Today the site is occupied by the JP Morgan Chase Tower, constructed in 1960 and designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
- No. 410: Monroe Wheeler and Glenway Wescott’s latest apartment was in a very grand building at 410 Park Avenue, and they gave a large party for their friend. Maugham enjoyed the gathering, but when their upstairs neighbour Marlene Dietrich appeared, he felt upstaged and left. By the late 40s, Monroe Wheeler was a high profile New Yorker. His full-page portrait appeared in the Nov. 1948 issue of Vogue. At his parties at 410 Park Avenue were such celebrities as Cecil Beaton, Francis Bacon, Ben Shahn, Gore Vidal, and Christopher Isherwood. Among the regulars were Paul Cadmus, Marianne Moore, Katherine Anne Porter, Pavel Tchelitchew and Charles Henri Ford, Diana and Reed Vreeland, Joseph Campbell, the Kirsteins, E.E. Cummings, Brooke Astor, Philip Johnson, and others. Wheeler’s most amusing annual guests were Osbert and Edith Sitwell, the brother and sister poet famous for their double wit and set-up dry humor. In 1958 Monroe Wheeler learned that the grand old building at 410 Park Avenue would be demolished and replaced by a office tower. He found a small apartment at 215 E. 79 St. in a tall pale-blond brick building called the Thornely. They lived there for two years.
- No. 465, The Ritz Tower: Built in 1925 as the city’s most elegant apartment hotel, The Ritz Tower today remains one of Manhattan’s most luxurious and sought-after residential cooperatives noted for its spacious and elegant apartments, each one unique. Greta Garbo lived here for a time in the 40s. Most happy about this move was probably Mercedes de Acosta, who had an apartment at 471 Park Avenue, from where she could see Garbo's north facing rooms. Mercedes told the story that during the wartime, when people were not allowed to show light at night “we gave each other signs with candles. Why we were not arrested for this offence is still today a riddle to me.” In 1951 Garbo moved from the Ritz into a suite with four rooms located on the seventeenth floor of The Hampshire House at 150 Central Park South.
- No. 530: In 1950, Alice DeLamar’s address is still a house in New York at 530 Park Avenue. This 19-story, white-brick apartment building at 530 Park Avenue on the southwest corner at 61st Street next to the Regency Hotel was erected in 1940 and designed by George F. Pelham Jr., who also designed 41, 50, 785, 1130 and 1150 Park Avenue and 1056 Fifth Avenue. It was bought in 2007 for about $211 million by Blackrock Realty Advisors which then sold it to Aby Rosen, the owner of the Seagrams Building and Lever House on Park Avenue who converted the rental building to a condominium with 116 apartments in 2013. Handel Architects LLP was architect and William T. Georgis was interior designer for the conversion.
- No. 564: The second clubhouse of the Colony Club, was commissioned in 1913 and constructed from 1914 to 1916. It was designed by Delano & Aldrich in the Neo-Georgian style, with interiors designed by Elsie de Wolfe. See Colony Club.
- No. 570: On April 24, 1947, Willa Cather died of a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 73 in her home at 570 Park Avenue in Manhattan.
- No. 695, 10065: Hunter College is an American public university and one of the constituent organizations of the City University of New York, located in the Lenox Hill neighborhood of Manhattan's Upper East Side. The college grants undergraduate and graduate degrees in over one-hundred fields of study across five schools. Hunter College also administers Hunter College High School and Hunter College Elementary School. Founded in 1870, originally as a women's college, Hunter is one of the oldest public colleges in the United States. The college assumed the location of its main campus on Park Avenue in 1873. Hunter began admitting men into its freshman class in 1964. In 1943 Eleanor Roosevelt dedicated the former home of herself and Franklin Delano Roosevelt to the college, which reopened in 2010 as the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Audre Lorde (1934-1992); Pauli Murray (1910–1985).
- No. 882-884: Ogden Codman, Jr. collaborated with Edith Wharton on the redesign of her townhouse at 882-884 Park Avenue, now demolished.
- No. 993: From the 1940s to the mid 1970s Marlene Dietrich kept, and often resided in apartment 12E, a four room apartment in this building. She relocated to New York to be close to her daughter Maria Riva and her grandchildren. 993 Park Avenue went co-op in the late fifties and Dietrich bought an apartment in the building. The full service, thirteen storey Italianite block had been built in the teens by Bing & Bing. Dietrich decorated her modest apartment (a two bed / two bath unit of 1600 square feet), in a mixture of styles: Louis XIV furniture was offset against glizy mirrored walls befitting a movie star. When she wasn’t travelling the world with her spectacular one-woman show, Dietrich divided her time between her New York home and a Paris rental on the Avenue Montaigne. Visting Dietrich in Paris in the late 70s, her friend Leo Lerman noted "the podge of the [Parisian] flat, which I find touching and that Gray [Foy] says is so unlike her New York controlled elegance. I like both and find both very much the way she is." After a stage fall in Australia in 1975 Dietrich went into semi-retirement in Paris, becoming increasingly reclusive. Her grandson, J. Michael Riva lived at the Park Avenue apartment during the early 80s with his then-fiance, Jamie Lee Curtis, when the latter was filming "Trading Places" (1983.) Dietrich died in 1992. Her heirs sold the apartment in 1998 for $615.000. 993 Park Ave #12E reappeared on the market in 2010. The refurbished unit was listed by Sotheby’s Real Estate for $ 2.250.000.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1959 the Wescotts moved to a 147-acre (0.59 km2) farm further south from Clinton in Hunterdon County, near the community of Rosemont in Delaware Township. The farm had been previously owned by big band leader Paul Whiteman. Glenway Wescott moved into a two-story stone house on the property, dubbed Haymeadows. In 1987, Wescott died of a stroke at his home in Rosemont.
Address: Wescott Preserve, Raven Rock Rosemont Rd, Stockton, NJ 08559, USA (40.4265, -75.01584)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Place
Rosemont is an unincorporated community located within Delaware Township in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Located at the top of a small hill, the center of the community is along Kingwood Stockton Road (County Route 519) near its intersections with Raven Rock Rosemont Road and Rosemont Ringoes Road (CR 604.) Farmland and residences make up the surrounding area while the center of the settlement includes residences, a post office, and an antique shop. Wescott Preserve is named after Lloyd Wescott (1907-1990), an agriculturalist and philanthropist who was the founder and first chairman of the Hunterdon Medical Center. Wescott and his wife Barbara purchased this farm in 1959, and raised dairy cows. In 1966, they donated 15 acres of land to the county for open space, which became Hunterdon’s first county park. The park even predates the Division, which was established in 1973. The Wescotts donated an additional 65 acres to the county four years later. In 2006, 102 acres of mature woodlands and meadows along the Lockatong Creek were added through the generous efforts of the Peters family, the Hunterdon Land Trust Alliance, and the county. Also on the property is a former one-room schoolhouse. Built out of stone in 1861, it was known as the John Reading School or District Schoolhouse #97. Wescott Farm is one-of-a-kind farmhouse apartment located on a working grass-fed cattle and sheep farm. Original XVIII century farmhouse on a 200+ acre working farm. The farmhouse has a porch that overlooks a sculpted kitchen garden and the Delaware river in the distance. The original floor boards of the farmhouse stretch throughout the apartment and other details like moldings and exposed beams make the spaces explode with charm. The historic farmhouse has been used over the centuries by famous writers (Glenway Wescott) and musicians (Paul Whiteman.) There is cooking school located downstairs from the farm stay apartment with classes and dinners available some days and evenings.
Life
Who: Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987) and Monroe Wheeler (1899-1988)
While Monroe Wheeler was on a long museum trip to Japan and France, Lloyd Wescott found a farm that was for sale by bandleader Paul Whiteman. Glenway Wescott wrote to his mother, who was making her last visit to Wisconsin, “Lloyd has come to an agreement with Mr. Whiteman. The lawyers are drawing up the papers.” He expressed regret to Bernardine Szold: “Now the last season of our beloved valley… For me it will take all that time to prepare to move – twenty years of these attics and archives… Monroe’s as well, very massive now that he has moved from 410 Park Avenue into a small flat.” But after seeing the new farm, he praised Lloyd to William Maxwell: “My brother has bought another farm between Rosemont and Stockton in Delaware township, and is letting me have the handsomest old stone house on it. So, beyond the ordeal of moving, my way of life will not be greatly changed. My good fortune puts me to shame.” Glenway gave the name Haymeadows to the stone house and grounds being refurbished for himself and Wheeler. John Connolly drove Glenway to the property and remembered, “When I first saw it, there was a farm worker named Leroy living there with a house full of kids.” When he died, Glenway Wescot was cremated and his ashes buried in the small farmer's graveyard hidden behind a rock wall and trees at the farm at Haymeadows. In the same graveyard was buried Monroe Wheeler one year later.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Edna St. Vincent Millay was an American poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism.
Born: February 22, 1892, Rockland, Maine, United States
Died: October 19, 1950, Austerlitz, New York, United States
Education: Vassar College
Lived: Ragged Island, Harpswell, Maine
75½ Bedford St, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73138, -74.00499)
Steepletop, 440 E Hill Rd, Austerlitz, NY 12017, USA (42.32114, -73.44319)
Whitehall (52 High St, Camden, ME 04843)
200 Broadway, Rockland, ME 04841
Buried: Steepletop Cemetery, Austerlitz, Columbia County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 713
Siblings: Norma Millay Ellis, Kathleen Millay
Movies: Hitler's Madman

Edna St. Vincent Millay was a lyrical poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was known for her feminist activism and her many love affairs. Counted among her close friends were Witter Bynner, Arthur Davison Ficke, and Susan Glaspell, as well as Floyd Dell and Edmund Wilson, both of whom proposed marriage to her and were refused. While playing the lead in her own The Princess Marries the Page at Vassar, she was approached by the British actress Edith Wynne Matthison, who, excited by the performance, came backstage to kiss Millay and invite her to her summer home. Millay felt great passion in the kiss and the two exchanged letters, providing one of her few known straightforward pronouncements of lesbian love: "You wrote me a beautiful letter,--I wonder if you meant it to be as beautiful as it was.--I think you did; for somehow I know that your feeling for me, however slight it is, is of the nature of love. . . . When you tell me to come, I will come, by the next train, just as I am. This is not meekness, be assured; I do not come naturally by meekness; know that it is a proud surrender to You.” Another of Edna’s lovers was Thelma Wood, who later became Djuna Barnes’ lover.
Edith Wynne Matthison (November 23, 1875 – September 23, 1955)
Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950) was born at 200 Broadway, Rockland, ME 04841, to Cora Lounella Buzelle, a nurse, and Henry Tolman Millay, a schoolteacher who would later become a superintendent of schools. Her middle name derives from St. Vincent's Hospital in New York, where her uncle's life had been saved just before her birth. The family's house was "between the mountains and the sea where baskets of apples and drying herbs on the porch mingled their scents with those of the neighboring pine woods."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1901, a young widow, who had spent her honeymoon in Camden, purchased an 1834 Sea Captains house. The first of only six owners, she took in a handful of summer guests for income, and then added rooms each year until she operated Whitehall (52 High St, Camden, ME 04843), one of only five hotels in Camden Maine at the start of the century. Whitehall, sometimes called Whitehall Hotel, later became the Whitehall Inn. In 2015, new owners have returned the property to its original and classic name -- Whitehall. It was the summer home for the elite of Camden's summer visitors. Guests would arrive by train with maids or by chauffeur driven cars. Royalty, titans of industry and celebrities, both famous and infamous, made Whitehall a part of their summer schedule. The inn has welcomed a king, a U.S. President and other political notables, many fabled screen stars and sports heroes. And the guest list includes a supermodel, a legendary TV anchorman, and a world-renowned singer-songwriter. Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950) used to work at this tourists’ inn during the busy summer season. In 1912, “Vincent,” as she preferred to be called, did her first public reading here for guests and employees at the inn’s end-of-summer party. The first lines of the poem she read, “Renascence,” described the view of the Maine countryside from nearby Mount Battie, which Vincent loved to climb. “All I could see from where I stood,” the poem began, “was three long mountains and a wood.” A professor, who was vacationing at Whitehall, was so impressed by Vincent’s poem that he arranged to have one of his wealthy friends pay for the girl to study at Vassar College.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

75½ Bedford St is a building in the Greenwich Village area of New York City that is only 9 feet 6 inches (2.9 meters) wide. It is considered to be the narrowest house in New York. Its past tenants have included Edna St. Vincent Millay, Ann McGovern, cartoonist William Steig and anthropologist Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901 - November 15, 1978). It is sometimes referred to as the Millay House, indicated by a New York City Landmark plaque on the outside of the house.
Address: 75½ Bedford St, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73138, -74.00499)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1873
The three-story house is located at 75½ Bedford St., off Seventh Ave. between Commerce and Moore Streets, in the West Greenwich Village section of Manhattan. On the inside, the house measures 8 ft. 7 in. wide; at its narrowest, it is only 2 ft. wide. There is a shared garden in the rear of the house. The archives of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation states that the house was constructed in 1873 during a smallpox epidemic, for Horatio Gomez, trustee of the Hettie Hendricks-Gomez Estate, on what was the former carriage entranceway for the adjacent property, which includes the 1799 house at 77 Bedford St., built by Joshua Isaacs, the oldest house in Greenwich Village. However, the house may have been constructed earlier, as the style that appears in a 1922 photograph at the New-York Historical Society is typical of the 1850’s Italianate architecture common in the area at the time. In 1923, the house was leased by a consortium of artists who used it for actors working at the Cherry Lane Theater. Cary Grant and John Barrymore stayed at the house while performing at the Cherry Lane during this time. Edna St. Vincent Millay, the Pulitzer Prize winning poet and her new husband, coffee importer Eugen Jan Boissevain, lived in the house from 1923 to 1924. They hired Ferdinand Savignano to renovate the house, who added a skylight, transformed the top floor into a studio for Millay and added a Dutch-inspired front gabled façade for her husband. Later occupants included cartoonist William Steig, and his sister-in-law, anthropologist Margaret Mead. The current owner is George Gund IV (son of sports entrepreneur George Gund III), who purchased the house for $3.25 million in June 2013. “A centrally placed spiral staircase dominates all three floors and bisects the space into two distinct living areas. The narrow steps call for expert sideways navigational skills. Under the stairwell on the first floor is a tiny utility closet, the only closed storage space in the house. All three floors have fireplaces.” The house has two bathrooms, and its galley kitchen comes with a microwave built into the base of the winding staircase that rises to the upper floors.
Life
Who: Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950)
Edna St. Vincent Millay was a poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism. She used the pseudonym Nancy Boyd for her prose work. The poet Richard Wilbur asserted, "She wrote some of the best sonnets of the century." Millay was openly bisexual. Counted among her close friends were the writers Witter Bynner, Arthur Davison Ficke, and Susan Glaspell, as well as Floyd Dell and the critic Edmund Wilson, both of whom proposed marriage to her and were refused. In January 1921, she went to Paris, where she met and befriended the sculptor Thelma Wood. In 1923 she married 43-year-old Eugen Jan Boissevain (1880–1949), the widower of the labor lawyer and war correspondent Inez Milholland, a political icon Millay had met during her time at Vassar. Boissevain died in 1949 of lung cancer, and Millay lived alone for the last year of her life.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Steepletop, also known as the Edna St. Vincent Millay House, was the farmhouse home of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Edna St. Vincent Millay and her husband Eugene Jan Boissevain, in Austerlitz, New York. Her former home and gardens are maintained by the Edna St. Vincent Millay Society. The Millay Colony for the Arts, founded in 1973 by Norma Millay Ellis, sister of the poet, is also located at Steepletop.
Address: 440 E Hill Rd, Austerlitz, NY 12017, USA (42.32114, -73.44319)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 518-392-3362
National Register of Historic Places: 71000534, 1971. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The name Steepletop comes from a pink, conical wildflower that grows there. The Society opened the house for tours in 2010. The guest house is believed to have been built in the late XVIII century, considerably predating the main house, which is believed to have been built around 1870. Millay and Boissevain bought the property, which had been a 635-acre (257 ha) blueberry farm and moved in in 1925, after the period in which critics and scholars generally believe she had done her best work. She continued to write since the rural setting provided sufficient distance from the outside world, and the couple lived there except for periods of travel. After WWII, in the late 1940s, she left Steepletop less frequently. Boissevain died in 1949, making her even more reclusive in the year before she was found dead at the foot of the stairway in the main house. The fall was the proximate cause of death, but what led to it is unknown. Her sister Norma and her husband, painter Charles Ellis, moved in afterwards. In 1973, they established Millay Colony for the Arts on the seven acres (2.8 ha) around the guest house and barn. After her husband’s death in 1976, Norma continued to manage the colony program until her death in 1986. During that time, in 1980, she renovated the barn into housing for visiting artists. In 1997 a disabled-accessible main building was built on colony property. The colony continues to offer one-month residencies to writers, visual artists and composers from the U.S. and other countries. The Edna St. Vincent Millay Society remains in charge of the main house, the outbuildings around it and the grounds as a whole. It operates the property as a historic house museum dedicated to Millay and has spent much effort on restoring the house and grounds.
Life
Who: Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950)
On the grounds of Steepletop, Boissevain and Millay built a barn (from a Sears Roebuck kit), and then a writing cabin and a tennis court. Millay grew her own vegetables in a small garden. The couple later bought Ragged Island in Casco Bay, Maine, as a summer retreat. Edna St. Vincent Millay died at her home on October 19, 1950 and is buried at Steepletop: the path rises through hardwood forest to the poet's grave, in a small clearing with a bench that invites contemplation. It's a short walk, maybe a half-mile from the country road high on the Taconic Ridge. In 2003 the Friends of the Millay Society built the Millay Poetry Trail along the dirt road leading to her grave and those of several family members. The trail is open to the public and posted with her nature poetry along the shaded route.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Ragged Island (Harpswell, Maine) is a privately owned island in Harpswell, Cumberland County, Maine, which is geographically within Casco Bay in the Gulf of Maine. It is notable as having been the summer home of poet Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950) and husband Eugen Jan Boissevain from 1933 until her death in 1950. Whatever the history of the island's name, at least one 1790 maritime chart identifies it simply as Cold Arse. 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Christopher Bram is an American author. Bram grew up in Virginia Beach, Virginia, where he was a paperboy and an Eagle Scout. He graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1974. He moved to New York City in 1978.
Born: February 22, 1952, Buffalo, New York, United States
Education: College of William & Mary
Movies: Gods and Monsters, Queer City, Dangerous Music
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts, US & Canada, Lambda Literary Award for Gay Fiction
Nominations: Lambda Literary Award for Gay Men's Mystery, more
Anniversary: October 1979

Christopher Bram is an American author. In 2012, he published Eminent Outlaws: much of the literary history Bram recounts takes place in New York City, where Bram - a native of Virginia - has lived since 1978. Unsurprisingly, a large proportion of that history centers on Greenwich Village, where Bram lives with his partner, filmmaker Draper Shreeve. “We met in a bar talking about movies in 1979 - we are still talking about movies.” Bram has also written two shorts directed by Draper Shreeve. Bram’s 1995 novel Father of Frankenstein, about film director James Whale, was made into the 1998 movie Gods and Monsters starring Ian McKellen, Lynn Redgrave, and Brendan Fraser. The film was written and directed by Bill Condon who won an Academy Award for the adapted screenplay. Shreeve has made several documentaries, including Kids of Penzance, about a high school production of Gilbert and Sullivan, and Queer City, about LGBT lives in New York.
Together since 1979: 36 years.
Christopher Bram (born February 22, 1952)
Draper Shreeve (born May 5, 1954)
Anniversary: October 1979
We met at Julius', a New York gay bar, on a Friday night in October 1979. I was standing by the cigarette machine, Draper by the jukebox. He smiled and I walked over. When he told me his name, I said, "Oh. You're from the South." I am from the South myself and was hoping to meet someone more exotic. Then we started talking about movies. We had both seen the new Bertolucci film, Luna, and we knew it was bad but we admitted we had enjoyed it. We moved from the bar to a diner, where we talked about politics. Then we went uptown to my place, where we stopped talking. The next morning we went for a long walk around Columbia University and talked about our families. We have been talking about movies, politics, and our families ever since, along with books, art, music, friends, and everything else under the sun. We have not run out of words or news or thoughts to share with each other. -Christopher Bram



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Julius (159 West 10th Street at Waverly Place), is a tavern in Manhattan's Greenwich Village. It is often called the oldest continuously operating gay bar in New York City; however, its management was actively unwilling to operate as such and harassed gay customers until 1966. On April 21, 1966 members of the New York Chapter of the Mattachine Society staged a "Sip-In" at the bar which was to change the legal landscape. Dick Leitsch, the society's president, John Timmons and Craig Rodwell planned to draw attention to the practice by identifying themselves as homosexuals before ordering a drink in order to bring court scrutiny to the regulation. The three were going to read from Mattachine stationary "We are homosexuals. We are orderly, we intend to remain orderly, and we are asking for service." Newspaper articles on the wall of Julius indicate it was the favorite bar of Tennessee Williams, Truman Capote and Rudolf Nureyev. In 2016 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Angela Baddeley, CBE was an English stage and television actress, best-remembered for her role as household cook Mrs. Bridges in the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs. Her stage career lasted more than six decades.
Born: July 4, 1904, West Ham, London, United Kingdom
Died: February 22, 1976, Grayshott, United Kingdom
Lived: 64 Pretoria Road, West Ham, London
4 Holmbush Road, Putney
Buried: St Mary's, Mill Green, Station Road, Wargrave, Berkshire, RG10 8EU
Find A Grave Memorial# 41541832
Children: Juliet Shaw
Spouse: Glen Byam Shaw (m. 1929–1976), Stephen Thomas (m. 1921)

Glen Byam Shaw was an English actor and theatre director, known for his dramatic productions in the 1950s and his operatic productions in the 1960s and later. In the 1920s and 1930s Byam Shaw was a successful actor, both in romantic leads and in character parts. He worked frequently with his old friend Sir John Gielgud. Actress Constance Collier was impressed by Byam Shaw and used her influence to gain him roles. She introduced him to Ivor Novello, then a leading figure in London theatre. This drew him into contact with the poet Siegfried Sassoon, a friend of Collier; he and Byam Shaw became close. Their friendship lasted for the rest of Sassoon's life, although they ceased to be partners quite quickly; Sassoon became involved with Stephen Tennant, and Byam Shaw fell in love with an actress, Angela Baddeley. Their 1929 marriage, which lasted until her death in 1976, was, Denison writes, "a supremely happy one, both domestically and professionally”. Angela Baddeley was an English stage and television actress, best remembered for her role as "Mrs. Bridges" in the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs. They are interred together at St Mary's Church, Wargrave, Berkshire.
Together from 1929 to 1976: 47 years.
Angela Baddeley, CBE (July 4, 1904 – February 22, 1976)
Glencairn Alexander "Glen" Byam Shaw, CBE (December 13, 1904 – April 29, 1986)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Angela Baddeley (1904-1976), actress, was born on July 4, 1904 at 64 Pretoria Road, West Ham, London, one of the four daughters of William Herman Clinton-Baddeley, journalist, and his wife, Louise Rosalie Bourdin. She was a descendant of Sir Henry Clinton, the British general.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Actress Constance Collier directed Ivor Novello and Glen Byam Shaw in the play “Down Hill” in 1926. This drew Byam Shaw into contact with the poet Siegfried Sassoon, a friend of Collier; he and Byam Shaw became close. Their friendship lasted for the rest of Sassoon's life, although they ceased to be partners quite quickly; Sassoon became involved with Stephen Tennant, and Byam Shaw fell in love with an actress, Angela Baddeley. They married in 1929 and lived from 1930 to 1956 at 4 Holmbush Road, Putney.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Glen Byam Shaw (1904–1986) was an English actor and theatre director, known for his dramatic productions in the 1950s and his operatic productions in the 1960s and later. Byam Shaw fell in love with an actress, Angela Baddeley. They married in 1929. The marriage, which lasted until her death in 1976, was, Denison writes, "a supremely happy one, both domestically and professionally"; the couple had a son and a daughter. They are interred side by side at Wargrave St Mary's (Mill Green, Station Road, Wargrave, Berkshire, RG10 8EU).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Wystan Hugh Auden was an English poet, who later became an American citizen. He is best known for love poems such as "Funeral Blues," poems on political and social themes such as "September 1, 1939" ...
Born: February 21, 1907, York, United Kingdom
Died: September 29, 1973, Vienna, Austria
Lived: 2 West Cottages, West End Lane, NW6
559 Finchley Road, NW3
38 Upper Park Road, NW3
77 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.72795, -73.98559)
46 Fitzroy Street, W1T
15 Loudoun Road, NW8
54 Bootham, York YO30, UK (53.96413, -1.08782)
43 Thurloe Square, SW7
25 Randolph Crescent, W9
George Washington Hotel, 23 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10010
43 Chester Row, SW1W
February House, 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Education: University of Oxford
Gresham's School
Buried: Kirchstetten, Kirchstetten, Sankt Pölten-Land Bezirk, Lower Austria (Niederösterreich), Austria
Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA (memorial)
Christ Church Cathedral, St Aldate's, Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 1DP (memorial)
Find A Grave Memorial# 2969
Books: Poems, The Age of Anxiety, The Dyer's Hand, more
Influenced by: T. S. Eliot, Christopher Isherwood, John Donne, more
Married: June 15, 1935

Erika Mann was a German actress and writer, the eldest daughter of novelist Thomas Mann and Katia Mann. Her first noted affair was with actress Pamela Wedekind, whom she met in Berlin, and who was engaged to her brother Klaus Mann. She later became involved with actress Therese Giehse, and journalists Betty Knox and Annemarie Schwarzenbach, whom she served with as a war correspondent during World War II. On July 24, 1926, Erika Mann married German actor Gustaf Grundgens, but they divorced in 1929. In 1927, she and Klaus undertook a trip around the world, which they documented in their book Rundherum; Das Abenteuer einer Weltreise. She was involved as an actor in the lesbian film Mädchen in Uniform (1931, Leontine Sagan) but left the production before its completion. In 1935, she undertook a lavender marriage (marriage of convenience) to the homosexual English poet W.H. Auden, in order to obtain British citizenship. She and Auden never lived together, but remained friends and technically married until Erika's death. “Isherwood told me that Thomas Mann jokingly referred to him as the "family pimp" due to Isherwood having suggested the marriage in the first place.” Stathis Orphanos
Together from 1935 to 1969: 34 years.
Erika Julia Hedwig Mann (November 9, 1905 – August 27, 1969)
W.H. Auden (February 21, 1907 – September 29, 1973)
Married: June 15, 1935



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Wystan Hugh Auden, who published as W.H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, born in England, later an American citizen, regarded by many critics as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. His work is noted for its stylistic and technical achievement, its engagement with moral and political issues, and its variety in tone, form and content. In 1939, at the Yorkville apartment on 81st St in NYC, two days after a League of American Writers reading, Auden met the poet Chester Kallman, who became his lover for the next two years (Auden described their relationship as a "marriage" that began with a cross-country "honeymoon" journey). In August 1941, Kallman ended their sexual relationship because he could not accept Auden's insistence on a mutual faithfulness, but he and Auden remained companions, sharing houses and apartments from 1953 until Auden's death. Kallman died less than two years after Auden, seemingly of a broken heart.
Together from 1939 to 1973: 34 years.
Chester Simon Kallman (January 7, 1921 – January 17, 1975)
W.H. Auden (February 21, 1907 – September 29, 1973)
Anniversary: April 8, 1938



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

54 Bootham is situated in a Conservation Area. It was the birthplace in 1907 of the poet, W. H. Auden.
Address: 54 Bootham, York YO30, UK (53.96413, -1.08782)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 462897 (Grade II, 1954)
Place
A substantial three storey house of c. 1840. The symmetrical five-bay front built in white brick has the central bay and pilaster strips at each end projecting forward; brackets under the eaves cornice are set against a white plaster frieze which is matched by a deep white band under the second-floor windows. The front door is protected by an open porch and the window above is emphasised by a bold plaster surround. The back is built in red brick and has a central projection which on the upper floors contains alcoves leading off the half-landings of the staircase and giving access to what were water closets. The plan, apart from the projections at the back, is square with the common arrangement of four rooms disposed two on each side of the central hall. This central hall has the entrance hall divided from the stair-hall by Corinthian pilasters carrying enriched entablature, the doorways to principal rooms have enriched architraves and overdoors and the alcove off the half-landing is reached between fluted columns with foliated capitals, but the detail of these decorative features is all coarsely designed. The building was once used as a dormitory by Bootham School, later to become the home of the Buddhists in York, and since its purchase in 1986 is now used as offices by a firm of chartered accountants, and is the registered office of this Trust.
Life
Who: Wystan Hugh Auden (February 21, 1907 – September 29, 1973)
W.H. Auden was an English poet, who later became an American citizen. He is best known for love poems such as "Funeral Blues," poems on political and social themes such as "September 1, 1939" and "The Shield of Achilles," poems on cultural and psychological themes such as The Age of Anxiety, and poems on religious themes such as "For the Time Being" and "Horae Canonicae." He was born in York, grew up in and near Birmingham in a professional middle-class family.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

W.H. Auden lived in 1930 at 43 Chester Row, SW1W staying with the Benensons whilst tutoring their son Peter.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

W.H. Auden (1907-73), writer and poet, lived with his brother John at 43 Thurloe Square, SW7 in the 1930s.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1932, W.H. Auden stayed at 46 Fitzroy Street, W1T with Robert Medley (educator and artist) and Rupert Doone (English dancer and choreographer). In Paris on Nov. 1925, Rupert Doone met and fell in love with Robert Medley. Medley and Doone lived together until Doone's death, because of multiple sclerosis. Medley and Doone invited Auden to write plays for the Group Theatre, and through Auden, Medley met Stephen Spender, Louis MacNeice, and others who became associated with the Group.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1933 W.H. Auden lodged at 25 Randolph Crescent, W9 with Stephen Spender, English poet and author. Spender's sexuality has been the subject of debate. Spender's seemingly changing attitudes have caused him to be labeled bisexual. Many of his friends in his earlier years were gay. Spender himself had many affairs with men in his earlier years, most notably with Tony Hyndman (who is called "Jimmy Younger" in his memoir “World Within World”). Following his affair with Muriel Gardiner he shifted his focus to heterosexuality, though his relationship with Hyndman complicated both this relationship and his short-lived marriage to Inez Pearn (1936–39). His marriage to Natasha Litvin in 1941 seems to have marked the end of his romantic relationships with men, although not the end of all homosexual activity, as his unexpurgated diaries reveal.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

From 1935 to 1936, 2 West Cottages, West End Lane, NW6. In 1936, W.H. Auden stayed here with Benjamin Britten. From 1936 to 1937, 559 Finchley Road, NW3. W.H. Auden stayed here with Benjamin Britten. From 1937 to 1938, 38 Upper Park Road, NW3. Britten Rents a room. In 1934 W.H. Auden, after a conflict with Basil Wright with whom he was lodging in Highgate, moved out of Wright’s flat and began to lodge with William Coldstream and his wife Nancy at their house at 38 Upper Park Road, Hampstead.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

February House was the most fertile and improbable live-in salon of the XX century. Its residents included, among others, Carson McCullers, W. H. Auden, Paul Bowles, and the famed burlesque performer Gypsy Rose Lee (January 8, 1911 – April 26, 1970). This ramshackle Brooklyn brownstone was host to an explosion of creativity, an extraordinary experiment in communal living, and a nonstop yearlong party fueled by the appetites of youth. Here these burgeoning talents composed many of their most famous, iconic literary works while experiencing together a crucial historical moment--America on the threshold of WWII.
Address: 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
In 1940, George Davis, an editor recently fired from Harper's Bazaar, rented a dilapidated house in Brooklyn Heights in which he installed brilliant, volatile artists, who spent the next year working, fighting, and drinking. Carson McCullers sipped sherry while, down the hall, the burlesque star Gypsy Rose Lee typed her mystery novel with three-inch fingernails, and, downstairs, Benjamin Britten and Paul Bowles fought over practice space. W. H. Auden was housemother, collecting rent, assigning chores, and declaring no politics at dinner. Like all bohemian utopias, February House (so named because of the residents' February birthdays) was unable to withstand the centrifugal force of its constituent egos. The artists dispersed—to return home, serve in the military, or follow wayward lovers—and the house was demolished to make way for the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The George Washington Hotel was a hotel and boarding house (23 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10010) open in 1928. The building was occupied by many famous writers, musicians, and poets including W. H. Auden, who called it “the nicest hotel in town,” and Christopher Isherwood who lived there in the 1930s. Much of the space is currently under sublease to the School of Visual Arts except for apartments still occupied by original (non-student) tenants who pay stabilized rent, and who are still protected under NYC rent laws.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

8th Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan that runs from Sixth Avenue to Third Avenue, and Avenue B to Avenue D; its addresses switch from West to East as it crosses Fifth Avenue. Between Third Avenue and Avenue A, it is named St. Mark’s Place, after the nearby St. Mark’s Church in-the-Bowery on 10th Street at Second Avenue.
Address: 77 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.72795, -73.98559)
Type: Private Property
Place
St. Mark’s Place is considered a main cultural street for the East Village. Vehicular traffic runs east along both one-way streets. St. Mark’s Place features a wide variety of retailers. Venerable institutions lining St. Mark’s Place include Gem Spa, Yaffa Café, the St. Mark’s Hotel, St. Mark’s Comics, and Trash and Vaudeville. There are several open front markets that sell sunglasses, clothing and jewelry. There are also a number of restaurants and bars, as well as several record stores. Wouter van Twiller, colonial governor of New Amsterdam, once owned a tobacco farm near 8th and Macdougal Streets. Such farms were located around the area until the 1830s. Nearby, a Native American trail crossed the island via the right-of-ways of Greenwich Avenue, Astor Place, and Stuyvesant Street. Under the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811, a city grid for much of Manhattan was defined. Eighth Street was to run from Sixth Avenue in the west to Third Avenue and the Bowery to the east. The area west of Sixth Avenue was already developed as Greenwich Village. Mercer, Greene, Wooster, Thompson Street, Sullivan Street, and Macdougal Streets, as well as Laurens Street (present-day LaGuardia Place), extended to Eighth Street until the 1820s, when the construction of Washington Square Park severed Laurens, Thompson, and Sullivan Streets south of 4th Street. After the Commissioners’ Plan was laid out, property along the street’s right of way quickly developed. By 1835, the New York University opened its first building, the Silver Center, along Eighth Street near the Washington Square Park. Row houses were also built on Eighth Street. The street ran between the Jefferson Market, built in 1832 at the west end, and the Tompkins Market, built in 1836, at the east end. These were factors in the street’s commercialization in later years. Eighth Street was supposed to extend to a market place at Avenue C, but since that idea never came to fruition. Capitalizing on the high-class status of Bond, Bleecker, Great Jones, and Lafayette Streets in NoHo, developer Thomas E. Davis developed the east end of the street and renamed it "St. Mark’s Place.” Davis built up St. Mark’s Place between Third and Second Avenues between 1831 and 1832. Although the original plan was for Federal homes, only three such houses remained in 2014.
Notable queer residents at St. Marks Place:
• No. 33: Home to poet Anne Waldman in the late 1960s/mid-1970s. In 1977, the storefront was occupied by Manic Panic, the first U.S. boutique to sell punk rock attire, which developed its own line of make-up and vibrant hair dyes; notable patrons have included performers David Bowie, Cyndi Lauper, Debbie Harry, and Joey Ramone.
• No. 51: In the early 1980s, this was home to 51X, a gallery that featured graffiti art, representing artists such as Keith Haring, and Jean-Michel Basquiat.
• No. 57: Club 57 was an important art and performance space in the late 1970s and early 1980s; notable people, such as Ann Magnuson, Keith Haring, Klaus Nomi, John Sex, Kenny Scharf, David Wojnarowicz, Wendy Wild, The Fleshtones, and Fab Five Freddy, performed or showed there.
• No. 75: The Holiday Cocktail Lounge has had a range of visitors including W.H. Auden, Allen Ginsberg and other Beat writers, Shelley Winters, and Frank Sinatra, whose agent lived in the neighborhood.
• No. 77: Home to W.H. Auden (February 21, 1907 –September 29, 1973) for almost 20 years, from 1953 to 1972. Born in England, the poet Wystan Hugh Auden, arrived in New York City in 1939. After stints at the George Washington Hotel on East 23rd Street and in Brooklyn Heights, he and companion Chester Kallman settled into a second-floor apartment at this location. His living quarters were described as being so cold that the toilet no longer functioned and he had to use the toilet in the liquor store at the corner. Auden is regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the XX century. The building now houses a restaurant, La Palapa. The basement of this building was the location where the newspaper Novy Mir ("New World" or "New Peace"), a Russian-language Communist paper, was founded in 1916. It was edited by Nikolai Ivanovich Bukharin, and Leon Trotsky worked there; the paper stopped publishing after the Russian Revolution of October, 1917.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The San Remo Cafe was a bar at 93 MacDougal Street at the corner of Bleecker Street. It was a hangout for Bohemians and writers such as James Agee, W. H. Auden, Tennessee Williams, James Baldwin, William S. Burroughs, Gregory Corso, Miles Davis, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O'Hara, Jack Kerouac, Jackson Pollock, William Styron, Dylan Thomas, Gore Vidal, Judith Malina and many others. It opened in 1925 closed in 1967. Jack Kerouac described the bar's crowd in his novel “The Subterraneans”: “Hip without being slick, intelligent without being corny, they are intellectual as hell and know all about Pound without being pretentious or saying too much about it. They are very quiet, they are very Christlike.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1963, W.H. Auden stayed with Stephen Spender at this latter home at 15 Loudoun Road, NW8. This is the house where Spender died of a heart attack on July 16, 1995, aged 86. He was buried in the graveyard of St Mary on Paddington Green Church, W2.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Klaus Mann (1906-1949), homosexual son of Thomas Mann and brother to Erika Mann, who married in a lavender marriage W.H. Auden, is buried at Cimetière du Grand Jas de Cannes, Plot: Carré 16. His sister Erika Mann is buried at Kilchberg Village Cemetery (Kilchberg, Switzerland), while instead W.H. Auden is buried at Kirchstetten, Austria.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Paul Frederic Bowles was an American expatriate composer, author, and translator. He became associated with Tangier, Morocco, where he settled in 1947 and lived for 52 years to the end of his life.
Died: November 18, 1999, Tangier, Morocco
Education: University of Virginia
Lived: Rue Sidi Bouknadel (near Rue Riad Sultan), Tanger, Morocco (35.78906, -5.81259)
Taprobane Island, Weligama By Pass Rd, Sri Lanka (5.96775, 80.42573)
February House, 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Buried: Lakemont Cemetery, Lakemont, Yates County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 10542065
Spouse: Jane Bowles (m. 1938–1973)
Movies: The Sheltering Sky, Paul Bowles: The Complete Outsider, more
Married: February 21, 1938

Paul Bowles was an American expatriate composer, author, and translator. Jane Bowles was an American writer and playwright. Jane spent her life examining lesbian identity with an honest and sardonic wit. Jane's adventures in the lesbian and gay bars of Greenwich Village, and her open pursuit of women lovers, caused her mother and her family consternation. In 1937, she was introduced to Paul--himself a homosexual--and agreed to marry him. The two soon recognized that their marriage would succeed only as a platonic friendship; both continued their homosexual liaisons. After a brief sojourn in France, they were prominent among the literary figures of New York throughout the 1940s, with Paul working under Virgil Thomson as a music critic at the New York Herald Tribune. In 1947, Bowles settled in Tangier, Morocco. Except for winters spent in Sri Lanka (then known as Ceylon) during the early 1950s, Tangier was Paul Bowles’ home for the remaining 52 years of his life. Paul Bowles died in 1999 at the age of 88. His ashes are buried in Lakemont Cemetery in upstate New York.
Together from 1937 to 1973: 36 years.
Jane Sydney Auer Bowles (February 22, 1917 – May 4, 1973)
Paul Frederic Bowles (December 30, 1910 – November 18, 1999)
Married: February 21, 1938



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

February House was the most fertile and improbable live-in salon of the XX century. Its residents included, among others, Carson McCullers, W. H. Auden, Paul Bowles, and the famed burlesque performer Gypsy Rose Lee (January 8, 1911 – April 26, 1970). This ramshackle Brooklyn brownstone was host to an explosion of creativity, an extraordinary experiment in communal living, and a nonstop yearlong party fueled by the appetites of youth. Here these burgeoning talents composed many of their most famous, iconic literary works while experiencing together a crucial historical moment--America on the threshold of WWII.
Address: 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
In 1940, George Davis, an editor recently fired from Harper's Bazaar, rented a dilapidated house in Brooklyn Heights in which he installed brilliant, volatile artists, who spent the next year working, fighting, and drinking. Carson McCullers sipped sherry while, down the hall, the burlesque star Gypsy Rose Lee typed her mystery novel with three-inch fingernails, and, downstairs, Benjamin Britten and Paul Bowles fought over practice space. W. H. Auden was housemother, collecting rent, assigning chores, and declaring no politics at dinner. Like all bohemian utopias, February House (so named because of the residents' February birthdays) was unable to withstand the centrifugal force of its constituent egos. The artists dispersed—to return home, serve in the military, or follow wayward lovers—and the house was demolished to make way for the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1947 Paul Bowles settled in Tangier, Morocco, and his wife Jane Bowles followed in 1948. Except for winters spent in Sri Lanka (then known as Ceylon) during the early 1950s, Tangier was Bowles’ home for the remainder of his life. He came to symbolize American expatriates in the city.
Address: Rue Sidi Bouknadel (near Rue Riad Sultan), Tanger, Morocco (35.78906, -5.81259)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
In Paris, Paul Bowles became part of Gertrude Stein’s literary and artistic circle. On her advice he made his first visit to Tangier with Aaron Copland in the summer of 1931. They took a house on the Mountain above Tangier Bay. Bowles later made Morocco his full-time home, and it inspired many of his short stories. From there he returned to Berlin, where he met British writers Stephen Spender and Christopher Isherwood. (Isherwood was reportedly so taken with him that he named character Sally Bowles in his novel after him.) The next year, Bowles returned to North Africa, traveling throughout other parts of Morocco, the Sahara, Algeria, and Tunisia. In 1947 Paul Bowles received a contract for a novel from Doubleday; with the advance, he moved permanently to Tangier. Jane joined him there the next year. Bowles commented: “I was a composer for as long as I’ve been a writer. I came here because I wanted to write a novel. I had a commission to do it. I was sick of writing music for other people — Joseph Losey, Orson Welles, a whole lot of other people, endless.” He set his second novel, “Let It Come Down” (1952), in North Africa, specifically Tangier. It explored the disintegration of an American (Nelson Dyar), who was unprepared for the encounter with an alien culture. The first American edition by Random House was published later that same month. While Bowles was concentrating on his career as a writer, he composed incidental music for nine plays presented by the American School of Tangier. The Bowles couple became fixtures of the American and European expatriate scene in Tangier. Visitors included Truman Capote, Tennessee Williams and Gore Vidal. The Beat writers Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs and Gregory Corso followed in the mid-1950s and early 1960s. In 1951, Bowles was introduced to the Master Musicians of Jajouka, having first heard the musicians when he and Brion Gysin attended a festival or moussem at Sidi Kacem. Bowles described his continued association with the Master Musicians of Jajouka and their hereditary leader Bachir Attar in his book, “Days: A Tangier Journal.” After the death of Jane Bowles on May 4, 1973 in Málaga, Spain, Bowles continued to live in Tangier. He wrote regularly and received many visitors to his modest apartment. Bowles died of heart failure on November 18, 1999 at the Italian Hospital in Tangier at the age of 88. He had been ill for some time with respiratory problems. His ashes were buried in Lakemont, New York, next to the graves of his parents and grandparents.
Life
Who: Paul Frederic Bowles (December 30, 1910 – November 18, 1999)
In 1938 Paul Bowles married Jane Auer, an author and playwright. It was an unconventional marriage: their intimate relationships were with people of their own sex, but they maintained close personal ties with each other. Bowles has frequently been featured in anthologies as a gay writer, but during his life, he always regarded such typecasting as both absurd and irrelevant. After a brief sojourn in France, the couple were prominent among the literary figures of New York throughout the 1940s. Paul Bowles also worked under Virgil Thomson as a music critic at the New York Herald Tribune. His light opera “The Wind Remains,” based on a poem by Federico García Lorca, was performed in 1943 with choreography by Merce Cunningham and conducted by Leonard Bernstein. His translation of Sartre’s play “Huis Clos” (No Exit), directed by John Huston, won a Drama Critic’s Award in 1943.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: In 1952, Paul Bowles bought the tiny island of Taprobane, off the coast of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka.) There he wrote much of his novel “The Spider’s House,” returning to Tangier in the warmer months. He returned to Sri Lanka most winters.
Place
Taprobane Island is a rocky private island with one villa, located just off the southern coast of Sri Lanka opposite the village of Weligama. The island was named after the old Greek word for Sri Lanka. The island was previously owned by (self-titled) Count Maurice Maria de Mauny Talvande who fell in love with Weligama Bay. It was he who had the villa built on this tiny island. The islet passed on to the American author and composer Paul Bowles and then the Sri Lankan born former UN Chief Prosecutor Sir Desmond Lorenz de Silva before it came to the ownership of the Australian businessman Geoffrey Dobbs. Notable people who stayed on Taprobane include Dutch author Peter ten Hoopen, who spent a month there in 1984 during civil unrest on the mainland, as well as Kylie Minogue, who composed a song about the island inspired by her stay titled "Taprobane (Extraordinary Day.”) It had inspired Jason Kouchak to compose "Dark Island" in his 1999 album Watercolours.
Life
Who: Maurice Talvande, Count de Mauny Talvande (March 21, 1866 – November 27, 1941)
Maurice attended St Mary's College at Hales Place in Canterbury, which was run by French Jesuit Priests, during the period 1883-1884. His brother Roger also attended St Mary's College and stayed on for a longer period from 1883-1888. Maurice, subsequently, went to Saint-Cyr Military College which was also influenced by the Jesuit Order. Despite the basic French environment that he was surrounded by, Maurice probably learned his English too while he was under their tutorship. His close friendship with George Byng, brother of Lady Mary, whom he first met at St Mary's College in Canterbury, may have given him the opportunity to meet Mary, in the first place, and then develop into a relationship that ended in marriage to her. After completing his education, it is reported that, he travelled widely in America for several years. He is reported to have sailed from Le Havre and arrived in New York, in the US, on November 19, 1894 on board the 9,000 ton SS La Touraine., being in transit to Boston, in a journey that lasted about seven days. Count Maurice Maria de Mauny Talvande married Lady Mary Elizabeth Agnes Bynge, daughter of the fourth Earl of Strafford, enry William John Byng, on June 24, 1898. The wedding was a great social occasion and attended by the Princess of Wales, Princess Christian and Prince and Princess Saxe-Weimer. His mother Mme de Mauny Talvande and brother Roger de Mauny Talvande also attended. His father, Felix Talvande, was not present. The bridegroom was 32 and the bride was 33 years old at the timeof their marriage. The newly wed De Mauny's settled down in 1898 at the famous Azay-le-Rideau castle, whose long and memorable history goes bact to the reign of Francois I in the XVI century. From Azay, Maurice and Mary moved to Cannes where their son Victor Alexander Christian henry George was born on April 19 1899. From here they moved briefly to San Remo and then returned to England. On their return from France in 1900 the de Mauny family moved to an old Queen Anne house called "Terrick House", near Ellesbrough in Buckimhamshire. A daughter, Alexandra Mary, was born here on July 19 1904. Maurice is reported to have written three books, "The Peace of Suffering 1914-1918", "Gardening in Ceylon", "The Gardens of Taprobane". Maurice was a great traveller. It is believed that he visited Ceylon for extended periods of a time a year or two after 1910. William Warren has suggested in "Tropical Asian Style", that de Mauny was first invited to Ceylon in 1912 by Sir Thomas Lipton, the tea magnate. Warren has conjectured that it was some “great personal disaster” that drove de Mauny to Ceylon. It is possible that both his diminishing financial status and also his many marital problems he was facing may have been the reasons for his move eastwards.de Mauny travelled several times between Hampshire and Ceylon soon after his bankruptcy problems. His skills as an expert gardener and furniture maker in Ceylon, and, later on Journalism, may have provided him with the necessary finances to supplekent his travel and living. There are accounts from people who knew him in Ceylon that he also used to receive remittances from overseas which probably could have beensent by his wife, Mary, from time to time for his upkeep and living. It is reported that he also ran a furniture factory and workshop in Colombo. A number of de Mauny furniture pieces have survived in the hands of private owners. They are now highly valued and cherished in Sri Lanka. He started the "Weligama Local Industrues" in 1925 which as he claimed gave employment to over 200 carpenters, carvers and inlayers. By 1930, the enterprise suffered at the hands of the Depression and had to be halted until better times. It was restarted in 1936. The craftsmanship was most admirable and the designs were very much French styles of that time. Ferguson's Ceylon Directory for 1920-21 shows that his address was “Ascot,” Albert Crescent, Cinnamon Gardens, Colombo 7, a very elite and high-society area of Colombo. His son, Victor, is also listed as living there. It was in September 1927 that he saw for the first time, and quite by chance, a place that was to become his final home. At the center of the arc of the Bay of Weligama, in the southern tip of Ceylon, “a red granite rock, covered with palms and jungle shrub, rising from the Indian Ocean - an emerald in a setting of pink corral” was where he finally chose to build andlive his eternal dream of peace and tranquility close to nature that he loved so much. He swam across the narrow straight and saw an admirable view as he reached the plateau of the rock. "There was nothing", he recalled some ten years later, "between me and the South Pole". Having located and identified his magical island, which was only a few acres in area, de Mauny then set upon the task of building it into his future home that he had been dreaming of for so many years. The foundation stone of the house was laid on February 1, 1927 and thus initiated the beginning of what was to become a famous and much visited site by many distinguished persons. The seeds of "The Gardens of Taprobane" had been planted. The island was named "Taprobane" based on the ancient name for Ceylon given by the Greeks and also because it suited its pear-shape outline more like a mini Ceylon itself. The local name, by tradition, for the sland was "Galduwa" meaning "Rock Islan" in Sinalese. It is conjectured that the island may have been a art of the mainland in ancient tmes as it is not shown in maps of the Portuguese Colonial era. The name Taprobane is also considered to have been originated from the sanskrit "Tamba Vanna" meaning "copper colored" as a reference to the many famous golden beaches of Ceylon. The house was built on a 135 feet square area with a broad terrace surrounding it. It was octagonal in shape spanninga surface of 25 by 25 yards. This gave the resident and eight faced view of the outsde world with the north side facing towards the mainland and the south facing Antarctica in the South Pole. The central hall was called the "Hall of Lotus" and was also octagonal in shape measuring 26 by 26 feet. A 30 foot high dome lined with eight panels of inlaid wood was located in the center of he hall. The panels were dyed with an opaque gold and blue color and bore designs of Lotus buds and flowers. The dome was supported by eight square pilars of Wedgewood-blue, 24 feet tall. On either side of these were two light columns, 12 feet tall, making sixteen in all, terracotta with gilded capitals. They supported a white stone traverse that connected the pillars in an arch that was 12 foot span. This was hung with curtains of soft blue silk with a deep brocaded border of art noveau design at the bottom colored black and gold on cream. The rooms converged on the hall through eight arches. A Sigiriya frescoe styled border ran along the stone white walls. The whole scheme was engulfed in a golden hue by light entering through Venetian blinds created out of amber colored glass. The furniture within was made by local craftsmen using some of the rarest woods of Ceylon. They were mainly of French style although here were any pieces that belonged to the Dutch designs too. A carpet of Maidenhair ferns and a light bronze creeper with clumps of Eucharist Lilies adorned the hall. From the north-east terrace here was a splendid view of the shoreline, the forest of coconut palms fringing the Bay of Weligama, and the copper colored sands clustered with boats on a pea-green sea. Through the entrances of iron gates, with their design of brass-headed peacocks with prussian blue eyes one could see he openness and vastness of the mighty Indian Ocean sprawling through time. The Count was residing at Weligama in 1931. His son, Victor Alexander, was then residing at "Boxmead", Turret Road (now renamed to Dharmapala Mawatha and running from Kollupitiya junction in Colombo 3 all the way down to Liptons Circus in Colombo 7, bounding one of the most prestigious residential areas of Colombo), Colombo 7. Victor was employed at the Rosehough Tea Company, first as an Assistant and then as an under-manager. It is also reported in the Fergusons Directory that he held the position of Second Lieutenant in the Royal Navy. he went on to become a Commander in the Royal Navy in WW II, wher he was awarded the DFC. He eventually went on to become the Chairman of Rosehough until he resigned in the early 1970's. Local records in Sri Lanka show that the island was actually purchased by de Mauny for a sum of Rs 250 in 1925 in the name of his son Victor Alexander. It remained in his ownership until it was sold by public auction, in 1942, for Rs 12,000. The Count encouraged people to visit is island. His historical visitors book was filled with names of Kings, Princes, Dukes, Duchesses, Aristocrats, Prime Ministers, and other famous personalities from across the blue marble. Count Maurice de Mauny Talvande died on November 27, 1941 while at the Chelvarayan Estate, Navatkuli, in the northern city of Jaffna in Ceylon. Hs remains were buried at St Mary's Burial Grounds in Jaffna. Maurice's son Victor passed away in 1978 and his daughter Alexandra died in 1989. They were both chidlless. De Mauny's island was a very famous destination for many notables from different nations. The island was sold by public auction in 1942 after having been neglected ad in a state of derelict for many years. In 1957 Paul Bowles wrote an article about finding and living on a tiny tropical island in the Indian Ocean – Taprobane – only one hundred yards off the coast of Weligama, near Galle, in southern Ceylon (now Sri Lanka.) He first became intrigued by Taprobane island in 1949 when he saw photographs of it during a stay at Wilton House, the magnificent ancestral home of his friend from Tangier, David Herbert. The Herbert family had stayed on the island in the mid-1930s. Bowles first visited Ceylon in 1950 and two years later, when Taprobane was put up for sale, he bought the island with some of the proceeds from his second book “The Delicate Prey and Other Stories.” Paul Bowles wrote the final chapters of “The Spider’s House” while living on Taprobane. Bowles sold the island n 1956 to the Irish writer Shaun Mandy. For several years, since 1964, the island was in the ownership of of the de Silva whose senior member was Desmond de Silva QC, the very distinguished British barristor. The island was then on a long lease to to the very successful Hong Kong business tycoon Geofrey Dobbs. It may be interesting to note that the wife of Desmond de Silva is Princess Katharina of Yugoslavia. The author Robin Maugham, who visited the Island as a young man, and in the mid-1970s, considered the unique beauty and harmony of the villa had become compromised after de Mauny's death by partitioning and the loss of his furniture and fittings, and that the area itself had been despoiled by the construction of a new road along the mainland beach. Since then, and particularly after the 2004 tsunami, significant development of the adjoining mainland village has occurred.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Lakemont Cemetery (Dundee, NY 14837) is buried Paul Bowles (1910–1999), American expatriate composer, author, and translator. He became associated with Tangier, Morocco, where he settled in 1947 and lived for 52 years to the end of his life.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
John Henry Newman CO was a Catholic cardinal and theologian who was an important figure in the religious history of England in the 19th century. He was known nationally by the mid-1830s.
Born: February 21, 1801, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
Died: August 11, 1890, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Education: University of Oxford
Lived: Oratory House, Birmingham B45 8, UK (52.38483, -2.00464)
Newman House, 52 Ham Street, Richmond, Greater London TW10 7HQ, UK (51.43782, -0.31251)
Buried: Rednal Roman Catholic Cemetery, Rednal, Metropolitan Borough of Birmingham, West Midlands, England
Buried alongside: Ambrose St. John
Find A Grave Memorial# 35439076
Parents: Jemina Fourdrinier, John Newman

John Henry Newman was an important figure in the religious history of England. The Reverend Father Ambrose St. John was an English Oratorian, convert to Catholicism. He is now best known as a lifelong friend of Cardinal Newman. Newman wrote after St John's death: "I have ever thought no bereavement was equal to that of a husband's or a wife's, but I feel it difficult to believe that any can be greater, or any one's sorrow greater, than mine." In accordance with his expressed wishes, Cardinal Newman was buried in the grave with Fr. St. John at Rednal Roman Catholic Cemetery, Rednal, England: "I wish, with all my heart, to be buried in Fr Ambrose St John's grave — and I give this as my last, my imperative will.” The pall over the coffin bore his cardinal's motto Cor ad cor loquitur ("Heart speaks to heart".) The two men have a joint memorial stone that is inscribed with the words he had chosen: Ex umbris et imaginibus in veritatem ("Out of shadows and phantasms into the truth"). In The Dream of Gerontius, Edward Elgar's piece on Newman's poem, the Guardian Angel is considered to be based on St. John. In preparation for his beatification and canonization, the Catholic Church wanted to transfer his body, but when the grave was opened in 2008, no remains were found due to his body being buried in a wooden coffin in very damp ground.
Together from (around) 1835 to 1875: 40 years.
The Reverend Father Ambrose St. John (1815 – May 24, 1875)
Cardinal John Henry Newman CO (February 21, 1801 – August 11, 1890)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

English Heritage Blue Plaque: Grey Court, Ham Street, Cardinal Newman (1801–1890), "In this house John Henry Newman, later Cardinal Newman spent some of his early years"
Address: 52 Ham Street, Richmond, Greater London TW10 7HQ, UK (51.43782, -0.31251)
Type: Student facility (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 205346 (Grade II, 1950)
Place
Built in late XVIII century
Grey Court School was built in the grounds of a Georgian house called Grey Court House. The school would take its name from the house. The house itself was renamed Newman House after Cardinal Newman who lived there as a child in the early part of the XIX Century. Three storeys, 5 windows. Brown brick with parapet above cornice. Slate roof. Central pedimented porch. Grey Court School is a coeducational secondary school with academy status, located in Ham, London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. It is twinned with Alexander-von-Humboldt-Gymnasium in Konstanz, Germany. The school has received an "outstanding" rating in all areas from Ofsted. In September 2014, a new Sixth Form Centre opened for Grey Court’s founding sixth form students. The school occupies a large acreage in Ham, with playing fields and tennis courts. The school’s current head teacher is Maggie Bailey. The school was opened in 1956 to provide education for the children of the newly constructed Ham Estate.
Life
Who: John Henry Newman Cong. Orat. (February 21, 1801 – August 11, 1890)
Cardinal Newman was born in London in 1801. Three years later the family moved to Grey Court House, an XVIII century mansion that still stands in Ham Street, but has been re-named Newman House. The future cardinal only lived there for three years but it became engraved on his memory. Revisiting it 54 years later, he wrote: "I have been looking at the windows of our home at Ham near Richmond, where I lay aged five looking at the candles stuck in them in celebration of the victory of Trafalgar. I have never seen the house since September 1807 - I know more about it than any house I have been in since, and could pass an examination in it. It has ever been in my dreams." Built in 1742, the house was already a school before Newman died in 1890. Now it forms part of Grey Court, the school built in its grounds some 50 years ago.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Birmingham Oratory is an English Catholic religious community of the Congregation of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri, located in the Edgbaston area of Birmingham. The community was founded in 1849 by the Blessed John Henry Newman, C.O., the first house of that congregation in England.
Address: Birmingham B45 8, UK (52.38483, -2.00464)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 217208 (Grade II, 1952)
Place
The living quarters of the Birmingham Oratory, called the Oratory House (1850–51), fronting Hagley Road, served as Cardinal Newman’s home from 1852 to 1890 (except for four years spent in Ireland). His personal papers are located here. The Birmingham Oratory was to play a major role in the life of J. R. R. Tolkien, the author of “The Lord of the Rings,” who was a parishioner there for about nine years during his childhood. J. R. R. Tolkien lived at Fern Cottage in Rednal at the age of 12, and his mother died there in 1904. He wandered widely around the Lickeys and later recalled: “When I think of my mother’s death ... worn out with persecution, poverty, and, largely consequent, disease, in the effort to hand on to us small boys the faith, and remember the tiny bedroom she shared with us in rented rooms in a postman’s cottage at Rednal, where she died alone, too ill for viaticum, I find it very hard and bitter, when my children stray away.” The body of Cardinal Newman was buried in the small Roman Catholic cemetery at Rednal, by the Oratory country house. Attempts to move his body to Birmingham Oratory, near Birmingham’s city centre, as he was being considered for canonisation, failed due to the absence of any mortal remains.
Life
Who: John Henry Newman Cong. Orat. (February 21, 1801 – August 11, 1890), aka Cardinal Newman and Blessed John Henry Newman and Ambrose St. John (June 29, 1815 – May 24, 1875)
In accordance with his express wishes, Cardinal John Henry Newman was buried in the grave of his lifelong friend Ambrose St. John (1815-1876.) The pall over the coffin bore the motto that Newman adopted for use as a cardinal, “Cor ad cor loquitur” (Heart speaks to heart), which William Barry, writing in the “Catholic Encyclopedia” (1913), traces to Francis de Sales and sees as revealing the secret of Newman’s "eloquence, unaffected, graceful, tender, and penetrating.” Ambrose St. John had become a Roman Catholic at around the same time as Newman, and the two men have a joint memorial stone inscribed with the motto Newman had chosen, “Ex umbris et imaginibus in veritatem” (Out of shadows and phantasms into the truth), which Barry traces to Plato’s allegory of the cave.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Jane Bowles was an American writer and playwright.
Born: February 22, 1917, New York City, New York, United States
Died: May 4, 1973, Málaga, Spain
Lived: Rue Sidi Bouknadel (near Rue Riad Sultan), Tanger, Morocco (35.78906, -5.81259)
Buried: Cementerio de San Miguel, Málaga, Provincia de Málaga, Andalucia, Spain, Plot: Grave 453-F
Find A Grave Memorial# 13173300
Spouse: Paul Bowles (m. 1938–1973)
Married: February 21, 1938

Paul Bowles was an American expatriate composer, author, and translator. Jane Bowles was an American writer and playwright. Jane spent her life examining lesbian identity with an honest and sardonic wit. Jane's adventures in the lesbian and gay bars of Greenwich Village, and her open pursuit of women lovers, caused her mother and her family consternation. In 1937, she was introduced to Paul--himself a homosexual--and agreed to marry him. The two soon recognized that their marriage would succeed only as a platonic friendship; both continued their homosexual liaisons. After a brief sojourn in France, they were prominent among the literary figures of New York throughout the 1940s, with Paul working under Virgil Thomson as a music critic at the New York Herald Tribune. In 1947, Bowles settled in Tangier, Morocco. Except for winters spent in Sri Lanka (then known as Ceylon) during the early 1950s, Tangier was Paul Bowles’ home for the remaining 52 years of his life. Paul Bowles died in 1999 at the age of 88. His ashes are buried in Lakemont Cemetery in upstate New York.
Together from 1937 to 1973: 36 years.
Jane Sydney Auer Bowles (February 22, 1917 – May 4, 1973)
Paul Frederic Bowles (December 30, 1910 – November 18, 1999)
Married: February 21, 1938



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Jane Bowles was an American writer and playwright. Paul Bowles introduced Jane to Cherifa (Amina Bakalia), a countrywoman, working in the grain market near the bottom of the Grand Hotel Villa de France, who will become Jane's live-in partner. Later Jane will write: “I love Tangier. But like a dying person. When Tetum and Cherifa die I might leave. But we are all three of us the same age, more or less. Tetum older, Cherifa a bit younger. I’d like to buy them meat and fish and oil so that they will stay alive longer. I don’t know which one I like best, or how long I can go on this way, at the point of expectation, yet knowing at the same time that it is all hopeless. Does it matter? It is more coming home to them that I want than it is they themselves. But I do want them to belong to me, which is of course impossible . . .”
Together from 1948 to 1973: 25 years
Cherifa (died in the late ‘90s)
Jane Bowles (February 22, 1917 - May 4, 1973)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Jane Bowles (February 22, 1917 - May 4, 1973), who suffered from alcoholism, had a stroke in 1957 at age 40. Her health continued to decline, despite various treatments in England and the United States, until she had to be admitted to a clinic in Málaga, Spain, where she died in 1973. She is buried at Cementerio de San Miguel (29014 Málaga, Spain).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer was a neoclassical sculptor, considered the most distinguished female sculptor in America during the 19th century. Among other technical innovations, she pioneered a process for turning limestone into marble.
Born: October 9, 1830, Watertown, Massachusetts, United States
Died: February 21, 1908, Watertown, Massachusetts, United States
Lived: Riverside Condominiums, Riverside Street, Watertown
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery
Find A Grave Memorial# 508
Period: Neoclassicism
Known for: Sculpture
Books: Harriet Hosmer letters and memories

Harriet Hosmer was an American sculptor. In November, 1852, with her father and her friend Charlotte Saunders Cushman, she went to Rome. While living in Rome, she was associated with Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thorvaldsen, Thackeray, George Eliot and George Sand; and she was frequently the guest of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning at Casa Guidi, in Florence. Novelist Henry James (brother of Alice James) unflatteringly referred to the group of women artists in Rome of which she was a part as "The White Marmorean Flock,“: lesbians Anne Whitney, Emma Stebbins, Edmonia Lewis and non-lesbians Louisa Lander, Margaret Foley, Florence Freeman, and Vinnie Ream. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton. Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie, and had one daughter, the Hon. Mary Florence ("Maisie"), born 1860 in London. She was a Patron of Arts after the death of her husband. Mount Hosmer, near Lansing, Iowa is named after Hosmer, the result a race to the top that she won as a youth.
Together from 1878 to 1903: 25 years.
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (October 9, 1830 - February 21, 1908)
Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, Lady Ashburton (March 5, 1827 – February 2, 1903)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Town of Watertown is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. It is part of the Greater Boston area. The population was 31,915 at the 2010 census.
Address: Watertown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA (42.37092, -71.18283)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Watertown Arsenal Historic District (Arsenal St.), 99000498, 1999
Place
Watertown is one of fourteen Massachusetts municipalities that have applied for, and been granted, city forms of government but wish to retain "The town of” in their official names. Watertown is made up of six neighborhoods: Bemis, Brigham (Brigham Historic District), Coolidge Square, East Watertown, Watertown Square and the West End. Archeological evidence suggests that Watertown was inhabited for thousands of years before the arrival of settlers from England. Two tribes of Massachusett people, the Pequossette and the Nonantum, had settlements on the banks of the river later called the Charles. The Pequossette built a fishing weir to trap herring at the site of the current Watertown Dam. The annual fish migration, as both alewife and blueback herring swim upstream from their adult home in the sea to spawn in the fresh water where they were hatched, still occurs every spring. Watertown, first known as Saltonstall Plantation, was one of the earliest of the Massachusetts Bay settlements. It was begun early in 1630 by a group of settlers led by Sir Richard Saltonstall and the Rev. George Phillips and officially incorporated that same year. The alternate spelling "Waterton" is seen in some early documents. The first buildings were upon land now included within the limits of Cambridge known as Gerry’s Landing. For its first quarter century Watertown ranked next to Boston in population and area. Since then its limits have been greatly reduced. Thrice portions have been added to Cambridge, and it has contributed territory to form the new towns of Weston (1712), Waltham (1738), Lincoln (1754) and Belmont (1859.) In 1632 the residents of Watertown protested against being compelled to pay a tax for the erection of a stockade fort at Cambridge; this was the first protest in America against taxation without representation and led to the establishment of representative government in the colony. As early as the close of the XVII century Watertown was the chief horse and cattle market in New England and was known for its fertile gardens and fine estates. Here about 1632 was erected the first grist mill in the colony, and in 1662 one of the first woolen mills in America was built here. Boston town meetings were held here during the siege of Boston, when many Boston families made their homes in the neighborhood. For several months early in the American Revolution the Committees of Safety and Correspondence made Watertown their headquarters and it was from here that General Joseph Warren set out for Bunker Hill. From 1832 to 1834 Theodore Parker conducted a private school here and his name is still preserved in the Parker School, though the building no longer operates as a public school. The Edmund Fowle House is a historic house and local history museum at 28 Marshall Street in Watertown, Massachusetts. Built in 1722, it is the second oldest surviving house in Watertown (after the Browne House, built c. 1698.) Watertown was the seat of Massachusetts government during the British occupation of Boston in the American Revolution. The committees of the 2nd and 3rd Provincial Congress met in this house from Apr. 22 to 19 July, 1775, and the Executive Committee met here from 19 July, 1775, to September 18, 1776. The house was built by Edmund Fowle (1747-1821) and originally located on Mount Auburn St., then called Mill St. In 1776 the Treaty of Watertown, the first treaty signed between the newly formed United States of America and a foreign power, the St. John’s and Mi’kmaq First Nations of Nova Scotia, was signed in this house. Sturgis and Brigham Architects (Charles Brigham and John Hubbard Sturgis) purchased the house in 1871, moved it to its present Marshall St. address and converted it into a two family residence. The Historical Society of Watertown purchased the house in 1922. The Historical Society was awarded $500,000 in 2004 and another $200,000 in 2006 by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the restoration of the Edmund Fowle House. The grand re-opening of the house took place in May, 2008. The Abraham Browne House (built circa 1694-1701) is a colonial house located at 562 Main Street. It is now a nonprofit museum operated by Historic New England and open to the public two afternoons per year. The house was originally a modest one-over-one dwelling, probably with a minor dependency to one side. It has grown by a series of enlargements but they occurred behind the original block, thus preserving the profile of the one-over-one elevation. (The exception, a XIX century addition, was removed before 1919.) The Browne House is one of fewer than a half-dozen houses in New England to retain this profile. By 1919 the house was nearly ruined when it was acquired by William Sumner Appleton, who in 1923 donated it to the nonprofit organization now known as Historic New England. It was then painstakingly restored in the first fully documented restoration in America. The Abraham Browne house was featured on PBS’s “This Old House” television program while they were in Watertown for a restoration project during their 20th anniversary season. The Watertown Arsenal operated continuously as a military munitions and research facility from 1816 until 1995, when the Army sold the property, by then known as the Army Materials Technology Laboratory, to the town of Watertown. The Arsenal is notable for being the site of a 1911 strike prompted by the management methods of operations research pioneer Frederick Winslow Taylor. Taylor’s method, which he dubbed "Scientific Management," broke tasks down into smaller components. Workers no longer completed whole items; instead, they were timed using stopwatches as they did small tasks repetitively, as Taylor attempted to find the balance of tasks that resulted in the maximum output from workers. The strike and its causes were controversial enough that they resulted in Congressional hearings in 1911; Congress passed a law in 1915 banning the method in government owned arsenals. Taylor’s methods spread widely, influencing such industrialists as Henry Ford, and the idea is one of the underlying inspirations of the factory (assembly) line industrial method. The Watertown Arsenal was the site of a major superfund clean-up in the 1990s, and has now become a center for shopping, dining and the arts, with the opening of several restaurants and a new theatre. The site includes the Arsenal Center for the Arts, a regional arts center that opened in 2005. The Arsenal is now owned by athenahealth. Arsenal Street features two shopping malls across the street from one another, with the Watertown Mall on one side, and The Arsenal Project of Watertown (formerly the Arsenal Mall) on the other. The Perkins School for the Blind, founded in 1829, has been located in Watertown since 1912. The Stanley Brothers built the first of their steam-powered cars, which came to be known as Stanley Steamers, in Watertown in 1897. In 1988, Watertown Square became the new location for the Armenian Library and Museum of America, said to host the largest collection of Armenian artifacts in North America. The Birthplace of Harriet Hosmer, Riverside Street, is currently the location of the Riverside Condominiums. Dr. Hiram Hosmer was born in 1798 in Walpole, NH. Helped his father on the farm and learned the trade of cabinet maker. He received his degree from Harvard in 1824. He married Sarah Watson Grant of Walpole, NH in 1827. Of his four children only the youngest, Harriet Hosmer survived. The John Hunt House is Anne Whitney’s birthplace. The house was built by James Barton in 1715. It was sold to John Hunt in 1745. Joseph Warren boarded (in the southwestern corner on the first floor) here during the session of the Provincial Congress in 1775. He left afterward to ride to Bunker Hill, 17 June, 1775. It was later owned by Nathaniel Whitney, Jr. and in it was born Anne Whitney, September 2, 1821. It was bought from Nathaniel Whitney, Jr. by Luke Robinson, who lived here the rest of his life. The house was demolished 8 May, 1935. It was later sold to Mr. F.E. Howard who moved it to Water Street and had tenants "of a lower class.”
Life
Who: Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895), Harriet Hosmer (1830-1908) and Anne Whitney (1821-1915)
Leverett Saltonstall travelled with Charles William Dabney, Jr., his Harvard classmate, after graduation and generally had a difficult time settling down; it was said that his mother forced him, against his will, to marry. He is buried at Harmony Grove Cemetery (30 Grove St, Salem, MA 01970). Both Harriet Hosmer, a neoclassical sculptor, considered the most distinguished female sculptor in America during the XIX century, and Anne Whitney, a sculptor and poet, where from Watertown. Nathaniel Hawthorne described in his novel “The Marble Faun,” the group of American women artists living in Rome, causing Henry James to dismiss them as "The White Marmorean Flock.” They were: Harriet Hosmer, Anne Whitney, Emma Stebbins, Edmonia Lewis, Louisa Lander, Margaret Foley, Florence Freeman, and Vinnie Ream. While living in Rome, Hosmer associated with a colony of artists and writers that included Nathaniel Hawthorne, Bertel Thorvaldsen, William Makepeace Thackeray, and the two female Georges, Eliot and Sand. When in Florence, she was frequently the guest of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning at Casa Guidi.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston.
Address: 580 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37479, -71.14449)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +1 617-547-7105
National Register of Historic Places: 75000254, 1975. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, Mount Auburn Cemetery marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery,” derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. It is Watertown’s largest contiguous open space and extends into Cambridge to the east, adjacent to the Cambridge City Cemetery and Sand Banks Cemetery.
Notable queer burials are at Mount Auburn Cemetery:
• Roger Brown (1925–1997), professor at Harvard University from 1952 until 1957 and from 1962 until 1994, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1957 until 1962. During his time at the University of Michigan, he met Albert Gilman, later a Shakespeare scholar and a professor of English at Boston University. Gilman and Brown were partners for over 40 years until Gilman's death from lung cancer in 1989. Brown's sexual orientation and his relationship with Gilman were known to a few of his closest friends, and he served on the editorial board of The Journal of Homosexuality from 1985, but he did not come out publicly until 1989. Brown chronicled his personal life with Gilman and after Gilman's death in his memoir. Brown died in 1997, and is buried next to Gilman.
• Katharine Ellis Coman (1857-1915), author on economic subjects who lived with Katharine Lee Bates (Author of "America the Beautiful"), and died at her home, was cremated at Mount Auburn Cemetery but was buried with her parents at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
• Charlotte Cushman (1816–1876), actress, her last partner was lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins, who sculpted Angels of the Water on Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, New York City.
• Martha May Eliot (1891–1978), was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health. She was a scion of the Eliot family, an influential American family that is regarded as one of the Boston Brahmins, originating in Boston, whose ancestors became wealthy and held sway over the American education system in the late XIX and early XX centuries. Her father, Christopher Rhodes Eliot, was a Unitarian minister, and her grandfather, William G. Eliot, was the first chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis. The poet, playwright, critic, and Nobel laureate T.S. Eliot was her first cousin. During undergraduate study at Bryn Mawr College she met Ethel Collins Dunham, who was to become her life partner.
• Mary Katherine Keemle "Kate" Field (1838-1896), American journalist, lecturer, and actress, of eccentric talent. She was the daughter of actors Joseph M. Field and Eliza Riddle. Kate Field never married. In October 1860, while visiting his mother's home in Florence, she met the celebrated British novelist Anthony Trollope. She became one of his closest friends and was the subject of Trollope's high esteem. Trollope scholars have speculated on the nature of their warm friendship. Twenty-four of his letters to Kate survive, at the Boston Public Library; hers to Trollope do not.
• Annie Adams Fields (1834–1915), author and hostess; wife of James Thomas Fields, later companion to Sarah Orne Jewett.
• Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924) was a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. She founded the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.
• Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908), sculptor. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton (died 1864). Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie. Hosmer was good friend with Charlotte Cushman and Matilda Hays, Cushman’s partner, left Charlotte for her.
• Alice James (1848-1892) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American diarist. The only daughter of Henry James, Sr. and sister of psychologist and philosopher William James and novelist Henry James, she is known mainly for the posthumously published diary that she kept in her final years. Her companion was Katherine Peabody Loring and from their relationship it was conied the term “Boston Marriage”.
• Henry James (1843-1916) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of XIX century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
• Amy Lowell (1874–1925), poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
• Abby Adeline Manning (1836-1906), painter, and her partner, Anne Whitney (1821-1915), poet and sculptor, together.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) was an American poet, editor, and professor of English literature. Along with Gilbert Seldes, Mitchell’s editorship of The Dial magazine signaled a pivotal shift in content from political articles to aesthetics in art and literature. In 1929 he became the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Richard Cowan (1909-1939)’s diary, which he started while he was a student at Cornell, chronicles the life of a young gay man in Boston in the 1930s. Cowan committed suicide at the age of thirty. His forty-seven-year old mentor and long-term lover, Stewart Mitchell, was devastated. Mitchell resigned as president of the Massachusetts Historical Society on account of a “personal misfortune,” and wrote a friend, “There is no running away from a broken heart.” According to the Boston Herald Nov. 9, 1957: “Mitchell directed that the urn containing his mortal remains be buried, “but not in winter,” in the lot “where my dear friends Georgine Holmes Thomas and Richard David Cowan now repose”.”
• Francis Williams Sargent (1848 - 1920) and Jane Welles Hunnewell Sargent (1851 - 1936), Margarett Williams Sargent’s parents. Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) was born into the privileged world of old Boston money; she was a distant relative of John Singer Sargent.
• Henry Davis Sleeper (1878-1934), a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator, who had a long lasting friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, an economist, an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, the founder and director of the American Ambulance Field Service during WWI, and a United States Representative from Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Edwina Cynthia Annette Mountbatten, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, CI GBE DCVO GCStJ was an English heiress, socialite, relief worker and the last Vicereine of India as wife of Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma.
Born: November 28, 1901, Broadlands, Romsey, United Kingdom
Died: February 21, 1960, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia
Lived: 2 Wilton Cres, Belgravia, London SW1X 8RN, UK (51.49981, -0.15615)
Classiebawn Castle, Cliffony, Co. Sligo, Ireland (54.4551, -8.46929)
Buried: at sea off the coast of Portsmouth (ashes)
Find A Grave Memorial# 42981711
Spouse: Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (m. 1922–1960)
Grandchildren: India Hicks, more
Children: Patricia Knatchbull, 2nd Countess Mountbatten of Burma, Lady Pamela Hicks
Parents: Wilfrid Ashley, 1st Baron Mount Temple, Amalia Mary Maud Cassel

Nadejda Mikhailovna Mountbatten was the second daughter of Grand Duke Michael Mikhailovich of Russia and his morganatic wife Sophie, Countess von Merenberg. Nicknamed "Nada," she married Prince George of Battenberg, later the 2nd Marquess of Milford Haven, in London, England, on 15 November, 1916. Nada and her sister-in-law, Edwina Mountbatten, were extremely close friends and the two frequently went together on rather daring adventures, traveling rough in difficult and often dangerous parts of the world. Rumors surrounding the nature of their relationship abounded. Edwina Cynthia Annette Ashley was an English heiress, socialite, relief-worker, wife of Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, and last Vicereine of India. Publishers Weekly summarizes the Janet Morgan biography of Lady Mountbatten: "Edwina Ashley wed Lord Louis ('Dickie') Mountbatten in 1922 at the age of 20, then embarked on two decades of frivolity. Not satisfied having two well-behaved daughters and an 'enthusiastic boy' of a husband, she took refuge in lovers and sparked scandals".
Edwina Cynthia Annette Mountbatten, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, CI, GBE, DCVO, GCStJ (November 28, 1901 – February 21, 1960)
Nadejda Mikhailovna Mountbatten, Marchioness of Milford Haven (March 28, 1896 – January 22, 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

English Heritage Blue Plaque: 2 Wilton Crescent, Louis, Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900–1979) and Edwina, Countess Mountbatten of Burma (1901–1960) , "Last Viceroy and Vicereine of India lived here"
Address: 2 Wilton Cres, Belgravia, London SW1X 8RN, UK (51.49981, -0.15615)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 207643 (Grade II, 1985)
Place
Wilton Crescent is a street in Belgravia, London. Wilton Crescent was created by Thomas Cundy II, the Grosvenor family estate surveyor, and was drawn up with the original 1821 Wyatt plan for Belgravia. It was named at the time of Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton, second son of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster on whose estate the road was built in 1825 by Seth Smith. In the XIX and XX century, it was home to many prominent British politicians, ambassadors and civil servants. Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma lived at 2 Wilton Crescent for many years. Today there is a blue plaque on the house marking this. Like much of Belgravia, Wilton Crescent is characterised by grand terraces with lavish white houses which are built in a crescent shape, many of them with stuccoed balconies, particularly on the southern part of the crescent. The houses to the north of the crescent are stone clad and five stories high and were refaced between 1908 and 1912. Most of the houses had originally been built in the stucco style, but such houses became stone clad during this renovation period. Other houses today have black iron balconies. Wilton Crescent lies east of Lowndes Square and Lowndes Street, to the northwest of Belgrave Square. It is accessed via Wilton Place which connects it to the main road in Knightsbridge. It is adjacent to Grosvenor Crescent to the east, which contains the Indonesian Embassy. Further to the east lies Buckingham Palace. The play “Major Barbara” is partly set at Lady Britomart’s house in Wilton Crescent. In 2007, Wilton Garden in the middle of the crescent won a bronze medal by the London Gardens Society. There are two diplomatic buildings in Wilton Crescent: the High Commission of Singapore at No. 9, and the Embassy of Luxembourg at No. 27 (formerly home to the Luxembourgish government-in-exile.)
Life
Who: Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, GCVO, DSO, PC, FRS, born Prince Louis of Battenberg (June 25, 1900 – August 27, 1979) and Edwina Cynthia Annette Mountbatten, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, GBE, DCVO, GCStJ, CI (November 28, 1901 – February 21, 1960)
Lord Mountbatten was a British statesman and naval officer, an uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, and second cousin once removed to Elizabeth II. Mountbatten was married on 18 July, 1922 to Edwina Cynthia Annette Ashley, daughter of Wilfred William Ashley, later 1st Baron Mount Temple, himself a grandson of the 7th Earl of Shaftesbury. She was the favourite granddaughter of the Edwardian magnate Sir Ernest Cassel and the principal heir to his fortune. There followed a glamorous honeymoon tour of European courts and America which included a visit to Niagara Falls (because "all honeymooners went there.”) Mountbatten admitted "Edwina and I spent all our married lives getting into other people’s beds." He maintained an affair for several years with Frenchwoman Yola Letellier, and a sexual interest in men has also been alleged. Edwina and Jawaharlal Nehru became intimate friends after Indian Independence. During the summers, she would frequent the prime minister’s house so she could lounge about on his veranda during the hot Delhi days. Personal correspondence between the two reveals a satisfying yet frustrating relationship. Edwina states in one of her letters. "Nothing that we did or felt would ever be allowed to come between you and your work or me and mine – because that would spoil everything." Lady Mountbatten died in her sleep at age 58 of unknown causes in 1960 in Jesselton (now Kota Kinabalu), British North Borneo (now Sabah) while on an inspection tour for the St John Ambulance Brigade. In accordance with her wishes, Lord Mountbatten buried her at sea off the coast of Portsmouth from HMS Wakeful on 25 February 1960; Nehru sent two Indian destroyers to accompany her body; Geoffrey Fisher, the Archbishop of Canterbury, officiated.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Classiebawn Castle is a country house built for Viscount Palmerston on what was formerly a 10,000 acre estate on the Mullaghmore peninsula near the village of Cliffoney, County Sligo, in the Republic of Ireland.
Address: Cliffony, Co. Sligo, Ireland (54.4551, -8.46929)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1875, Design by James Rawson Carroll (1830-1911)
Classiebawn Castle was designed in the Baronial style and is constructed from a yellow-brown sandstone brought by sea from County Donegal. It comprises a gabled range with a central tower topped by a conical roofed turret. The land, which once belonged to the O’Connor Sligo, was confiscated by the English Parliament to recompense the people concerned in putting down an Irish rebellion. Around 10,000 acres of land on which Classiebawn now stands was granted to Sir John Temple, Master of the Rolls in Ireland. The property passed down to the 3rd Viscount Palmerston, the statesman who served as both British Prime Minister and British Foreign Secretary. It was this Lord Palmerston who commissioned the building of the current Classiebawn Castle and the harbour at Mullaghmore. The house was not complete on his death in 1865, but was completed in 1874 by his stepson and successor, Rt. Hon. William Cowper-Temple, P.C., M.P. (later created 1st Baron Mount Temple.) The latter died childless in 1888 and the estate passed to his nephew, Hon. Evelyn Ashley, second surviving son of the 7th Earl of Shaftesbury. Evelyn Ashley spent some time there each year and on his death in 1907 was succeeded by his only son, Wilfred William Ashley (later created Baron Mount Temple in a new creation.) He also spent his summers at the castle with his daughters Edwina, the future Countess Mountbatten, and Mary, the future Lady Delamere. In 1916 the house was cleared and remained empty until 1950. It was inherited by Edwina, Lady Mountbatten (when she was still officially styled as Lady Louis Mountbatten), in 1939 who, with her husband Admiral of the Fleet 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, made a number of improvements, installing electricity and a mains water supply. After his wife’s death in 1960, Lord Mountbatten, the last Viceroy of India, spent his summers there until his death when his boat was blown up off the coast of Mullaghmore by the IRA in August 1979. The castle and surrounding lands are now owned by the estate of Hugh Tunney, a deceased businessman, who bought the castle and 3,000 acres of surrounding estate in 1991 after having leased it for many years.
Life
Who: Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, GCVO, DSO, PC, FRS, born Prince Louis of Battenberg (June 25, 1900 – August 27, 1979) and Edwina Cynthia Annette Mountbatten, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, GBE, DCVO, GCStJ, CI (November 28, 1901 – February 21, 1960)
Lord Mountbatten usually holidayed at his summer home, Classiebawn Castle, in Mullaghmore, a small seaside village in County Sligo, Ireland. The village was only 12 miles (19 km) from the border with Northern Ireland and near an area known to be used as a cross-border refuge by IRA members. In 1978, the IRA had allegedly attempted to shoot Mountbatten as he was aboard his boat, but "choppy seas had prevented the sniper lining up his target.” Despite security advice and warnings from the Garda Síochána, on August 27, 1979, Mountbatten went lobster-potting and tuna fishing in his 30-foot (9.1 m) wooden boat, the Shadow V, which had been moored in the harbour at Mullaghmore. IRA member Thomas McMahon had slipped onto the unguarded boat that night and attached a radio-controlled bomb weighing 50 pounds (23 kg.) When Mountbatten was aboard, just a few hundred yards from the shore, the bomb was detonated. The boat was destroyed by the force of the blast, and Mountbatten’s legs were almost blown off. Mountbatten, then aged 79, was pulled alive from the water by nearby fishermen, but died from his injuries before being brought to the shore. Also aboard the boat were his eldest daughter Patricia (Lady Brabourne), her husband John (Lord Brabourne), their twin sons Nicholas and Timothy Knatchbull, John’s mother Doreen, (dowager) Lady Brabourne, and Paul Maxwell, a young crew member from County Fermanagh. Nicholas (aged 14) and Paul (aged 15) were killed by the blast and the others were seriously injured. Doreen, Lady Brabourne (aged 83) died from her injuries the following day. Thomas McMahon, who had been arrested two hours before the bomb detonated at a Garda checkpoint between Longford and Granard on suspicion of driving a stolen vehicle, was tried for the assassinations in the Republic of Ireland, and convicted by forensic evidence supplied by James O’Donovan that showed flecks of paint from the boat and traces of nitroglycerine on his clothes.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161934572

A gifted and versatile artist, Tee Corinne worked with photography, line drawing, paint, sculpture, ceramics and printing, and she published erotic fiction, poetry, and reviews. Favorite cover artist for lesbian publisher Naiad and author of the famous Cunt Coloring Book, Corinne's work is found on bookshelves across the lesbian nation. Showing real sex between real-life lovers, she was "interested in loving, beautiful, sexy images. . . I also want the images to be a turn on, create an adrenaline high, a rush of desire so intense that the act of looking is sexual." Stripped of the distancing effect of routine pornographic signifiers, Corinne's work becomes more challenging and takes more risks. In 1966, Corinne married the man she described as her 'best friend'. She came out in 1975 at which time she was in a relationship with Honey Lee Cottrell. Over the years, Corrine embarked upon relationships with Caroline Overman (early 1980s), Lee Lynch (mid 1980's) and Beverly Anne Brown. Corinne died at her home in Oregon, after a valiant struggle with liver cancer. Her longtime partner, Beverly, preceded her in death. In her honor, Moonforce Media established the Tee A. Corinne Prize for Lesbian Media Artists.
Together from 1989 to 2005: 16 years.
Beverly Anne Brown (died in 2005)
Tee Corinne (November 3, 1943 - August 27, 2006)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp KG KCMG CB KStJ PC, styled Viscount Elmley until 1891, was a British Liberal politician.
Born: February 20, 1872, London, United Kingdom
Died: November 14, 1938, New York City, New York, United States
Education: University of Oxford
Lived: Walmer Castle, Walmer, Deal, Kent CT14 7LJ, UK (51.20058, 1.40201)
Madresfield Court, Madresfield, Malvern, Worcestershire WR13 5AJ, UK (52.12549, -2.2808)
Buried: St Mary, Madresfield Village, Madresfield, Worcestershire, WR13 5AA
Find A Grave Memorial# 83725459
Spouse: Lettice Grosvenor (m. 1902)
Party: Liberal Party
Succeeded by: Alfred Emmott, 1st Baron Emmott
Children: Lady Mary Lygon

Hugh Patrick Lygon was the second son of William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp, and is often believed to be the inspiration for Lord Sebastian Flyte in Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited. He was a friend of Waugh's at Oxford (A. L. Rowse believed the two to be lovers), where both were members of the Hypocrites' Club. He was educated at Eton and Pembroke College, Oxford. After leaving Oxford he worked in a bank in Paris before working in the City. Lygon died in Germany where he was on a motoring tour with his friend, the artist Henry Winch, son of Lady Newborough. Lygon was standing in the road to ask the way and fell backwards, hitting his head on a stone. He died later due to a fractured skull, having spent four days in a hospital in Rothenburg ob der Tauber. Evelyn Waugh was an English writer of novels, biographies, and travel books; and also was a prolific journalist and reviewer. His best-known works include the early satires Decline and Fall (1928) and A Handful of Dust (1934), the novel Brideshead Revisited (1945), and the Second World War trilogy Sword of Honour (1952–61). Hugh’s father, William Lygon, was outed as homosexual in 1931 and went into exile. Evelyn’s brother, Alec Waugh, like his father, had gone to school at Sherborne, however, in 1915, Alec was asked to leave, after a homosexual relationship came to light. He departed for military training and, while waiting for his commission to be confirmed, wrote a novel of school life, The Loom of Youth. The novel alluded to homosexual friendships in Sherborne and caused a public sensation.
Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh (October 28, 1903 – April 10, 1966)
Hugh Patrick Lygon (November 2, 1904 – August 19, 1936)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Walmer Castle is an artillery fort originally constructed by Henry VIII in Walmer, Kent, between 1539 and 1540.
Address: Walmer, Deal, Kent CT14 7LJ, UK (51.20058, 1.40201)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Place
Walmer Castle formed part of the King's Device programme to protect against invasion from France and the Holy Roman Empire, and defended the strategically important Downs anchorage off the English coast. Comprising a keep and four circular bastions, the moated stone castle covered 0.61 acres (0.25 ha) and had 39 firing positions on the upper levels for artillery. It cost the Crown a total of £27,092 to build the three castles of Walmer, Sandown, and Deal, which lay adjacent to one another along the coast and were connected by earthwork defences. The original invasion threat passed, but during the Second English Civil War of 1648–49, Walmer was seized by pro-Royalist insurgents and was only retaken by Parliamentary forces after several months' fighting. In the XVIII century, Walmer became the official residence of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports and was gradually modified from a military fortification into a private residence. Various Prime Ministers and prominent politicians were appointed as Lord Warden, including William Pitt, the Duke of Wellington and Lord Granville, who adapted parts of the Tudor castle as living spaces and constructed extensive gardens around the property. By 1904, the War Office agreed that Walmer had no remaining military utility and it passed to the Ministry of Works. Successive Lord Wardens continued to use the property but it was also opened to the public. Walmer was no longer considered a particularly comfortable or modern residence, however, and Lord Curzon blamed the poor condition of the castle for his wife's death in 1906. Lord Wardens since the Second World War have included Winston Churchill, Robert Menzies and Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, but they have made only intermittent use of Walmer Castle. In the XXI century, Walmer Castle is run as a tourist attraction by English Heritage. The interior of the castle displays a range of historical objects and pictures associated with the property and its Lord Wardens, protected since the XIX century by special legislation. The grounds include the Queen Mother's Garden, designed by Penelope Hobhouse as a 95th birthday gift for Elizabeth in 1997.
Life
Who: William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp KG KCMG CB KStJ PC (February 20, 1872 – November 14, 1938)
William Lygon, the Earl Beauchamp, became the Lord Warden in 1913, building a Roman Catholic chapel at the castle and holding large parties there each summer. His children later commented that they found the castle was chilly and cramped. The Prime Minister, Asquith, was invited by Beauchamp to use the castle during the WWI as a weekend retreat, as it had good communication links with the front line in France. Asquith's wife, Margot, was not initially impressed by Walmer, noting in her diary that while it was "very distinguished" and had "great charm", it was "terribly exposed" with "cold... noisy corridors and small rooms"; she later came to like the castle and noted that she was sad to finally leave it. Lygon had sexual relations with men, which was illegal in England during this period. Rumours spread about the parties that he had held at Walmer Castle after the war, where, according to the historian Richard Davenport-Hines, he had "behaved indiscreetly with young men". The King was informed about his lifestyle and Lygon fled the country in 1931, resigning the appointment of Lord Warden the following year.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Madresfield Court, near the village centre, has been the ancestral home for several centuries of the Lygon family, whose eldest sons took the title of Earl Beauchamp from 1815 until 1979, when the last Earl died. Distinguished collections of furniture, art, and porcelain are housed at Madresfield, which was rated by Sir Simon Jenkins among the 50 best in his book on 1,000 historic houses. The house is managed by the Elmley Foundation, a British registered charity.
Address: Madresfield, Malvern, Worcestershire WR13 5AJ, UK (52.12549, -2.2808)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 153385 (Grade I, 1968)
Place
The original Great Hall, built in the XII century, stands at the core of this building. In 1593 Madresfield Court was rebuilt, replacing a XV century medieval building. It was again remodelled in the XIX century to resemble a moated Elizabethan house, with the result that it contains 136 rooms. The chapel was designed by the architect Philip Charles Hardwick and sumptuously decorated in the Arts and Crafts style by Birmingham Group artists including Henry Payne, William Bidlake and Charles March Gere. Madresfield was the home of the 7th Earl Beauchamp. Evelyn Waugh was a frequent guest to the house and is said by Chips Channon in his diary to have based the Flyte family in “Brideshead Revisited” on the Lygons. In Jan. 2006, documents revealed by the National Archives showed that emergency plans were made to evacuate Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret of the British Royal Family to Madresfield in the event of a successful German invasion following the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940. Five years later, Worcestershire County Council’s Historic, Environment and Archaeology Service showed that the 1940 plan was simply part of pre-existing 1938 invasion contingency plans. In the event of an invasion breaking out of a likely lodgement in Kent and threatening London, the whole UK government would move to Worcestershire with the Royal family residing at Madresfield. Before her death in 1989, Countess Beauchamp, the widow of William Lygon, 8th Earl Beauchamp, the last Earl Beauchamp, endowed the Elmley Foundation to ensure the Court’s many generations of tradition as a patron of the arts in Herefordshire and Worcestershire. Madresfield Court has never been sold or bought in all its long history, instead simply remaining in the hands of the Lygon family. Madresfield Court is currently the home of Rosalind, Lady Morrison, niece of the 8th and last Earl Beauchamp. A variety of apple, first cultivated at the house, and a variety of black table grape, are named Madresfield Court. The house can be visited by appointment only, between April and July each year.
Life
Who: William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp KG KCMG CB KStJ PC (February 20, 1872 – November 14, 1938) and Hugh Patrick Lyon (November 2, 1904 – April 19, 1936)
William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp, styled Viscount Elmley until 1891, was a British Liberal politician. He was Governor of New South Wales between 1899 and 1901, a member of the Liberal administrations of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman and H. H. Asquith between 1905 and 1915 and leader of the Liberal Party in the House of Lords between 1924 and 1931. When political enemies threatened to make public his homosexuality he resigned from office to go into exile. Lord Beauchamp is generally supposed to have been the model for Lord Marchmain in Evelyn Waugh’s novel, “Brideshead Revisited.” Although Beauchamp’s homosexuality was an open secret in parts of high society and one that his political opponents had refrained from using against him despite its illegality, Lady Beauchamp was oblivious to it and professed a confusion as to what homosexuality was when it was revealed. He had numerous affairs at Madresfield and Walmer Castle, with his partners ranging from servants to socialites, including local men. In 1930, while on a trip to Australia, it became common knowledge in London society that one of the men escorting him, Robert Bernays, a member of the Liberal Party, was a lover. It was reported to King George V and Queen Mary by his Tory brother-in-law, the Duke of Westminster, who hoped to ruin the Liberal Party through Beauchamp, as well as Beauchamp personally due his private dislike of Beauchamp. Homosexuality was a criminal offence at the time, and the King was horrified, rumoured to have said, "I thought men like that shot themselves.” The King had a personal interest in the case, as his sons Henry and George had visited Madresfield in the past. George was then in a relationship with Beauchamp’s daughter Mary, which was cut off by her father’s outing. After sufficient evidence had been gathered by the Duke, Beauchamp was made an offer to separate from his wife Lettice (without a divorce), retire on a pretence and then leave the country. Beauchamp refused, and, shortly afterwards, the Countess Beauchamp obtained a divorce. There was no public scandal, but Lord Beauchamp resigned all his offices except that of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports and went into exile on the continent (fearing arrest if he did not), briefly contemplating suicide. On 26 July, 1902, Lord Beauchamp had married Lady Lettice Grosvenor, daughter of Victor Grosvenor, Earl Grosvenor, and Lady Sibell Lumley, and granddaughter of the 1st Duke of Westminster. They had three sons and four daughters: William Lygon, 8th Earl Beauchamp (1903–1979), the last Earl Beauchamp. His widow, Mona, née Else Schiewe, died 1989; Hon. Hugh Patrick Lygon (1904–1936), said to be the model for Sebastian in Brideshead Revisited; Lady Lettice Lygon (1906–1973) who married 1930 (div. 1958) Sir Richard Charles Geers Cotterell, 5th Bt. (1907–1978); Lady Sibell Lygon (1907–2005) who married Feb. 11, 1939 (bigamously) and 1949 (legally) Michael Rowley (d. 1952), stepson of her maternal uncle the 2nd Duke of Westminster; Lady Mary Lygon (1910–1982) who married 1937 (div) HH Prince Vsevolod Ivanovich of Russia; Lady Dorothy Lygon (1912–2001) who married 1985 (sep) Robert Heber-Percy (d. 1987) of Faringdon, Berkshire; Hon. Richard Edward Lygon (1916–1970) who married 1939 Patricia Janet Norman; their younger daughter Rosalind Lygon, now Lady Morrison (b. 1946), inherited Madresfield Court in 1979. Lady Beauchamp died in 1936, aged 59, estranged from all her children except her youngest child. Lord Beauchamp died of cancer in New York City, aged 66. He was succeeded in the earldom by his eldest son, William. Of the Earl’s seven children, all but the second son Hugh (who was homosexual) married, but only two left issue. Both father and son are buried at St Mary (Madresfield Village, Madresfield, Worcestershire, WR13 5AA).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Baron Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen was a French novelist and poet. His life forms the basis of a fictionalised biography by Roger Peyrefitte.
Born: February 20, 1880, Paris, France
Died: November 5, 1923, Capri
Lived: Villa Lysis, Via Lo Capo, 80073 Capri, Italy (40.55916, 14.25972)
Buried: Protestant Cemetery, Capri, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 58117754
Books: Messes Noires- Lord Lyllian
People also search for: Nino Cesarini, R. P. Coppini, R. Nieri

Baron Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen was a novelist and poet of the early 20th century; his fame is based on a mid-century fictionalized biography by Roger Peyrefitte. In 1903, a scandal involving Parisian students made him persona non grata in the salons of Paris and dashed his marriage plans, after which he took up residence in Capri with his longtime lover, Nino Cesarini. He became one of the many "characters" of the island in the interwar years, featuring in novels by Compton MacKenzie and others. His house was christened Villa Lysis (later sometimes referred to as Villa Fersen) in reference to Plato's Socratic dialogue Lysis discussing friendship (or, according to modern notions, homosexual love). Villa Fersen remains one of Capri's tourist attractions. Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen died in 1923 —allegedly by suicide achieved through drinking a cocktail of champagne and cocaine. His ashes are conserved in the non-Catholic cemetery of Capri. Cesarini returned to Rome.
Together from 1903 to 1923: 20 years.
Baron Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen (February 20, 1880 - November 5, 1923)
Nino Cesarini (September 29, 1889 – October 25, 1943)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Villa Lysis (initially, La Gloriette; today, Villa Fersen) is a villa on Capri built by industrialist and poet Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen. "Dedicated to the youth of love" (dédiée à la jeunesse d’amour), it was Fersen’s self-chosen exile from France after a sex scandal involving Parisian schoolboys and nude (or nearly nude) tableaux vivants.
Address: Via Lo Capo, 80073 Capri, Italy (40.55916, 14.25972)
Type: Museun (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 10.00-18.00
Phone: +39 0818386111
Place
Built in 1905
Fersen purchased the 12,000 square metres (130,000 sq ft) land in 1904 for 15,000 lire. The real designer of the Villa is unknown. A recent analysis of letters of Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen to his friend, the artist Edouard Chimot, shows that Chimot, who, since 1907, due to a trial following an accident in the building site, was said to be the designer, is not. The house was described in detail by Roger Peyrefitte in his novel “L’Exilé de Capri” (1959), a fictionalized account of Adelswärd-Fersen’s years on Capri together with his lover Nino Cesarini. Architecturally, the house is mainly Art Nouveau with Neoclassical elements; the style might be called "Neoclassical decadent." The well-known Latin inscription above the front steps (AMORI ET DOLORI SACRVM, "a shrine to love and sorrow") highlights Fersen’s Romantic view of himself. "Lysis" is a reference to the Socratic dialogue Lysis discussing friendship, and by our modern notion, homosexual love. In the atrium a marble stairway, with wrought iron balustrade, leads to the first floor where there are bedrooms with panoramic terraces, and a dining room. Fersen’s large room was on the upper floor, facing East, with three windows overlooking the Gulf of Naples and three towards Mount Tiberio. Nino also had a room on the upper floor. On the ground floor there is a lounge decorated with blue majolica and white ceramic, facing out over the Gulf of Naples. In the basement, there is a room for smoking opium, also known as the Chinese room. The large garden is connected to the villa by a flight of steps which leads to a portico with ionic columns. The ruins of Villa Jovis, one of Tiberius’ twelve villas on Capri, are a few hundred meters to the east-southeast of Villa Lysis.
Life
Who: Baron Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen (February 20, 1880 – November 5, 1923)
Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen became addicted to opium on a trip to Ceylon during construction of the house (Peyrefitte relates that a worker was killed during construction, and Fersen therefore decided to travel until the anger of the locals at him had subsided), and after WWI he started using cocaine. He eventually committed suicide in 1923 by ingesting an overdose of cocaine. His ashes are conserved in the non-Catholic cemetery of Capri. After Fersen’s death, the villa was left first to his sister, Germaine, but with the usufruct to Nino Cesarini. Cesarini sold the rights for 200 000 lire to Germaine and went to live in Rome. Germaine later gave the villa to her daughter, the Countess of Castelbianco. With the last of the maintenance work done in 1934, the house was essentially in ruins by the 1980s. In 1985, Villa Lysis passed into possession of the Italian state. The building was restored in the 1990s by the Lysis Funds Association (founded in 1986) and the Municipality of Capri. The Tuscan architect, Marcello Quiriconi, supervised the work. Since the restoration, Villa Lysis has been open to tourists. It is also available to rent for parties and dinners and cultural events have taken place there, such as an exhibition of photographs by Wilhelm von Gloeden in 2009. In Mar. 2010, the villa was put up for sale, listed as being 450 square metres (4,800 sq ft) with a 12,000 square metres (130,000 sq ft) garden.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Cimitero acattolico di Capri is a non-Catholic cemetery on the island of Capri. Established in 1878 by Englishman George Hayward, it contains 204 graves from a total of 21 different nations.
Address: Via Marina Grande, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.55153, 14.23452)
Type: Cimetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 081 838 6111
Place
Most of the people buried in the cemetery are of English,. German, Russian or American nationality. Aside from Protestants, also buried in the cemetery are people professing the Catholic religion (such as Anglicans, Jews, Orthodox). Notable interments include French Baron Jacques d'Adelsward-Fersen, Lucio Amelio, Günter Ammon, Gracie Fields, Norman Douglas and Jakob Johann von Uexküll. After WWII, the cemetery saw a period of great neglect, which ended in 1986 when the Municipality of Capri ensured the preservation and restoration of the cemetery graves.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero acattolico di Capri:
• Jacques d'Adelsward-Fersen (1880-1923), French novelist and poet. His life forms the basis of a fictionalised biography by Roger Peyrefitte.
• Norman Douglas (December 8, 1868-February 7, 1952), British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. His travel books such as his 1915 Old Calabria were also appreciated for the quality of their writing.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Robert Tobias "Bobbie" Andrews was a British stage actor. He also briefly appeared in films.
Born: February 20, 1895, London, United Kingdom
Died: 1976, Maidenhead, United Kingdom
Lived: 67 Egerton Gardens, Chelsea, SW3
37 St Mary's Mansions, St Mary's Terrace, W2
Redroofs, School Ln, Littlewick Green, Maidenhead, Berkshire, SL6 3QY, UK (51.51071, -0.79085)
Find A Grave Memorial# 101146344
Movies: The Man from Colorado, The Burgomaster of Stilemonde, The Walking Dead

Bobbie Andrews was a British stage actor. Ivor Novello was a Welsh composer and actor who became one of the most popular British entertainers of the first half of the 20th century. Novello and Andrews were at the very hub of London's theatrical gay society, dubbed "the Ivor/Noël naughty set (after Ivor Novello and Noël Coward)" by Cecil Beaton in his diaries. Novello had his first stage success with Theodore & Co in 1916, a production by George Grossmith, Jr. and Edward Laurillard with a score composed by Novello and the young Jerome Kern. In the same year, Novello contributed to André Charlot's revue See-Saw. In 1917, he wrote for another Grossmith and Laurillard production, the operette Arlette. In the same year, he was introduced him to the actor Bobbie Andrews, who became Novello's life partner. Andrews introduced Novello to the young Noël Coward. Coward, six years Novello's junior, was deeply envious of Novello's effortless glamour. He wrote, "I just felt suddenly conscious of the long way I had to go before I could break into the magic atmosphere in which he moved and breathed with such nonchalance".
Together from 1916 to 1951: 35 years.
Robert Tobias "Bobbie" Andrews (February 20, 1895 – 1976)
David Ivor Davies aka Ivor Novello (January 15, 1893 – March 6, 1951)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In the 1930s, Bobbie Andrews, partner of Ivor Novello, lived at 67 Egerton Gardens, Chelsea, SW3.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1956 Bobbie Andrews, Ivor Novello’s lifelong companion, lived at 37 St Mary's Mansions, St Mary's Terrace, W2.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The British film company Gainsborough Pictures offered Ivor Novello a lucrative contract, which enabled him to buy a country house in Littlewick Green, near Maidenhead. He renamed the property Redroofs, and he entertained there famously and with little regard for convention.
Address: School Ln, Littlewick Green, Maidenhead, Berkshire, SL6 3QY, UK (51.51071, -0.79085)
Type: Student Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1628 822982
Place
The village of Littlewick Green is set just off the main Bath Road two miles west of Maidenhead and has a certain charm, with many of its cottages and houses set around a sizeable green with the school and parish church completing the picture. Also here is “Redroofs,” the former home of Ivor Novello, where many of his most famous works were composed. The village pub, the Cricketers, overlooks the green. The village hall was built in 1911 and has an unusual balcony facing the green where the cricket teams watch matches and keep the score on the scoreboard. The church was completed in 1893 and was built mainly to provide a burial ground and to make unnecessary the long walk to White Waltham in whose civil parish the village lies.
Life
Who: David Ivor Davies (January 15, 1893 – March 6, 1951) aka Ivor Novello and Robert Tobias "Bobbie" Andrews (February 20, 1895 – 1976)
Cecil Beaton, noting the frequent homosexual excesses at Redroofs, coined the phrase, "the Ivor/Noel naughty set.” Noel Coward had by now caught Novello up professionally, despite a joint disaster when Novello starred in Coward’s play “Sirocco” in 1927, which was a débâcle, and closed within a month of opening. In 1928 Novello starred in the silent adaptation of Coward’s much more successful “The Vortex,” and made his last silent film, “A South Sea Bubble.” During the late 1920s, Novello was the most popular male star in British films. Novello died on March 6, 1951. Bobbie Andrews died in 1976 at Redroofs. Novello’s memory is promoted by The Ivor Novello Appreciation Bureau, which holds annual events around Britain, including an annual pilgrimage to Redroofs each June. Redroofs was sold after Novello’s death and is now a theatre training school.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Profile

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
reviews_and_ramblings

March 2017

S M T W T F S
    1 2 3 4
567891011
12131415161718
1920 21 22 23 24 25
262728293031 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Page Summary

Disclaimer

All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
I'm associated with Amazon/USA Affiliates Programs.
Books reviewed on this site were usually provided at no cost by the publisher or author. However, some books were purchased by the reviewer and not provided for free. For information on how a particular title was obtained, please contact by email the blog's owner.
Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Mar. 26th, 2017 10:47 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios