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2017-03-24 06:41 pm

Paul Mooney (November 4, 1904 – March 24, 1939)

Lived: Hangover House, Laguna Beach, 31172 Ceanothus Dr, Laguna Beach, CA 92651, USA (33.50984, -117.74785)
Find A Grave Memorial# 173571638

House: Architecture historian and writer Ted Wells considers Hangover House, which Richard Halliburton commissioned, one of the "best modern houses in the United States."

Address: 31172 Ceanothus Dr, Laguna Beach, CA 92651, USA (33.50984, -117.74785)
Gay Village: Laguna Beach (Orange County, CA 92651)

Place
Hangover House (also known as the Halliburton House) was designed and built by William Alexander Levy for his friend the travel writer Richard Halliburton. Constructed in 1938 on a Laguna Beach, California, hilltop, the house, boasting commanding views of the Pacific Ocean, was built with three bedrooms, one each for Halliburton, Alexander, and Halliburton's lover Paul Mooney, who was also Halliburton's editor and ghostwriter. Alexander drew upon European modern architecture and created flat-roofed boxes of concrete and glass. He hoped to create a house that, like the international modern spirit of Halliburton, soared above the clouds. Mies van der Rohe's work and his experimental concrete buildings of the 1920s, along with Le Corbusier's L'Esprit Nouveau Pavilion (1924–25) and his famous Villa Savoye (1928–29), influenced Alexander. Concrete and steel were the main materials used in its construction. Glass blocks formed part of the wall along the gallery that looked into a canyon several hundred feet below. A huge bastionlike retaining wall outside the main building made the house appear safe from intrusion and Olympian in its detachment. Alexander was a novice architect, a recent graduate of the New York University School of Architecture and close friend of Paul Mooney. Mooney managed the construction of the house, and offered occasional design advice, suggesting the creation of a small pond behind the house which, for its shape and size, he called "Clark Gable's ears." A mutual friend of Levy and Mooney, Charles Wolfsohn (born 1912), a penthouse garden designer, did the flower landscaping. The house, built of concrete and steel and bastion-like in appearance, contained a spacious living room, a spacious dining room and three bedrooms. Because of its position, perched 400 feet (120m) above a sheer canyon, it was called "Hangover House" by Mooney, and this title was cast into a retaining wall on the site. The nickname "Hangover House" is a pun on both the building's location overlooking the cliffs, and the alcohol consumed there. When he first saw the completed structure, Halliburton enthused, "it flies!" Alexander befriended Ayn Rand and provided quotes for her book “The Fountainhead” (1943). Rand's descriptions of the Heller House, and other houses designed by the book's hero Howard Roark, were believed, by Alexander, to be thinly disguised references to Hangover House. Halliburton was lost at sea in 1939. In 1942, the house was purchased for $9,000 by Gen. Wallace Thompson Scott. The house was sold in 2011 for $3.2 million, about a year after the death of the longtime owner, Zolite Scott, Wallace's daughter. As of April 2012, construction was underway to rehabilitate the building after much neglect had resulted in severe structural deterioration; although work was held up by preservationist disputes.

Life
Who: Richard Halliburton (January 9, 1900 – March 24, 1939), Paul Mooney (November 4, 1904 – March 24, 1939) and William Alexander Levy (October 21, 1909 - June 2, 1997)
Richard Halliburton was an American traveler, adventurer, and author. Best known today for having swum the length of the Panama Canal and paying the lowest toll in its history—36 cents—Halliburton was headline news for most of his brief career. His final and fatal adventure, an attempt to sail a Chinese junk, the Sea Dragon, across the Pacific Ocean from Hong Kong to the Golden Gate International Exposition in San Francisco, made him legendary. Halliburton's friends during this time included movie stars, writers, musicians, painters, and politicians, including writers Gertrude Atherton and Kathleen Norris, Senator James Phelan and philanthropist Noel Sullivan, and actors Ramón Novarro and Rod LaRoque. Halliburton never married. While young he dated several young women and, as revealed in letters to them, was infatuated with at least two. Later in his life, rumors of an impending marriage to Mary Lou Davis, who, with her two children from a previous marriage, resided at Hangover House during the Sea Dragon Expedition, were of little foundation. Halliburton was most likely bisexual. Among those romantically linked to him were film star Ramón Novarro and philanthropist Noel Sullivan, both of whom shared the bohemian lifestyle. Halliburton's most enduring relationship was with freelance journalist Paul Mooney, with whom he often shared living quarters and who assisted him with his written work. French police reports, dated 1935, noted the famed traveler's homosexual activity when in Paris - this about the time of his planned crossing by elephant over the Alps: "Mr Halliburton is a well known homosexual in some specialized establishments. One of his cruising locales was the Saint-Lazare Street." Missing at sea since March 1939, Halliburton was declared dead on October 5, 1939 by the Memphis Chancery Court. His empty grave is at Forest Hill Cemetery (1661 Elvis Presley Blvd, Memphis, TN 38106) at the Halliburton family gravesite. After the deaths of Halliburton and Mooney, William Alexander Levy assisted composer Arnold Schoenberg in the redesign of his studio in Brentwood, and also designed a house in Encino for scriptwriter David Greggory. The house in the Hollywood Hills he built for himself he called the House in Space, distinct as an early example in the region of cantilever construction. Alexander also designed wooden furniture and bowls. Alexander continued to practice architecture and interior design and by 1950 had moved permanently to West Hollywood. In 1952, Alexander opened The Mart, one of the first art and antique boutiques in Los Angeles, on Santa Monica Boulevard, operating it until 1977. During this period, he occasionally had bit parts in feature films, notably “The Shootist,” starring John Wayne, and “The McMasters,” starring Brock Peters, his sometime business partner at The Mart. A developer of the Hollywood Hills and a philanthropist, Alexander became a patron of the arts and a world traveler. Alexander's papers are kept at the Architecture and Design Collection, at the Art, Design & Architecture Museum, at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-24 06:38 pm

Noemie Perugia (November 7, 1903 – March 24, 1992)

Born: November 7, 1903
Died: March 24, 1992
Find A Grave Memorial# 161848975

Henriëtte Hilda Bosmans was a Dutch composer. Bosmans was born in Amsterdam, the daughter of Henri Bosmans, principal cellist of the Concertgebouw Orchestra, and the pianist Sara Benedicts, piano teacher at the Amsterdam Conservatory. A significant personality in the life of the composer was the violinist Francis Koene. Bosmans was head over heels in love with her duet partner. They were engaged; and Koene’s playing was the inspiration for the 1934 Concertstuk (concert piece) for violin and orchestra. Koene never played it as he died in 1934 as the result of a brain tumor. Bosmans fell into a deep depression. "Part of me died at that time," she wrote to her friend Matthijs Vermeulen. For years, she wrote not a single note. Just as before the war the cello of Frieda Belinfante played a key role in her life, now the voice took over. Bosmans’ muse was the French singer Noemie Perugia; she sang in 1949 in Amsterdam, and Bosmans heard the last part of her recital. She was overwhelmed. It took a while before Perugia responded to Bosmans’ musical and amorous advances, but eventually the pair developed a relationship that may be compared to that between Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears. The creative relationship did not last long. Bosmans wrote a series of inspired songs for her beloved, but died in 1952 of stomach cancer.

Together from 1949 to 1952: 3 years.
Henriëtte Hilda Bosmans (December 6, 1895 – July 2, 1952)
Noémie Pérugia (November 7, 1903 – April 1992)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Henriette Bosmans’ muse, French singer Noémie Pérugia (1903-1992), is buried in Nice; she sang in 1949 in Amsterdam, and Bosmans heard the last part of her recital. She was overwhelmed. It took a while before Perugia responded to Bosmans’ musical and amorous advances, but eventually the pair developed a relationship that may be compared to that between Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears. The creative relationship did not last long. Bosmans wrote a series of inspired songs for her beloved, but died in 1952 of stomach cancer. Bosmans is buried in Amsterdam.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-24 06:36 pm

Kenneth Nelson (March 24, 1930 – October 7, 1993)

Kenneth Nelson was an American actor. Born in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, Nelson appeared in several television series in the late 1940s, Captain Video and His Video Rangers and The Aldrich Family among them.
Born: March 24, 1930, Rocky Mount, North Carolina, United States
Died: October 7, 1993, London, United Kingdom
Buried: Putney Vale Cemetery and Crematorium, Wimbledon, London Borough of Merton, Greater London, England
Find A Grave Memorial# 101139656
Nominations: Golden Globe Award for Best New Star of the Year – Actor


Cemetery: Putney Vale Cemetery and Crematorium in southwest London is located in Putney Vale, surrounded by Putney Heath and Wimbledon Common and Richmond Park. It is located within 47 acres of parkland. The cemetery was opened in 1891 and the crematorium in 1938. The cemetery was originally laid out on land which had belonged to Newlands Farm, which was established in the medieval period.

Address: Stag Ln, London SW15 3DZ, UK (51.44001, -0.24122)
Phone: +44 20 8788 2113
Website: www.wandsworth.gov.uk

Place
The cemetery has two chapels, one being a traditional Church of England chapel and the other being used for multi-denomination or non-religious services. It has a large Garden of Remembrance. There are 87 Commonwealth war grave burials from WWI and 97 from WWII n the cemetery. Six Victoria Cross recipients have been buried or cremated here. The burials are scattered throughout the grounds of the cemetery and a Screen Wall Memorial has been erected to record the names of those whose graves are not marked by headstones. Those who have been cremated at Putney Vale Crematorium also have their names recorded on these panels.

Notable queer burials at Putney Vale Cemetery:
• Joe Randolph "J.R." Ackerley (1896-1967), British writer and editor. Starting with the BBC the year after its founding in 1927, he was promoted to literary editor of The Listener, its weekly magazine, where he served for more than two decades. He published many emerging poets and writers who became influential in Great Britain. He was openly gay, a rarity in his time when homosexuality was forbidden by law and socially ostracized.
• Ivy Compton-Burnett (1884-1969), English novelist, published (in the original hardback editions) as I. Compton-Burnett. She was awarded the 1955 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for her novel “Mother and Son.” Compton-Burnett spent much of her life as a companion to Margaret Jourdain (1876–1951), a leading authority and writer on the decorative arts and the history of furniture, who shared the author's Kensington flat from 1919.
• David Stuart Horner (1900-1983). In the mid-1920s Osbert Sitwell met David Horner who was his lover and companion for most of his life.
• Kenneth Nelson (1930-1993). In 1968, Nelson accepted the lead in the controversial and groundbreaking off-Broadway production of “The Boys in the Band,” the first play to explore the milieu of gay life in New York City in a verbally frank manner. He and the rest of the cast went on to appear in the 1970 film version directed by William Friedkin.
• Wilfred Thesiger (1910-2003), cremated.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-24 06:34 pm

Kate Sessions (November 8, 1857 – March 24, 1940)

Katherine Olivia "Kate" Sessions was an American botanist, horticulturalist, and landscape architect closely associated with San Diego, California, and known as the "Mother of Balboa Park."
Born: November 8, 1857, San Francisco, California, United States
Died: March 24, 1940, San Diego, California, United States
Education: University of California, Berkeley
Lived: 4016 Randolph Street, San Diego
Buried: Mount Hope Cemetery, San Diego, San Diego County, California, USA, Plot: Division 5
Find A Grave Memorial# 75383463

School: The University of California, Berkeley, (also referred to as Berkeley, UC Berkeley, and Cal, Berkeley, CA 94720) is a public research university located in Berkeley, California. Founded in 1868, Berkeley is the oldest of the ten research universities affiliated with the University of California system, and is often cited as the top public university in the United States and around the world. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Barbara Macdonald (1913-2000), Cora Du Bois (1903–1991), Florence Yoch (1890–1972), Helen Jacobs (1908–1997), Jessica Blanche Peixotto (1864–1941), Kate Sessions (1857–1940), Lillian Faderman (born 1940), Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880–1955), Mark Bingham (1970–2001), Pauli Murray (1910–1985), Robert Duncan (1919–1988), Susan Sontag (1933–2004), Walter Plunkett (1902–1982), William “Bill” Colvig (1917–2000).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Lee and Teats were companions who lived together from 1902 through 1943, when Lee died. Teats continued to live in their house until she died in 1952. The women were important in the early XX-century San Diego social scene, and entertained two US presidents in their home.

Addresses:
3574 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 (32.74269, -117.15871) - Alice Lee Residence
3560 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Katherine Teats Cottage
3578 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Alice Lee Cottage
Gay Village: Hillcrest (San Diego, CA 92103)

Place
Built in 1905, Design by Irving Gill with Lloyd Wright. Gardens by Kate Sessions
Known as the Teats Cottage, the Prairie-style house was built for Katherine Teats, the domestic partner of prominent San Diego socialite Alice Lee. Originally was part of a compound with three residences sharing a garden designed by noted botanist/landscape architect Kate Sessions. In May of 1906, Alice Lee granted the property of the Teats Cottage to her companion Katherine Teats. Misses Lee and Teats lived in the main house and used the other two for rentals. Miss Lee was close friends with both Mrs. Grover Clevelend and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, and often dined at the White House. President and Mrs. Roosevelt, Mrs. Cleveland, and other distinguished visitors were often guests at Miss Lee's Seventh Avenue home.

Life
Who: Alice Lee (May 27, 1854 - February 18, 1943)
Alice Lee was born in Westport, NY, and throughout her life was surrounded by individuals passionate about the Progressive movement including Teddy Roosevelt, who was married to her second cousin; Florence Nightingale; Ralph Waldo Emerson; and the Bronson Alcott family. When Lee moved to San Diego in 1902 for health reasons she became friends with the Marston Family who were involved with the Progressive movement in San Diego. Alice Lee became very involved with different organizations in San Diego including the First Unitarian Church, the Wednesday Club, the Civic Committee of the Chamber of Commerce, and other local civic and cultural groups. She took leadership positions as President of the San Diego Museum, Honorary Director of the Women’s Civic Center, Director of the Natural History Museum, President of the Balboa Park Auditorium Association, and President of the Balboa Park Commission. Alice Lee founded the group “Open Forum”, which was a public forum to openly talk about social, political, and international issues. According to a newspaper article from the San Diego Union, by 1935 the group had become one of the “oldest continuous non-legislative forum of free public discussion in the United States” before being disbanded sometime in the 1970s. Lee was also a leader of the Progressive movement in San Diego organizing Progressive thinking women to get out and vote for Teddy Roosevelt in 1932. She was recognized by the Progressive Party by being chosen to represent California at the National Convention for the Progressive Party in Chicago. Lee was the leader of the “Save the Beaches” campaign in San Diego which resulted in the city acquiring miles of beach for public use. She was also instrumental in developing the public playground system. Alice Lee was praised as a Civic leader in several publications including the San Diego Union, the Ticonderoga Sentinel, the Boston Globe, and a book entitled “Women of the West: A Series of Biographical Sketches of Living Eminent Women in the Eleven Western States of the United States of America.” Lee lived in the home at 3574 Seventh Avenue from its year of construction in 1905 until her death in 1943. Alice Lee is buried at Hillside Cemetery (165 Ridgefield Rd, Wilton, CT 06897), established in 1818.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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National Park: Named for the Spanish maritime explorer Vasco Núñez de Balboa, Balboa Park hosted the 1915–16 Panama–California Exposition and 1935–36 California Pacific International Exposition, both of which left architectural landmarks.

Address: San Diego, CA 92104 (32.73414, -117.14455)
Phone: +1 619-239-0512
Website: www.balboapark.org
National Register of Historic Places: 77000331, 1977

Place
Balboa Park is a 1,200-acre (490 ha) urban cultural park in San Diego, California. In addition to open space areas, natural vegetation zones, green belts, gardens, and walking paths, it contains museums, several theaters, and the world-famous San Diego Zoo. There are also many recreational facilities and several gift shops and restaurants within the boundaries of the park. Placed in reserve in 1835, the park's site is one of the oldest in the United States dedicated to public recreational use. Balboa Park is managed and maintained by the Parks and Recreation Department of the City of San Diego. Balboa Park is a primary attraction in San Diego and the region. Its many mature, and sometimes rare, trees and groves comprise an urban forest. Many of the original trees were planted by the renowned American landscape architect, botanist, plantswoman, and gardener Kate Sessions. An early proponent of drought tolerant and California native plants in garden design, Sessions established a nursery to propagate and grow for the park and the public. For the first few decades of its existence, "City Park" remained mostly open space. The land, lacking trees and covered in native wildflowers, was home to bobcats, rattlesnakes, coyotes, and other wildlife. Numerous proposals, some altruistic, some profit-driven, were brought forward for the development and use of the land during this time, but no comprehensive plan for development was adopted until 1902. Nevertheless, some building were constructed, including an orphanage and women's shelter (later burned down), a high school (Russ High School – later San Diego High School), and several gardens maintained by various private groups. One of the most celebrated of these early usages was a 36-acre nursery owned and maintained by local horticulturist and botanist Kate Sessions, who is often referred to as "the mother of Balboa Park." Although owned by Sessions, by agreement with the city the nursery was open to the public, and Sessions donated trees and plants to the city every year for its beautification. Sessions is responsible for bringing in many of the different varieties of native and exotic plants in the park. Her work was so progressive that she was in fact the first woman awarded the Meyer Medal for "foreign plant importation" by the American Genetic Association. The Exposition's lead designer and site planner was architect Bertram Goodhue, well known for his Gothic Revival Style churches in New York and Boston, who sought a regionally appropriate aesthetic to use in Southern California. Goodhue and associate architect Carleton Winslow chose to use the styles of highly ornamented Spanish Baroque architecture with the Spanish Colonial architecture created during the Spanish colonization era in New Spain-Mexico and the lower Americas, with Churrigueresque and Plateresque detailing "updating" the already popular Mission Revival Style—to create the Spanish Colonial Revival Style. The buildings and the style were extremely well received by the public and design professionals in California and nationally, becoming a reigning style for decades, and still the primary vernacular style in much of California. Goodhue's associate architect was Carleton M. Winslow, who is solely credited with the lattice-work Botanical Building and other structures. Goodhue's team, which included Kate Sessions and Lloyd Wright for landscape design, had won out over the local and more modernist Irving Gill to get the commission. One of the most significant improvements to the park from that time was the construction of the Cabrillo Bridge across a major canyon in the city. The bridge connects the main portion of the park with the western portion and with Laurel Street.

Life
Who: Katherine Olivia "Kate" Sessions (November 8, 1857 – March 24, 1940)
Kate Sessions was born in San Francisco, California and educated in Oakland. At the age of six, she moved with her family to a farm next to Lake Merritt. She attended the University of California, Berkeley in 1881 with a degree in natural science. While attending a San Francisco business school, at the request of a friend, she moved to San Diego in 1883 to work as an eighth grade teacher and vice principal at Russ School (now San Diego High School). She worked at the school for over a year before she left due to health problems. In San Diego, Sessions quickly moved on to her true interest, the cultivation of plants. In 1885, she purchased a nursery; within a few years she was the owner of a flower shop as well as growing fields and nurseries in Coronado, Pacific Beach, and Mission Hills. The Mission Hills Nursery, which she founded in 1910 and sold to her employees the Antonicelli brothers in 1926, is still in operation. In 1892 Sessions struck a deal with the City of San Diego to lease 30 acres (120,000 m2) of land in Balboa Park (then called City Park) as her growing fields. In return, she agreed to plant 100 trees a year in the mostly barren park, as well as 300 trees a year in other parts of San Diego. This arrangement left the park with an array of cypress, pine, oak, pepper trees and eucalyptus grown in her gardens from seeds imported from around the world; virtually all of the older trees still seen in the park were planted by her. Among many other plant introductions, she is credited with importing and popularizing the jacaranda, now very familiar in the city. She also collected, propagated, and introduced many California native plants to the horticulture trade and into gardens. In 1900, she took a trip to Baja California to find a palm tree not native in San Diego to be planted at the park. She would also later take a seven-month trip through Europe where she collected multiple plant varieties that she eventually helped plant in the park. Together with Alfred D. Robinson she co-founded the San Diego Floral Association in 1907; it is the oldest garden club in Southern California. The garden club was influential in teaching San Diegans how to grow ornamental and edible plants, at a time when most San Diego landscaping consisted of dirt and sagebrush. Sessions worked with architect Hazel Wood Waterman on the garden design for a group of houses built by San Diego socialite Alice Lee near Balboa Park. Dedicated to her plants, Kate never married. It’s been rumored that she was a lesbian, but in her younger years she also had a long list of male suitors, included John D. Spreckels. She lived to be 82, when she died in San Diego on March 24, 1940. Her office was at 4016 Randolph St, San Diego, CA 92103. She is interred in Mount Hope Cemetery (3751 Market St, San Diego, CA 92102).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-24 06:30 pm

Grayson Perry (born March 24, 1960)

Grayson Perry CBE RA is an English artist, known mainly for his ceramic vases and cross-dressing. Perry's vases have classical forms and are decorated in bright colours, depicting subjects at odds with their attractive appearance.
Born: March 24, 1960, Chelmsford, United Kingdom
Education: Braintree College
University of Portsmouth
King Edward VI Grammar School, Chelmsford
Lived: A House for Essex, Black Boy Ln, Wrabness, Manningtree, Essex CO11 2TW, UK (51.94118, 1.17322)
Spouse: Philippa Perry (m. 1992)
Awards: Turner Prize, British Academy Television Award for Best Specialist Factual
Movies and TV shows: All In The Best Possible Taste with Grayson Perry, Grayson/Flowers/Jewels, Bungalow Depression
Parents: Jean Dines, Tom Perry

School: King Edward VI Grammar School, or KEGS (Broomfield Rd, Chelmsford CM1 3SX), is a British grammar school with academy status located in the city of Chelmsford, Essex. It takes pupils between the ages of 11 and 18 — from Year 7 to 11 the pupils are exclusively male, although it becomes mixed in the sixth form (years 12 and 13). KEGS was one of many grammar schools founded by Edward VI. Its current form resulted from a royal warrant dated March 24, 1551, although evidence of this school exists from as far back as the 13th century, possibly earlier, in an alternative location. Indeed, the school of 1551 was merely a "rebranding" of the Chelmsford Chantry School, a Roman Catholic institution which had been abolished along with the monasteries during the English Reformation. The school was moved to its present site on Broomfield Road in 1892. Once a boarding school, it was one of many grammar schools to fully join the state sector and abolish the nominal fees. The last boarders left in the 1970s. In 1976 it admitted the first female pupil (Fiona Hook) to the Sixth Form, to study Classics. Grayson Perry (born 1960) was educated at King Edward VI Grammar School. Perry took interest in conventional boys' activities, such as model aircraft, motorcycles and girls. He was in the school's Combined Cadet Corps and wanted to train as an army officer. In the late 1970s he was involved in the Chelmsford punk scene. From an early age he liked to dress in women's clothes and in his teens realized that he was a transvestite. At the age of 15 he moved in with his father's family in Chelmsford, where he began to go out dressed as a woman. When he was discovered by his father he said he would stop, but his stepmother told everyone about it and a few months later threw him out. He returned to his mother and stepfather at Great Bardfield.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: Braintree College (Church Ln, Braintree CM7 5SN), now known as The College at Braintree, is a further education college based in Braintree, Essex. It is a constituent college of the Colchester Institute. The college was originally an independently controlled institution, but merged with the Colchester Institute on 29 February 2010. Despite being part of the Colchester Institute, Braintree continues to operate under its own name. Grayson Perry (born 1960), Turner Prize winning artist, did an art foundation course at Braintree College of Further Education from 1978 to 1979.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: The University of Portsmouth (University House, Winston Churchill Ave, Portsmouth PO1 2UP) is a public university in the city of Portsmouth, in the ceremonial county of Hampshire on the south coast of England; it is located mainly on Portsea Island with a population of 205,400, it is the United Kingdom's only island city. The history of the university dates back to 1908, when the Park building opened as a Municipal college and public library. The focus was on chemistry and engineering. The University's roots can be traced back even further to the Portsmouth and Gosport School of Science and the Arts. Grayson Perry (born 1960) studied for a BA in fine art at Portsmouth Polytechnic, graduating in 1982. He had an interest in film and exhibited his first piece of pottery at the "New Contemporaries" show at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in 1980. In the months following his graduation he joined The Neo Naturists, a group started by Christine Binnie to revive the "true sixties spirit – which involves living one's life more or less naked and occasionally manifesting it into a performance for which the main theme is body paint". They put on events at galleries and other venues. When he left for Portsmouth in 1979, his stepfather told him not to return home.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: “Disney meets Dalì,” that is how the BBC described A House for Essex. Ceramic artist Grayson Perry and the FAT team of architects designed this bizarre building in its pretty country setting for the Living Architecture project as a gallery and holiday home for up to four people. To the Turner prize winner, art is not art without lashings of trash.

Address: Black Boy Ln, Wrabness, Manningtree, Essex CO11 2TW, UK (51.94118, 1.17322)
Website: http://www.living-architecture.co.uk/the-houses/a-house-for-essex/overview/

Place
A House for Essex is designed to evoke a tradition of wayside and pilgrimage chapels in the landscape. It is a singular building, appearing as a small, beautifully crafted object amongst the trees and fields. Due to high demand, all holidays at A House for Essex are sold via a ballot. Each ballot offers you the chance to purchase a 2- or 3- night stay at A House for Essex, for up to 4 people. The house does not attempt to mimic the appearance or materials of existing buildings in the local village of Wrabness. Instead, it offers a unique addition. Its materials and forms are sympathetic to the site and the area’s sense of remoteness. For example, hand-made tiles relate tonally to the landscape while the building’s simple pitched roof forms echo simple agricultural buildings and farmhouses. The form of the house is solid and barn-like. A series of simple, house forms step up in scale from the entrance to the main living room space. Each of these spaces is expressed externally as a volume in its own right. The building gets higher as it steps down the hill with the tallest volume at the lowest point. It therefore presents two different faces, a modestly scaled entrance porch to the south and a taller more formal frontage to the north. Visitors entering the house from the south pass through a series of spaces that become increasingly formal, culminating in a double-height living room lined with decorative timber panelling and Grayson Perry´s richly coloured tapestries. Upstairs there are two bedrooms which have views across the landscape to the east and west. The stepping up of the volumes creates a series of interlocking spaces on the inside where each pushes into the other. The first floor bedrooms, for instance, will also have balconies that look into the living room space and the bath offers an unusual location from which to observe visitors in the hallway. The interior of the house contains a number of specially commissioned art works by Grayson Perry including beautiful tapestries, pots, decorative timberwork and mosaic floors, celebrating the history and psyche of Essex.

Life
Who: Grayson Perry, CBE (born March 24, 1960)
Grayson Perry is an artist, known mainly for his ceramic vases and cross-dressing. Perry’s vases have classical forms and are decorated in bright colours, depicting subjects at odds with their attractive appearance. There is a strong autobiographical element in his work, in which images of Perry as "Claire,” his female alter-ego, often appear. He was awarded the Turner Prize in 2003. From an early age Perry liked to dress in women’s clothes and in his teens realized that he was a transvestite. After graduating he lived a hand-to-mouth existence in squats, at one point sharing a house with milliner Stephen Jones and pop musician Boy George, the three of them competing to see who could wear the most outrageous outfits to Blitz, a New Romantic nightclub in Covent Garden, London. He lives in London with his wife, the author and psychotherapist Philippa Perry. They have one daughter, Florence, born in 1992. In 2015 he was appointed to succeed Kwame Kwei-Armah as chancellor of University of the Arts London.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-24 06:27 pm

Charlotte Mew (November 15, 1869 - March 24, 1928)

Charlotte Mary Mew was an English poet, whose work spans the cusp between Victorian poetry and Modernism.
Born: November 15, 1869, Bloomsbury, London
Died: March 24, 1928, London, United Kingdom
Buried: Hampstead Cemetery, Hampstead, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England, Plot: northern part of the cemetery, GPS (lat/lon): 51.55082, -0.15848
Find A Grave Memorial# 63323444

House: Hampstead Town Hall (Haverstock Hill, London NW3 4QP) has been listed as a queer venue since the 1970s. However, ever since the London Gay Men's Chorus was founded in 1991, its offices and facilities have been based in Hampstead Town Hall. LGMC was founded when nine friends came together to sing a few Christmas carols at Angel Underground Station hoping to raise a few pounds for the Terrance Higgins Trust. LGMC is now Europe's largest gay men's choir. Hampstead Town Hall was designed by Frederick Mew, father of Charlotte Mew (1869–1928), English poet, whose work spans the cusp between Victorian poetry and Modernism. She was born in Bloomsbury, the daughter of Frederick Mew and Anna Kendall. Her father died in 1898 without making adequate provision for his family; two of her siblings suffered from mental illness, and were committed to institutions, and three others died in early childhood leaving Charlotte, her mother and her sister, Anne. Charlotte and Anne made a pact never to marry for fear of passing on insanity to their children. (One author calls Charlotte "almost certainly chastely lesbian)". Through most of her adult life, Mew wore masculine attire and kept her hair short, adopting the appearance of a dandy. In 1898, Mew fell in love with Ella D'Arcy, a writer and the assistant literary editor of the Yellow Book. D'Arcy, however, did not reciprocate the affection. Nine years later, Mew fell in love with May Sinclair, a well known novelist who was active in the suffrage movement. Sinclair was friendly with Mew and helped with her career. Her presentation of Mew's work to Ezra Pound led to the publication of the poem “The Fête” in the Egoist. Nevertheless, Sinclair did not return Mew's affections, and may have even unsympathetically informed others of the poet's lesbianism. Mew gained the patronage of several literary figures, notably Thomas Hardy, who called her the best woman poet of her day, Virginia Woolf, who said she was "very good and interesting and quite unlike anyone else", and Siegfried Sassoon. She obtained a Civil List pension of seventy-five pounds per year with the aid of Sydney Cockerell, Hardy, John Masefield and Walter de la Mare. This helped ease her financial difficulties. After the death of her sister from cancer in 1927, she descended into a deep depression, and was admitted to a nursing home where she eventually committed suicide by drinking Lysol.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: University College London (UCL, Gower St, Kings Cross, London WC1E 6BT) is a public research university in London, England, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. It is the largest postgraduate institution in the UK by enrollment and is regarded as one of the world's leading multidisciplinary research universities. Established in 1826 as London University by founders inspired by the radical ideas of Jeremy Bentham, UCL was the first university institution to be established in London, and the first in England to be entirely secular and to admit students regardless of their religion. UCL also makes the contested claims of being the third-oldest university in England and the first to admit women. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Caroline Spurgeon (1869–1942), Charlotte Mew (1869–1928), Derek Jarman (1942–1994), Eileen Gray (1878–1976), Leander Starr Jameson (1853–1917).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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May Sinclair was a popular British writer who wrote about two dozen novels, short stories and poetry. She was an active suffragist, and member of the Woman Writers' Suffrage League. From the late 1920s she was suffering from the early signs of Parkinson's disease, and ceased writing. She settled with her companion of 30 years, Florence “Florrie” Bartrop, in Buckinghamshire in 1932.

Addresses:
The Gables, 96 Burcott Lane, Bierton, Aylesbury HP22 5AS, UK (51.83097, -0.78631)
Pembroke Cottage, Little Tingewick, Buckingham MK18 4AG, UK (51.98959, -1.06774)

Place
Bierton is a village in Buckinghamshire, England, about half a mile northeast of the town of Aylesbury. It is a mainly farming parish, The hamlets of Broughton, Broughton Crossing and Burcott lie within Bierton with Broughton civil parish part of Aylesbury Vale district and forms part of the Aylesbury Urban Area. Notable inhabitants of Bierton include architect Deborah Saunt of Channel 4 television's series Grand Designs, playwright Robert Farquhar, BBC fashion commentator Jerry O'Sullivan, and the notable author and poet May Sinclair who lived at The Gables in Burcott Lane for the last ten years of her life. Finmere is a village and civil parish in Oxfordshire, south of the River Great Ouse. It is almost 4 miles (6 km) west of Buckingham in Buckinghamshire and just over 4 miles (6 km) east of Brackley in Northamptonshire. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 466. Finmere's toponym is derived from the Old English for "pool frequented by woodpeckers". The village includes the hamlet of Little Tingewick.

Life
Who: Mary Amelia St. Clair (August 24, 1863 – November 14, 1946), aka May Sinclair
May Sinclair was an active suffragist, and member of the Woman Writers' Suffrage League. May Sinclair was also a significant critic in the area of modernist poetry and prose, and she is attributed with first using the term stream of consciousness in a literary context. Sinclair met Ezra Pound in 1908, and would become both his financial patron and advocate for his work. Through him she met H.D. and Richard Aldington in 1911, and she became a champion of these imagist poets, of T.S. Eliot, and of Vorticism. In 1913 May Sinclair met Charlotte Mew, whose long poem The Farmer’s Bride she admired, and the two had a brief but intense friendship. In 1934, Sinclair was living at Pembroke Cottage, Little Tingewick, in Buckinghamshire, with her maid and companion since 1919, Florence Bartrop. She moved to the Gables, 96, Burcott Lane, Bierton in 1936, where she died in 1946. She is buried at St John-at-Hampstead Churchyard, Hampstead, London.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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In 1913 Esther Roper and Eva Gore-Booth moved to London, at 14 Frognal Gardens, London NW3 6UX, for the sake of Eva’s health. The house has a fine mature rear garden. Frognal gardens is a very quiet position, tucked behind Hampstead Village is the most historical location abutting Church Row. Not far from here, at 108 Frognal, London NW3 6XU, lived Tamara Karsavina (1885–1978). She is buried at Hampstead Cemetery (Fortune Green Rd, West Hampstead, London NW6 1DR). 14 Frognal Gardens was listed for rent in 2014 for £5,200. In the same cemetery is buried Charlotte Mew (1869–1928).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-24 06:23 pm

Bob Mackie (born March 24, 1940)

Robert Gordon "Bob" Mackie is an American fashion designer, best known for his dressing of entertainment icons such as Joan Rivers, Cher, RuPaul, Barbara Eden, Bette Midler, Diana Ross, Judy Garland, ...
Born: March 24, 1940, Monterey Park, California, United States
Education: Chouinard Art Institute
Pasadena City College
Spouse: LuLu Porter (m. 1960–1963)
Children: Robert Gordon Mackie Jr.
Awards: Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Costumes for a Series, more
Parents: Mildred Agnes Mackie, Charles Robert Mackie

School: The Chouinard Art Institute (743 S Grand View St, Los Angeles, CA 90057) was a professional art school founded in 1921 by Nelbert Murphy Chouinard (1879–1969) in Los Angeles, California. In 1961, Walt and Roy Disney guided the merger of the Chouinard Art Institute and the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music to establish the California Institute of the Arts. The Chouinard Art Institute building is situated at 743 Grand View Street in the Westlake district of central Los Angeles. Today it is used by the Western Day Care School, a child-care center. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Bob Mackie (born 1940), Don Bachardy (born 1934), Ted Graber (1920–2000).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: Pasadena City College (PCC, 1570 E Colorado Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91106) is a community college located in Pasadena, California. Pasadena City College was founded in 1924 as Pasadena Junior College. From 1928 to 1953, it operated as a four-year junior college, combining the last two years of high school with the first two years of college. In 1954, Pasadena Junior College merged with another junior college, John Muir College, to become Pasadena City College. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Dustin Lance Black (born 1974), Oscar-award winning screenwriter, actor and LGBT activist, known for his work in the film Milk and the TV series Big Love; Dennis Cooper (born 1953), poet and novelist; Jack Larson (1928-2015), “Jimmy Olsen” on TV's Superman show; Bob Mackie (born 1940), fashion designer.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-23 09:35 pm

Paul Leicester Ford (March 23, 1865 - May 8, 1902)

Paul Leicester Ford was an American novelist and biographer, born in Brooklyn, the son of Gordon Lester Ford and Emily Fowler Ford.
Born: March 23, 1865, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: May 8, 1902, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Buried: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, Westchester County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 24405176
Movies: Janice Meredith
Siblings: Worthington C. Ford, Malcolm Webster Ford

Cemetery: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Sleepy Hollow, New York, is the resting place of numerous famous figures, including Washington Irving, whose story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is set in the adjacent Old Dutch Burying Ground. Incorporated in 1849 as Tarrytown Cemetery, it posthumously honored Irving's request that it change its name to Sleepy Hollow Cemetery.

Address: 540 N Broadway, Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591, USA (41.09702, -73.86162)
National Register of Historic Places: 09000380, 2009

Place
The cemetery is a non-profit, non-sectarian burying ground of about 90 acres (360,000 m2). It is contiguous with, but separate from, the church yard of the colonial-era church that was a setting for "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow". The Rockefeller family estate (see Kykuit), whose grounds abut Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, contains the private Rockefeller cemetery. Several outdoor scenes from the 1970 feature film “House of Dark Shadows” were filmed at the cemetery's receiving vault.

Notable queer burials at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery:
• Elizabeth Arden (1878–1966), businesswoman who built a cosmetics empire.
• Brooke Astor (1902–2007), philanthropist and socialite.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959), philanthropist; member of the Astor family.
• Paul Leicester Ford (1865–1902), editor, bibliographer, novelist, and biographer; brother of Malcolm Webster Ford by whose hand he died.
• Leila Howard Griswold Webb Codman (1856-1910), widow of railroad magnate H. Walter Webb, in 1904 married Ogden Codman, Jr. but died unexpectedly in 1910.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-23 09:32 pm

Norman Fowler (1927 - March 23, 1971)

Lived: Bath Hotel, Charlestown, St. Kitts & Nevis (17.13244, -62.62588)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161870547

Peter Watson was a wealthy English art collector and benefactor. He funded the literary magazine, Horizon, edited by Cyril Connolly. "When I think of him then, I think of his clothes, which were beautiful, his general neatness and cleanness, which seemed almost those of a handsome young Bostonian." –Stephen Spender. In 1930, society photographer, artist and set designer Sir Cecil Beaton began a lifelong obsession with Watson, though the two never became lovers. One chapter from Hugo Vickers' authorized biography of Cecil Beaton is titled I Love You, Mr. Watson. One
of Watson's lovers was the American male prostitute and socialite Denham Fouts, whom he continued to support even after they separated because of Fouts's drug addiction. Norman Fowler was Watson's boyfriend from 1949 and heir to most
of Watson's estate. When Watson drowned in his bath, Fowler was in the flat; some have suggested that Fowler murdered him, but the police dismissed foul play, even if the death remained suspicious. Fowler bought a hotel, called The Bath Hotel, on Nevis, in the British Virgin Islands, and lived there until he himself drowned in the bath in 1971, within weeks of the fifteenth anniversary of Watson's death.

Together from 1949 to 1956: 7 years.
Norman Fowler (1927 - March 23, 1971)
Peter Watson (September 14, 1908 – May 3, 1956)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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House: The “White House,” as Sulhamstead is sometimes affectionately called, was sold by the Thoyts' to Sir George Watson in 1910.

Address: 1 North Dr, Sulhamstead, West Berkshire RG7 4DU, UK (51.41866, -1.08021)
English Heritage Building ID: 40018 (Grade II, 1951)

Place
Built in 1748, Rebuilt in the early XIX century with further alterations in 1852 and 1910.
The house is now a police training centre. Painted stucco with hipped slate roofs. Central 3 storey 3 bay block with set back 2 storey wings. Plinth, first floor cill band, cornice, coped parapet, and paired end stacks to central block and wings. Central 2 storey, 3 bay tetrastyle Ionic portico with triangular pediment. Lead downpipes and rainwater heads. 9 bays; glazing bar sashes with architraves and cornices. Central enclosed porch and two 3-panelled doors with bracketed cornice. Rear similar without portico. North-east front of 4 bays. Low early XIX century additions to south-west. Interior: largely 1910. Early XVIII century style panelled entrance hall with coupled Doric pilasters, screen of coupled Doric columns, and bifurcating staircase with balcony on to central landing. Other rooms with early XVIII century style panelling, fireplaces, and plaster ceilings.

Life
Who: Peter Watson (September 14, 1908 – May 3, 1956) and Norman Fowler (1927 – March 23, 1971)
The Watson family constructed the present swimming pool in 1935 but, on the 23rd October 1940, they left and the building became occupied by the War Office as the Commando Troop Headquarters. Late in 1941, it was entirely taken over by the Air Ministry for use as an RAF Elementary Flying Training School. The present large hard-standing garage housed a link trainer and was also used as an Officers Squash Court. Because of the lack of a purpose built landing field, the RAF utilised a nearby grass field. Peter Watson was a wealthy English art collector and benefactor. Norman Fowler was Watson's boyfriend from 1949. When Watson drowned in his bath, Fowler was in the flat; some have suggested that Fowler murdered him, but the police dismissed foul play, even if the death remained suspicious. Fowler bought a hotel, called The Bath Hotel, on Nevis, in the British Virgin Islands, and lived there until he himself drowned in the bath in 1971, within weeks of the fifteenth anniversary of Watson's death.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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National Park: The Bath Hotel in Nevis is considered to have been the first tourist hotel in the Caribbean.

Address: Charlestown, St. Kitts & Nevis (17.13244, -62.62588)

Place
Built in 1778
Bath Hotel was a rather grand “spa” hotel, and it rapidly became a very successful venture, attracting many wealthy European visitors who were hoping to treat their various ailments using the healing waters of the nearby volcanic hot spring, the Bath Spring, and perhaps more importantly, to enjoy the social scene at this tropical spa hotel on what was then the busy colonial island of Nevis. John Huggins, a merchant and aristocrat built the large, stone hotel at a cost of 43,000 “island” pounds, and surrounded it with lush landscaping, statuary, and goldfish ponds. The hotel was 200 feet long and 60 feet wide. Dignitaries such as Lord Nelson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Prince William Henry, who was the Duke of Clarence, visited the hotel in its heyday. With the downturn of the sugar industry, Nevis stepped into the world of tourism with this hotel, which flourished for about 60 years. Since then the hotel has had various uses, reopening as a hotel from 1912 until 1940. It was used as training center for the West Indian regiment during WWII, and most recently, the headquarters of the Nevis Island Administration.

Life
Who: Norman Fowler (1927 – March 23, 1971)
In 1968, Norman Fowler moved to St Kitts and Nevis, farther east in the Leeward Islands, where he was one of the few white people among the mostly black population. He settled on the island of Nevis, where he purchased the Bath Hotel, an elegant XVIII century pile in Charlestown with a two-storey bathhouse attached to it (from which it took its name). He set about restoring the hotel, and lived in one of its suites. His residency there lasted just over two years. On March 23, 1971, at the age of forty-four, Norman Fowler was found dead. He had lost consciousness while bathing in the hot bathhouse and drowned. Almost 15 years before, his lover Peter Watson had drowned in his bathroom as well. Fowler was in the flat; some have suggested that Fowler murdered him, but the police dismissed foul play, even if the death remained suspicious. Fowler’s death was front-page news in his local paper back on Tortola: “There is profound sympathy here over the sad news of his death.” The coroner's inquest returned an open verdict — simply “death by drowning in hot water bath.” There was suspicion locally that he had been murdered, and the case was investigated, but no evidence was ever found and the case was dropped.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-23 09:30 pm

Joan Crawford (March 23, 1906 – May 10, 1977)

Joan Crawford was an American film and television actress who began her career as a dancer and stage showgirl. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Crawford tenth on their list of the greatest female stars of Classic Hollywood Cinema.
Born: San Antonio, Texas, United States
Died: May 10, 1977, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Stephens College
Lived: Omni Parker House, 60 School St, Boston, MA 02108
Buried: Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum, Hartsdale, Westchester County, New York, USA, Plot: Ferncliff Mausoleum, Unit 8, Alcove E, Crypt 42
Find A Grave Memorial# 242
Children: Christina Crawford, Christopher Crawford, Cathy Crawford, Cynthia Crawford
Spouse: Alfred Steele (m. 1955–1959), more

School: Stephens College (1200 E Broadway, Columbia, MO 65215) is a women's college located in Columbia, Missouri. It is the second oldest female educational establishment that is still a women's college in the United States. It was founded on August 24, 1833, as the Columbia Female Academy. In 1856, David H. Hickman helped secure the college's charter under the name The Columbia Female Baptist Academy. In the late XIX century it was renamed Stephens Female College after James L. Stephens endowed the college with $20,000. From 1937-1943 its Drama Department was renowned by its chairman and teacher, the actress Maude Adams (1872-1953), James M. Barrie's first Peter Pan. The campus includes a National Historic District: Stephens College South Campus Historic District (National Register of Historic Places: 05001326, 2005). Joan Crawford (1904-1977) registered at Stephens College in 1922, giving her year of birth as 1906. She attended Stephens for only a few months before withdrawing after she realized she was not prepared for college.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Place
Ferncliff Cemetery has three community mausoleums that offer what The New York Times has described as "lavish burial spaces". As of 2001, a standard crypt space in the mausoleums was priced at $15,000. The highest-priced spaces were private burial rooms with bronze gates, crystal chandeliers, and stained-glass windows, priced at $280,000. The Ferncliff Mausoleum, aka "The Cathedral of Memories", is the cemetery's oldest mausoleum, constructed in 1928. It has classic architecture, but the corridors are dark without glass panes to admit natural light. Judy Garland, Ed Sullivan, and Joan Crawford are three of the most famous interments in the main mausoleum. The Shrine of Memories is Ferncliff's second mausoleum and was constructed in 1956. "Shrine of Memories" is a more contemporary structure than "Ferncliff Mausoleum." It has many panes of glass to admit natural light, and there is a large frieze of Christopher Columbus in the main hall of the building. Basil Rathbone is one of the most famous interments in "Shrine of Memories." Rosewood is Ferncliff's most recently completed community mausoleum, having been constructed in 1999. Aaliyah and her father Michael Haughton have a private room in Rosewood. Cab Calloway is interred with his wife Zulme "Nuffie". The cemetery is also known for its in-ground burials in sections located in front of the mausoleums. Ferncliff is one of the very few cemeteries that does not permit upright headstones in its outdoor plots. All outdoor grave markers are flush with the ground. This feature facilitates maintenance of the cemetery grounds. However, there are several upright headstones that were placed before this policy was instituted. Malcolm X is one of the most famous ground burials, in plot Pinewood B.

Notable queer burials at Ferncliff Cemetery:
• Diane Arbus (1923-1971), photographer and writer
• James Baldwin (1924–1987) (Cemetery Grounds, HILLA,1203), novelist, essayist
• Joan Crawford (c. 1905–1977) (Ferncliff Mausoleum, M08,E,42-52), actress
• Alice Delamar (1895-1983), heiress and socialite, cremated here but buried in Palm Beach
• Judy Garland (1922–1969), singer, actress
• Moss Hart (1904–1961) (Ferncliff Mausoleum, M08N,EEFF,D,4), playwright and director
• Gerald Haxton (1892-1944) (Cemetery Grounds, PAUL,112C,CENTER), long term secretary and lover of novelist and playwright W. Somerset Maugham.
• Alberta Hunter (1895-1984) (Cemetery Grounds, ELM1,1411), blues singer
• Elsa Maxwell (1883–1963) (Cemetery Grounds, ROSE2,1132), columnist, society figure
• Ona Munson (1910–1955) (Ferncliff Mausoleum, M08TN,Y,G,5), actress
• Basil Rathbone (1892–1967) (Shrine of Memories, S01,K,117), actor. In 1924 he was involved in a brief relationship with Eva Le Gallienne.
• Paul Robeson (1898–1976) (Cemetery Grounds, HILLA,1511), actor, singer, and civil rights activist.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-23 09:27 pm

J.C. Leyendecker (March 23, 1874 - July 25, 1951)

Joseph Christian Leyendecker was one of the preeminent American illustrators of the early 20th century.
Born: March 23, 1874, Montabaur, Germany
Died: July 25, 1951, New Rochelle, New York, United States
Education: Académie Julian
Lived: Mount Tom Day Camp, 48 Mt Tom Rd, New Rochelle, NY 10805, USA (40.89411, -73.78963)
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, Bronx County, New York, USA, Plot: White Oak Plot, Section 18 Lot West 1925
Find A Grave Memorial# 11089743
Influenced: Norman Rockwell
Siblings: Frank Xavier Leyendecker
Influenced by: Alphonse Mucha, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Jules Chéret

J.C. Leyendecker was one of the pre-eminent American illustrators of the early 20th century. Leyendecker lived for most of his life with Charles Beach, the Arrow Collar Man, on whom the stylish men in his artwork were modeled. In 1914, the Leyendeckers and Beach, moved into a large home and art studio in New Rochelle, New York, where J. C. would reside for the remainder of his life. While Beach often organized the famous gala-like social gatherings that Leyendecker was known for in the 1920s, he apparently also contributed largely to Leyendecker's social isolation in his later years. Beach reportedly forbade outside contact with the artist in the last months of his life. When commissions began to wane in the 1930s, Leyendecker was forced to curtail spending considerably. By the time of his death, Leyendecker had let all of the household staff at his New Rochelle estate go. Leyendecker left a tidy estate equally split between his sister and Beach. Leyendecker is buried alongside parents and brother Frank at Woodlawn Cemetery in Bronx, New York. Charles Beach died a few months after Leyendecker, and his burial location is unknown.

Together from 1901 to 1951: 50 years.
Charles Beach (1886–1952)
Joseph Christian "J.C." Leyendecker (March 23, 1874 - July 25, 1951)

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House: In 1914, J.C. Leyendecker, accompanied by Charles Beach, moved into a large home and art studio in New Rochelle, New York, where J.C. would reside for the remainder of his life.

Address: Mount Tom Day Camp, 48 Mt Tom Rd, New Rochelle, NY 10805, USA (40.89411, -73.78963)
Phone: +1 914-636-8130
Website: http://www.mounttomdaycamp.com/

Place
Built in 1914
A three-tiered estate, built by the renowned illustrator, J.C. Leyendecker, to provide space and intimacy. A magnificent 19-room mansion, it features comfortable rooms, covered outdoor lunch patios and a large kitchen. Today is the facility for the Mount Tom Day Camp.

Life
Who: Joseph Christian Leyendecker (March 23, 1874 – July 25, 1951)
J.C. Leyendecker was one of the preeminent illustrators of the early XX century. He is best known for his poster, book and advertising illustrations, the trade character known as The Arrow Collar Man, and his numerous covers for The Saturday Evening Post. Between 1896 and 1950, Leyendecker painted more than 400 magazine covers. During the Golden Age of American Illustration, for The Saturday Evening Post alone, J.C. Leyendecker produced 322 covers, as well as many advertisement illustrations for its interior pages. No other artist, until the arrival of Norman Rockwell two decades later, was so solidly identified with one publication. Leyendecker "virtually invented the whole idea of modern magazine design." Leyendecker often used his favorite model and partner Charles Beach (1886–1952.) The 1920s were in many ways the apex of Leyendecker’s career, with some of his most recognizable work being completed during this time. Modern advertising had come into its own, with Leyendecker widely regarded as among the preeminent American commercial artists. This popularity extended beyond the commercial, and into Leyendecker’s personal life, where he and Charles Beach hosted large galas attended by people of consequence from all sectors. The parties they hosted at their New Rochelle home/studio were important social and celebrity making events. Leyendecker died on July 25, 1951, at his estate in New Rochelle of an acute coronary occlusion. By the time of his death, Leyendecker had let all of the household staff at his New Rochelle estate go, with he and Beach attempting to maintain the extensive estate themselves. Leyendecker left a tidy estate equally split between his sister and Beach. Leyendecker is buried alongside parents and brother Frank at Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx, New York City. Charles Beach died a few months after Leyendecker, and his burial location is unknown.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Cemetery: Although located in Woodlawn, Bronx and one of the largest cemeteries in New York City, it has the character of a rural cemetery.

Address: 517 E 233rd St, Bronx, NY 10470, USA (40.89006, -73.87425)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.30-16.30
Phone: +1 718-920-0500
Website: http://www.thewoodlawncemetery.org/
National Register of Historic Places: 11000563, 2011 Also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
Woodlawn Cemetery opened in 1863, in what was then southern Westchester County, in an area that was later annexed to New York City in 1874. It is notable in part as the final resting place of some great figures in the American arts, such as authors Countee Cullen and Herman Melville, and musicians Irving Berlin, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, and Max Roach. “Memorial To A Marriage” has been erected by Patricia Cronin and her partner Deborah Kass. Sculptor Cronin did the original sculpture of Carrara marble in 2002, to address what she considered a Federal failure: not allowing gay Americans the right to marry. It has been replaced with a bronze casting, installed on the couple’s burial plot in 2011. Since 2002 when the marble was first installed, the memorial has become one of the most visited of Woodlawn. After 18 years together, Patricia Cronin and Deborah Kass went to City Hall on the morning of July 24, 2011, with nearly 900 other New York City couples, waiting for three hours in the heat to get legally married on the first day.

Notable queer burials at Woodlawn Cemetery:
• Diana Blanche Barrymore Blythe (1921-1960), known professionally as Diana Barrymore, was a film and stage actress. She was the daughter of renowned actor John Barrymore and his second wife, poet Blanche Oelrichs.
• Frances (Fannie) Evelyn Bostwick (died in 1921) was the mother of Marion “Joe” Carstairs. Bostwick was an American heiress who was the second child of Jabez Bostwick and his wife Helen. Joe Carstairs' legal father was Scottish army officer Captain Albert Carstairs. At least one biographer has suggested that the Captain may not have been Joe's biological father. Carstairs' mother, an alcoholic and drug addict, later married Captain Francis Francis. She divorced Captain Francis to marry French count Roger de Périgny in 1915, but eventually left him because of his infidelity. Her fourth and last husband, whom she married in 1920, was Serge Voronoff, a Russian–French surgeon who become famous in the 1920s and 1930s for his practice of transplanting monkey testicle tissue into male humans for the claimed purpose of rejuvenation. For some years Evelyn had believed in Voronoff's theories, and she funded his research and acted as his laboratory assistant at the Collège de France in Paris. Voronoff arrived in New York with his wife's body on the ship "S.S. France" in May 1921.
• Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was a women’s suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920. She was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, New York alongside her longtime companion, Mary Garrett Hay, a fellow New York state suffragist, with whom she lived for over 20 years. Under a single monument inscribed in block letters: "Here lie two, united in friendship for 38 years through constant service to a great cause."
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) born as Countee Porter, was a poet, author and scholar who was a leading figure in the Harlem Renaissance. It is rumored that Cullen was a homosexual, and his relationship with Harold Jackman ("the handsomest man in Harlem"), was a significant factor in his divorce. The young, dashing Jackman was a school teacher and, thanks to his noted beauty, a prominent figure among Harlem’s gay elite. Van Vechten had used him as a character model in his novel “Nigger Heaven” (1926.)
• Joseph Raphael De Lamar (1843-1918), a prominent mine owner and operator in the western United States and Canada, as well as a financier and speculator, from the late 1870s until his death in 1918. De Lamar married Nellie Virginia Sands, a direct descendant of John Quincy Adams, on May 8, 1893, and they had one daughter together, Alice DeLamar.
• Marjory Lacey-Baker (died in 1971), actress, she was the long-time companion of Dr. Lena Madesin Phillips, founder of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs. They met in 1919 and together until Ms Philipps’ death in 1955. Ms Phillips is buried at Maple Grove Cemetery (500 N Main St, Nicholasville, KY 40356).
• Joseph Christian “J.C.” Leyendecker (1874-1951) was one of the preeminent illustrators of the early XX century.
• George Platt Lynes (1907-1955) was a fashion and commercial photographer.
• Elisabeth "Bessie" Marbury (1856–1933) was a pioneering American theatrical and literary agent and producer who represented prominent theatrical performers and writers in the late XIX and early XX centuries and helped shape business methods of the modern commercial theater. She was the longtime companion of Elsie de Wolfe (later known as Lady Mendl), a prominent socialite and famous interior decorator.
• Herman Melville (1819-1891) was a novelist, short story writer, and poet from the American Renaissance period.
• Blanche Marie Louise Oelrichs (1890-1950) was a poet, playwright and theatre actress known by the pseudonym "Michael Strange.” Starting in the summer of 1940 until her death, Oelrichs was in a long-term relationship with Margaret Wise Brown, the author of many children’s books. The relationship began as something of a mentoring one, but became a romantic relationship including co-habitating at 10 Gracie Square beginning in 1943.
• Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) was a suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women’s rights movement.
• John William Sterling (1844–1918) was a founding partner of Shearman & Sterling LLP and major benefactor to Yale University. In Sterling's will, he directs: "no interment other than my own and that of my sister, Cordelia, shall ever take place" in his Mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery. An exception is made, however, "in case my said friend, James O. Bloss (1847–1918), who has lived with me for more than forty years, should desire to be interred in the said Mausoleum and should die without ever having been married." Cordelia Sterling is burried with her brother. Bloss died less than six months after Sterling, according to his sister, of a broken heart, and is not buried with his friend, though the reason is unknown. He is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester (same cemetery where are buried Susan B. Anthony and Lillian D. Wald). Sterling's obituary in the New York Times referred to "his lifelong friend, James O. Bloss, a retired cotton broker, who made his home with the testator for more than forty years." James Orville Bloss died suddenly in New York City, on December 15, 1918.
• Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875-1942) was an American sculptor, art patron and collector, and founder in 1931 of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. She was a prominent social figure and hostess, who was born into the wealthy Vanderbilt family and married into the Whitney family. At age 21, Gertrude married the extremely wealthy sportsman Harry Payne Whitney (1872–1930). In 1934, she was at the center of a highly publicized court battle with her sister-in-law, Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt, for custody of her ten-year-old niece, Gloria Vanderbilt. Gertrude Whitney died in 1942, at age 67, and was interred next to her husband.
• Bert Williams (1874-1922) was one of the pre-eminent entertainers of the Vaudeville era. He married Charlotte ("Lottie") Thompson, a singer with whom he had worked professionally, in a very private ceremony. Lottie was a widow eight years Bert's senior. The Williamses never had children biologically, but they adopted three of Lottie's nieces. In 1919 their niece Lottie Tyler met blues singer Alberta Hunter. In August 1927, Hunter sailed for France, accompanied by Lottie. Their relationship lasted until Ms. Tyler's death, many years later.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-23 09:24 pm

Ethel Mars (September 19, 1876 - March 23, 1959)

Buried: Saint Paul Town Cemetery, Saint-Paul-de-Vence, Departement des Alpes-Maritimes, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Buried alongside: Maud Hunt Squire
Find A Grave Memorial# 161717757

American artists and life partners for 60 years, Maud Hunt Squire and Ethel Mars met as students at the Cincinnati Art Academy in the 1890s. Mars and Squire forged distinguished careers in book illustration, painting, and woodblock printing. Émigrées to France, they frequented Gertrude Stein’s salons and, during World War I, were among the Provincetown artists working in new methods of printmaking, called the “Provincetown Print” or “White-Line Woodcut.” Squire and Mars were the subject
of Stein's whimsical word portrait Miss Furr and Miss Skeene (Squire's nickname was Skeene), written between 1909 and 1911. With characteristic playfulness, Stein in this piece spoofs young women who come to Paris to "cultivate something." Stein's incessant reiteration of the word "gay" at a time when its coded meaning was not in mainstream use is interpreted today as an in-group double entendre. While in their sixties, Ethel and Maud went into hiding at Grenoble during WWII, and returned to their French Riviera home afterwards. The two women are buried together in France.

Together from 1894 to 1954: 60 years.
Ethel Mars (September 19, 1876 - March 23, 1959)
Maud Hunt Squire (January 30, 1873 - October 25, 1954)

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Cemetery: Within the historic village, a medieval walled village, there are numerous interesting sights and monuments. The Peyra Gate was remodelled in 1810. The fountain was rebuilt in 1822 replacing an older one dating from 1578. Nearby is an oak, donated by François I and planted in 1538. The castle is today the Fondation Émile Hugues, a modern and contemporary art museum. The cathedral was built in the IV century on the site of a Roman temple. The stone of the western façade dates from 239. Another, on the right, was engraved in December 220. Other stones in the external walls represent funerary dedications. Also on the western side of the church, the Pierre du Tauroble evokes the cult of Cybele and also the Great mother of the Gods of Mount Ida. A chapel in the cathedral has a mosaic by Marc Chagall, dated 1911. The rue des Portiques is a section of the old Roman road. The town has a small chapel, the Cité Historique Chapelle du Rosaire (1948, completed in 1951), decorated with stained glass and other fittings by Henri Matisse, who owned a home in the village towards the end of his life. Vence is famous for its spring water, which can be collected from numerous fountains in the town. American artists and life partners for more than 50 years, Maud Hunt Squire (1873-1954) and Ethel Mars (1876-1959), forged distinguished careers in book illustration, painting, and woodblock printing. Émigrées to France, they frequented Gertrude Stein's salons and, during WWI, were among the Provincetown artists working in new methods of printmaking. Squire and Mars were the subject of Stein's whimsical word portrait "Miss Furr and Miss Skeene" (Squire's nickname was Skeene), written between 1909 and 1911. With characteristic playfulness, Stein in this piece spoofs young ladies who come to Paris to "cultivate something." Stein's incessant reiteration of the word "gay" at a time when its coded meaning was not in mainstream use is interpreted today as an in-group double entendre. At the beginning of WWI, Squire and Mars returned to the U.S. and eventually relocated to Provincetown, Massachusetts. The quaint fishing community at the tip of Cape Cod, with its old-world ambience and affordable rentals, had by this time become an artists' colony, and the international reputations of Squire and Mars attracted other artists to the town. In the 1920s Squire and Mars returned to Europe, eventually settling in Vence on the French Riviera. There Squire and Mars were active in an artists' community that included Marsden Hartley and Reginald Marsh. The couple continued to collaborate on children's book illustration and each again took up painting and drawing. Mars, who concentrated on modernist painting and gouache drawing, exhibited in Paris during the 1920s. Squire concentrated on large-scale watercolors of outdoor public scenes. The couple continued working until about 1930. During WWII, Squire and Mars, then in their sixties, went into hiding near Grenoble. After the war, they returned to their home, La Farigoule, in Vence. Squire died on October 25, 1954; Mars on March 23, 1959. The two women are buried together at Saint Paul de Vence Cemetery (Chemin de Saint-Paul, 06570 Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-23 09:21 pm

Bessie Rayner Parkes Belloc (June 16, 1829 - March 23, 1925)

Bessie Rayner Parkes Belloc was one of the most prominent English feminists and campaigners for women’s rights in Victorian times and also a poet, essayist and journalist.
Born: June 16, 1829, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Died: March 23, 1925, Slindon, United Kingdom
Buried: St Richards Catholic Church, Top Rd, Slindon, Arundel BN18 0RG
Find A Grave Memorial# 103006416
Children: Hilaire Belloc, Marie Adelaide Belloc Lowndes
Grandchild: Countess Iddesleigh
People also search for: Hilaire Belloc, more

Church: Bessie Rayner Parkes Belloc (1829-1925) was one of the most prominent English feminists and campaigners for women’s rights in Victorian times and also a poet, essayist and journalist. Bessie Rayner Parkes’ wide circle of literary and political friends included George Eliot, Harriet Martineau, Anna Jameson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon, Elizabeth Blackwell, Lord Shaftesbury, Herbert Spencer, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Elizabeth Gaskell, William Thackeray, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, John Ruskin, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Her most fruitful friendship was with Barbara Bodichon, for out of their joint efforts grew the first organized women’s movement in Britain. She is buried at St Richards Catholic Church (Top Rd, Slindon, Arundel BN18 0RG).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-22 10:50 am

Stephen Sondheim (born March 22, 1930)

Stephen Joshua Sondheim is an American composer and lyricist known for more than a half-century of contributions to musical theatre.
Born: March 22, 1930, New York City, New York, United States
Education: George School
New York Military Academy
Ethical Culture Fieldston School
Williams College
Lived: 246 E. 49th St
Partner: Jeff Romley
Albums: Company (2006 Broadway revival cast), more

School: George School (1690 Newtown Langhorne Rd, Newtown, PA 18940) is a private Quaker boarding and day high school located on a rural campus near Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. George School was founded in 1891 and opened in 1893. It is named for John M. George who donated much of the money for the school. It has grown from a single building (still standing) to over 20 academic, athletic, and residential buildings. Besides the usual college preparatory courses, including an International Baccalaureate program, the school features several distinct programs deriving from its Quaker heritage. Stephen Sondheim (born 1930, class 1946), Pulitzer Prize–winning composer/lyricist, attended George School, where he wrote his first musical, “By George,” and from which he graduated in 1946. Sondheim spent several summers at Camp Androscoggin.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: New York Military Academy (NYMA, 78 Academy Ave, Cornwall-On-Hudson, NY 12520) is a private boarding school in the rural village of Cornwall-on-Hudson, 60 miles (97 km) north of New York City, and one of the oldest military schools in the United States. Originally a boys' school, it became coeducational in 1975. On March 3, 2015, NYMA filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, facing serious financial difficulties from low enrollment. Instead of opening for the fall semester in September 2015, NYMA closed and was sold at auction to a group of Chinese investors who reopened the school in November. NYMA was founded in 1889 by Charles Jefferson Wright, an American Civil War veteran and former schoolteacher from New Hampshire who believed that a military structure provided the best environment for academic achievement, a philosophy to which the school still adheres. Stephen Sondheim (born 1930, class 1946), Tony, Grammy, Oscar and Pulitzer-winning composer and lyricist, attended the New York Military Academy, but did not graduate.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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School: Ethical Culture Fieldston School (ECFS, 3901 Fieldston Rd, Bronx, NY 10471), known as just Fieldston, is a private, highly selective independent school in New York City. The school is a member of the Ivy Preparatory School League. The school opened in 1878 as a free kindergarten, founded by Felix Adler at the age of 24. In 1880, elementary grades were added, and the school was then called the Workingman's School. At that time, the idea that the children of the poor should be educated was innovative. By 1890 the school's academic reputation encouraged many more wealthy parents to seek it out, and the school was expanded to accommodate the upper-class as well, and began charging tuition; in 1895 the name changed to "The Ethical Culture School", and in 1903 the New York Society for Ethical Culture became its sponsor. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Diane Arbus, photographer; Roy Cohn, attorney; Stephen Sondheim (born 1930), composer, attended the Fieldston Lower School.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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School: Williams College (880 Main St, Williamstown, MA 01267) is a highly selective private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. Currently ranked 1st place in the U.S. News & World Report's liberal arts ranking for the 14th consecutive year, Williams College is regarded as a leading institution of higher education in the United States. Forbes magazine ranked Williams the second best undergraduate institution in the United States in its 2016 publication of America's Top Colleges, and the best undergraduate institution in its 2010, 2011, 2014 and 2016 report. Colonel Ephraim Williams was an officer in the Massachusetts militia and a member of a prominent landowning family. His will included a bequest to support and maintain a free school to be established in the town of West Hoosac, Massachusetts, provided that the town change its name to Williamstown. Williams was killed at the Battle of Lake George on September 8, 1755. After Shays' Rebellion, the Williamstown Free School opened with 15 students on October 26, 1791. The first president was Ebenezer Fitch. Not long after its founding, the trustees of the school petitioned the Massachusetts legislature to convert the free school to a tuition-based college. The legislature agreed and on June 22, 1793, Williams College was chartered. It was the second college to be founded in Massachusetts. Stephen Sondheim (born 1930) attended Williams College, whose theatre program attracted him. His first teacher there was Robert Barrow: “everybody hated him because he was very dry, and I thought he was wonderful because he was very dry. And Barrow made me realize that all my romantic views of art were nonsense.” The composer told Meryle Secrest, "I just wanted to study composition, theory, and harmony without the attendant musicology that comes in graduate school. But I knew I wanted to write for the theatre, so I wanted someone who did not disdain theatre music." Barrow suggested that Sondheim study with Milton Babbitt, who Sondheim described as "a frustrated show composer" with whom he formed "a perfect combination." When he met Babbitt, he was working on a musical for Mary Martin based on the myth of Helen of Troy. Sondheim and Babbitt would meet once a week in New York City for four hours (at the time, Babbitt was teaching at Princeton University). At Williams, Sondheim wrote a musical adaption of “Beggar on Horseback” (a 1924 play by George S. Kaufman and Marc Connelly, with permission from Kaufman) which had three performances. A member of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, he graduated magna cum laude in 1950.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: Turtle Bay is a neighborhood in New York City, on the east side of Midtown Manhattan. It extends from either 41s or 43rd Streets to 53rd Street, and eastward from Lexington Avenue to the East River’s western branch, facing Roosevelt Island. The neighborhood is the site of the headquarters of the United Nations and the Chrysler Building. The Tudor City apartment complex is also considered to be within Turtle Bay.

Address: E 49th St, New York, NY 10017, USA
National Register of Historic Places: Turtle Bay Gardens Historic District (226-246 E. 49th St. and 227-245 E. 48th St.), 83001750, 1983

Place
An army enrollment office was established at Third Avenue and 46th Street, after the first Draft Act was passed during the American Civil War. On July 13, 1863, an angry mob burned the office to the ground and proceeded to riot through the surrounding neighborhood, destroying entire blocks. The New York Draft Riots continued for three days before army troops managed to contain the mob, which had burned and looted much of the city. After the war ended, the formerly pastoral neighborhood was developed with brownstones. By 1868 the bay had been entirely filled in by commercial overdevelopment, packed with breweries, gasworks, slaughterhouses, cattle pens, coal yards, and railroad piers. By the early XX century, Turtle Bay was "a riverside back yard" for the city, as the WPA Guide to New York City (1939) described it: "huge industrial enterprises— breweries, laundries, abattoirs, power plants— along the water front face squalid tenements not far away from new apartment dwellings attracted to the section by its river view and its central position. The numerous plants shower this district with the heaviest sootfall in the city— 150 tons to the square mile annually.” The huge Waterside Station, a power plant operated by the Consolidated Edison Company, producing 367,000 kilowatts of electricity in its coal-fired plant, marked the southern boundary of the neighborhood. There were also 18 acres (73,000 m2) of slaughterhouses along First Avenue. With an infusion of poor immigrants having had come in the later part of the XIX century, and the opening of the elevated train lines along Second and Third Avenues, the neighborhood went into decay with crumbling tenement buildings.

Notable queer residents at Turtle Bay:
• No. 109 E. 42nd St, 10017: Greta Garbo (1905-1990) and Mauritz Stiller occupied rooms at the Hotel Commodore in the first two months of their stay in America in July 1925. The Hotel Commodore (today the Grand Hyatt) was a modest place, at 42nd street, which formed a part of Grand Central Station and just a few steps away from the MGM office at Broadway.
• 525 Lexington Ave, 10017 (now the New York Marriot East Side): in 1925 Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986) and Alfred Stieglitz moved to the Shelton Hotel taking an apartment on the 30th floor of the new building. They would live here for 12 years. With a spectacular view, Georgia began to paint the city. The building was depicted in some of the works of these two legendary tenants, O’Keefe the painter and Stieglitz the photographer.
• No. 237 E. 48th St, 10017: Dorothy Thompson (1894-1961), a well-known foreign correspondent and author of "I Saw Hitler," was once married to writer Sinclair Lewis, but the great love of her life was Christa Winsloe, author of the novel upon which the classic lesbian film, "Madchen in Uniform" was based. After they broke up, Thompson lived alone in this three-story brownstone from 1941 to 1957. She spent more than $20,000 for renovations to make it, as she wrote, “the most perfect small house I have ever seen.” Thompson’s “small” home included a library with more than 3,000 books, five fireplaces, and a third-floor study for writing. In the drawing room, a wine-colored satin sofa could hold, she bragged, five of “the most distinguished bottoms in New York.” In the front door were eight painted glass panels showing Thompson in medieval attire performing various tasks – writing, lecturing, greeting guests. There was also the house’s motto: “Gallus in sterquilinio suo plurimum potest.” (“The rooster on his own dunghill is very much in charge.”)
• No. 246 E. 49th St, 10017: Stephen Sondheim (born 1930) has been a long-time resident of the Turtle Bay Gardens. Sondheim has spoken in the past of feeling like an outsider – “somebody who people want to both kiss and kill” – from quite early on in his life. He spent some 25 years – from his thirties through his fifties – in analysis, did not come out as gay until he was about 40, and did not live with a partner, a dramatist named Peter Jones, until he was 61. They separated in 1999. Since 2004 he has been in a relationship with Jeff Romley (born 1978.) In 1969, while he was playing music, he heard a knock on the door. His neighbor, Katharine Hepburn, was in "bare feet – this angry, red-faced lady" and told him "You have been keeping me awake all night!" (she was practicing for her musical debut in Coco). When Sondheim asked why she had not asked him to play for her, she said she lost his phone number. According to Sondheim, "My guess is that she wanted to stand there in her bare feet, suffering for her art".
• No. 244 E. 49 St, 10017: Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003) lived in the apartment at 244 East 49th Street in the Turtle Bay neighborhood for more than 60 years. After her death in 2003, her beloved four-story brownstone was sold sight-unseen to a fan in 2004 for $3.9 million. According to the listing for the renting, the home has been renovated, but “the original mirrored dressing room area retains the glitter.” There is a formal entry, spacious living room, a parlor floor and the master bedroom/bath on the third floor and guest bedrooms on the fourth floor. Behind the brownstone are communal gardens — Turtle Bay Gardens — which are shared by other rowhome owners on East 49th and East 48th Streets. The city honored Hepburn by renaming the nearby intersection of Second Avenue and East 49th Street “Katharine Hepburn Place.” Nearby, in the Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, is a garden dedicated to her — the Katharine Hepburn Garden – which contains 12 stepping stones inscribed with quotes by Hepburn.
• No. 211 E. 49th St, 10017: Amster Yard, located at East 49th Street between Second and Third Avenues. James Amster (1908-1986) had first set eyes on what would become Amster Yard back in 1944 when, after a dinner party, two other guests who were in real estate business took him to see some “down-in-the-heels properties,” as he called them. An old tenement, boarding house, and a carpenter’s workshop ringed a debris-filled yard. But the creative Amster immediately saw potential in the site. Within two years, on a May evening in 1946, Amster was ready to unveil his charming Amster Yard with a grand party attended by some 700 clients, friends and the press. Eugenia Sheppard, writing for the New York Herald Tribune, described her gracious and handsome host as “a man with great romantic flair” and Amster Yard as “pretty and perfect… inside and out.” It was Amster’s dream to make Amster Yard a center of the design profession, and the earliest residents of its six apartments included the Yard’s architect, Sterner, and his wife, Paula; art patron Leonard Hanna; interior designer Billy Baldwin; artist Isamu Noguchi; fahion designer Norman Norell; as well as Amster, of course. Robert Moyer, Jimmy Amster’s partner for 41 years, stayed on at Amster Yard after Amster died in 1986 moving out in 1992.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-22 10:46 am

Pearl M. Hart (April 7, 1890 - March 22, 1975)

Pearl M. Hart was a Chicago attorney notable for her work defending oppressed minority groups. Hart was the first woman in Chicago to be appointed Public Defender in the Morals Court.
Born: April 7, 1890, Traverse City, Michigan, United States
Died: March 22, 1975, United States of America
Education: John Marshall Law School
Lived: 2821 N Pine Grove Ave, Chicago, IL 60657, USA (41.93357, -87.64111)
Find A Grave Memorial# 101046635
Partner: Valerie Taylor (1963–1975)

School: The John Marshall Law School (315 S Plymouth Ct, Chicago, IL 60604) is a law school in Chicago, Illinois, that was founded in 1899 and accredited by the American Bar Association in 1951. The school was named for the influential XIX-century U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall. Pearl M. Hart (1890–1975), Chicago attorney notable for her work defending oppressed minority groups, was the first woman in Chicago to be appointed Public Defender in the Morals Court. Most notably, she represented children, women, immigrants, lesbians, and gay men, often without fee or for a nominal fee. She attended the John Marshall Law School and was admitted to the Illinois State Bar in 1914.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Pearl Hart, lawyer, social justice advocate, and long-time gay-rights activist lived in the Lakeview neighborhood. Pearl Hart was a founding member and board member of the National Lawyers Guild, the Committee to Defend the Foreign-Born, and the Portes Cancer Preservation Clinic.

Address: 2821 N Pine Grove Ave, Chicago, IL 60657, USA (41.93357, -87.64111)
LGBTQ-friendly Bookstore: Unabridged Books (3251 North Broadway, Chicago, IL 60657)

Life
Who: Pearl Minnie Harchovsky (April 7, 1890 - March 22, 1975) aka Pearl M. Hart and Valerie Taylor (September 7, 1913 – October 22, 1997)
Pearl M. Hart was an ardent defender of gay rights, appearing on behalf of many victims of entrapment and harassment, often without fee or for minimal fee. She worked for anti-entrapment laws and the right to privacy. She was involved in the founding and work of the present Mattachine Society as well as its predecessor and focused on the Chicago Police Department and its historic entrapment of gays. Valerie Taylor was an American author of books published in the lesbian pulp fiction genre, as well as poetry and novels after the "golden age" of lesbian pulp fiction. She was born Velma Nacella Young and also published as Nacella Young, Francine Davenport, and Velma Tate. Her publishers included Naiad Press, Banned Books, Universal, Gold Medal Books, Womanpress, Ace and Midwood-Tower. In 1965 she met Pearl Hart, another founder of Mattachine Midwest. They were together until 1975 when Hart died. Taylor lived in an apartment at 540 W Surf St, Chicago, IL 60657, around the corner from Hart, the heart of the" gay ghetto" of Chicago at that time, but close to Hart. Not being an immediate family member, Taylor was not allowed to visit Hart in the hospital as she was dying and missed being able to tell her goodbye. She had to appeal to a friend of Hart's but by the time she was able to see her, Hart was in a coma. When Pearl Hart died in February, 1975, Taylor moved to 3356 N Claremont Ave, Chicago, IL 60618, but soon after she moved again to Margaretville, New York, in October 1975 to be near friends Hank and Ada Mayer's Catskills farm. In 1979, she moved again to Tucson, initially at the guest house of La Casa Nuestra (2433 N Dodge Blvd, Tucson, AZ 85716), a private lesbian club, but then, in 1980, to 3751 E Grant Rd, Tucson, AZ 85716, where she lived until hospitalized after a fall on October 10, 1997. She died on October 22, 1997, in a Tucson hospice.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-22 10:34 am

Nona L. Brooks (March 22, 1861 – March 14, 1945)

Nona Lovell Brooks, described as a "prophet of modern mystical Christianity", was a leader in the New Thought movement and a founder of the Church of Divine Science.
Born: March 22, 1861, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
Died: March 14, 1945, Denver, Colorado, United States
Lived: First Church of Divine Science, 1400 N Williams St, Denver, CO 80218, USA (39.73874, -104.96557)
645 Lafayette Street, Denver
Buried: Fairmount Cemetery, Denver, Denver County, Colorado, USA, Plot: Blk 2
Find A Grave Memorial# 33130165
Books: Short Lessons in Divine Science, In the Light of Healing: Sermons by Nona L. Brooks, Mysteries

Church: The First Church of Divine Science in Denver is located at the northeast corner of 14th Avenue and Williams Street, just north of Cheesman Park. Now known as the Althea Center for Engaged Spirituality, the church and its Denver congregants were important in the development of Divine Science.

Address: 1400 N Williams St, Denver, CO 80218, USA (39.73874, -104.96557)
Phone: +1 303-322-7738
Website: www.altheacenter.org

Place
Founded in 1885 in San Francisco by Malinda Cramer, the Church of Divine Science moved its headquarters to Denver after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Cramer first visited Colorado in 1887 to lecture on Divine Science and found an attentive audience in Denver, particularly in the Brooks sisters of Pueblo. By 1898, Cramer’s followers founded the Colorado College of Divine Science, and a year later they founded the First Church of Divine Science in Denver. From what I have read, Divine Science has similarities to Christian Science, but more information about the faith can be found here. The First Church of Divine Science building was constructed in 1922 to accommodate the growing congregation in Denver. The church has a circular colonnade at the corner entrance, which is flanked by two wings, both with a series of columns supporting a decorative frieze. Large windows between the columns allow light into the sanctuary and offices. The church was designed by Denver society architect, Jules Jacques Benois Benedict, often known as J.J.B. Benedict. Benedict was a talented architect who also had a reputation for being moody and difficult to work with despite his creative genius. He designed numerous residences for Denver’s elite, including the (demolished) Belmar mansion for May Bonfils Berryman. He also designed commercial buildings and several structures for Denver’s city and mountain parks. According to the National Register nomination for Benedict’s completed buildings, the First Church of Divine Science was Benedict’s first church commission. The main body of the church is buff-colored stucco textured with small pebbles. This is ornamented by beautiful buff and pale-blue glazed terra cotta at the rounded colonnade and on the flanking wings. The National Register nomination refers to a 1923 article in Architectural Record noting that the congregation requested classical ornament rather than more overtly religious symbolism.

Life
Who: Nona Lovell Brooks (March 22, 1861 – March 14, 1945)
Nona L. Brooks, described as a "prophet of modern mystical Christianity", was a leader in the New Thought movement and a founder of the Church of Divine Science. Brooks was born in Louisville, Kentucky, the youngest daughter of Chauncey and Lavinia Brooks. At a fairly early age, her family moved just outside Charleston, West Virginia, where Brooks graduated from the Charleston Female Academy. Due to the collapse of her father's salt mining business, the family moved again, this time to Pueblo, Colorado where he entered the metal mining business. He died shortly after the move, when Brooks was 19. In 1890, with the aim of becoming a teacher, Brooks enrolled at Pueblo Normal School, which was followed by a one-year stay at Wellesley College. In 1887, encouraged by her sister, Althea Brooks Small, Nona Brooks attended classes taught by Kate Bingham, proponent of the New Thought philosophy. While attending these classes, Brooks "found herself healed of a persistent throat infection" and shortly thereafter Brooks and Small began to heal others. In December 1898, Brooks was ordained by Malinda Cramer as a minister in the Church of Divine Science and founded the Denver Divine Science College. Shortly thereafter, she inaugurated the Divine Science Church of Denver, holding its initial service on January 1, 1899 at the Plymouth Hotel in Denver, in the process becoming the first woman pastor in Denver. In 1902, Brooks founded Fulfillment, a Divine Science periodical. During this period, she also served on several Denver civic boards, including the Colorado State Prison Board. After World War I Brooks succeeded her sister Fannie James as head of the college and in 1922 Brooks aligned the growing Church of Divine Science with the International New Thought Alliance. In the early 1930s she moved to Australia, where she established several Divine Science organizations, returning to Chicago in 1935 and then back to Denver in 1938. Nona was described by many who knew her as warm, gentle, and "motherly", but with "a strength that came from conviction". She lived at 645 N Lafayette St, Denver, CO 80218, and is buried at Fairmount Cemetery (430 S Quebec St, Denver, CO 80247, USA).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-22 10:31 am

Jean-Baptiste Lully (November 28, 1632 - March 22, 1687)

Jean-Baptiste Lully was an Italian-born French composer, instrumentalist, and dancer who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France. He is considered a master of the French baroque style.
Born: November 28, 1632, Florence
Died: March 22, 1687, Paris, France
Spouse: Madeleine Lambert (m. 1662–1687)
Buried: Basilica of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, Paris, France
Find A Grave Memorial# 87133521
Children: Louis Lully, Jean-Baptiste Lully fils, Jean-Louis Lully
Employer: Paris Opera Ballet

School: The Paris Opera Ballet (Place de l'Opéra, 75009) is the oldest national ballet company. Together with the Moscow Bolshoi Ballet and the London Royal Ballet it is regarded as one of the three most preeminent ballet companies in the world. The Paris Opera Ballet has always been an integral part of the Paris Opera, which was founded in 1669 as the Académie d'Opéra (Academy of Opera), although theatrical dance did not become an important component of the Paris Opera until 1673, after it was renamed the Académie Royale de Musique (Royal Academy of Music) and placed under the leadership of Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632-1687). The Paris Opera Ballet had its origins in the earlier dance institutions, traditions and practices of the court of Louis XIV. Of particular importance were the series of comédies-ballets created by Molière with, among others, the choreographers and composers Pierre Beauchamps and Jean-Baptiste Lully. In 1929, Jacques Rouché invited 24-year-old dancer Serge Lifar (1905-1986) to take over the directorship of the Paris Opéra Ballet, which had fallen into decline in the late XIX century. As ballet master from 1930 to 1944, and from 1947 to 1958, he devoted himself to the restoration of the technical level of the Opéra Ballet, returning it to its place as one of the best companies in the world. Lifar gave the company a new strength and purpose, initiating the rebirth of ballet in France, and began to create the first of many ballets for that company. During his three decades as director of the Paris Opéra Ballet, Lifar led the company through the turbulent times of World War II and the German occupation of France. Lifar brought the Paris Opéra Ballet to America and performed to full houses at the New York City Center. Audiences were enthusiastic and had great admiration for the company of dancers. In 1983, Rudolf Nureyev was appointed director of the Paris Opera Ballet, where, as well as directing, he continued to dance and to promote younger dancers. The top female ballet dancer at that time, if not of all times was Sylvie Guillem who was nominated principal dancer at the age of 19 by Rudolf Nureyev in 1984. They were a mythical dance couple. The years of Nureyev marked a golden era of the Paris Opera Ballet.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Church: Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632–1687) was an Italian-born French composer, instrumentalist, and dancer who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France. After Queen Marie-Thérèse's death in 1683 and the king's secret marriage to Mme de Maintenon, devotion came to the fore at court. The king's enthusiasm for opera dissipated; he was revolted by Lully's dissolute life and homosexual encounters. Lully died from gangrene, having struck his foot with his long conducting staff during a performance of his “Te Deum” to celebrate Louis XIV's recovery from surgery. He refused to have his leg amputated so he could still dance. This resulted in gangrene propagating through his body and ultimately infecting the greater part of his brain, causing his death. He died in Paris and was buried in the church of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires (Place des Petits Pères, 75002), where his tomb with its marble bust can still be seen. All three of his sons (Louis Lully, Jean-Baptiste Lully fils, and Jean-Louis Lully) had musical careers as successive surintendants of the King's Music.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-22 10:27 am

Ilana Kloss (born March 22, 1956)

Ilana Sheryl Kloss is a former professional tennis player, tennis coach, and the current commissioner of World TeamTennis, a position that she has held since 2001.
Born: March 22, 1956, Johannesburg, South Africa
Turned pro: 1973
Partner: Billie Jean King

Ilana Sheryl Kloss (born 22 March 1956) is a former professional tennis player and the commissioner of World Team Tennis. Kloss is the partner of Billie Jean King, the US tennis player. She currently resides near the Museum of Natural History in New York City. Kloss is the daughter of Ruth and Shlaim Kloss. She has a sister, Yvette Merle Blackman (née Kloss), now married to Richard Blackman with two children, Lara and Joshua Blackman. Kloss was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. Before turning professional, in 1972 she won the Wimbledon juniors singles title. In 1974 she won U.S. Open juniors singles title, and was the youngest player ever to be ranked No. 1 in South Africa. Kloss was ranked No. 1 in the world in doubles in 1976. That year, she won doubles titles at the U.S. Open, the Italian Open, the U.S. Clay Courts, the German Open, the British Hard Courts Championship, and Hilton Head, as well as the mixed doubles title at the French Open. She was ranked as high as No. 19 in the world in singles play in 1976. In 1977 she won both the German and Canadian championships, and the British clay court championship. In 1973, she won the title in Cincinnati with Pat Walkden, defeating Evonne Goolagong and Janet Young in the final. Most of her women's doubles titles were achieved with partner Linky Boshoff. After retiring, Kloss took part in the 35-and-over tour, winning the U.S. Open doubles and mixed doubles championship in 1999. In the 1970s she was 12–5 in Federation Cup matches. Kloss, who is Jewish, was inducted into the Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 2006. She also played in the Maccabiah Games in Israel. Since 2001 she has been the Chief Executive Officer & Commissioner of World Team Tennis, a coed professional tennis league.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilana_Kloss
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2017-03-21 02:38 pm

Steve Callahan (born August 8, 1967)

Born: August 8, 1967, Livonia, Michigan, United States
Education: Ohio State University
Spouse: Matthew Montgomery (m. 2015)
People also search for: Matthew Montgomery, Rob Williams, more
Anniversary: March 21, 2008
Married: March 21, 2015

After winning Best Supporting Actor at the Tampa International Gay Film Festival for the film Nine Lives, Steve Callahan has become a regular on the gay film circuit. He starred in East Side Story, winner of the 2009 GLAAD Award. Matthew Montgomery (born Matthew Robert Ramírez) is an American actor, producer and writer born in Corpus Christi, Texas. Since his début in Gone, But Not Forgotten, he has specialized in independent movies with LGBT themes. Steve Callahan and Matthew Montgomery met working as actors in the film Pornography: A Thriller. They had one scene together in the movie, but ending up talking all night on set. They went on their first date on March 21, 2008 and have been together since. They are currently engaged. Matt and Steve live in Los Angeles with their dog Dude.

Together since 2008: 7 years.
Matthew Montgomery (born March 16, 1978)
Steve Callahan (born August 8, 1967)
Anniversary: March 21, 2008 / Married: March 21, 2015

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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2017-03-21 02:34 pm

Newton Arvin (August 23, 1900 – March 21, 1963)

Fredrick Newton Arvin was an American literary critic and academic. He achieved national recognition for his studies of individual nineteenth-century American authors.
Born: August 23, 1900, Valparaiso, Indiana, United States
Died: March 21, 1963, Northampton, Massachusetts, United States
Education: Harvard Univeristy
Buried: Old City Cemetery, Valparaiso, Porter County, Indiana, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 19602976
Employer: Smith College
Books: Longfellow: his life and work, Herman Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman
Awards: National Book Award for Nonfiction, Guggenheim Fellowship for Humanities, US & Canada

Notable queer alumni and faculty at Harvard University:
• Henry Adams (1838-1918), after his graduation from Harvard University in 1858, embarked on a grand tour of Europe, during which he also attended lectures in civil law at the University of Berlin. He was initiated into the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity as honorary member at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Harris J. Ryan, a judge for the exhibit on electrical engineering. Through that organization, he was a member of the Irving Literary Society. In 1870, Adams was appointed professor of medieval history at Harvard, a position he held until his early retirement in 1877 at 39. As an academic historian, Adams is considered to have been the first (in 1874–1876) to conduct historical seminar work in the United States. Among his students was Henry Cabot Lodge, who worked closely with Adams as a graduate student. On June 27, 1872, Clover Hooper and he were married in Beverly, Massachusetts, and spent their honeymoon in Europe, much of it with Charles Milnes Gaskell at Wenlock Abbey in Shropshire, England. Upon their return, he went back to his position at Harvard, and their home at 91 Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, became a gathering place for a lively circle of intellectuals. Adams was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1875.
• Horatio Alger (1832-1899) passed the Harvard entrance examinations in July, 1848, and was admitted to the class of 1852. Alger's classmate Joseph Hodges Choate described Harvard at this time as "provincial and local because its scope and outlook hardly extended beyond the boundaries of New England; besides which it was very denominational, being held exclusively in the hands of Unitarians". Alger flowered in the highly disciplined and regimented Harvard environment, winning scholastic prizes and prestigious awards. His genteel poverty and less-than-aristocratic heritage, however, barred him from membership in the Hasty Pudding Club and the Porcellian Club. He was chosen Class Odist and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa Society honors in 1852, eighth in a class of 88. He is buried in the family plot at Glenwood Cemetery, Natick, MA 01760.
• Josep Alsop (1910-1989) graduated from the Groton School, a private boarding school in Groton, Massachusetts, in 1928, and from Harvard University in 1932. He is buried in the family mausoleum at Indian Hill Cemetery (383 Washington St, Middletown, CT 06457).
• A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1893 to 1898, graduating with a master's degree in 1895 and a doctorate in 1900. He was instructor and assistant professor of economics at Harvard University from 1900 to 1909.
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) studied English Literature at Harvard, graduating summa cum laude in 1921. His writing career began when Van Wyck Brooks, the Harvard teacher he most admired, invited him to write for The Freeman while he was still an undergraduate. After a short period teaching at the high school level, Arvin joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist.
• John Ashbery (born 1927) graduated in 1949 with an A.B., cum laude, was a member of the Harvard Advocate, the university's literary magazine, and the Signet Society.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959) attended from 1911 to 1912, leaving school without graduating.
• Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957) entered Harvard College in the Class of 1922. He interrupted his undergraduate career to work in Egypt and the Sudan (1922-1923) with the Harvard University/Boston Museum of Fine Arts archaeological expedition under George A. Reisner, then the leading American Egyptologist. After taking his degree in 1924, he became a graduate student in Harvard's fine arts department, where he served for three years as chief graduate assistant to Edward W. Forbes, Director of the Fogg Art Museum.
• Maud Babcock (1867-1954) was studying and teaching at Harvard University when she met noted Utahn and daughter of Brigham Young, Susa Young Gates, who, impressed by Babcock's work as a summer course instructor in physical culture, convinced her to move to Salt Lake City. She established UU's first physical training curriculum, of which speech and dramatics were part for several years.
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University. During his tenure at boarding school and university, Beebe was known for his numerous pranks. One of his more outrageous stunts included an attempt at festooning J. P. Morgan's yacht Corsair III with toilet paper from a chartered airplane. His pranks were not without consequence and he proudly noted that he had the sole distinction of having been expelled from both Harvard and Yale, at the insistence, respectively, of the president and dean of each. Beebe earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard in 1926, only to be expelled during graduate school. During and immediately after obtaining his degree from Harvard, Beebe published several books of poetry, but eventually found his true calling in journalism.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990) completed his studies in 1939, graduating with a B.A. cum laude
• Lem Billings (1916-1981) attended Harvard Business School from 1946 to 1948 and earned an MBA.
• John Boswell (1947-1994) received his doctorate in 1975.
• Roger Brown (1925-1997) started his career in 1952 as an instructor and then assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1957 he left Harvard for an associate professorship at MIT, and became a full professor of psychology there in 1960. In 1962, he returned to Harvard as a full professor, and served as chair of the Department of Social Relations from 1967 to 1970. From 1974 until his retirement in 1994, he held the title of John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William James.
• John Horne Burns (1916–1953) was the author of three novels. The first, “The Gallery” (1947), is his best known work, which was very well received when published and has been reissued several times. Burns was educated by the Sisters of Notre Dame at St. Augustine's School and then Phillips Academy, where he pursued music. He attended Harvard, where he became fluent in French, German, and Italian and wrote the book for a student musical comedy in 1936. In 1937 he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in English magna cum laude and became a teacher at the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut. Burns wrote several novels while at Harvard and at Loomis, none of which he published. Gore Vidal reported a conversation he had with Burns following “The Gallery”'s success: “Burns was a difficult man who drank too much, loved music, detested all other writers, wanted to be great.... He was also certain that to be a great writer it was necessary to be homosexual. When I disagreed, he named a half dozen celebrated contemporaries. "A Pleiad," he roared delightedly, "of pederasts!" But what about Faulkner?, I asked, and Hemingway? He was disdainful. Who said they were any good?” He died in Florence from a cerebral hemorrhage on August 11, 1953. He was buried in the family plot in Holyhood Cemetery (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467). Ernest Hemingway later sketched Burns' brief life as a writer: "There was a fellow who wrote a fine book and then a stinking book about a prep school and then just blew himself up."
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) graduated in 1936.
• Witter Bynner (1881–1968) was the first member of his class invited to join the student literary magazine, The Advocate. He was also published in another of Harvard's literary journals, The Harvard Monthly. He graduated with honors in 1902. His first book of poems, “An Ode to Harvard” (later changed to “Young Harvard”), came out in 1907. In 1911 he was the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa Poet.
• Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) began studying at Harvard University in 1894 and left after two years to become an artist.
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) entered in 1925, to pursue a masters in English.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) accepted an appointment at Harvard University in 1954 as the second person to hold the Zimurray Chair at Radcliffe College. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1955. She was the first woman tenured in Harvard's Anthropology Department and the second woman tenured in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), educated at Radcliffe College, became department chairman of child and maternal health at Harvard School of Public Health in 1956.
• Kenward Elmslie (born 1929) earned a BA at Harvard University before moving back to New York City, where he became a central figure in the New York School.
• William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952) received his Bachelor of Arts in 1886. While studying at Harvard, he and classmates began The Harvard Monthly. After his graduation and first trip to Europe in 1888, he spent several years working as a journalist in the Boston Area. In 1890, four years after his graduation from Harvard, Fullerton moved to France to begin work for The Times office in Paris.
• Henry Geldzahler (1935–1994) left graduate school in 1960 to join the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
• Julian Wood Glass, Jr, (1910-1992) attended Oklahoma schools and was graduated from Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) was an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. She was one of the first Woman of Colour/Interracial women to have a play publicly performed. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller. During the summers, Grimké frequently took classes at Harvard University, where her father had attended law school. He was the second African American to have graduated from Harvard Law School.
• Alice Hamilton (1869–1970) was hired in 1919 as assistant professor in a new Department of Industrial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, making her the first woman appointed to the faculty there in any field. Her appointment was hailed by the New York Tribune with the headline: "A Woman on Harvard Faculty—The Last Citadel Has Fallen—The Sex Has Come Into Its Own". Her own comment was "Yes, I am the first woman on the Harvard faculty—but not the first one who should have been appointed!" Hamilton still faced discrimination as a woman, and was excluded from social activities and ceremonies.
• Andrew Holleran (born 1944), pseudonym of Eric Garber, novelist, essayist, and short story writer, graduated from Harvard College in 1965.
• Henry James (1843–1916) attended Harvard Law School in 1862, but realized that he was not interested in studying law. He pursued his interest in literature and associated with authors and critics William Dean Howells and Charles Eliot Norton in Boston and Cambridge, formed lifelong friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., the future Supreme Court Justice, and with James and Annie Fields, his first professional mentors.
• Philip Johnson (1906–2005), student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) graduated with both a master's degree (1949) and doctorate (1956) in astronomy.
• Helen Keller (1880–1968) entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College, where she lived in Briggs Hall, South House.
• John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) graduated from Harvard University in June 1940.
• Alfred Kinsey (1804-1956) continued his graduate studies at Harvard University's Bussey Institute, which had one of the most highly regarded biology programs in the United States. It was there that Kinsey studied applied biology under William Morton Wheeler, a scientist who made outstanding contributions to entomology. Under Wheeler, Kinsey worked almost completely autonomously, which suited both men quite well. Kinsey chose to do his doctoral thesis on gall wasps, and began zealously collecting samples of the species. Kinsey was granted a Sc.D. degree in 1919 by Harvard University, and published several papers in 1920 under the auspices of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, introducing the gall wasp to the scientific community and describing its phylogeny. Of the more than 18 million insects in the museum's collection, some 5 million are gall wasps collected by Kinsey.
• Marshall Kirk (1957-2005) was valedictorian of his high school class and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1980, majoring in psychology, and writing his honors thesis on the testing of gifted children. In 1987 Kirk partnered with Hunter Madsen (writing under the pen-name "Erastes Pill") to write an essay, "The Overhauling of Straight America." The pair developed their argument in the 1989 book "After the Ball: How America Will Conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the ’90s." The book outlined a public relations strategy for the LGBT movement.
• Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) attended Harvard, where his father, the vice-president of Filene's Department Store, had also attended, graduating in 1930. In 1927, while still an undergraduate at Harvard, Kirstein was annoyed that the literary magazine The Harvard Advocate would not accept his work. With a friend Varian Fry, who met his wife Eileen through Lincoln's sister Mina, he convinced his father to finance their own literary quarterly, the Hound & Horn.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) graduated from Harvard University in 1907 with degrees in English and philosophy, and was honored as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and recipient of the prestigious Bowdoin Prize. After graduation, he was the first African-American selected as a Rhodes Scholar (and the last to be selected until 1960). At that time, Rhodes selectors did not meet candidates in person, but there is evidence that at least some selectors knew he was African-American.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) read Environmental Studies at the University of Manitoba, Landscape Architecture at Harvard University and completed his PhD in Historical Geography at University College, London. He lectures widely on landscape history and design both in Britain and abroad, is a lecturer on the MA course in Historical and Sustainable Architecture at New York University, and contributes regularly to a range of publications.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) completed his M.A. in 1926 and Ph.D. degree in 1927. He returned to Harvard to begin a distinguished teaching career.
• Michael McDowell (1950-1999) received a B.A. and an M.A. from Harvard College and a Ph.D in English from Brandeis University in 1978 based on a dissertation entitled "American Attitudes Toward Death, 1825-1865".
• Henry Plumer McIlhenny (1910–1986) he was graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Fine Arts in 1933. During his years at Harvard, Paul J. Sachs influenced his future collecting.
• Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930), American archeologist, artifact collector, tile-maker, and designer, attended Harvard University between 1875 and 1879, obtaining a liberal arts degree.
• Francis Davis Millet (1848–1912) graduated with a Master of Arts degree. A bronze bust in Harvard University's Widener Library also memorializes Millet.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) graduated from Harvard University in 1916. He taught English literature at the University of Wisconsin. He resigned his position for political reasons, frustrated that he was forced to give a “politician’s son who should have been flunked” passing grades. Mitchell enlisted in the army, serving in France until he was discharged as a private two years later. In 1922, following two years’ study at the University of Montpellier and Jesus College, Cambridge, he returned to the States and lived with his elderly aunt in New York. Mitchell privately studied foreign language and literature, focusing on French and Greek, before returning to Harvard and graduating with a Ph.D. in Literature in 1933.
• Agnes Morgan (1879-1976) attended Radcliffe College and received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1901 and her Master of Arts in 1903. In 1904 she attended George Pierce Baker's 47 Workshop at Harvard University.
• Frank O’Hara (1926–1966) attended with the funding made available to veterans. Published poems in the Harvard Advocate. He graduated in 1950 with a degree in English.
• Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006) studied with Walter Piston; Aaron Copland, Archibald T. Davison, and A. Tillman Merritt were also among his teachers. He completed a bachelor's degree in 1943 and a master's in 1944. He taught at various times at Simmons College (1953–1954), Boston University (1953–1954), and Harvard University (1957–1958). Among Pinkham's notable students were the jazz musician and composer Gigi Gryce (1925–1983) and the composer Mark DeVoto.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) enrolled in Harvard Law School in 1913. At the suggestion of the dean of the law school, switched to Harvard's music faculty, where he studied harmony and counterpoint with Pietro Yon.
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), after graduating from high school, gained her college diploma at Radcliffe College, where she focused primarily on poetry and learning writing craft, encountering no women teachers at all. In 1951, her last year at college, Rich's first collection of poetry, “A Change of World,2 was selected by the senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1953, Rich married Alfred Haskell Conrad, an economics professor at Harvard University she met as an undergraduate. She said of the match: "I married in part because I knew no better way to disconnect from my first family. I wanted what I saw as a full woman's life, whatever was possible." They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts and had three sons.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) earned his bachelor's degree in architecture at Auburn University (then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute) in 1940 and then moved on to the Harvard Graduate School of Design to study with Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius. After three years, he left to serve in the Navy for another three years, returning to Harvard to receive his master's in 1947
• Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895) graduated at Harvard College in 1844; overseer of Harvard University for 18 years.
• George Santayana (1863–1952) lived in Hollis Hall as a student. He was founder and president of the Philosophical Club, a member of the literary society known as the O.K., an editor and cartoonist for The Harvard Lampoon, and co-founder of the literary journal The Harvard Monthly. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1886, Santayana studied for two years in Berlin. He then returned to Harvard to write his dissertation on Hermann Lotze and teach philosophy, becoming part of the Golden Age of the Harvard philosophy department.
• Laurence Senelick (born 1942) holds a Ph.D. from Harvard. He is Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) attended Harvard University for graduate school, initially studying literature with Perry Miller and Harry Levin before moving into philosophy and theology under Paul Tillich, Jacob Taubes, Raphael Demos and Morton White. After completing her Master of Arts in philosophy, she began doctoral research into metaphysics, ethics, Greek philosophy and Continental philosophy and theology at Harvard. The philosopher Herbert Marcuse lived with Sontag and her husband Philip Rieff for a year while working on his 1955 book “Eros and Civilization.”
• Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880-1955) was educated at the University of California, Berkeley and later transferred to Radcliffe College to receive her A.B. degree. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1902.
• Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) attended Radcliffe College, then an annex of Harvard University, from 1893 to 1897.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989) entered thanks to a loan from Dr. Fred M. Smith, the president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and father of Alice Smith.
• George Tooker (1920-2011) graduated from Harvard University with an English degree in 1942 and enlisted in the Officer Candidates School (United States Marine Corps), but was discharged for medical reasons.
• Prescott Townsend (1894–1973) graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape (1938), emigrated to America, at the invitation of Walter Gropius, to teach at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. From 1938 to 1943 Tunnard taught at Harvard.
• Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (1859–1927) graduated from Harvard in 1881; he began studying law in 1883, and opened a law office specializing in international law in Washington, D.C. in 1885.
• Edward Perry Warren (1860–1928) received his B.A. in 1883.
• Harry Elkins Widener (1885-1912) was the son of George and Eleanor Widener. He lived in Elkins Park, PA. Harry studied at Hill School, a private establishment in Pottstown, PA; graduating in 1903 he left to study at Harvard (graduated 1907). Harry was a noted collector of rare books, included in his collection was a Shakespeare Folio and a Gutenberg Bible. Harry developed his bibliophilic interests while in college, when he did research among early books with coloured plates illustrating costumes for a Hasty Pudding Theatrical. In the spring of 1912, he went to England to buy books (including the second edition of Bacon's Essais, 1598) and it was while returning from this visit that he lost his life along with many of the books purchased. Harry boarded the Titanic at Cherbourg with his father and mother, George Widener's valet Edwin Keeping and Mrs Widener's maid Emily Geiger. The Widener's occupied cabins C-80-82. On the night of April 14th Harry and his parents threw a party in honour of Captain Smith which was attended by some of the most wealthy passengers on board the Titanic. Later that night Harry helped his mother into boat 4 and then stood back to await his fate, at one point he was joined by William Ernest Carter who advised him to try for a boat but Harry "I'll think I'll stick to the big ship, Billy, and take a chance." A story, never confirmed by Mrs Widener, romanticizes the death of her son. He was about to step into a lifeboat that would have saved his life when he remembered a newly acquired and unique copy of Bacon's Essais and ran back to get it. After his death the librarians turned to Mrs Widener for a donation in memory of her bibliophile son. His mother gave $2,000,000 for the construction of the building that would also house her son's collection and in 1915 the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library was dedicated. Horace Trumbauer (hon. A.M. 1915) of Philadelphia designed the library building. Harvard still pays for fresh flowers to be placed under a portrait of Widener in the chapel.
• Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), M.A. from Radcliffe College.

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Yaddo, Saratoga Springs (12866)

School: Yaddo was founded by Spencer and Katrina Trask as an artist colony on their estate in Saratoga Springs. LGBTQ artists and writers, including Patricia Highsmigh, Langston Hughes, Aaron Copland, and Truman Capote spent time as artists in residence at Yaddo.

Address: 312 Union Ave, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866, USA (43.06926, -73.758)
Phone: +1 518-584-0746
Website: www.yaddo.org
National Register of Historic Places: 13000282, 2013

Place
Yaddo is an artists' community located on a 400-acre (1.6 km²) estate in Saratoga Springs, New York. Its mission is "to nurture the creative process by providing an opportunity for artists to work without interruption in a supportive environment." It offers residencies to artists working in choreography, film, literature, musical composition, painting, performance art, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and video. Collectively, artists who have worked at Yaddo have won 66 Pulitzer Prizes, 27 MacArthur Fellowships, 61 National Book Awards, 24 National Book Critics Circle Awards, 108 Rome Prizes, 49 Whiting Writers' Awards, a Nobel Prize (Saul Bellow, who won the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction and Nobel Prize in Literature in 1976), and countless other honors. Yaddo is included in the Union Avenue Historic District. Entering its second century, Yaddo accepts contributions to its endowment and underwriting for specific projects to ensure that the artists' community will always be a place of inspiration. During the Centennial Gift Campaign, Yaddo received large contributions from Spencer Trask & Company and Kevin Kimberlin, the firm's current chairman. Novelist Patricia Highsmith bequeathed her entire estate, valued at $3 million, to the community.

Notable queer Alumni at Yaddo:
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) became a trustee in 1939, where he was also a frequent writer in residence. There in the summer of 1946 he met and began a two-year affair with the young Truman Capote. Newton addressed him as "Precious Spooky" in amorous letters that went on to discuss literary matters.
• James Baldwin (1924-1987)
• Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990)
• Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979)
• Truman Capote (1924-1984) was accepted in the spring of 1946. He later endorsed Patricia Highsmith as a Yaddo candidate, and she wrote “Strangers on a Train” while she was there.
• John Cheever (1912-1982) wrote to Elizabeth Ames, the director of Yaddo, in 1933: "The idea of leaving the city," he said, "has never been so distant or desirable." Ames denied his first application but offered him a place the following year. Cheever spent the summer of 1934 at Yaddo, which would serve as a second home for much of his life.
• Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
• Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) met writer Marc Brandel (the son of J.D. Beresford) during her stay in 1948 and entered into a short-lived relationship with him.
• Langston Hughes (1902-1967)
• Ned Rorem (born 1923)
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989)
• Colm Tóibín (born 1955)

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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School: Smith College is a private, independent women's liberal arts college with coed graduate and certificate programs, located in Northampton, Massachusetts. It is the largest member of the Seven Sisters. In its 2017 edition, U.S. News & World Report ranked it tied for 12th among the best National Liberal Arts Colleges.

Address: Northampton, MA 01063, USA (42.31809, -72.63723)
Phone: +1 413-584-2700
Website: www.smith.edu
Gay Village: Northampton (Hampshire County, MA 01060)

Place
Smith is also a member of the Five Colleges consortium, which allows its students to attend classes at four other Pioneer Valley institutions: Mount Holyoke College, Amherst College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The college was chartered in 1871-1891 by a bequest of Sophia Smith and opened its doors in 1875 with 14 students and six faculty. When she inherited a fortune from her father at age 65, Smith decided that leaving her inheritance to found a women's college was the best way for her to fulfill the moral obligation she expressed in her will: "I hereby make the following provisions for the establishment and maintenance of an Institution for the higher education of young women, with the design to furnish for my own sex means and facilities for education equal to those which are afforded now in our colleges to young men." The Documenting Lesbian Lives Oral History Project is a collection of life histories of women who identify as lesbian, bisexual, woman-identified-woman, queer, or who prefer not to identify with sexuality categories. The project provides a complex and nuanced collective story of American lesbian history and experience. Interviews were conducted by Smith College students in Kelly Anderson's “Documenting Lesbian Lives” course in the spring of 2010 to the present. Students were trained in both United States lesbian history and oral history techniques and protocols. Narrators include grassroots activists and political organizers, educators and academics; musicians, writers, and artists; as well as community and religious leaders. They come from a variety of class, ethnic, racial, social, and geographic backgrounds. Interviews cover childhood and growing up experiences; education and employment; activism and politics; family, identity, relationships, and community.

Notable queer alumni and faculty at Smith College:
• Alice Morgan Wright (1881-1975), a graduate of Smith College, she continued her studies in New York City. Prohibited from attending life studies at the Art Students League of New York, Wright watched local boxing and wrestling competitions in order to study the human form.
• Edith J. Goode (1881–1970), Alice Morgan Wright’s long-time companion, attended Smith College, graduating in 1904.
• Edward "Ned" Spofford (1931-2014) continued teaching literature after his termination as professor from Smith College at Stanford University. His publications include “The Social Poetry of the Georgics.”
• Elisabeth Irwin (1880–1942) attended the Packer Collegiate Institute and received her A.B. from Smith College in 1903, and her M.A. from Columbia University in 1923. She was a member of the feminist intellectual club Heterodoxy.
• Elizabeth McCausland (1899–1965) was born in Wichita, Kansas in 1899, grew up in a middle-class environment, and graduated from Smith College in 1920.
• Newton Arvin (1900–1963) joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist. He taught at Smith College for 38 years and was Mary Augusta Jordan Professor of English during the year before his retirement in 1961. He rarely left Northampton for long nor travelled far. He visited Europe only once in the summer of 1929 or 1930. He spent a year's leave of absence in the mid-1920s as the editor of “Living Age,” a weekly compendium of articles from British and American periodicals. In 1960, the office of the United States Postmaster General (then Arthur Ellsworth Summerfield) initiated a campaign against the distribution and possession of lewd materials, including soft-core homosexually-themed pictures. At the same time, local officials in Northampton were engaged in an anti-homosexual crusade. On September 2, officers of the Massachusetts State Police arrested Arvin on pornography-related charges. The police charged Arvin with "being a lewd person" and charged both him and a Smith faculty colleague, Edward Spofford, with "possession of obscene photographs." Police said Arvin led them to Spofford and that both implicated other male faculty members. Arvin, they said, admitted "displaying the photographs at his apartment and swapping them with others." Further reports specified that the pictures were of males, later revealed as issues of Grecian Guild Pictorial and Trim: Young America’s Favorite Physique Publication containing pictures of semi-nude men. Smith College suspended Arvin from teaching, but kept him on half salary until retirement age. In 2002, Smith College established the "Newton Arvin Prize in American Studies," a student award.
• Oskar Seidlin (1911–1984) was briefly employed by the emigres Thomas Mann and Erika Mann as an amanuensis before obtaining a lecturership in German language and literature at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, in 1939, and advancing to an assistant professorship in 1941. Between 1942 and 1946, he was granted an extended wartime leave from his teaching position at Smith to serve with the "Ritchie Boys" (Military Intelligence Service).
• Raymond Joel Dorius (1919–2006) left the United States after the scandal at Smith College and worked as a professor at the University of Hamburg in Germany. In 1964 he returned to the United States and taught as a professor at San Francisco State University. He died of bone marrow cancer at his home in San Francisco, California, in 2006.
• Vida Dutton Scudder (1861-1954) attended private secondary schools in Boston, and was graduated from the Boston Girl's Latin School in 1880. Scudder then entered Smith College, where she received her BA degree in 1884. She received the degree of LHD from Smith College in 1922.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Cemetery: Newton Arvin (1900–1963) was an American literary critic and academic. He achieved national recognition for his studies of individual XIX-century American authors. After teaching at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts for 38 years, he was forced into retirement in 1960 after pleading guilty to charges stemming from the possession of pictures of semi-nude males that the law deemed pornographic. Arvin was also one of the first lovers of the author Truman Capote. Arvin was born in Valparaiso, Indiana. He died of pancreatic cancer in Northampton on March 21, 1963 and is buried at Union Street Cemetery, Valparaiso, IN 46383. Truman Capote established in his will the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism to be awarded "in honor of the critic Newton Arvin." It has been awarded annually since 1994 by the University of Iowa. It is said to be the largest annual cash prize for literary criticism in the English language.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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